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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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subject book bibliographic info
daily/universal Beck (2006), The Religion of the Mithras Cult in the Roman Empire: Mysteries of the Unconquered Sun, 79, 123, 124, 125, 149, 174, 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 205, 241, 246, 247, 248
daily/universal, in depth bathos Beck (2006), The Religion of the Mithras Cult in the Roman Empire: Mysteries of the Unconquered Sun, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249
daily/universal, in latitude platos Beck (2006), The Religion of the Mithras Cult in the Roman Empire: Mysteries of the Unconquered Sun, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249
daily/universal, in longitude meâ¯kos Beck (2006), The Religion of the Mithras Cult in the Roman Empire: Mysteries of the Unconquered Sun, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249
primary/universal, body d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 53, 72, 152, 306, 309
universal Joosse (2021), Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 128, 131, 132, 150
Katzoff (2019), On Jews in the Roman World: Collected Studies. 54, 150, 296, 360
Papadodima (2022), Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II, 18, 19, 58, 69, 151
universal, and hence more similar to poetry, aristotle, believed that history had to be made more Feldman (2006), Judaism and Hellenism Reconsidered, 414
universal, and local nature of gods and goddesses Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 11, 13, 14
universal, and partial creation d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150
universal, apollonius of tyana, greek and Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 259, 272, 273, 278, 283, 294, 297, 298, 299, 300, 306, 307
universal, axis Beck (2006), The Religion of the Mithras Cult in the Roman Empire: Mysteries of the Unconquered Sun, 109, 110, 111
universal, church Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 121, 122
Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 7, 184, 185
universal, church, ejkklhsiva, local and Lieu (2004), Christian Identity in the Jewish and Graeco-Roman World, 232, 233, 234, 235
universal, consent Tuori (2016), The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication<, 97, 98
universal, demiurge d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 144, 145, 146, 147, 150
universal, desire for, peace O'Daly (2020), Augustine's City of God: A Reader's Guide (2nd edn), 212, 213, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 263, 301
universal, equivalent, money, as Seaford (2018), Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays, 45
universal, exemplar, abraham, as Birnbaum and Dillon (2020), Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 43, 44, 50, 216
universal, expressions of religion, greek Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 12, 62, 71, 188, 230, 231, 235, 236, 238, 274, 284, 285, 294, 303
universal, extension of christianity Simmons(1995), Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian, 278, 279, 280, 281, 282, 283, 284
universal, fulfillment, identity, and Dawson (2001), Christian Figural Reading and the Fashioning of Identity, 178
universal, grant, ius quattuor liberorum Hug (2023), Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome, 176
universal, history Bacchi (2022), Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics, 65, 93, 95, 96, 98, 102, 112, 122, 160, 171, 173
Kingsley Monti and Rood (2022), The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography, 316, 321, 382
Miltsios (2023), Leadership and Leaders in Polybius. 87, 98
Van Nuffelen (2012), Orosius and the Rhetoric of History, 14, 22, 47, 170, 171, 175
universal, history, standard of truth in differs from that in a monograph Feldman (2006), Judaism and Hellenism Reconsidered, 346, 347, 348, 349, 350, 351, 352, 353, 354, 355, 356, 357, 358, 359, 360
universal, import of jesus christ, identity of Dawson (2001), Christian Figural Reading and the Fashioning of Identity, 180
universal, in scope, knowing, γινώσκειν, as Kelsey (2021), Mind and World in Aristotle's De Anima 29, 31, 37, 146, 147, 148, 149
universal, intellect Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 25, 37
universal, invocation Hickson (1993), Roman prayer language: Livy and the Aneid of Vergil, 34, 35, 42
universal, judgment, final Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 239, 240, 634
universal, kinship, suggeneia Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 579, 580
universal, law Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 523
Najman (2010), The Significance of Sinai: Traditions about Sinai and Divine Revelation in Judaism and Christianity, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 101, 103, 104, 105, 158, 182, 246, 255
universal, literacy, literacy, ideal of Carr (2004), Writing on the Tablet of the Heart: Origins of Scripture and Literature, 137, 172, 188, 190, 247, 269, 271
universal, message of christianity Osborne (1996), Eros Unveiled: Plato and the God of Love. 176, 177
universal, mission, stephen speech forecasts Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 589
universal, mosaic law Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 96
universal, nonverbal, continuities Boeghold (2022), When a Gesture Was Expected: A Selection of Examples from Archaic and Classical Greek Literature. 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 44
universal, outlook, aristeas, letter of Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 47, 52
universal, polytheism Novenson (2020), Monotheism and Christology in Greco-Roman Antiquity, 34, 48, 49
universal, repentance Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 634
universal, restoration Despotis and Lohr (2022), Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions, 257, 258, 259
universal, rome, ideally placed for rule, ideas about descent and lineage of its people Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 134, 135, 136, 137, 139, 140, 141, 142, 144, 145, 146, 147, 148
universal, rome, ideally placed for rule, its site away from the sea Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 241
universal, rule, and greeks Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 72
universal, rule, and greeks, said to be a law of nature Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 182, 184, 185
universal, rule, aristotle, on greeks and Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 72
universal, rule, greeks, said to be capable of Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 73
universal, salvation Hellholm et al. (2010), Ablution, Initiation, and Baptism: Late Antiquity, Early Judaism, and Early Christianity, 1208, 1217, 1224, 1225
universal, salvation, as Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 432
universal, salvation, mystery, of Hellholm et al. (2010), Ablution, Initiation, and Baptism: Late Antiquity, Early Judaism, and Early Christianity, 1227
universal, significance of allegorical interpretation Birnbaum and Dillon (2020), Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 25, 28
universal, soteriology, as Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 451
universal, state Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 93, 94, 105, 107, 108, 109, 113, 114, 115, 119, 120, 121
universal, state, sin as Marmodoro and Prince (2015), Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity, 246, 247
universal, truth Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 147
universal, value, virtue, of Birnbaum and Dillon (2020), Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 2, 3
universal, vs particular Joosse (2021), Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher, 81, 90, 108, 120, 131, 132
universal, vs. planetary motion Beck (2006), The Religion of the Mithras Cult in the Roman Empire: Mysteries of the Unconquered Sun, 79, 82, 83, 84, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 164, 182, 205, 246
universal, way of salvation DeMarco, (2021), Augustine and Porphyry: A Commentary on De ciuitate Dei 10, 137, 274, 275, 276, 280, 282, 287, 288, 293, 296, 297, 299, 317
universalism Bickerman and Tropper (2007), Studies in Jewish and Christian History, 47, 86
Boustan Janssen and Roetzel (2010), Violence, Scripture, and Textual Practices in Early Judaism and Christianity, 81
Hayes (2015), What's Divine about Divine Law?: Early Perspectives, 17, 18, 60, 124, 125, 127, 131, 132, 133, 150
Langworthy (2019), Gregory of Nazianzus’ Soteriological Pneumatology, 64
Niehoff (2011), Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria, 91, 92
Schwartz (2008), 2 Maccabees, 177, 187, 237, 238, 254, 313, 335, 365, 423
Wilson (2010), Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 4, 29, 33, 250, 285, 414
universalism, acts and Matthews (2010), Perfect Martyr: The Stoning of Stephen and the Construction of Christian Identity, 28, 32, 33, 41, 42
universalism, and particularism Hayes (2022), The Literature of the Sages: A Re-Visioning, 519
universalism, and particularism, qumran and esoteric and exoteric wisdom, and Hayes (2015), What's Divine about Divine Law?: Early Perspectives, 131, 132, 133
universalism, and particularism, sirach, on Hayes (2015), What's Divine about Divine Law?: Early Perspectives, 125, 126, 127
universalism, avot, particularism and Hayes (2022), The Literature of the Sages: A Re-Visioning, 519
universalism, christian Dawson (2001), Christian Figural Reading and the Fashioning of Identity, 180
universalism, frei, hans, on pauls Dawson (2001), Christian Figural Reading and the Fashioning of Identity, 179
universalism, holy spirit, ethnic Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 588
universalism, holy spirit, geographic Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 586, 587, 588, 589, 590, 591, 592
universalism, jewish Gruen (2011), Rethinking the Other in Antiquity, 336, 337
universalism, motifs, thematic, struggle is between good and evil, see also Schwartz (2008), 2 Maccabees, 432, 436
universalism, of paul, the apostle Dawson (2001), Christian Figural Reading and the Fashioning of Identity, 178, 179, 180, 222, 269
universalism, particularism and Hayes (2022), The Literature of the Sages: A Re-Visioning, 519
universalism, pauline Dawson (2001), Christian Figural Reading and the Fashioning of Identity, 178, 179, 180, 222, 269
universalism, qualitative, tyrtaeus Oksanish (2019), Benedikt Eckhardt, and Meret Strothmann, Law in the Roman Provinces, 106, 107, 113, 114
universalism/universalistic Piotrkowski (2019), Priests in Exile: The History of the Temple of Onias and Its Community in the Hellenistic Period, 116, 179, 196, 224, 399, 405, 409, 412, 420
universalism/universalization Balberg (2017), Blood for Thought: The Reinvention of Sacrifice in Early Rabbinic Literature, 140
universality Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 84, 129, 186, 226, 260, 261, 262, 265, 267, 287, 310, 311, 324
Lynskey (2021), Tyconius’ Book of Rules: An Ancient Invitation to Ecclesial Hermeneutics, 61, 114, 195, 228, 232, 233, 236, 241, 242, 244, 245, 246, 248, 250, 251, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 258, 260, 261, 262, 263, 265, 266, 267, 268, 269, 271, 272, 280, 287, 288, 293, 323, 325, 333
universality, of church Graham (2022), The Church as Paradise and the Way Therein: Early Christian Appropriation of Genesis 3:22–24, 68, 73, 122, 123, 143, 144, 146, 157, 158, 160
universality, of fulfillment Dawson (2001), Christian Figural Reading and the Fashioning of Identity, 178
universality, of god, josephus, on unity of temple and Ganzel and Holtz (2020), Contextualizing Jewish Temples, 173
universality, of jesus christ Dawson (2001), Christian Figural Reading and the Fashioning of Identity, 180
universality, of pantomime, tragoedia saltata, saltatio Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach (2021), Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond, 9, 93
universality, of sexual situation of first humans Beatrice (2013), The Transmission of Sin: Augustine and the Pre-Augustinian Sources, 119, 172, 173, 253
universalization Ando (2013), Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire, 40, 176, 190, 330, 337, 339, 388, 389
universalizing, de architectura Oksanish (2019), Benedikt Eckhardt, and Meret Strothmann, Law in the Roman Provinces, 21, 22, 27, 36, 38, 91, 92, 96, 97, 102, 103, 117, 118, 138
universals Ebrey and Kraut (2022), The Cambridge Companion to Plato, 2nd ed, 23, 37
Frede and Laks (2001), Traditions of Theology: Studies in Hellenistic Theology, its Background and Aftermath, 30, 36
Gerson and Wilberding (2022), The New Cambridge Companion to Plotinus, 76, 77, 129
MacDougall (2022), Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition. 14
van der EIjk (2005), Medicine and Philosophy in Classical Antiquity: Doctors and Philosophers on Nature, Soul, Health and Disease, 52, 81
universals, as individuated by abstraction Marmodoro and Prince (2015), Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity, 106
universals, participation, methexis, μέθεξις‎, series of participated d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 57, 77, 107, 109, 110, 116
universe Demoen and Praet (2009), Theios Sophistes: Essays on Flavius Philostratus' Vita Apollonii, 288, 290, 291
Despotis and Lohr (2022), Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions, 128, 204, 207, 208, 214, 220
Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 16, 17, 18, 34
Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 195, 204
Laemmle (2021), Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration, 70, 213
Mathews (2013), Riches, Poverty, and the Faithful: Perspectives on Wealth in the Second Temple Period and the Apocalypse of John, 168, 176, 181, 192
Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 79, 84, 86, 87, 88, 104, 105, 106, 153, 155, 160, 187, 190, 191, 192, 194, 255, 275
Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020), Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity, 28, 300, 301, 302, 303, 304, 310, 313, 314, 327, 350, 353, 357, 361, 364
universe, a body, body Williams (2009), Williams, The Panarion of Epiphanius of Salamis: Book I: (Sects 1-46), 24
universe, and of man, anonymous, on the constitution of the Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 343
universe, and the city Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 169, 170, 171, 172
universe, aphrodite, and sea, mother of Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 140
universe, as copy of something eternal Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 27, 97, 98, 100, 101, 263
universe, as perishable but everlasting Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 16, 98
universe, as place of correction, origen, on O'Daly (2020), Augustine's City of God: A Reader's Guide (2nd edn), 171
universe, citizen of the Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 93, 94, 96, 97, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 119, 120, 121, 122
universe, coming to be, of Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 96
universe, cosmic soul and Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 16
universe, created from seed, chrysippus Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 24
universe, created vs. uncreated Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 86, 87, 88, 92, 93, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135, 183, 279
universe, creation of O'Daly (2020), Augustine's City of God: A Reader's Guide (2nd edn), 164, 165, 166, 168, 169, 170, 171
universe, creation, of Lunn-Rockliffe (2007), The Letter of Mara bar Sarapion in Context, 132, 149, 153
universe, creator, motivation of for creating Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 248
universe, demiurge as creator of timaean Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 31, 32
universe, destruction of O'Daly (2020), Augustine's City of God: A Reader's Guide (2nd edn), 246
universe, distinct from intelligible sphere Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 177
universe, doesn't last, consolation writings, even the Sorabji (2000), Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation, 242, 395
universe, elements, four in Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 155, 178
universe, factors of Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 107
universe, function of virgil, vision of Gee (2020), Mapping the Afterlife: From Homer to Dante, 157, 158
universe, g/good, ness, of the d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 144, 245, 246, 254
universe, god and the Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 142, 143, 144, 145, 146, 245, 256
universe, god, cause of the Schibli (2002), Hierocles of Alexandria, 343
universe, god, leader of the, entire Geljon and Runia (2019), Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 22, 45, 56, 59, 96
universe, gods, as one ???? of timaean Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 208, 209
universe, gods, mind of ordered Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 210
universe, harmony of the Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 48, 55, 69, 87, 101, 102, 137, 138, 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 166, 167, 168, 170, 171, 172, 233, 234, 235, 236, 244, 245, 247, 248
universe, humans united with Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 124, 125, 154, 155, 156, 256
universe, isis, mistress of the Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 7, 170
universe, isis, mother of the Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 5, 140
universe, mistress of the Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 7, 170
universe, mother of Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 5, 7, 170
universe, myth of er, of the Horkey (2019), Cosmos in the Ancient World, 79, 94, 95, 106, 144, 163
universe, of god Langstaff, Stuckenbruck, and Tilly, (2022), The Lord’s Prayer, 5, 156
universe, of isis, mother of the Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 5, 140
universe, organization King (2006), Common to Body and Soul: Philosophical Approaches to Explaining Living Behaviour in Greco-Roman Antiquity, 237
universe, organization, species King (2006), Common to Body and Soul: Philosophical Approaches to Explaining Living Behaviour in Greco-Roman Antiquity, 221, 227, 247
universe, organization, state King (2006), Common to Body and Soul: Philosophical Approaches to Explaining Living Behaviour in Greco-Roman Antiquity, 22, 121, 124, 125
universe, organization, uniform/multifarious King (2006), Common to Body and Soul: Philosophical Approaches to Explaining Living Behaviour in Greco-Roman Antiquity, 105, 114
universe, organization, unity of King (2006), Common to Body and Soul: Philosophical Approaches to Explaining Living Behaviour in Greco-Roman Antiquity, 103, 114, 115, 117, 173
universe, organization, unmoved mover King (2006), Common to Body and Soul: Philosophical Approaches to Explaining Living Behaviour in Greco-Roman Antiquity, 49, 63, 64, 65, 89, 90
universe, organization, with intensional objects King (2006), Common to Body and Soul: Philosophical Approaches to Explaining Living Behaviour in Greco-Roman Antiquity, 196
universe, organization, world soul King (2006), Common to Body and Soul: Philosophical Approaches to Explaining Living Behaviour in Greco-Roman Antiquity, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 116, 255
universe, origin of turnebus, adrien Taylor and Hay (2020), Philo of Alexandria: On the Contemplative Life: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 271
universe, periodic world-cycles O'Daly (2020), Augustine's City of God: A Reader's Guide (2nd edn), 177, 178
universe, possesses soul and intellect Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 16
universe, reason for creation of Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 73, 79, 80
universe, renewal of Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 157
universe, res publica, metaphor for O'Daly (2020), Augustine's City of God: A Reader's Guide (2nd edn), 170, 171
universe, ruled by highest god Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 197
universe, seeds, of chrysippus Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 24
universe, shape of Gee (2020), Mapping the Afterlife: From Homer to Dante, 235
universe, single cause Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 631
universe, soul of the Pedersen (2004), Demonstrative Proof in Defence of God: A Study of Titus of Bostra’s Contra Manichaeos. 22, 32, 33
universe, theories of its eternity O'Daly (2020), Augustine's City of God: A Reader's Guide (2nd edn), 176, 177, 178
universe, timaeus on Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 14
universe, tripartite King (2006), Common to Body and Soul: Philosophical Approaches to Explaining Living Behaviour in Greco-Roman Antiquity, 108, 109, 115, 232, 236
universe, two souls, soul of the Pedersen (2004), Demonstrative Proof in Defence of God: A Study of Titus of Bostra’s Contra Manichaeos. 256, 257, 299, 300
universe, uncreated and everlasting, neoplatonists Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 228
universe, venus, heavenly, mother of Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 140
universe, zeno of citium, treatise on the Graver (2007), Stoicism and Emotion, 225
universe, τό πάν/ τών őλων Schibli (2002), Hierocles of Alexandria, 179, 180, 181, 186, 235, 238, 289, 301, 321
universe, τό πάν/ τών őλων, completion, τελειότης, of Schibli (2002), Hierocles of Alexandria, 287
universe, τό πάν/ τών őλων, management of διοίκηισς Schibli (2002), Hierocles of Alexandria, 236
university Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020), Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity, 11, 159, 176, 180, 250, 251, 252, 253, 403
university, bible edition hebrew, hubp Allen and Dunne (2022), Ancient Readers and their Scriptures: Engaging the Hebrew Bible in Early Judaism and Christianity, 210
university, college, london Reif (2006), Problems with Prayers: Studies in the Textual History of Early Rabbinic Liturgy, 316
university, medieval Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 410
university, michigan, of antioch of pisidia Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 609, 610
university, of pisa, egyptian collection Amendola (2022), The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary, 10
university, uppsala Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer (2022), Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity, 9, 18, 19, 27
world/universe, eternity, of the Segev (2017), Aristotle on Religion, 154, 159, 160
κόσμος‎, /universe, and human soul, cosmos, kosmos d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 133, 135, 195, 263
κόσμος‎, /universe, and mathematics, cosmos, kosmos d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 130, 271
κόσμος‎, /universe, and matter/body, cosmos, kosmos d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 135, 251
κόσμος‎, /universe, and politics, cosmos, kosmos d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 271, 272, 273
κόσμος‎, /universe, and soul ch., physical cosmos, kosmos d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 124, 132
κόσμος‎, /universe, as image, cosmos, kosmos d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 104, 225, 238
κόσμος‎, /universe, as living being, cosmos, kosmos d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 225, 238, 263, 271, 272, 273
κόσμος‎, /universe, as sphere, cosmos, kosmos d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 125, 127, 136, 157, 262
κόσμος‎, /universe, center of cosmos, kosmos d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 124, 136
κόσμος‎, /universe, christian cosmos, kosmos d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 273
κόσμος‎, /universe, divine cosmos, kosmos d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 262, 272, 273
κόσμος‎, /universe, eternal cosmos, kosmos d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 259, 273
κόσμος‎, /universe, generation of cosmos, kosmos d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 293
κόσμος‎, /universe, governance of cosmos, kosmos d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 28
κόσμος‎, /universe, intellect of cosmos, kosmos d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 146, 155
κόσμος‎, /universe, limit of cosmos, kosmos d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 125, 126
κόσμος‎, /universe, literary cosmos, kosmos d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 41
κόσμος‎, /universe, motion of cosmos, kosmos d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 124
κόσμος‎, /universe, order of cosmos, kosmos d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 242, 271
κόσμος‎, /universe, perception of cosmos, kosmos d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 274
κόσμος‎, /universe, thinking, cosmos, kosmos d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 262
κόσμος‎, /universe, unity of cosmos, kosmos d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 41

List of validated texts:
51 validated results for "universe"
1. Hebrew Bible, Deuteronomy, 4.5, 4.19-4.20, 10.14 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Literacy, ideal of universal literacy • Universe (of God) • universalism • universalism/universalistic

 Found in books: Carr (2004), Writing on the Tablet of the Heart: Origins of Scripture and Literature, 137; Hayes (2015), What's Divine about Divine Law?: Early Perspectives, 17; Langstaff, Stuckenbruck, and Tilly, (2022), The Lord’s Prayer, 156; Piotrkowski (2019), Priests in Exile: The History of the Temple of Onias and Its Community in the Hellenistic Period, 399

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4.5 רְאֵה לִמַּדְתִּי אֶתְכֶם חֻקִּים וּמִשְׁפָּטִים כַּאֲשֶׁר צִוַּנִי יְהוָה אֱלֹהָי לַעֲשׂוֹת כֵּן בְּקֶרֶב הָאָרֶץ אֲשֶׁר אַתֶּם בָּאִים שָׁמָּה לְרִשְׁתָּהּ׃
4.19
וּפֶן־תִּשָּׂא עֵינֶיךָ הַשָּׁמַיְמָה וְרָאִיתָ אֶת־הַשֶּׁמֶשׁ וְאֶת־הַיָּרֵחַ וְאֶת־הַכּוֹכָבִים כֹּל צְבָא הַשָּׁמַיִם וְנִדַּחְתָּ וְהִשְׁתַּחֲוִיתָ לָהֶם וַעֲבַדְתָּם אֲשֶׁר חָלַק יְהוָה אֱלֹהֶיךָ אֹתָם לְכֹל הָעַמִּים תַּחַת כָּל־הַשָּׁמָיִם׃' 10.14 הֵן לַיהוָה אֱלֹהֶיךָ הַשָּׁמַיִם וּשְׁמֵי הַשָּׁמָיִם הָאָרֶץ וְכָל־אֲשֶׁר־בָּהּ׃'' None
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4.5 Behold, I have taught you statutes and ordices, even as the LORD my God commanded me, that ye should do so in the midst of the land whither ye go in to possess it.
4.19
and lest thou lift up thine eyes unto heaven, and when thou seest the sun and the moon and the stars, even all the host of heaven, thou be drawn away and worship them, and serve them, which the LORD thy God hath allotted unto all the peoples under the whole heaven. 4.20 But you hath the LORD taken and brought forth out of the iron furnace, out of Egypt, to be unto Him a people of inheritance, as ye are this day.
10.14
Behold, unto the LORD thy God belongeth the heaven, and the heaven of heavens, the earth, with all that therein is.' ' None
2. Hebrew Bible, Exodus, 3.14 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • universe • universe, created vs. uncreated

 Found in books: Despotis and Lohr (2022), Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions, 128; Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 279

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3.14 וַיֹּאמֶר אֱלֹהִים אֶל־מֹשֶׁה אֶהְיֶה אֲשֶׁר אֶהְיֶה וַיֹּאמֶר כֹּה תֹאמַר לִבְנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל אֶהְיֶה שְׁלָחַנִי אֲלֵיכֶם׃'' None
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3.14 And God said unto Moses: ‘I AM THAT I AM’; and He said: ‘Thus shalt thou say unto the children of Israel: I AM hath sent me unto you.’'' None
3. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 1.26-1.27, 6.3, 12.1, 21.33, 24.7 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Abraham, as universal exemplar • God, leader of the (entire) universe • Holy Spirit, Geographic universalism • Tabernacle, represents the universe • Universal way of salvation • Universe, single cause • laws, universalistic dimension of • universal law • universalism

 Found in books: Birnbaum and Dillon (2020), Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 43, 209; DeMarco, (2021), Augustine and Porphyry: A Commentary on De ciuitate Dei 10, 296; Geljon and Runia (2019), Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 59; Heo (2023), Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages. 78; Kosman (2012), Gender and Dialogue in the Rabbinic Prism, 188; Niehoff (2011), Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria, 92; Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 592, 631

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1.26 וַיֹּאמֶר אֱלֹהִים נַעֲשֶׂה אָדָם בְּצַלְמֵנוּ כִּדְמוּתֵנוּ וְיִרְדּוּ בִדְגַת הַיָּם וּבְעוֹף הַשָּׁמַיִם וּבַבְּהֵמָה וּבְכָל־הָאָרֶץ וּבְכָל־הָרֶמֶשׂ הָרֹמֵשׂ עַל־הָאָרֶץ׃ 1.27 וַיִּבְרָא אֱלֹהִים אֶת־הָאָדָם בְּצַלְמוֹ בְּצֶלֶם אֱלֹהִים בָּרָא אֹתוֹ זָכָר וּנְקֵבָה בָּרָא אֹתָם׃
6.3
וַיֹּאמֶר יְהוָה לֹא־יָדוֹן רוּחִי בָאָדָם לְעֹלָם בְּשַׁגַּם הוּא בָשָׂר וְהָיוּ יָמָיו מֵאָה וְעֶשְׂרִים שָׁנָה׃
12.1
וַיְהִי רָעָב בָּאָרֶץ וַיֵּרֶד אַבְרָם מִצְרַיְמָה לָגוּר שָׁם כִּי־כָבֵד הָרָעָב בָּאָרֶץ׃
12.1
וַיֹּאמֶר יְהוָה אֶל־אַבְרָם לֶךְ־לְךָ מֵאַרְצְךָ וּמִמּוֹלַדְתְּךָ וּמִבֵּית אָבִיךָ אֶל־הָאָרֶץ אֲשֶׁר אַרְאֶךָּ׃
21.33
וַיִּטַּע אֶשֶׁל בִּבְאֵר שָׁבַע וַיִּקְרָא־שָׁם בְּשֵׁם יְהוָה אֵל עוֹלָם׃
24.7
יְהוָה אֱלֹהֵי הַשָּׁמַיִם אֲשֶׁר לְקָחַנִי מִבֵּית אָבִי וּמֵאֶרֶץ מוֹלַדְתִּי וַאֲשֶׁר דִּבֶּר־לִי וַאֲשֶׁר נִשְׁבַּע־לִי לֵאמֹר לְזַרְעֲךָ אֶתֵּן אֶת־הָאָרֶץ הַזֹּאת הוּא יִשְׁלַח מַלְאָכוֹ לְפָנֶיךָ וְלָקַחְתָּ אִשָּׁה לִבְנִי מִשָּׁם׃'' None
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1.26 And God said: ‘Let us make man in our image, after our likeness; and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.’ 1.27 And God created man in His own image, in the image of God created He him; male and female created He them.
6.3
And the LORD said: ‘My spirit shall not abide in man for ever, for that he also is flesh; therefore shall his days be a hundred and twenty years.’
12.1
Now the LORD said unto Abram: ‘Get thee out of thy country, and from thy kindred, and from thy father’s house, unto the land that I will show thee.
21.33
And Abraham planted a tamarisk-tree in Beer-sheba, and called there on the name of the LORD, the Everlasting God.
24.7
The LORD, the God of heaven, who took me from my father’s house, and from the land of my nativity, and who spoke unto me, and who swore unto me, saying: Unto thy seed will I give this land; He will send His angel before thee, and thou shalt take a wife for my son from thence.'' None
4. Hebrew Bible, Isaiah, 6.9-6.10, 46.6 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Acts and universalism • Judgment, final universal • Repentance, universal • restoration, universal • universality • universe

 Found in books: Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 262; Despotis and Lohr (2022), Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions, 259; Mathews (2013), Riches, Poverty, and the Faithful: Perspectives on Wealth in the Second Temple Period and the Apocalypse of John, 181; Matthews (2010), Perfect Martyr: The Stoning of Stephen and the Construction of Christian Identity, 33; Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 634

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6.9 וַיֹּאמֶר לֵךְ וְאָמַרְתָּ לָעָם הַזֶּה שִׁמְעוּ שָׁמוֹעַ וְאַל־תָּבִינוּ וּרְאוּ רָאוֹ וְאַל־תֵּדָעוּ׃' 46.6 הַזָּלִים זָהָב מִכִּיס וְכֶסֶף בַּקָּנֶה יִשְׁקֹלוּ יִשְׂכְּרוּ צוֹרֵף וְיַעֲשֵׂהוּ אֵל יִסְגְּדוּ אַף־יִשְׁתַּחֲוּוּ׃'' None
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6.9 And He said: ‘Go, and tell this people: Hear ye indeed, but understand not; and see ye indeed, but perceive not. 6.10 Make the heart of this people fat, and make their ears heavy, and shut their eyes; lest they, seeing with their eyes, and hearing with their ears, and understanding with their heart, return, and be healed.’
46.6
Ye that lavish gold out of the bag, and weigh silver in the balance; ye that hire a goldsmith, that he make it a god, to fall down thereto, yea, to worship.'' None
5. None, None, nan (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • gods and goddesses, universal and local nature of • university

 Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 14; Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020), Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity, 403

6. Herodotus, Histories, 2.43 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • gods and goddesses, universal and local nature of • universal historical space

 Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 13; Torok (2014), Herodotus In Nubia, 133

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2.43 Ἡρακλέος δὲ πέρι τόνδε τὸν λόγον ἤκουσα, ὅτι εἴη τῶν δυώδεκα θεῶν· τοῦ ἑτέρου δὲ πέρι Ἡρακλέος, τὸν Ἕλληνες οἴδασι, οὐδαμῇ Αἰγύπτου ἐδυνάσθην ἀκοῦσαι. καὶ μὴν ὅτι γε οὐ παρʼ Ἑλλήνων ἔλαβον τὸ οὔνομα Αἰγύπτιοι τοῦ Ἡρακλέος, ἀλλὰ Ἕλληνες μᾶλλον παρʼ Αἰγυπτίων καὶ Ἑλλήνων οὗτοι οἱ θέμενοι τῷ Ἀμφιτρύωνος γόνῳ τοὔνομα Ἡρακλέα, πολλά μοι καὶ ἄλλα τεκμήρια ἐστὶ τοῦτο οὕτω ἔχειν, ἐν δὲ καὶ τόδε, ὅτι τε τοῦ Ἡρακλέος τούτου οἱ γονέες ἀμφότεροι ἦσαν Ἀμφιτρύων καὶ Ἀλκμήνη γεγονότες τὸ ἀνέκαθεν ἀπʼ Αἰγύπτου, καὶ διότι Αἰγύπτιοι οὔτε Ποσειδέωνος οὔτε Διοσκούρων τὰ οὐνόματα φασὶ εἰδέναι, οὐδέ σφι θεοὶ οὗτοι ἐν τοῖσι ἄλλοισι θεοῖσι ἀποδεδέχαται. καὶ μὴν εἴ γε παρʼ Ἑλλήνων ἔλαβον οὔνομά τευ δαίμονος, τούτων οὐκ ἥκιστα ἀλλὰ μάλιστα ἔμελλον μνήμην ἕξειν, εἴ περ καὶ τότε ναυτιλίῃσι ἐχρέωντο καὶ ἦσαν Ἑλλήνων τινὲς ναυτίλοι, ὡς ἔλπομαί τε καὶ ἐμὴ γνώμη αἱρέει· ὥστε τούτων ἂν καὶ μᾶλλον τῶν θεῶν τὰ οὐνόματα ἐξεπιστέατο Αἰγύπτιοι ἢ τοῦ Ἡρακλέος. ἀλλά τις ἀρχαῖος ἐστὶ θεὸς Αἰγυπτίοισι Ἡρακλέης· ὡς δὲ αὐτοὶ λέγουσι, ἔτεα ἐστὶ ἑπτακισχίλια καὶ μύρια ἐς Ἄμασιν βασιλεύσαντα, ἐπείτε ἐκ τῶν ὀκτὼ θεῶν οἱ δυώδεκα θεοὶ ἐγένοντο τῶν Ἡρακλέα ἕνα νομίζουσι.'' None
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2.43 Concerning Heracles, I heard it said that he was one of the twelve gods. But nowhere in Egypt could I hear anything about the other Heracles, whom the Greeks know. ,I have indeed a lot of other evidence that the name of Heracles did not come from Hellas to Egypt, but from Egypt to Hellas (and in Hellas to those Greeks who gave the name Heracles to the son of Amphitryon), besides this: that Amphitryon and Alcmene, the parents of this Heracles, were both Egyptian by descent ; and that the Egyptians deny knowing the names Poseidon and the Dioscuri, nor are these gods reckoned among the gods of Egypt . ,Yet if they got the name of any deity from the Greeks, of these not least but in particular would they preserve a recollection, if indeed they were already making sea voyages and some Greeks, too, were seafaring men, as I expect and judge; so that the names of these gods would have been even better known to the Egyptians than the name of Heracles. ,But Heracles is a very ancient god in Egypt ; as the Egyptians themselves say, the change of the eight gods to the twelve, one of whom they acknowledge Heracles to be, was made seventeen thousand years before the reign of Amasis. '' None
7. Plato, Protagoras, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Tyrtaeus, universalism, qualitative • Universe, citizen of the

 Found in books: Oksanish (2019), Benedikt Eckhardt, and Meret Strothmann, Law in the Roman Provinces, 107; Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 112

322a βίου γίγνεται, Προμηθέα δὲ διʼ Ἐπιμηθέα ὕστερον, ᾗπερ λέγεται, κλοπῆς δίκη μετῆλθεν. ΣΩ.'' None322a that man gets facility for his livelihood, but Prometheus, through Epimetheus’ fault, later on (the story goes) stood his trial for theft. Soc.'' None
8. Plato, Theaetetus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Universal • universe,organization, unity of

 Found in books: Joosse (2021), Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher, 85; King (2006), Common to Body and Soul: Philosophical Approaches to Explaining Living Behaviour in Greco-Roman Antiquity, 103

184d ΣΩ. δεινὸν γάρ που, ὦ παῖ, εἰ πολλαί τινες ἐν ἡμῖν ὥσπερ ἐν δουρείοις ἵπποις αἰσθήσεις ἐγκάθηνται, ἀλλὰ μὴ εἰς μίαν τινὰ ἰδέαν, εἴτε ψυχὴν εἴτε ὅτι δεῖ καλεῖν, πάντα ταῦτα συντείνει, ᾗ διὰ τούτων οἷον ὀργάνων αἰσθανόμεθα ὅσα αἰσθητά. ΘΕΑΙ. ἀλλά μοι δοκεῖ οὕτω μᾶλλον ἢ ἐκείνως. ΣΩ. τοῦδέ τοι ἕνεκα αὐτά σοι διακριβοῦμαι, εἴ τινι ἡμῶν αὐτῶν τῷ αὐτῷ διὰ μὲν ὀφθαλμῶν ἐφικνούμεθα λευκῶν τε'' None184d SOC. Yes, for it would be strange indeed, my boy, if there are many senses ensconced within us, as if we were so many wooden horses of Troy, and they do not all unite in one power, whether we should call it soul or something else, by which we perceive through these as instruments the objects of perception. THEAET. I think what you suggest is more likely than the other way. SOC. Now the reason why I am so precise about the matter is this: I want to know whether there is some one and the same power within ourselves by which we perceive black and white through the eyes, and again other qualitie'' None
9. Plato, Timaeus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Christian cosmos (kosmos, κόσμος‎)/universe • Virgil, Vision of universe, function of • center of cosmos (kosmos, κόσμος‎)/universe • cosmos (kosmos, κόσμος‎)/universe and human soul • cosmos (kosmos, κόσμος‎)/universe and politics • cosmos (kosmos, κόσμος‎)/universe as living being • cosmos (kosmos, κόσμος‎)/universe as sphere • daily/universal • divine cosmos (kosmos, κόσμος‎)/universe • eternal cosmos (kosmos, κόσμος‎)/universe • intellect of cosmos (kosmos, κόσμος‎)/universe • kosmos (universe), as the fixed stars • limit of cosmos (kosmos, κόσμος‎)/universe • motion of cosmos (kosmos, κόσμος‎)/universe • order of cosmos (kosmos, κόσμος‎)/universe • physical cosmos (kosmos, κόσμος‎)/universe and soul Ch. • universe • universe (τό πάν/ τών őλων) • universe, demiurge as creator of Timaean • universe, reason for creation of • universe, ruled by highest god • universe,organization, unity of • universe,organization, world soul

 Found in books: Bartninkas (2023), Traditional and Cosmic Gods in Later Plato and the Early Academy. 234; Beck (2006), The Religion of the Mithras Cult in the Roman Empire: Mysteries of the Unconquered Sun, 181; Despotis and Lohr (2022), Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions, 207; Gee (2020), Mapping the Afterlife: From Homer to Dante, 157; Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 32, 34, 73, 197; King (2006), Common to Body and Soul: Philosophical Approaches to Explaining Living Behaviour in Greco-Roman Antiquity, 84, 85, 87, 103; Schibli (2002), Hierocles of Alexandria, 289; d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 124, 125, 126, 129, 133, 155, 157, 242, 273

29d ὑμεῖς τε οἱ κριταὶ φύσιν ἀνθρωπίνην ἔχομεν, ὥστε περὶ τούτων τὸν εἰκότα μῦθον ἀποδεχομένους πρέπει τούτου μηδὲν ἔτι πέρα ζητεῖν. ΣΩ. ἄριστα, ὦ Τίμαιε, παντάπασί τε ὡς κελεύεις ἀποδεκτέον· τὸ μὲν οὖν προοίμιον θαυμασίως ἀπεδεξάμεθά σου, τὸν δὲ δὴ νόμον ἡμῖν ἐφεξῆς πέραινε. ΤΙ. λέγωμεν δὴ διʼ ἥντινα αἰτίαν γένεσιν καὶ τὸ πᾶν' 34b ἐσόμενον θεὸν λογισθεὶς λεῖον καὶ ὁμαλὸν πανταχῇ τε ἐκ μέσου ἴσον καὶ ὅλον καὶ τέλεον ἐκ τελέων σωμάτων σῶμα ἐποίησεν· ψυχὴν δὲ εἰς τὸ μέσον αὐτοῦ θεὶς διὰ παντός τε ἔτεινεν καὶ ἔτι ἔξωθεν τὸ σῶμα αὐτῇ περιεκάλυψεν, καὶ κύκλῳ δὴ κύκλον στρεφόμενον οὐρανὸν ἕνα μόνον ἔρημον κατέστησεν, διʼ ἀρετὴν δὲ αὐτὸν αὑτῷ δυνάμενον συγγίγνεσθαι καὶ οὐδενὸς ἑτέρου προσδεόμενον, γνώριμον δὲ καὶ φίλον ἱκανῶς αὐτὸν αὑτῷ. διὰ πάντα δὴ ταῦτα εὐδαίμονα θεὸν αὐτὸν ἐγεννήσατο. 35a συνεστήσατο ἐκ τῶνδέ τε καὶ τοιῷδε τρόπῳ. ΤΙ. τῆς ἀμερίστου καὶ ἀεὶ κατὰ ταὐτὰ ἐχούσης οὐσίας καὶ τῆς αὖ περὶ τὰ σώματα γιγνομένης μεριστῆς τρίτον ἐξ ἀμφοῖν ἐν μέσῳ συνεκεράσατο οὐσίας εἶδος, τῆς τε ταὐτοῦ φύσεως αὖ πέρι καὶ τῆς τοῦ ἑτέρου, καὶ κατὰ ταὐτὰ συνέστησεν ἐν μέσῳ τοῦ τε ἀμεροῦς αὐτῶν καὶ τοῦ κατὰ τὰ σώματα μεριστοῦ· καὶ τρία λαβὼν αὐτὰ ὄντα συνεκεράσατο εἰς μίαν πάντα ἰδέαν, τὴν θατέρου φύσιν δύσμεικτον οὖσαν εἰς ταὐτὸν συναρμόττων βίᾳ. 38b τό τε γεγονὸς εἶναι γεγονὸς καὶ τὸ γιγνόμενον εἶναι γιγνόμενον, ἔτι τε τὸ γενησόμενον εἶναι γενησόμενον καὶ τὸ μὴ ὂν μὴ ὂν εἶναι, ὧν οὐδὲν ἀκριβὲς λέγομεν. περὶ μὲν οὖν τούτων τάχʼ ἂν οὐκ εἴη καιρὸς πρέπων ἐν τῷ παρόντι διακριβολογεῖσθαι. ' None29d and you who judge are but human creatures, so that it becomes us to accept the likely account of these matters and forbear to search beyond it. Soc. Excellent, Timaeus! We must by all means accept it, as you suggest; and certainly we have most cordially accepted your prelude; so now, we beg of you, proceed straight on with the main theme. Tim. Let us now state the Cause wherefore He that constructed it' 34b which was one day to be existent, whereby He made it smooth and even and equal on all sides from the center, a whole and perfect body compounded of perfect bodies, And in the midst thereof He set Soul, which He stretched throughout the whole of it, and therewith He enveloped also the exterior of its body; and as a Circle revolving in a circle He established one sole and solitary Heaven, able of itself because of its excellence to company with itself and needing none other beside, sufficing unto itself as acquaintance and friend. And because of all this He generated it to be a blessed God. 35a and in the fashion which I shall now describe. Tim. and remains always the same and the Being which is transient and divisible in bodies, He blended a third form of Being compounded out of the twain, that is to say, out of the Same and the Other; and in like manner He compounded it midway between that one of them which is indivisible and that one which is divisible in bodies. And He took the three of them, and blent them all together into one form, by forcing the Other into union with the Same, in spite of its being naturally difficult to mix. 38b that what is become is become, and what is becoming is becoming, and what is about to become is about to become, and what is non-existent is non-existent; but none of these expressions is accurate. But the present is not, perhaps, a fitting occasion for an exact discussion of these matters. ' None
10. Sophocles, Antigone, 450 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Universalism • law, Universal

 Found in books: Najman (2010), The Significance of Sinai: Traditions about Sinai and Divine Revelation in Judaism and Christianity, 92; Schwartz (2008), 2 Maccabees, 313

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450 Yes, since it was not Zeus that published me that edict, and since not of that kind are the laws which Justice who dwells with the gods below established among men. Nor did I think that your decrees were of such force, that a mortal could override the unwritten'' None
11. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Universe • knowing (γινώσκειν), as universal in scope • seeds, of universe (Chrysippus) • universe (τό πάν/ τών őλων) • universe, created from seed (Chrysippus) • universe,organization, uniform/multifarious • universe,organization, unity of • universe,organization, world soul

 Found in books: Hankinson (1998), Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought, 108; Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 24; Kelsey (2021), Mind and World in Aristotle's De Anima 31; King (2006), Common to Body and Soul: Philosophical Approaches to Explaining Living Behaviour in Greco-Roman Antiquity, 86, 114; Schibli (2002), Hierocles of Alexandria, 289

12. None, None, nan (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Aristotle, on Greeks and universal rule • universal • universal rule, and Greeks

 Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 72; Papadodima (2022), Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II, 69

13. Anon., 1 Enoch, 10 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Universal History • creation, of universe

 Found in books: Bacchi (2022), Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics, 95; Lunn-Rockliffe (2007), The Letter of Mara bar Sarapion in Context, 149

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10 Then said the Most High, the Holy and Great One spake, and sent Uriel to the son of Lamech,,and said to him: \'Go to Noah and tell him in my name \'Hide thyself!\' and reveal to him the end that is approaching: that the whole earth will be destroyed, and a deluge is about to come,upon the whole earth, and will destroy all that is on it. And now instruct him that he may escape,and his seed may be preserved for all the generations of the world.\' And again the Lord said to Raphael: \'Bind Azazel hand and foot, and cast him into the darkness: and make an opening,in the desert, which is in Dudael, and cast him therein. And place upon him rough and jagged rocks, and cover him with darkness, and let him abide there for ever, and cover his face that he may,not see light. And on the day of the great judgement he shall be cast into the fire. And heal the earth which the angels have corrupted, and proclaim the healing of the earth, that they may heal the plague, and that all the children of men may not perish through all the secret things that the,Watchers have disclosed and have taught their sons. And the whole earth has been corrupted",through the works that were taught by Azazel: to him ascribe all sin.\' And to Gabriel said the Lord: \'Proceed against the bastards and the reprobates, and against the children of fornication: and destroy the children of fornication and the children of the Watchers from amongst men and cause them to go forth: send them one against the other that they may destroy each other in,battle: for length of days shall they not have. And no request that they (i.e. their fathers) make of thee shall be granted unto their fathers on their behalf; for they hope to live an eternal life, and,that each one of them will live five hundred years.\' And the Lord said unto Michael: \'Go, bind Semjaza and his associates who have united themselves with women so as to have defiled themselves,with them in all their uncleanness. And when their sons have slain one another, and they have seen the destruction of their beloved ones, bind them fast for seventy generations in the valleys of the earth, till the day of their judgement and of their consummation, till the judgement that is,for ever and ever is consummated. In those days they shall be led off to the abyss of fire: and",to the torment and the prison in which they shall be confined for ever. And whosoever shall be condemned and destroyed will from thenceforth be bound together with them to the end of all",generations. And destroy all the spirits of the reprobate and the children of the Watchers, because,they have wronged mankind. Destroy all wrong from the face of the earth and let every evil work come to an end: and let the plant of righteousness and truth appear: and it shall prove a blessing; the works of righteousness and truth\' shall be planted in truth and joy for evermore.",And then shall all the righteous escape, And shall live till they beget thousands of children, And all the days of their youth and their old age Shall they complete in peace.,And then shall the whole earth be tilled in righteousness, and shall all be planted with trees and,be full of blessing. And all desirable trees shall be planted on it, and they shall plant vines on it: and the vine which they plant thereon shall yield wine in abundance, and as for all the seed which is sown thereon each measure (of it) shall bear a thousand, and each measure of olives shall yield,ten presses of oil. And cleanse thou the earth from all oppression, and from all unrighteousness, and from all sin, and from all godlessness: and all the uncleanness that is wrought upon the earth,destroy from off the earth. And all the children of men shall become righteous, and all nations,shall offer adoration and shall praise Me, and all shall worship Me. And the earth shall be cleansed from all defilement, and from all sin, and from all punishment, and from all torment, and I will never again send (them) upon it from generation to generation and for ever.'' None
14. Polybius, Histories, 1.4, 1.4.7, 1.4.10, 5.33.2 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • "historiography, universal", • Greco-Roman culture, universal histories and simultaneity • Tyrtaeus, universalism, qualitative • history, universal • simultaneity and synchronicity, classical universal histories and local history • universal history

 Found in books: Goldhill (2022), The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity, 138; Hau (2017), Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus, 248; Kingsley Monti and Rood (2022), The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography, 316, 382; Miltsios (2023), Leadership and Leaders in Polybius. 98; Oksanish (2019), Benedikt Eckhardt, and Meret Strothmann, Law in the Roman Provinces, 107

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5.33.2 περὶ ὧν ἐγώ, παραιτησάμενος Ἔφορον τὸν πρῶτον καὶ μόνον ἐπιβεβλημένον τὰ καθόλου γράφειν, τὸ μὲν πλείω λέγειν ἢ μνημονεύειν τινὸς τῶν ἄλλων ἐπʼ ὀνόματος παρήσω,' ' None
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5.33.2 \xa0Now, while paying all due deference to Ephorus, the first and only writer who really undertook a general history, I\xa0will avoid criticizing at length or mentioning by name any of the others, and will simply say this much, that certain writers of history in my own times after giving an account of the war between Rome and Carthage in three or four pages, maintain that they write universal history. <' ' None
15. Septuagint, 2 Maccabees, 7.28 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Universalism • universe

 Found in books: Despotis and Lohr (2022), Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions, 207; Schwartz (2008), 2 Maccabees, 238

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7.28 I beseech you, my child, to look at the heaven and the earth and see everything that is in them, and recognize that God did not make them out of things that existed. Thus also mankind comes into being.'"" None
16. Septuagint, Ecclesiasticus (Siracides), 24.9-24.14 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Church, Universality of • Sirach, on universalism and particularism • universalism

 Found in books: Graham (2022), The Church as Paradise and the Way Therein: Early Christian Appropriation of Genesis 3:22–24, 143; Hayes (2015), What's Divine about Divine Law?: Early Perspectives, 126, 127

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24.9 From eternity, in the beginning, he created me,and for eternity I shall not cease to exist. 24.11 In the beloved city likewise he gave me a resting place,and in Jerusalem was my dominion. 24.12 So I took root in an honored people,in the portion of the Lord, who is their inheritance. 24.13 "I grew tall like a cedar in Lebanon,and like a cypress on the heights of Hermon. 24.14 I grew tall like a palm tree in En-gedi,and like rose plants in Jericho;like a beautiful olive tree in the field,and like a plane tree I grew tall.' ' None
17. None, None, nan (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Universe, harmony of the • universe, created vs. uncreated

 Found in books: Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 87; Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 164

18. None, None, nan (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • daily/universal • universe, created vs. uncreated

 Found in books: Beck (2006), The Religion of the Mithras Cult in the Roman Empire: Mysteries of the Unconquered Sun, 124, 125; Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 92

19. Anon., Sibylline Oracles, 3.113, 3.248-3.256 (1st cent. BCE - 5th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Universal History • universalism/universalistic

 Found in books: Bacchi (2022), Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics, 98, 102, 160; Piotrkowski (2019), Priests in Exile: The History of the Temple of Onias and Its Community in the Hellenistic Period, 224

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3.113 of the Orient and of the Occident,
3.248
Adulterous and altogether bad; 3.249 And for men shall be no more rest from war. 3.250 250 And the dread Phrygians shall perish all, 3.251 And unto Troy shall evil come that day. 3.252 And to the Persians and Assyrian 3.253 Evil shall straightaway come, and to all Egypt 3.254 And Libya and the Ethiopians, 3.255 255 And to the Carians and Pamphylians– 3.256 Evil to pass from one place to another,'' None
20. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.9-1.10, 1.21 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Destruction, of the universe/cosmic • Dissolution, cosmic dissolution/of the universe • Dracontius, universal flux, conception of

 Found in books: Fielding (2017), Transformations of Ovid in Late Antiquity. 105; Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 189, 190

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1.9 non bene iunctarum discordia semina rerum.' ' None
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1.9 the face of Nature in a vast expanse' ' None
21. Philo of Alexandria, On The Decalogue, 1, 52 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Judgment, final universal • Repentance, universal • Shekhina, universal • Torah, universality • virtue, of universal value

 Found in books: Birnbaum and Dillon (2020), Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 2; Brooke et al. (2008), Past Renewals: Interpretative Authority, Renewed Revelation, and the Quest for Perfection in Jewish Antiquity, 143; Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 634

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1 I have in my former treatises set forth the lives of Moses and the other wise men down to his time, whom the sacred scriptures point out as the founders and leaders of our nation, and as its unwritten laws; I will now, as seems pointed out by the natural order of my subject, proceed to describe accurately the character of those laws which are recorded in writing, not omitting any allegorical meaning which may perchance be concealed beneath the plain language, from that natural love of more recondite and laborious knowledge which is accustomed to seek for what is obscure before, and in preference to, what is evident. 52 But we must consider, with all the accuracy possible, each of these oracles separately, not looking upon any one of them as superfluous. Now the best beginning of all living beings is God, and of all virtues, piety. And we must, therefore, speak of these two principles in the first place. There is an error of no small importance which has taken possession of the greater portion of mankind concerning a subject which was likely by itself, or, at least, above all other subjects, to have been fixed with the greatest correctness and truth in the mind of every one; ' None
22. Philo of Alexandria, On The Creation of The World, 3 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Shekhina, universal • Torah, universality • law, Universal • laws, universalistic dimension of • universe • universe, as perishable but everlasting • universe, cosmic soul and • universe, possesses soul and intellect • virtue, of universal value

 Found in books: Birnbaum and Dillon (2020), Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 2, 209; Brooke et al. (2008), Past Renewals: Interpretative Authority, Renewed Revelation, and the Quest for Perfection in Jewish Antiquity, 143; Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 16; Najman (2010), The Significance of Sinai: Traditions about Sinai and Divine Revelation in Judaism and Christianity, 255

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3 And his exordium, as I have already said, is most admirable; embracing the creation of the world, under the idea that the law corresponds to the world and the world to the law, and that a man who is obedient to the law, being, by so doing, a citizen of the world, arranges his actions with reference to the intention of nature, in harmony with which the whole universal world is regulated. '' None
23. Philo of Alexandria, On Curses, 152, 171-172 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • universal law • virtue, of universal value

 Found in books: Birnbaum and Dillon (2020), Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 2; Heo (2023), Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages. 195

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152 So that they are marvellously simple people who have ever had an idea of coming to the end of any branch of knowledge whatever. For that which has seemed to be near and within reach is nevertheless a long way distant from the end; since no created being is perfect in any department of learning, but falls as far short of it as a thoroughly infant child just beginning to learn does, in comparison of a man who both by age and skill is qualified to be a master. XLV. 171 but the seeds which are sown by mortals, whether for the generation of animals or of plants, do not all come to perfection; but we must be content if more are not wasted than those which remain above; and God sows nothing in our souls which is incomplete; but his seed is all so seasonable and so perfect that every one of them is at once borne forward to produce abundance of its appropriate fruit. L. 172 But when Moses says here that Seth sprung up as another or different seed, he does not say from which it was different; was it different from Abel who was treacherously slain, or from Cain who slew him? But may we not say perhaps that the original seed from which each of these sprung was different? That from which Cain sprung, inasmuch as it was hostile; for a thirst for virtue is the most hostile thing possible to that deserter, wickedness; that from which Abel sprung, as friendly and kindred; for that which is beginning to exist is a different thing from, but not a contrary thing to, that which is perfected; and so that which pertains to creation is different from that which pertains to the uncreate. ' None
24. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 2.162, 3.6 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Shekhina, universal • Torah, universality • law, Universal • virtue, of universal value

 Found in books: Birnbaum and Dillon (2020), Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 2; Brooke et al. (2008), Past Renewals: Interpretative Authority, Renewed Revelation, and the Quest for Perfection in Jewish Antiquity, 143, 144; Najman (2010), The Significance of Sinai: Traditions about Sinai and Divine Revelation in Judaism and Christianity, 105

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2.162 There is also a festival on the day of the paschal feast, which succeeds the first day, and this is named the sheaf, from what takes place on it; for the sheaf is brought to the altar as a first fruit both of the country which the nation has received for its own, and also of the whole land; so as to be an offering both for the nation separately, and also a common one for the whole race of mankind; and so that the people by it worship the living God, both for themselves and for all the rest of mankind, because they have received the fertile earth for their inheritance; for in the country there is no barren soil but even all those parts which appear to be stony and rugged are surrounded with soft veins of great depth, which, by reason of their richness, are very well suited for the production of living Things.{20}{sections 163û174 were omitted in Yonge's translation because the edition on which Yonge based his translation, Mangey, lacked this material. These lines have been newly translated for this volume.} " 3.6 But even in these circumstances I ought to give thanks to God, that though I am so overwhelmed by this flood, I am not wholly sunk and swallowed up in the depths. But I open the eyes of my soul, which from an utter despair of any good hope had been believed to have been before now wholly darkened, and I am irradiated with the light of wisdom, since I am not given up for the whole of my life to darkness. Behold, therefore, I venture not only to study the sacred commands of Moses, but also with an ardent love of knowledge to investigate each separate one of them, and to endeavour to reveal and to explain to those who wish to understand them, things concerning them which are not known to the multitude.II. '" None
25. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Moses, 2.14, 2.26-2.27, 2.31-2.40, 2.44, 2.48 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Shekhina, universal • Torah, universality • law, Universal • universal law

 Found in books: Brooke et al. (2008), Past Renewals: Interpretative Authority, Renewed Revelation, and the Quest for Perfection in Jewish Antiquity, 143, 144; Heo (2023), Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages. 195; Najman (2010), The Significance of Sinai: Traditions about Sinai and Divine Revelation in Judaism and Christianity, 90, 93, 94, 97, 101, 104, 255

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2.14 But the enactments of this lawgiver are firm, not shaken by commotions, not liable to alteration, but stamped as it were with the seal of nature herself, and they remain firm and lasting from the day on which they were first promulgated to the present one, and there may well be a hope that they will remain to all future time, as being immortal, as long as the sun and the moon, and the whole heaven and the whole world shall endure.
2.26
In olden time the laws were written in the Chaldaean language, and for a long time they remained in the same condition as at first, not changing their language as long as their beauty had not made them known to other nations; 2.27 but when, from the daily and uninterrupted respect shown to them by those to whom they had been given, and from their ceaseless observance of their ordices, other nations also obtained an understanding of them, their reputation spread over all lands; for what was really good, even though it may through envy be overshadowed for a short time, still in time shines again through the intrinsic excellence of its nature. Some persons, thinking it a scandalous thing that these laws should only be known among one half portion of the human race, namely, among the barbarians, and that the Greek nation should be wholly and entirely ignorant of them, turned their attention to their translation.
2.31
He, then, being a sovereign of this character, and having conceived a great admiration for and love of the legislation of Moses, conceived the idea of having our laws translated into the Greek language; and immediately he sent out ambassadors to the high-priest and king of Judea, for they were the same person. 2.32 And having explained his wishes, and having requested him to pick him out a number of men, of perfect fitness for the task, who should translate the law, the high-priest, as was natural, being greatly pleased, and thinking that the king had only felt the inclination to undertake a work of such a character from having been influenced by the providence of God, considered, and with great care selected the most respectable of the Hebrews whom he had about him, who in addition to their knowledge of their national scriptures, had also been well instructed in Grecian literature, and cheerfully sent them. ' "2.33 And when they arrived at the king's court they were hospitably received by the king; and while they feasted, they in return feasted their entertainer with witty and virtuous conversation; for he made experiment of the wisdom of each individual among them, putting to them a succession of new and extraordinary questions; and they, since the time did not allow of their being prolix in their answers, replied with great propriety and fidelity as if they were delivering apophthegms which they had already prepared. " '2.34 So when they had won his approval, they immediately began to fulfil the objects for which that honourable embassy had been sent; and considering among themselves how important the affair was, to translate laws which had been divinely given by direct inspiration, since they were not able either to take away anything, or to add anything, or to alter anything, but were bound to preserve the original form and character of the whole composition, they looked out for the most completely purified place of all the spots on the outside of the city. For the places within the walls, as being filled with all kinds of animals, were held in suspicion by them by reason of the diseases and deaths of some, and the accursed actions of those who were in health. 2.35 The island of Pharos lies in front of Alexandria, the neck of which runs out like a sort of tongue towards the city, being surrounded with water of no great depth, but chiefly with shoals and shallow water, so that the great noise and roaring from the beating of the waves is kept at a considerable distance, and so mitigated. 2.36 They judged this place to be the most suitable of all the spots in the neighbourhood for them to enjoy quiet and tranquillity in, so that they might associate with the laws alone in their minds; and there they remained, and having taken the sacred scriptures, they lifted up them and their hands also to heaven, entreating of God that they might not fail in their object. And he assented to their prayers, that the greater part, or indeed the universal race of mankind might be benefited, by using these philosophical and entirely beautiful commandments for the correction of their lives. 2.37 Therefore, being settled in a secret place, and nothing even being present with them except the elements of nature, the earth, the water, the air, and the heaven, concerning the creation of which they were going in the first place to explain the sacred account; for the account of the creation of the world is the beginning of the law; they, like men inspired, prophesied, not one saying one thing and another another, but every one of them employed the self-same nouns and verbs, as if some unseen prompter had suggested all their language to them. 2.38 And yet who is there who does not know that every language, and the Greek language above all others, is rich in a variety of words, and that it is possible to vary a sentence and to paraphrase the same idea, so as to set it forth in a great variety of manners, adapting many different forms of expression to it at different times. But this, they say, did not happen at all in the case of this translation of the law, but that, in every case, exactly corresponding Greek words were employed to translate literally the appropriate Chaldaic words, being adapted with exceeding propriety to the matters which were to be explained; 2.39 for just as I suppose the things which are proved in geometry and logic do not admit any variety of explanation, but the proposition which was set forth from the beginning remains unaltered, in like manner I conceive did these men find words precisely and literally corresponding to the things, which words were alone, or in the greatest possible degree, destined to explain with clearness and force the matters which it was desired to reveal. 2.40 And there is a very evident proof of this; for if Chaldaeans were to learn the Greek language, and if Greeks were to learn Chaldaean, and if each were to meet with those scriptures in both languages, namely, the Chaldaic and the translated version, they would admire and reverence them both as sisters, or rather as one and the same both in their facts and in their language; considering these translators not mere interpreters but hierophants and prophets to whom it had been granted it their honest and guileless minds to go along with the most pure spirit of Moses.
2.44
and then, if they make any fresh start and begin to improve, how great is the increase of their renown and glory? I think that in that case every nation, abandoning all their own individual customs, and utterly disregarding their national laws, would change and come over to the honour of such a people only; for their laws shining in connection with, and simultaneously with, the prosperity of the nation, will obscure all others, just as the rising sun obscures the stars.
2.48
for he was not like any ordinary compiler of history, studying to leave behind him records of ancient transactions as memorials to future ages for the mere sake of affording pleasure without any advantage; but he traced back the most ancient events from the beginning of the world, commencing with the creation of the universe, in order to make known two most necessary principles. First, that the same being was the father and creator of the world, and likewise the lawgiver of truth; secondly, that the man who adhered to these laws, and clung closely to a connection with and obedience to nature, would live in a manner corresponding to the arrangement of the universe with a perfect harmony and union, between his words and his actions and between his actions and his words.'' None
26. None, None, nan (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • De architectura, universalizing • Rome, ideally placed for universal rule, its site away from the sea • Universe

 Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 241; Oksanish (2019), Benedikt Eckhardt, and Meret Strothmann, Law in the Roman Provinces, 103; Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 155

27. Clement of Rome, 1 Clement, 54 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Universe, harmony of the • church (ejkklhsiva), local and universal

 Found in books: Lieu (2004), Christian Identity in the Jewish and Graeco-Roman World, 232; Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 248

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54 Who then among you is noble-minded? Who compassionate? Who full of love? Let him declare, If on my account sedition and disagreement and schisms have arisen, I will depart, I will go away wherever ye desire, and I will do whatever the majority commands; only let the flock of Christ live on terms of peace with the presbyters set over it. He that acts thus shall procure to himself great glory in the Lord; and every place will welcome him. For the earth is the Lord's, and the fullness thereof. These things they who live a godly life that is never to be repented of, both have done and always will do. "" None
28. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 12.32, 12.55, 12.61, 12.74-12.76, 12.81-12.83 (1st cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • God and the universe • Judgment, final universal • Repentance, universal • Universe, harmony of the

 Found in books: Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 634; Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 48, 101, 102, 137, 138, 142, 143, 161

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12.32 \xa0So experiencing all these things and afterwards taking note of them, men could not help admiring and loving the divinity, also because they observed the seasons and saw that it is for our preservation that they come with perfect regularity and avoidance of excess in either direction, and yet further, because they enjoyed this god-given superiority over the other animals of being able to reason and reflect about the gods. <
12.55
\xa0Perhaps in answer to this Pheidias would say, since he was not tongue-tied nor belonged to a tongue-tied city, and besides was the close friend and comrade of Pericles:"My Greek fellow-citizens, the issue is the greatest that has ever arisen. For it is not about empire or the presidency of one single state or the size of the navy or as to whether an army of infantry has or has not been correctly administered, that I\xa0am now being called to account, but concerning that god who governs the universe and my representation of him: whether it has been made with due respect to the dignity of the god and so as to be a true likeness of him, in no way falling short of the best portrayal of the divinity that is within the capacity of human beings to make, or is unworthy of him and unbefitting. <
12.61
\xa0For precisely as infant children when torn away from father or mother are filled with terrible longing and desire, and stretch out their hands to their absent parents often in their dreams, so also do men to the gods, rightly loving them for their beneficence and kinship, and being eager in every possible way to be with them and to hold converse with them. Consequently many of the barbarians, because they lack artistic means and find difficulty in employing them, name mountains gods, and unhewn trees, too, and unshapen stones, things which are by no means whatever more appropriate in shape than is the human form. <
12.74
\xa0But our god is peaceful and altogether gentle, such as befits the guardian of a faction-free and concordant Hellas; and this I,\xa0with the aid of my art and of the counsel of the wise and good city of the Eleans have set up â\x80\x94 a\xa0mild and majestic god in pleasing guise, the Giver of our material and our physical life and of all our blessings, the common Father and Saviour and Guardian of mankind, in so far as it was possible for a mortal man to frame in his mind and to represent the divine and inimitable nature. < 12.75 \xa0"And consider whether you will not find that the statue is in keeping with all the titles by which Zeus is known. For he alone of the gods is entitled \'Father and King,\' \'Protector of Cities,\' \'God of Friendship,\' and \'God of Comradeship\' and also \'Protector of Suppliants,\' and \'God of Hospitality,\' \'Giver of Increase,\' and has countless other titles, all indicative of goodness: he is addressed as \'King\' because of his dominion and power; as \'Father,\' I\xa0think, on account of his solicitude for us and his kindness: as \'Protector of Cities\' in that he upholds the law and the common weal; as \'Guardian of the Race\' on account of the tie of kinship which unites gods and men; <' "12.76 \xa0as 'God of Friendship' and 'God of Comradeship' because he brings all men together and wills that they be friends of one another and never enemy or foe; as 'Protector of Suppliants' since he inclines his ear and is gracious to men when they pray; as 'God of Refuge' because he gives refuge from evils; as 'God of Hospitality' because we should not be unmindful even of strangers, nor regard any human being as an alien; as 'Giver of Wealth and Increase' since he is the cause of all crops and is the giver of wealth and power. <" 12.81 \xa0These can work upon nothing but whatever hard residuary substance is held bound within all these elements. I\xa0do not mean gold or silver, for these are trivial and worthless things, but the essential substance, tough all through and heavy; and to select each kind of material and entwining them together to compose every species, both of animals and of plants â\x80\x94 this is a thing which is impossible for even the gods, all except this God alone, one may almost say, whom another poet quite beautifully has addressed as follows: Lord of Dodona, father almighty, consummate artist. < 12.82 \xa0For he is indeed the first and most perfect artificer, who has taken as his coadjutor in his art, not the city of Elis, but the entire material of the entire universe. But of a Pheidias or of a Polycleitus you could not reasonably demand more than they have done; nay, even what they essayed is too great and august for our handiwork. < 12.83 \xa0Indeed, not even Hephaestus did Homer represent as showing his skill in other materials, but while he furnished a god as the craftsman for the making of the shield, he did not succeed in finding any different sort of material for it. For he speaks as follows: The stubborn brass, and tin, and precious gold, And silver, first he melted in the fire; Nay, I\xa0will not concede to any man that there ever has been a better sculptor than\xa0I, but to Zeus, who fashioned the whole universe, it is not right to compare any mortal." <' ' None
29. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 3.180, 12.388, 13.62-13.73, 20.236, 20.264 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Literacy, ideal of universal literacy • Shekhina, universal • Tabernacle, represents the universe • Torah, universality • Universalism • universalism/universalistic

 Found in books: Brooke et al. (2008), Past Renewals: Interpretative Authority, Renewed Revelation, and the Quest for Perfection in Jewish Antiquity, 135, 138, 146; Carr (2004), Writing on the Tablet of the Heart: Origins of Scripture and Literature, 247; Kosman (2012), Gender and Dialogue in the Rabbinic Prism, 188; Piotrkowski (2019), Priests in Exile: The History of the Temple of Onias and Its Community in the Hellenistic Period, 409, 420; Schwartz (2008), 2 Maccabees, 187

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12.388 καὶ τιμῆς ἀξιωθεὶς ὑπό τε αὐτοῦ καὶ τῆς γυναικὸς Κλεοπάτρας λαμβάνει τόπον ἀξιώσας ἐν τῷ νομῷ τῷ ̔Ηλιοπολίτῃ, ἐν ᾧ καὶ ὅμοιον τῷ ἐν ̔Ιεροσολύμοις ᾠκοδόμησεν ἱερόν. περὶ τούτου μὲν οὖν εὐκαιρότερον ἡμῖν ἔσται διελθεῖν.
13.62
̔Ο δὲ ̓Ονίου τοῦ ἀρχιερέως υἱὸς ὁμώνυμος δὲ ὢν τῷ πατρί, ὃς ἐν ̓Αλεξανδρείᾳ φυγὼν πρὸς τὸν βασιλέα Πτολεμαῖον τὸν ἐπικαλούμενον Φιλομήτορα διῆγεν, ὡς καὶ πρότερον εἰρήκαμεν, ἰδὼν τὴν ̓Ιουδαίαν κακουμένην ὑπὸ τῶν Μακεδόνων καὶ τῶν βασιλέων αὐτῶν,' "13.63 βουλόμενος αὑτῷ δόξαν καὶ μνήμην αἰώνιον κατασκευάσαι, διέγνω πέμψας πρὸς Πτολεμαῖον τὸν βασιλέα καὶ τὴν βασίλισσαν Κλεοπάτραν αἰτήσασθαι παρ' αὐτῶν ἐξουσίαν, ὅπως οἰκοδομήσειεν ναὸν ἐν Αἰγύπτῳ παραπλήσιον τῷ ἐν ̔Ιεροσολύμοις καὶ Λευίτας καὶ ἱερεῖς ἐκ τοῦ ἰδίου γένους καταστήσῃ." "13.64 τοῦτο δ' ἐβούλετο θαρρῶν μάλιστα τῷ προφήτῃ ̔Ησαί̈ᾳ, ὃς ἔμπροσθεν ἔτεσιν ἑξακοσίοις πλέον γεγονὼς προεῖπεν, ὡς δεῖ πάντως ἐν Αἰγύπτῳ οἰκοδομηθῆναι ναὸν τῷ μεγίστῳ θεῷ ὑπ' ἀνδρὸς ̓Ιουδαίου. διὰ ταῦτα οὖν ἐπηρμένος ̓Ονίας γράφει Πτολεμαίῳ καὶ Κλεοπάτρᾳ τοιαύτην ἐπιστολήν:" '13.65 “πολλὰς καὶ μεγάλας ὑμῖν χρείας τετελεκὼς ἐν τοῖς κατὰ πόλεμον ἔργοις μετὰ τῆς τοῦ θεοῦ βοηθείας, καὶ γενόμενος ἔν τε τῇ κοίλῃ Συρίᾳ καὶ Φοινίκῃ, καὶ εἰς Λεόντων δὲ πόλιν τοῦ ̔Ηλιοπολίτου σὺν τοῖς ̓Ιουδαίοις καὶ εἰς ἄλλους τόπους ἀφικόμενος τοῦ ἔθνους, 13.66 καὶ πλείστους εὑρὼν παρὰ τὸ καθῆκον ἔχοντας ἱερὰ καὶ διὰ τοῦτο δύσνους ἀλλήλοις, ὃ καὶ Αἰγυπτίοις συμβέβηκεν διὰ τὸ πλῆθος τῶν ἱερῶν καὶ τὸ περὶ τὰς θρησκείας οὐχ ὁμόδοξον, ἐπιτηδειότατον εὑρὼν τόπον ἐν τῷ προσαγορευομένῳ τῆς ἀγρίας Βουβάστεως ὀχυρώματι βρύοντα ποικίλης ὕλης καὶ τῶν ἱερῶν ζῴων μεστόν,' "13.67 δέομαι συγχωρῆσαί μοι τὸ ἀδέσποτον ἀνακαθάραντι ἱερὸν καὶ συμπεπτωκὸς οἰκοδομῆσαι ναὸν τῷ μεγίστῳ θεῷ καθ' ὁμοίωσιν τοῦ ἐν ̔Ιεροσολύμοις αὐτοῖς μέτροις ὑπὲρ σοῦ καὶ τῆς σῆς γυναικὸς καὶ τῶν τέκνων, ἵν' ἔχωσιν οἱ τὴν Αἴγυπτον κατοικοῦντες ̓Ιουδαῖοι εἰς αὐτὸ συνιόντες κατὰ τὴν πρὸς ἀλλήλους ὁμόνοιαν ταῖς σαῖς ἐξυπηρετεῖν χρείαις:" '13.68 καὶ γὰρ ̔Ησαί̈ας ὁ προφήτης τοῦτο προεῖπεν: ἔσται θυσιαστήριον ἐν Αἰγύπτῳ κυρίῳ τῷ θεῷ: καὶ πολλὰ δὲ προεφήτευσεν ἄλλα τοιαῦτα διὰ τὸν τόπον.”' "13.69 Καὶ ταῦτα μὲν ὁ ̓Ονίας τῷ βασιλεῖ Πτολεμαίῳ γράφει. κατανοήσειε δ' ἄν τις αὐτοῦ τὴν εὐσέβειαν καὶ Κλεοπάτρας τῆς ἀδελφῆς αὐτοῦ καὶ γυναικὸς ἐξ ἧς ἀντέγραψαν ἐπιστολῆς: τὴν γὰρ ἁμαρτίαν καὶ τὴν τοῦ νόμου παράβασιν εἰς τὴν ̓Ονίου κεφαλὴν ἀνέθεσαν:" "13.71 ἐπεὶ δὲ σὺ φῂς ̔Ησαί̈αν τὸν προφήτην ἐκ πολλοῦ χρόνου τοῦτο προειρηκέναι, συγχωροῦμέν σοι, εἰ μέλλει τοῦτ' ἔσεσθαι κατὰ τὸν νόμον: ὥστε μηδὲν ἡμᾶς δοκεῖν εἰς τὸν θεὸν ἐξημαρτηκέναι.”" '13.72 Λαβὼν οὖν τὸν τόπον ὁ ̓Ονίας κατεσκεύασεν ἱερὸν καὶ βωμὸν τῷ θεῷ ὅμοιον τῷ ἐν ̔Ιεροσολύμοις, μικρότερον δὲ καὶ πενιχρότερον. τὰ δὲ μέτρα αὐτοῦ καὶ τὰ σκεύη νῦν οὐκ ἔδοξέ μοι δηλοῦν: ἐν γὰρ τῇ ἑβδόμῃ μου βίβλῳ τῶν ̓Ιουδαϊκῶν ἀναγέγραπται. 13.73 εὗρεν δὲ ̓Ονίας καὶ ̓Ιουδαίους τινὰς ὁμοίους αὐτῷ ἱερεῖς καὶ Λευίτας τοὺς ἐκεῖ θρησκεύσοντας. ἀλλὰ περὶ μὲν τοῦ ἱεροῦ τούτου ἀρκούντως ἡμῖν δεδήλωται.
20.236
διὰ τοῦτο καὶ ̓Ονίας ὁ τοῦ τετελευτηκότος ̓Ονίου ἐξάδελφος ὁμώνυμος τῷ πατρὶ παραγενόμενος εἰς Αἴγυπτον καὶ διὰ φιλίας ἀφικόμενος Πτολεμαίῳ τῷ Φιλομήτορι καὶ Κλεοπάτρᾳ τῇ γυναικὶ αὐτοῦ, πείθει τούτους κατὰ τὸν ̔Ηλιοπολίτην νομὸν δειμαμένους τῷ θεῷ ναὸν παραπλήσιον τῷ ἐν ̔Ιεροσολύμοις αὐτὸν ἀρχιερέα καταστῆσαι.' "
20.264
παρ' ἡμῖν γὰρ οὐκ ἐκείνους ἀποδέχονται τοὺς πολλῶν ἐθνῶν διάλεκτον ἐκμαθόντας διὰ τὸ κοινὸν εἶναι νομίζειν τὸ ἐπιτήδευμα τοῦτο μόνον οὐκ ἐλευθέροις τοῖς τυχοῦσιν ἀλλὰ καὶ τῶν οἰκετῶν τοῖς θέλουσι, μόνοις δὲ σοφίαν μαρτυροῦσιν τοῖς τὰ νόμιμα σαφῶς ἐπισταμένοις καὶ τὴν τῶν ἱερῶν γραμμάτων δύναμιν ἑρμηνεῦσαι δυναμένοις." ' None
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12.388 and when he found he was in great esteem with him, and with his wife Cleopatra, he desired and obtained a place in the Nomus of Heliopolis, wherein he built a temple like to that at Jerusalem; of which therefore we shall hereafter give an account, in a place more proper for it.
13.62
1. But then the son of Onias the high priest, who was of the same name with his father, and who fled to king Ptolemy, who was called Philometor, lived now at Alexandria, as we have said already. When this Onias saw that Judea was oppressed by the Macedonians and their kings, 13.63 out of a desire to purchase to himself a memorial and eternal fame he resolved to send to king Ptolemy and queen Cleopatra, to ask leave of them that he might build a temple in Egypt like to that at Jerusalem, and might ordain Levites and priests out of their own stock. 13.64 The chief reason why he was desirous so to do, was, that he relied upon the prophet Isaiah, who lived above six hundred years before, and foretold that there certainly was to be a temple built to Almighty God in Egypt by a man that was a Jew. Onias was elevated with this prediction, and wrote the following epistle to Ptolemy and Cleopatra: 13.65 “Having done many and great things for you in the affairs of the war, by the assistance of God, and that in Celesyria and Phoenicia, I came at length with the Jews to Leontopolis, and to other places of your nation, 13.66 where I found that the greatest part of your people had temples in an improper manner, and that on this account they bare ill-will one against another, which happens to the Egyptians by reason of the multitude of their temples, and the difference of opinions about divine worship. Now I found a very fit place in a castle that hath its name from the country Diana; this place is full of materials of several sorts, and replenished with sacred animals; 13.67 I desire therefore that you will grant me leave to purge this holy place, which belongs to no master, and is fallen down, and to build there a temple to Almighty God, after the pattern of that in Jerusalem, and of the same dimensions, that may be for the benefit of thyself, and thy wife and children, that those Jews which dwell in Egypt may have a place whither they may come and meet together in mutual harmony one with another, and he subservient to thy advantages; 13.68 for the prophet Isaiah foretold that, ‘there should be an altar in Egypt to the Lord God;’” and many other such things did he prophesy relating to that place. 13.69 2. And this was what Onias wrote to king Ptolemy. Now any one may observe his piety, and that of his sister and wife Cleopatra, by that epistle which they wrote in answer to it; for they laid the blame and the transgression of the law upon the head of Onias. And this was their reply: 13.71 But since thou sayest that Isaiah the prophet foretold this long ago, we give thee leave to do it, if it may be done according to your law, and so that we may not appear to have at all offended God herein.” 13.72 3. So Onias took the place, and built a temple, and an altar to God, like indeed to that in Jerusalem, but smaller and poorer. I do not think it proper for me now to describe its dimensions or its vessels, which have been already described in my seventh book of the Wars of the Jews. 13.73 However, Onias found other Jews like to himself, together with priests and Levites, that there performed divine service. But we have said enough about this temple.
20.236
On which account Onias, who was the nephew of Onias that was dead, and bore the same name with his father, came into Egypt, and got into the friendship of Ptolemy Philometor, and Cleopatra his wife, and persuaded them to make him the high priest of that temple which he built to God in the prefecture of Heliopolis, and this in imitation of that at Jerusalem;
20.264
for our nation does not encourage those that learn the languages of many nations, and so adorn their discourses with the smoothness of their periods; because they look upon this sort of accomplishment as common, not only to all sorts of free-men, but to as many of the servants as please to learn them. But they give him the testimony of being a wise man who is fully acquainted with our laws, and is able to interpret their meaning;' ' None
30. Josephus Flavius, Jewish War, 1.33 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Universalism • universalism/universalistic

 Found in books: Piotrkowski (2019), Priests in Exile: The History of the Temple of Onias and Its Community in the Hellenistic Period, 420; Schwartz (2008), 2 Maccabees, 187

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1.33 καὶ προσέβαλλεν μὲν συνεχῶς τῷ φρουρίῳ, πρὶν δὲ ἑλεῖν χειμῶνι βιασθεὶς χαλεπωτάτῳ ταῖς πλησίον ἐνστρατοπεδεύεται κώμαις. ἐπεὶ δ' αὐτῷ μετ' ὀλίγας ἡμέρας καὶ τὸ δεύτερον παρὰ ̓Αντωνίου τάγμα συνέμιξεν, δείσαντες τὴν ἰσχὺν οἱ πολέμιοι διὰ νυκτὸς ἐξέλιπον τὸ ἔρυμα."
1.33
ὁ δ' ἀρχιερεὺς ̓Ονίας πρὸς Πτολεμαῖον διαφυγὼν καὶ παρ' αὐτοῦ λαβὼν τόπον ἐν τῷ ̔Ηλιοπολίτῃ νομῷ πολίχνην τε τοῖς ̔Ιεροσολύμοις ἀπεικασμένην καὶ ναὸν ἔκτισεν ὅμοιον: περὶ ὧν αὖθις κατὰ χώραν δηλώσομεν." "" None
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1.33 But Onias, the high priest, fled to Ptolemy, and received a place from him in the Nomus of Heliopolis, where he built a city resembling Jerusalem, and a temple that was like its temple, concerning which we shall speak more in its proper place hereafter.
1.33
He also made an immediate and continual attack upon the fortress. Yet was he forced, by a most terrible storm, to pitch his camp in the neighboring villages before he could take it. But when, after a few days’ time, the second legion, that came from Antony, joined themselves to him, the enemy were affrighted at his power, and left their fortifications in the nighttime.'' None
31. Josephus Flavius, Against Apion, 1.38-1.41, 2.178, 2.193-2.194, 2.204 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Literacy, ideal of universal literacy • Shekhina, universal • universalism/universalistic

 Found in books: Brooke et al. (2008), Past Renewals: Interpretative Authority, Renewed Revelation, and the Quest for Perfection in Jewish Antiquity, 132, 133, 138, 139, 147; Carr (2004), Writing on the Tablet of the Heart: Origins of Scripture and Literature, 247; Piotrkowski (2019), Priests in Exile: The History of the Temple of Onias and Its Community in the Hellenistic Period, 399

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1.38 οὐ μυριάδες βιβλίων εἰσὶ παρ' ἡμῖν ἀσυμφώνων καὶ μαχομένων, δύο δὲ μόνα πρὸς τοῖς εἴκοσι βιβλία τοῦ παντὸς ἔχοντα χρόνου τὴν ἀναγραφήν, τὰ δικαίως πεπιστευμένα." "1.39 καὶ τούτων πέντε μέν ἐστι Μωυσέως, ἃ τούς τε νόμους περιέχει καὶ τὴν ἀπ' ἀνθρωπογονίας παράδοσιν μέχρι τῆς αὐτοῦ τελευτῆς: οὗτος ὁ χρόνος ἀπολείπει τρισχιλίων ὀλίγῳ ἐτῶν." "1.41 ἀπὸ δὲ ̓Αρταξέρξου μέχρι τοῦ καθ' ἡμᾶς χρόνου γέγραπται μὲν ἕκαστα, πίστεως δ' οὐχ ὁμοίας ἠξίωται τοῖς πρὸ αὐτῶν διὰ τὸ μὴ γενέσθαι τὴν τῶν προφητῶν ἀκριβῆ διαδοχήν." "
2.178
ἡμῶν δὲ ὁντινοῦν τις ἔροιτο τοὺς νόμους ῥᾷον ἂν εἴποι πάντας ἢ τοὔνομα τὸ ἑαυτοῦ. τοιγαροῦν ἀπὸ τῆς πρώτης εὐθὺς αἰσθήσεως αὐτοὺς ἐκμανθάνοντες ἔχομεν ἐν ταῖς ψυχαῖς ὥσπερ ἐγκεχαραγμένους, καὶ σπάνιος μὲν ὁ παραβαίνων, ἀδύνατος δ' ἡ τῆς κολάσεως παραίτησις." 2.193 Εἷς ναὸς ἑνὸς θεοῦ, φίλον γὰρ ἀεὶ παντὶ τὸ ὅμοιον, κοινὸς ἁπάντων κοινοῦ θεοῦ ἁπάντων. τοῦτον θεραπεύσουσιν μὲν διὰ παντὸς οἱ ἱερεῖς, ἡγήσεται δὲ τούτων ὁ πρῶτος ἀεὶ κατὰ γένος. 2.194 οὗτος μετὰ τῶν συνιερέων θύσει τῷ θεῷ, φυλάξει τοὺς νόμους, δικάσει περὶ τῶν ἀμφισβητουμένων, κολάσει τοὺς ἐλεγχθέντας. ὁ τούτῳ μὴ πειθόμενος ὑφέξει δίκην ὡς εἰς θεὸν αὐτὸν ἀσεβῶν.' "
2.204
Οὐ μὴν οὐδ' ἐπὶ ταῖς τῶν παίδων γενέσεσιν ἐπέτρεψεν εὐωχίας συντελεῖν καὶ προφάσεις ποιεῖσθαι μέθης, ἀλλὰ σώφρονα τὴν ἀρχὴν εὐθὺς τῆς τροφῆς ἔταξε. καὶ γράμματα παιδεύειν ἐκέλευσεν τὰ περὶ τοὺς νόμους καὶ τῶν προγόνων τὰς πράξεις ἐπίστασθαι, τὰς μὲν ἵνα μιμῶνται, τοῖς δ' ἵνα συντρεφόμενοι μήτε παραβαίνωσι μήτε σκῆψιν ἀγνοίας ἔχωσι." " None
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1.38 For we have not an innumerable multitude of books among us, disagreeing from and contradicting one another as the Greeks have, but only twenty-two books, which contain the records of all the past times; which are justly believed to be divine; 1.39 and of them five belong to Moses, which contain his laws and the traditions of the origin of mankind till his death. This interval of time was little short of three thousand years; 1.41 It is true, our history hath been written since Artaxerxes very particularly, but hath not been esteemed of the like authority with the former by our forefathers, because there hath not been an exact succession of prophets since that time;
2.178
but for our people, if any body do but ask any one of them about our laws, he will more readily tell them all than he will tell his own name, and this in consequence of our having learned them immediately as soon as ever we became sensible of any thing, and of our having them, as it were engraven on our souls. Our transgressors of them are but few; and it is impossible, when any do offend, to escape punishment.


2.193 24. There ought also to be but one temple for one God; for likeness is the constant foundation of agreement. This temple ought to be common to all men, because he is the common God of all men. His priests are to be continually about his worship, over whom he that is the first by his birth is to be their ruler perpetually. 2.194 His business must be to offer sacrifices to God, together with those priests that are joined with him, to see that the laws be observed, to determine controversies, and to punish those that are convicted of injustice; while he that does not submit to him shall be subject to the same punishment, as if he had been guilty of impiety towards God himself.
2.204
Nay, indeed, the law does not permit us to make festivals at the births of our children, and thereby afford occasion of drinking to excess; but it ordains that the very beginning of our education should be immediately directed to sobriety. It also commands us to bring those children up in learning and to exercise them in the laws, and make them acquainted with the acts of their predecessors, in order to their imitation of them, and that they might be nourished up in the laws from their infancy, and might neither transgress them, nor have any pretense for their ignorance of them.
32. New Testament, 1 Peter, 2.5 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • symbolic universe, see worldview, of emotional directives • universality

 Found in books: Hockey (2019), The Role of Emotion in 1 Peter, 245, 246; Lynskey (2021), Tyconius’ Book of Rules: An Ancient Invitation to Ecclesial Hermeneutics, 233

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2.5 καὶ αὐτοὶ ὡς λίθοι ζῶντες οἰκοδομεῖσθε οἶκος πνευματικὸς εἰς ἱεράτευμα ἅγιον, ἀνενέγκαι πνευματικὰς θυσίας εὐπροσδέκτους θεῷ διὰ Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ·'' None
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2.5 You also, as living stones, are built up as a spiritual house, to be a holy priesthood, to offer up spiritual sacrifices, acceptable to God through Jesus Christ. '' None
33. New Testament, 1 Corinthians, 12.12-12.30 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • God and the universe • Paul, the apostle, universalism of • Universalism, Pauline • Universe, harmony of the • universalism

 Found in books: Dawson (2001), Christian Figural Reading and the Fashioning of Identity, 269; Langworthy (2019), Gregory of Nazianzus’ Soteriological Pneumatology, 64; Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 244, 245

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12.12 Καθάπερ γὰρ τὸ σῶμα ἕν ἐστιν καὶ μέλη πολλὰ ἔχει, πάντα δὲ τὰ μέλη τοῦ σώματος πολλὰ ὄντα ἕν ἐστιν σῶμα, οὕτως καὶ ὁ χριστός· 12.13 καὶ γὰρ ἐν ἑνὶ πνεύματι ἡμεῖς πάντες εἰς ἓν σῶμα ἐβαπτίσθημεν, εἴτε Ἰουδαῖοι εἴτε Ἕλληνες, εἴτε δοῦλοι εἴτε ἐλεύθεροι, καὶ πάντες ἓν πνεῦμα ἐποτίσθημεν. 12.14 καὶ γὰρ τὸ σῶμα οὐκ ἔστιν ἓν μέλος ἀλλὰ πολλά. ἐὰν εἴπῃ ὁ πούς 12.15 Ὅτι οὐκ εἰμὶ χείρ, οὐκ εἰμὶ ἐκ τοῦ σώματος, οὐ παρὰ τοῦτο οὐκ ἔστιν ἐκ τοῦ σώματος· καὶ ἐὰν εἴπῃ τὸ οὖς 12.16 Ὅτι οὐκ εἰμὶ ὀφθαλμός, οὐκ εἰμὶ ἐκ τοῦ σώματος, οὐ παρὰ τοῦτο οὐκ ἔστιν ἐκ τοῦ σώματος· 12.17 εἰ ὅλον τὸ σῶμα ὀφθαλμός, ποῦ ἡ ἀκοή; εἰ ὅλον ἀκοή, ποῦ ἡ ὄσφρησις; 12.18 νῦν δὲ ὁ θεὸς ἔθετο τὰ μέλη, ἓν ἕκαστον αὐτῶν, ἐν τῷ σώματι καθὼς ἠθέλησεν. 12.19 εἰ δὲ ἦν τὰ πάνταἓν μέλος, ποῦ τὸ σῶμα; 12.20 νῦν δὲ πολλὰ μέλη, ἓν δὲ σῶμα. οὐ δύναται δὲ ὁ ὀφθαλμὸς εἰπεῖν τῇ χειρί 12.21 Χρείαν σου οὐκ ἔχω, ἢ πάλιν ἡ κεφαλὴ τοῖς ποσίν Χρείαν ὑμῶν οὐκ ἔχω· 12.22 ἀλλὰ πολλῷ μᾶλλον τὰ δοκοῦντα μέλη τοῦ σώματος ἀσθενέστερα ὑπάρχειν ἀναγκαῖά ἐστιν, 12.23 καὶ ἃ δοκοῦμεν ἀτιμότερα εἶναι τοῦ σώματος, τούτοις τιμὴν περισσοτέραν περιτίθεμεν, καὶ τὰ ἀσχήμονα ἡμῶν εὐσχημοσύνην περισσοτέραν ἔχει, 12.24 τὰ δὲ εὐσχήμονα ἡμῶν οὐ χρείαν ἔχει. ἀλλὰ ὁ θεὸς συνεκέρασεν τὸ σῶμα, τῷ ὑστερουμένῳ περισσοτέραν δοὺς τιμήν, 12.25 ἵνα μὴ ᾖ σχίσμα ἐν τῷ σώματι, ἀλλὰ τὸ αὐτὸ ὑπὲρ ἀλλήλων μεριμνῶσι τὰ μέλη. 12.26 καὶ εἴτε πάσχει ἓν μέλος, συνπάσχει πάντα τὰ μέλη· εἴτε δοξάζεται μέλος, συνχαίρει πάντα τὰ μέλη. 12.27 ὑμεῖς δέ ἐστε σῶμα Χριστοῦ καὶ μέλη ἐκ μέρους. 12.28 Καὶ οὓς μὲν ἔθετο ὁ θεὸς ἐν τῇ ἐκκλησίᾳ πρῶτον ἀποστόλους, δεύτερον προφήτας, τρίτον διδασκάλους, ἔπειτα δυνάμεις, ἔπειτα χαρίσματα ἰαμάτων, ἀντιλήμψεις, κυβερνήσεις, γένη γλωσσῶν. 12.29 μὴ πάντες ἀπόστολοι; μὴ πάντες προφῆται; μὴ πάντες διδάσκαλοι; μὴ πάντες δυνάμεις; 12.30 μὴ πάντες χαρίσματα ἔχουσιν ἰαμάτων; μὴ πάντες γλώσσαις λαλοῦσιν; μὴ πάντες διερμηνεύουσιν;'' None
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12.12 For as the body is one, and has many members, and all themembers of the body, being many, are one body; so also is Christ. 12.13 For in one Spirit we were all baptized into one body, whetherJews or Greeks, whether bond or free; and were all given to drink intoone Spirit. 12.14 For the body is not one member, but many. 12.15 If the foot would say, "Because I\'m not the hand, I\'m not part of thebody," it is not therefore not part of the body. 12.16 If the earwould say, "Because I\'m not the eye, I\'m not part of the body," it\'snot therefore not part of the body. 12.17 If the whole body were aneye, where would the hearing be? If the whole were hearing, where wouldthe smelling be? 12.18 But now God has set the members, each one ofthem, in the body, just as he desired. 12.19 If they were all onemember, where would the body be? 12.20 But now they are many members,but one body. 12.21 The eye can\'t tell the hand, "I have no need foryou," or again the head to the feet, "I have no need for you." 12.22 No, much rather, those members of the body which seem to be weaker arenecessary. 12.23 Those parts of the body which we think to be lesshonorable, on those we bestow more abundant honor; and ourunpresentable parts have more abundant propriety; 12.24 whereas ourpresentable parts have no such need. But God composed the bodytogether, giving more abundant honor to the inferior part, 12.25 thatthere should be no division in the body, but that the members shouldhave the same care for one another. 12.26 When one member suffers,all the members suffer with it. Or when one member is honored, all themembers rejoice with it. 12.27 Now you are the body of Christ, and members individually. 12.28 God has set some in the assembly: first apostles, secondprophets, third teachers, then miracle workers, then gifts of healings,helps, governments, and various kinds of languages. 12.29 Are allapostles? Are all prophets? Are all teachers? Are all miracle workers? 12.30 Do all have gifts of healings? Do all speak with variouslanguages? Do all interpret?'' None
34. New Testament, 1 Thessalonians, 1.10 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Judgment, final universal • Repentance, universal • universality

 Found in books: Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 324; Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 634

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1.10 καὶ ἀναμένειν τὸν υἱὸν αὐτοῦ ἐκ τῶν οὐρανῶν, ὃν ἤγειρεν ἐκ τῶν νεκρῶν, Ἰησοῦν τὸν ῥυόμενον ἡμᾶς ἐκ τῆς ὀργῆς τῆς ἐρχομένης.'' None
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1.10 and to wait for his Son from heaven, whom he raised from the dead -- Jesus, who delivers us from the wrath to come. '' None
35. New Testament, 2 Peter, 3.11-3.12 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Universe, harmony of the • universe, destruction of

 Found in books: O'Daly (2020), Augustine's City of God: A Reader's Guide (2nd edn), 246; Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 233

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3.11 Τούτων οὕτως πάντων λυομένων ποταποὺς δεῖ ὑπάρχειν ὑμᾶς ἐν ἁγίαις ἀναστροφαῖς καὶ εὐσεβείαις, 3.12 προσδοκῶντας καὶ σπεύδοντας τὴν παρουσίαν τῆς τοῦ θεοῦ ἡμέρας, διʼ ἣνοὐρανοὶπυρούμενοι λυθήσονται καὶ στοιχεῖα καυσούμενα τήκεται·'' None
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3.11 Therefore since all these things are thus to be destroyed, what manner of persons ought you to be in holy living and godliness, 3.12 looking for and earnestly desiring the coming of the day of God, by reason of which the heavens being on fire will be dissolved, and the elements will melt with fervent heat? '' None
36. New Testament, 2 Thessalonians, 2.6-2.8 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • universality • universe, destruction of

 Found in books: Lynskey (2021), Tyconius’ Book of Rules: An Ancient Invitation to Ecclesial Hermeneutics, 287, 288; O'Daly (2020), Augustine's City of God: A Reader's Guide (2nd edn), 246

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2.6 καὶ νῦν τὸ κατέχον οἴδατε, εἰς τὸ ἀποκαλυφθῆναι αὐτὸν ἐν τῷ αὐτοῦ καιρῷ· 2.7 τὸ γὰρ μυστήριον ἤδη ἐνεργεῖται τῆς ἀνομίας· μόνον ὁ κατέχων ἄρτι ἕως ἐκ μέσου γένηται. 2.8 καὶ τότε ἀποκαλυφθήσεταιὁ ἄνομος,ὃν ὁ κύριος Ἰησοῦςἀνελεῖ τῷ πνεύματι τοῦ στόματος αὐτοῦκαὶ καταργήσει τῇ ἐπιφανείᾳ τῆς παρουσίας αὐτοῦ,'' None
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2.6 Now you know what is restraining him, to the end that he may be revealed in his own season. 2.7 For the mystery of lawlessness already works. Only there is one who restrains now, until he is taken out of the way. 2.8 Then the lawless one will be revealed, whom the Lord will kill with the breath of his mouth, and bring to nothing by the brightness of his coming; '' None
37. New Testament, Acts, 1.8, 2.17, 2.23-2.24, 2.32, 2.36-2.39, 3.13-3.15, 3.17-3.21, 3.26, 5.30-5.31, 8.12, 8.22, 8.26-8.39, 9.10, 9.15, 9.17-9.18, 10.19, 10.42, 13.27, 14.15-14.16, 15.29, 16.16-16.18, 17.16-17.33, 19.28, 19.35, 20.32, 21.4, 21.11, 28.25-28.28 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Acts and universalism • Church, universal • God and the universe • Holy Spirit, Ethnic universalism • Holy Spirit, Geographic universalism • Judgment, final universal • Repentance, universal • Stephen speech forecasts universal mission • Universe • Universe, single cause • church (ejkklhsiva), local and universal • restoration, universal • universal polytheism • universalism • universality • university

 Found in books: Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 129, 186, 260, 261, 262, 265, 310, 311, 324; Despotis and Lohr (2022), Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions, 259; Hayes (2015), What's Divine about Divine Law?: Early Perspectives, 150; Lieu (2004), Christian Identity in the Jewish and Graeco-Roman World, 234; Matthews (2010), Perfect Martyr: The Stoning of Stephen and the Construction of Christian Identity, 28, 32, 33, 41, 42; Novenson (2020), Monotheism and Christology in Greco-Roman Antiquity, 49; Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 586, 587, 588, 589, 631, 634; Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 160, 187; Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 7, 144; Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020), Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity, 11, 176

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1.8 ἀλλὰ λήμψεσθε δύναμιν ἐπελθόντος τοῦ ἁγίου πνεύματος ἐφʼ ὑμᾶς, καὶ ἔσεσθέ μου μάρτυρες ἔν τε Ἰερουσαλὴμ καὶ ἐν πάσῃ τῇ Ἰουδαίᾳ καὶ Σαμαρίᾳ καὶ ἕως ἐσχάτου τῆς γῆς.
2.17

2.23
τοῦτον τῇ ὡρισμένῃ βουλῇ καὶ προγνώσει τοῦ θεοῦ ἔκδοτον διὰ χειρὸς ἀνόμων προσπήξαντες ἀνείλατε, 2.24 ὃν ὁ θεὸς ἀνέστησεν λύσας τὰς ὠδῖνας τοῦ θανάτου, καθότι οὐκ ἦν δυνατὸν κρατεῖσθαι αὐτὸν ὑπʼ αὐτοῦ·
2.32
τοῦτον τὸν Ἰησοῦν ἀνέστησεν ὁ θεός, οὗ πάντες ἡμεῖς ἐσμὲν μάρτυρες.
2.36
ἀσφαλῶς οὖν γινωσκέτω πᾶς οἶκος Ἰσραὴλ ὅτι καὶ κύριον αὐτὸν καὶ χριστὸν ἐποίησεν ὁ θεός, τοῦτον τὸν Ἰησοῦν ὃν ὑμεῖς ἐσταυρώσατε. 2.37 Ἀκούσαντες δὲ κατενύγησαν τὴν καρδίαν, εἶπάν τε πρὸς τὸν Πέτρον καὶ τοὺς λοιποὺς ἀποστόλους Τί ποιήσωμεν, 2.38 ἄνδρες ἀδελφοί; Πέτρος δὲ πρὸς αὐτούς Μετανοήσατε, καὶ βαπτισθήτω ἕκαστος ὑμῶν ἐν τῷ ὀνόματι Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ εἰς ἄφεσιν τῶν ἁμαρτιῶν ὑμῶν, καὶ λήμψεσθε τὴν δωρεὰν τοῦ ἁγίου πνεύματος· 2.39 ὑμῖν γάρ ἐστιν ἡ ἐπαγγελία καὶ τοῖς τέκνοις ὑμῶν καὶ πᾶσι τοῖς εἰς μακρὰν ὅσους ἂν προσκαλέσηται Κύριος ὁ θεὸς ἡμῶν.
3.13
αὐτόν; ὁ θεὸς Ἀβραὰμ καὶ Ἰσαὰκ καὶ Ἰακώβ, ὁ θεὸς τῶν πατέρων ἡμῶν, ἐδόξασεν τὸν παῖδα αὐτοῦ Ἰησοῦν, ὃν ὑμεῖς μὲν παρεδώκατε καὶ ἠρνήσασθε κατὰ πρόσωπον Πειλάτου, κρίναντος ἐκείνου ἀπολύειν· 3.14 ὑμεῖς δὲ τὸν ἅγιον καὶ δίκαιον ἠρνήσασθε, καὶ ᾐτήσασθε ἄνδρα φονέα χαρισθῆναι ὑμῖν, 3.15 τὸν δὲ ἀρχηγὸν τῆς ζωῆς ἀπεκτείνατε, ὃν ὁ θεὸς ἤγειρεν ἐκ νεκρῶν, οὗ ἡμεῖς μάρτυρές ἐσμεν.
3.17
καὶ νῦν, ἀδελφοί, οἶδα ὅτι κατὰ ἄγνοιαν ἐπράξατε, ὥσπερ καὶ οἱ ἄρχοντες ὑμῶν· 3.18 ὁ δὲ θεὸς ἃ προκατήγγειλεν διὰ στόματος πάντων τῶν προφητῶν παθεῖν τὸν χριστὸν αὐτοῦ ἐπλήρωσεν οὕτως. 3.19 μετανοήσατε οὖν καὶ ἐπιστρέψατε πρὸς τὸ ἐξαλιφθῆναι ὑμῶν τὰς ἁμαρτίας, 3.20 ὅπως ὒν ἔλθωσιν καιροὶ ἀναψύξεως ἀπὸ προσώπου τοῦ κυρίου καὶ ἀποστείλῃ τὸν προκεχειρισμένον ὑμῖν χριστὸν Ἰησοῦν, 3.21 ἃν δεῖ οὐρανὸν μὲν δέξασθαι ἄχρι χρόνων ἀποκαταστάσεως πάντων ὧν ἐλάλησεν ὁ θεὸς διὰ στόματος τῶν ἁγίων ἀπʼ αἰῶνος αὐτοῦ προφητῶν.
3.26
ὑμῖν πρῶτον ἀναστήσας ὁ θεὸς τὸν παῖδα αὐτοῦ ἀπέστειλεν αὐτὸν εὐλογοῦντα ὑμᾶς ἐν τῷ ἀποστρέφειν ἕκαστον ἀπὸ τῶν πονηριῶν ὑμῶν.
5.30
ὁ θεὸς τῶν πατέρων ἡμῶν ἤγειρεν Ἰησοῦν, ὃν ὑμεῖς διεχειρίσασθεκρεμάσαντες ἐπὶ ξύλου· 5.31 τοῦτον ὁ θεὸς ἀρχηγὸν καὶ σωτῆρα ὕψωσεν τῇ δεξιᾷ αὐτοῦ, τοῦ δοῦναι μετάνοιαν τῷ Ἰσραὴλ καὶ ἄφεσιν ἁμαρτιῶν·
8.12
ὅτε δὲ ἐπίστευσαν τῷ Φιλίππῳ εὐαγγελιζομένῳ περὶ τῆς βασιλείας τοῦ θεοῦ καὶ τοῦ ὀνόματος Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ, ἐβαπτίζοντο ἄνδρες τε καὶ γυναῖκες.
8.22
μετανόησον οὖν ἀπὸ τῆς κακίας σου ταύτης, καὶ δεήθητι τοῦ κυρίου εἰ ἄρα ἀφεθήσεταί σοι ἡ ἐπίνοια τῆς καρδίας σου·
8.26
Ἄγγελος δὲ Κυρίου ἐλάλησεν πρὸς Φίλιππον λέγων Ἀνάστηθι καὶ πορεύου κατὰ μεσημβρίαν ἐπὶ τὴν ὁδὸν τὴν καταβαίνουσαν ἀπὸ Ἰερουσαλὴμ εἰς Γάζαν· αὕτη ἐστὶν ἔρημος. 8.27 καὶ ἀναστὰς ἐπορεύθη, καὶ ἰδοὺ ἀνὴρ Αἰθίοψ εὐνοῦχος δυνάστης Κανδάκης βασιλίσσης Αἰθιόπων, ὃς ἦν ἐπὶ πάσης τῆς γάζης αὐτῆς, ὃς ἐληλύθει προσκυνήσων εἰς Ἰερουσαλήμ, 8.28 ἦν δὲ ὑποστρέφων καὶ καθήμενος ἐπὶ τοῦ ἅρματος αὐτοῦ καὶ ἀνεγίνωσκεν τὸν προφήτην Ἠσαίαν. 8.29 εἶπεν δὲ τὸ πνεῦμα τῷ Φιλίππῳ Πρόσελθε καὶ κολλήθητι τῷ ἅρματι τούτῳ. 8.30 προσδραμὼν δὲ ὁ Φίλιππος ἤκουσεν αὐτοῦ ἀναγινώσκοντος Ἠσαίαν τὸν προφήτην, καὶ εἶπεν Ἆρά γε γινώσκεις ἃ ἀναγινώσκεις; 8.31 ὁ δὲ εἶπεν Πῶς γὰρ ἂν δυναίμην ἐὰν μή τις ὁδηγήσει με; παρεκάλεσέν τε τὸνΦίλιππον ἀναβάντα καθίσαι σὺν αὐτῷ. 8.32 ἡ δὲ περιοχὴ τῆς γραφῆς ἣν ἀνεγίνωσκεν ἦν αὕτη 8.34 ἀποκριθεὶς δὲ ὁ εὐνοῦχος τῷ Φιλίππῳ εἶπεν Δέομαί σου, περὶ τίνος ὁ προφήτης λέγει τοῦτο; περὶ ἑαυτοῦ ἢ περὶ ἑτέρου τινός; 8.35 ἀνοίξας δὲ ὁ Φίλιππος τὸ στόμα αὐτοῦ καὶ ἀρξάμενος ἀπὸ τῆς γραφῆς ταύτης εὐηγγελίσατο αὐτῷ τὸν Ἰησοῦν. 8.36 ὡς δὲ ἐπορεύοντο κατὰ τὴν ὁδόν, ἦλθον ἐπί τι ὕδωρ, καί φησιν ὁ εὐνοῦχος Ἰδοὺ ὕδωρ· τί κωλύει με βαπτισθῆναι; 8.38 καὶ ἐκέλευσεν στῆναι τὸ ἅρμα, καὶ κατέ βησαν ἀμφότεροι εἰς τὸ ὕδωρ ὅ τε Φίλιππος καὶ ὁ εὐνοῦχος, καὶ ἐβάπτισεν αὐτόν. 8.39 ὅτε δὲ ἀνέβησαν ἐκ τοῦ ὕδατος, πνεῦμα Κυρίου ἥρπασεν τὸν Φίλιππον, καὶ οὐκ εἶδεν αὐτὸν οὐκέτι ὁ εὐνοῦχος, ἐπορεύετο γὰρ τὴν ὁδὸν αὐτοῦ χαίρων.
9.10
Ἦν δέ τις μαθητὴς ἐν Δαμασκῷ ὀνόματι Ἁνανίας, καὶ εἶπεν πρὸς αὐτὸν ἐν ὁράματι ὁ κύριος Ἁνανία. ὁ δὲ εἶπεν Ἰδοὺ ἐγώ, κύριε.
9.15
εἶπεν δὲ πρὸς αὐτὸν ὁ κύριος Πορεύου, ὅτι σκεῦος ἐκλογῆς ἐστίν μοι οὗτος τοῦ βαστάσαι τὸ ὄνομά μου ἐνώπιον τῶν ἐθνῶν τε καὶ βασιλέων υἱῶν τε Ἰσραήλ,
9.17
Ἀπῆλθεν δὲ Ἁνανίας καὶ εἰσῆλθεν εἰς τὴν οἰκίαν, καὶ ἐπιθεὶς ἐπʼ αὐτὸν τὰς χεῖρας εἶπεν Σαοὺλ ἀδελφέ, ὁ κύριος ἀπέσταλκέν με, Ἰησοῦς ὁ ὀφθείς σοι ἐν τῇ ὁδῷ ᾗ ἤρχου, ὅπως ἀναβλέψῃς καὶ πλησθῇς πνεύματος ἁγίου. 9.18 καὶ εὐθέως ἀπέπεσαν αὐτοῦ ἀπὸ τῶν ὀφθαλμῶν ὡς λεπίδες, ἀνέβλεψέν τε, καὶ ἀναστὰς ἐβαπτίσθη,
10.19
Τοῦ δὲ Πέτρου διενθυμουμένου περὶ τοῦ ὁράματος εἴπεν τὸ πνεῦμα Ἰδοὺ ἄνδρες δύο ζητοῦντές σε·
10.42
καὶ παρήγγειλεν ἡμῖν κηρύξαι τῷ λαῷ καὶ διαμαρτύρασθαι ὅτι οὗτός ἐστιν ὁ ὡρισμένος ὑπὸ τοῦ θεοῦ κριτὴς ζώντων καὶ νεκρῶν.
13.27
οἱ γὰρ κατοικουlt*gtντες ἐν Ἰερουσαλὴμ καὶ οἱ ἄρχοντες αὐτῶν τοῦτον ἀγνοήσαντες καὶ τὰς φωνὰς τῶν προφητῶν τὰς κατὰ πᾶν σάββατον ἀναγινωσκομένας κρίναντες ἐπλήρωσαν,
14.15
καὶ λέγοντες Ἄνδρες, τί ταῦτα ποιεῖτε; καὶ ἡμεῖς ὁμοιοπαθεῖς ἐσμ ὑμῖν ἄνθρωποι, εὐαγγελιζόμενοι ὑμᾶς ἀπὸ τούτων τῶν ματαίων ἐπιστρέφειν ἐπὶ θεὸν ζῶντα ὃς ἐποίησεν τὸν οὐρανὸν καὶ τὴν γῆν καὶ τὴν θάλασσαν καὶ πάντα τὰ ἐν αὐτοῖς· 14.16 ὃς ἐν ταῖς παρῳχημέναις γενεαῖς εἴασεν πάντα τὰ ἔθνη πορεύεσθαι ταῖς ὁδοῖς αὐτῶν·
15.29
ἐξ ὧν διατηροῦντες ἑαυτοὺς εὖ πράξετε. Ἔρρωσθε.
16.16
Ἐγένετο δὲ πορευομένων ἡμῶν εἰς τὴν προσευχὴν παιδίσκην τινὰ ἔχουσαν πνεῦμα πύθωνα ὑπαντῆσαι ἡμῖν, ἥτις ἐργασίαν πολλὴν παρεῖχεν τοῖς κυρίοις 16.17 αὐτῆς μαντευομένη· αὕτη κατακολουθοῦσα τῷ Παύλῳ καὶ ἡμῖν ἔκραζεν λέγουσα Οὗτοι οἱ ἄνθρωποι δοῦλοι τοῦ θεοῦ τοῦ ὑψίστου εἰσίν, οἵτινες καταγγέλλουσιν ὑμῖν ὁδὸν σωτηρίας. 16.18 τοῦτο δὲ ἐποίει ἐπὶ πολλὰς ἡμέρας. διαπονηθεὶς δὲ Παῦλος καὶ ἐπιστρέψας τῷ πνεύματι εἶπεν Παραγγέλλω σοι ἐν ὀνόματι Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ ἐξελθεῖν ἀπʼ αὐτῆς· καὶ ἐξῆλθεν αὐτῇ τῇ ὥρᾳ.
17.16
Ἐν δὲ ταῖς Ἀθήναις ἐκδεχομένου αὐτοὺς τοῦ Παύλου, παρωξύνετο τὸ πνεῦμα αὐτοῦ ἐν αὐτῷ θεωροῦντος κατείδωλον οὖσαν τὴν πόλιν. 17.17 διελέγετο μὲν οὖν ἐν τῇ συναγωγῇ τοῖς Ἰουδαίοις καὶ τοῖς σεβομένοις καὶ ἐν τῇ ἀγορᾷ κατὰ πᾶσαν ἡμέραν πρὸς τοὺς παρατυγχάνοντας. 17.18 τινὲς δὲ καὶ τῶν Ἐπικουρίων καὶ Στωικῶν φιλοσόφων συνέβαλλον αὐτῷ, καί τινες ἔλεγον Τί ἂν θέλοι ὁ σπερμολόγος οὗτος λέγειν; οἱ δέ Ξένων δαιμονίων δοκεῖ καταγγελεὺς εἶναι· 17.19 ὅτι τὸν Ἰησοῦν καὶ τὴν ἀνάστασιν εὐηγγελίζετο. ἐπιλαβόμενοι δὲ αὐτοῦ ἐπὶ τὸν Ἄρειον Πάγον ἤγαγον, λέγοντες Δυνάμεθα γνῶναι τίς ἡ καινὴ αὕτη ἡ ὑπὸ σοῦ λαλουμένη διδαχή; 17.20 ξενίζοντα γάρ τινα εἰσφέρεις εἰς τὰς ἀκοὰς ἡμῶν·βουλόμεθα οὖν γνῶναι τίνα θέλει ταῦτα εἶναι. 17.21 Ἀθηναῖοι δὲ πάντες καὶ οἱ ἐπιδημοῦντες ξένοι εἰς οὐδὲν ἕτερον ηὐκαίρουν ἢ λέγειν τι ἢ ἀκούειν τι καινότερον. 17.22 σταθεὶς δὲ Παῦλος ἐν μέσῳ τοῦ Ἀρείου Πάγου ἔφη Ἄνδρες Ἀθηναῖοι, κατὰ πάντα ὡς δεισιδαιμονεστέρους ὑμᾶς θεωρῶ· 17.23 διερχόμενος γὰρ καὶ ἀναθεωρῶν τὰ σεβάσματα ὑμῶν εὗρον καὶ βωμὸν ἐν ᾧ ἐπεγέγραπτο ΑΓΝΩΣΤΩ ΘΕΩ. ὃ οὖν ἀγνοοῦντες εὐσεβεῖτε, τοῦτο ἐγὼ καταγγέλλω ὑμῖν. 17.24 ὁ θεὸς ὁ ποιήσας τὸν κόσμον καὶ πάντατὰ ἐν αὐτῷ, οὗτος οὐρανοῦ καὶ γῆς ὑπάρχων κύριος οὐκ ἐν χειροποιήτοις ναοῖς κατοικεῖ 17.25 οὐδὲ ὑπὸ χειρῶν ἀνθρωπίνων θεραπεύεται προσδεόμενός τινος, αὐτὸςδιδοὺς πᾶσι ζωὴν καὶ πνοὴν καὶ τὰ πάντα· 17.26 ἐποίησέν τε ἐξ ἑνὸς πᾶν ἔθνος ανθρώπων κατοικεῖν ἐπὶ παντὸς προσώπου τῆς γῆς, ὁρίσας προστεταγμένους καιροὺς καὶ τὰς ὁροθεσίας τῆς κατοικίας αὐτῶν, 17.27 ζητεῖν τὸν θεὸν εἰ ἄρα γε ψηλαφήσειαν αὐτὸν καὶ εὕροιεν, καί γε οὐ μακρὰν ἀπὸ ἑνὸς ἑκάστου ἡμῶν ὑπάρχοντα. 17.28 ἐν αὐτῷ γὰρ ζῶμεν καὶ κινούμεθα καὶ ἐσμέν, ὡς καί τινες τῶν καθʼ ὑμᾶς ποιητῶν εἰρήκασιν 17.29 γένος οὖν ὑπάρχοντες τοῦ θεοῦ οὐκ ὀφείλομεν νομίζειν χρυσῷ ἢ ἀργύρῳ ἢ λίθῳ, χαράγματι τέχνής καὶ ἐνθυμήσεως ἀνθρώπου, τὸ θεῖον εἶναι ὅμοιον. 17.30 τοὺς μὲν οὖν χρόνους τῆς ἀγνοίας ὑπεριδὼν ὁ θεὸς τὰ νῦν ἀπαγγέλλει τοῖς ἀνθρώποις πάντας πανταχοῦ μετανοεῖν, 17.31 καθότι ἔστησεν ἡμέραν ἐν ᾗ μέλλει κρίνειν τὴν οἰκουμένην ἐν δικαιοσύνῃ ἐν ἀνδρὶ ᾧ ὥρισεν, πίστιν παρασχὼν πᾶσιν ἀναστήσας αὐτὸν ἐκ νεκρῶν. 17.32 ἀκούσαντες δὲ ἀνάστασιν νεκρῶν οἱ μὲν ἐχλεύαζον οἱ δὲ εἶπαν Ἀκουσόμεθά σου περὶ τούτου καὶ πάλιν. 17.33 οὕτως ὁ Παῦλος ἐξῆλθεν ἐκ μέσου αὐτῶν·
19.28
ἀκούσαντες δὲ καὶ γενόμενοι πλήρεις θυμοῦ ἔκραζον λέγοντες Μεγάλη ἡ Ἄρτεμις Ἐφεσίων.
19.35
καταστείλας δὲ τὸν ὄχλον ὁ γραμματεύς φησιν Ἄνδρες Ἐφέσιοι, τίς γάρ ἐστιν ἀνθρώπων ὃς οὐ γινώσκει τὴν Ἐφεσίων πόλιν νεωκόρον οὖσαν τῆς μεγάλης Ἀρτέμιδος καὶ τοῦ διοπετοῦς;
20.32
καὶ τὰ νῦν παρατίθεμαι ὑμᾶς τῷ κυρίῳ καὶ τῷ λόγῳ τῆς χάριτος αὐτοῦ τῷ δυναμένῳ οἰκοδομῆσαι καὶ δοῦναι τὴν κληρονομίαν ἐν τοῖς ἡγιασμένοις πᾶσιν.
21.4
ἀνευρόντες δὲ τοὺς μαθητὰς ἐπεμείναμεν αὐτοῦ ἡμέρας ἑπτά, οἵτινες τῷ Παύλῳ ἔλεγον διὰ τοῦ πνεύματος μὴ ἐπιβαίνειν εἰς Ἰεροσόλυμα.
21.11
καὶ ἐλθὼν πρὸς ἡμᾶς καὶ ἄρας τὴν ζώνην τοῦ Παύλου δήσας ἑαυτοῦ τοὺς πόδας καὶ τὰς χεῖρας εἶπεν Τάδε λέγει τὸ πνεῦμα τὸ ἅγιον Τὸν ἄνδρα οὗ ἐστὶν ἡ ζώνη αὕτη οὕτως δήσουσιν ἐν Ἰερουσαλὴμ οἱ Ἰουδαῖοι καὶ παραδώσουσιν εἰς χεῖρας ἐθνῶν.
28.25
ἀσύμφωνοι δὲ ὄντες πρὸς ἀλλήλους ἀπελύοντο, εἰπόντος τοῦ Παύλου ῥῆμα ἓν ὅτι Καλῶς τὸ πνεῦμα τὸ ἅγιον ἐλάλησεν διὰ Ἠσαίου τοῦ προφήτου πρὸς τοὺς πατέρας ὑμῶν 2
8.26
λέγων 28.28 γνωστὸν οὖν ὑμῖν ἔστω ὅτι τοῖς ἔθνεσιν ἀπεστάλη τοῦτο τὸ σωτήριον τοῦ θεοῦ· αὐτοὶ καὶ ἀκούσονται.' ' None
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1.8 But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come on you. You will be witnesses to me in Jerusalem, in all Judea and Samaria, and to the uttermost parts of the earth."' "
2.17
'It will be in the last days, says God, I will pour out my Spirit on all flesh. Your sons and your daughters will prophesy. Your young men will see visions. Your old men will dream dreams. " 2.23 him, being delivered up by the determined counsel and foreknowledge of God, you have taken by the hand of lawless men, crucified and killed; 2.24 whom God raised up, having freed him from the agony of death, because it was not possible that he should be held by it.
2.32
This Jesus God raised up, whereof we all are witnesses.
2.36
"Let all the house of Israel therefore know assuredly that God has made him both Lord and Christ, this Jesus whom you crucified." 2.37 Now when they heard this, they were cut to the heart, and said to Peter and the rest of the apostles, "Brothers, what shall we do?" 2.38 Peter said to them, "Repent, and be baptized, everyone of you, in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of sins, and you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit. 2.39 For to you is the promise, and to your children, and to all who are far off, even as many as the Lord our God will call to himself."
3.13
The God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, the God of our fathers, has glorified his Servant Jesus, whom you delivered up, and denied before the face of Pilate, when he had determined to release him. 3.14 But you denied the Holy and Righteous One, and asked for a murderer to be granted to you, 3.15 and killed the Prince of life, whom God raised from the dead, whereof we are witnesses.
3.17
"Now, brothers, I know that you did this in ignorance, as did also your rulers. 3.18 But the things which God announced by the mouth of all his prophets, that Christ should suffer, he thus fulfilled. 3.19 "Repent therefore, and turn again, that your sins may be blotted out, that so there may come times of refreshing from the presence of the Lord, 3.20 and that he may send Christ Jesus, who was ordained for you before, 3.21 whom the heaven must receive until the times of restoration of all things, whereof God spoke by the mouth of his holy prophets that have been from ancient times.
3.26
God, having raised up his servant, Jesus, sent him to you first, to bless you, in turning away everyone of you from your wickedness."
5.30
The God of our fathers raised up Jesus, whom you killed, hanging him on a tree. 5.31 God exalted him with his right hand to be a Prince and a Savior, to give repentance to Israel, and remission of sins.
8.12
But when they believed Philip preaching good news concerning the Kingdom of God and the name of Jesus Christ, they were baptized, both men and women.
8.22
Repent therefore of this, your wickedness, and ask God if perhaps the thought of your heart may be forgiven you.
8.26
But an angel of the Lord spoke to Philip, saying, "Arise, and go toward the south to the way that goes down from Jerusalem to Gaza. This is a desert." 8.27 He arose and went. Behold, there was a man of Ethiopia, a eunuch of great authority under Candace, queen of the Ethiopians, who was over all her treasure, who had come to Jerusalem to worship. 8.28 He was returning and sitting in his chariot, and was reading the prophet Isaiah. 8.29 The Spirit said to Philip, "Go near, and join yourself to this chariot." 8.30 Philip ran to him, and heard him reading Isaiah the prophet, and said, "Do you understand what you are reading?" 8.31 He said, "How can I, unless someone explains it to me?" He begged Philip to come up and sit with him. 8.32 Now the passage of the Scripture which he was reading was this, "He was led as a sheep to the slaughter. As a lamb before his shearer is silent, So he doesn\'t open his mouth. 8.33 In his humiliation, his judgment was taken away. Who will declare His generations? For his life is taken from the earth." 8.34 The eunuch answered Philip, "Please tell who the prophet is talking about: about himself, or about some other?" 8.35 Philip opened his mouth, and beginning from this Scripture, preached to him Jesus. 8.36 As they went on the way, they came to some water, and the eunuch said, "Behold, here is water. What is keeping me from being baptized?" 8.37 8.38 He commanded the chariot to stand still, and they both went down into the water, both Philip and the eunuch, and he baptized him. ' "8.39 When they came up out of the water, the Spirit of the Lord caught Philip away, and the eunuch didn't see him any more, for he went on his way rejoicing. " 9.10 Now there was a certain disciple at Damascus named Aias. The Lord said to him in a vision, "Aias!"He said, "Behold, it\'s me, Lord."
9.15
But the Lord said to him, "Go your way, for he is my chosen vessel to bear my name before the nations and kings, and the children of Israel.
9.17
Aias departed, and entered into the house. Laying his hands on him, he said, "Brother Saul, the Lord, who appeared to you in the way which you came, has sent me, that you may receive your sight, and be filled with the Holy Spirit." 9.18 Immediately something like scales fell from his eyes, and he received his sight. He arose and was baptized.
10.19
While Peter thought about the vision, the Spirit said to him, "Behold, three men seek you.
10.42
He charged us to preach to the people and to testify that this is he who is appointed by God as the Judge of the living and the dead. ' "
13.27
For those who dwell in Jerusalem, and their rulers, because they didn't know him, nor the voices of the prophets which are read every Sabbath, fulfilled them by condemning him. " 14.15 "Men, why are you doing these things? We also are men of like passions with you, and bring you good news, that you should turn from these vain things to the living God, who made the sky and the earth and the sea, and all that is in them; 14.16 who in the generations gone by allowed all the nations to walk in their own ways.
15.29
that you abstain from things sacrificed to idols, from blood, from things strangled, and from sexual immorality, from which if you keep yourselves, it will be well with you. Farewell."
16.16
It happened, as we were going to prayer, that a certain girl having a spirit of divination met us, who brought her masters much gain by fortune telling. 16.17 The same, following after Paul and us, cried out, "These men are servants of the Most High God, who proclaim to us the way of salvation!" 16.18 This she did for many days. But Paul, becoming greatly annoyed, turned and said to the spirit, "I charge you in the name of Jesus Christ to come out of her!" It came out that very hour.
17.16
Now while Paul waited for them at Athens, his spirit was provoked within him as he saw the city full of idols. 17.17 So he reasoned in the synagogue with Jews and the devout persons, and in the marketplace every day with those who met him. 17.18 Some of the Epicurean and Stoic philosophers also encountered him. Some said, "What does this babbler want to say?"Others said, "He seems to be advocating foreign demons," because he preached Jesus and the resurrection. 17.19 They took hold of him, and brought him to the Areopagus, saying, "May we know what this new teaching is, which is spoken by you? 17.20 For you bring certain strange things to our ears. We want to know therefore what these things mean." 17.21 Now all the Athenians and the strangers living there spent their time in nothing else, but either to tell or to hear some new thing. 17.22 Paul stood in the midst of the Areopagus, and said, "You men of Athens, I perceive that you are very religious in all things. ' "17.23 For as I passed along, and observed the objects of your worship, I found also an altar with this inscription: 'TO AN UNKNOWN GOD.' What therefore you worship in ignorance, this I announce to you. " '17.24 The God who made the world and all things in it, he, being Lord of heaven and earth, dwells not in temples made with hands, ' "17.25 neither is he served by men's hands, as though he needed anything, seeing he himself gives to all life and breath, and all things. " '17.26 He made from one blood every nation of men to dwell on all the surface of the earth, having determined appointed seasons, and the bounds of their habitation, 17.27 that they should seek the Lord, if perhaps they might reach out for him and find him, though he is not far from each one of us. ' "17.28 'For in him we live, and move, and have our being.' As some of your own poets have said, 'For we are also his offspring.' " '17.29 Being then the offspring of God, we ought not to think that the Divine Nature is like gold, or silver, or stone, engraved by art and device of man. 17.30 The times of ignorance therefore God overlooked. But now he commands that all men everywhere should repent, 17.31 because he has appointed a day in which he will judge the world in righteousness by the man whom he has ordained; whereof he has given assurance to all men, in that he has raised him from the dead." 17.32 Now when they heard of the resurrection of the dead, some mocked; but others said, "We want to hear you yet again concerning this." 17.33 Thus Paul went out from among them.
19.28
When they heard this they were filled with anger, and cried out, saying, "Great is Artemis of the Ephesians!"
19.35
When the town clerk had quieted the multitude, he said, "You men of Ephesus, what man is there who doesn\'t know that the city of the Ephesians is temple-keeper of the great goddess Artemis, and of the image which fell down from Zeus?
20.32
Now, brothers, I entrust you to God, and to the word of his grace, which is able to build up, and to give you the inheritance among all those who are sanctified.
21.4
Having found disciples, we stayed there seven days. These said to Paul through the Spirit, that he should not go up to Jerusalem.
21.11
Coming to us, and taking Paul\'s belt, he bound his own feet and hands, and said, "Thus says the Holy Spirit: \'So will the Jews at Jerusalem bind the man who owns this belt, and will deliver him into the hands of the Gentiles.\'"
28.25
When they didn\'t agree among themselves, they departed after Paul had spoken one word, "The Holy Spirit spoke well through Isaiah, the prophet, to our fathers, ' "2
8.26
saying, 'Go to this people, and say, In hearing, you will hear, And will in no way understand. In seeing, you will see, And will in no way perceive. " "28.27 For this people's heart has grown callous. Their ears are dull of hearing. Their eyes they have closed. Lest they should see with their eyes, Hear with their ears, Understand with their heart, And would turn again, And I would heal them.' " '28.28 "Be it known therefore to you, that the salvation of God is sent to the Gentiles. They will also hear."' ' None
38. New Testament, Colossians, 1.15-1.22 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • church (universal), • soteriology, as universal • universal law • universe

 Found in books: Despotis and Lohr (2022), Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions, 207; Heo (2023), Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages. 78; Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 121, 122; Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 451

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1.15 ὅς ἐστιν εἰκὼν τοῦ θεοῦ τοῦ ἀοράτου, πρωτότοκος πάσης κτίσεως, 1.16 ὅτι ἐν αὐτῷ ἐκτίσθη τὰ πάντα ἐν τοῖς οὐρανοῖς καὶ ἐπὶ τῆς γῆς, τὰ ὁρατὰ καὶ τὰ ἀόρατα, εἴτε θρόνοι εἴτε κυριότητες εἴτε ἀρχαὶ εἴτε ἐξουσίαι· τὰ πάντα διʼ αὐτοῦ καὶ εἰς αὐτὸν ἔκτισται· 1.17 καὶ αὐτὸς ἔστιν πρὸ πάντων καὶ τὰ πάντα ἐν αὐτῷ συνέστηκεν, 1.18 καὶ αὐτός ἐστιν ἡ κεφαλὴ τοῦ σώματος, τῆς ἐκκλησίας· ὅς ἐστιν ἡ ἀρχή, πρωτότοκος ἐκ τῶν νεκρῶν, ἵνα γένηται ἐν πᾶσιν αὐτὸς πρωτεύων, 1.19 ὅτι ἐν αὐτῷ εὐδόκησεν πᾶν τὸ πλήρωμα κατοικῆσαι 1.20 καὶ διʼ αὐτοῦ ἀποκαταλλάξαι τὰ πάντα εἰς αὐτόν, εἰρηνοποιήσας διὰ τοῦ αἵματος τοῦ σταυροῦ αὐτοῦ, διʼ αὐτοῦ εἴτε τὰ ἐπὶ τῆς γῆς εἴτε τὰ ἐν τοῖς οὐρανοῖς· 1.21 καὶ ὑμᾶς ποτὲ ὄντας ἀπηλλοτριωμένους καὶ ἐχθροὺς τῇ διανοίᾳ ἐν τοῖς ἔργοις τοῖς πονηροῖς, — 1.22 νυνὶ δὲ ἀποκατήλλαξεν ἐν τῷ σώματι τῆς σαρκὸς αὐτοῦ διὰ τοῦ θανάτου, — παραστῆσαι ὑμᾶς ἁγίους καὶ ἀμώμους καὶ ἀνεγκλήτους κατενώπιον αὐτοῦ,'' None
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1.15 who is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of all creation. 1.16 For by him were all things created, in the heavens and on the earth, things visible and things invisible, whether thrones or dominions or principalities or powers; all things have been created through him, and for him. 1.17 He is before all things, and in him all things are held together. 1.18 He is the head of the body, the assembly, who is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead; that in all things he might have the preeminence. 1.19 For all the fullness was pleased to dwell in him; 1.20 and through him to reconcile all things to himself, having made peace through the blood of his cross. Through him, I say, whether things on the earth, or things in the heavens. 1.21 You, being in past times alienated and enemies in your mind in your evil works, 1.22 yet now he has reconciled in the body of his flesh through death, to present you holy and without blemish and blameless before him, '' None
39. New Testament, Ephesians, 1.22-1.23, 2.5-2.6, 2.11-2.22, 4.3-4.4, 4.6, 4.11, 4.13 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Church, universal • Fulfillment, universality of • Identity, and universal fulfillment • Paul, the apostle, universalism of • Universalism, Pauline • Universe, harmony of the • soteriology, as universal • universal intellect • universalism • universality • universality of the church

 Found in books: Black, Thomas, and Thompson (2022), Ephesos as a Religious Center under the Principate. 181, 182, 213; Dawson (2001), Christian Figural Reading and the Fashioning of Identity, 178; Langworthy (2019), Gregory of Nazianzus’ Soteriological Pneumatology, 64; Lynskey (2021), Tyconius’ Book of Rules: An Ancient Invitation to Ecclesial Hermeneutics, 246; Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 451; Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 25; Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 185, 244

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1.22 καὶ πάντα ὑπέταξεν ὑπὸ τοὺς πόδας αὐτοῦ, καὶ αὐτὸν ἔδωκεν κεφαλὴν ὑπὲρ πάντα τῇ ἐκκλησίᾳ, 1.23 ἥτις ἐστὶν τὸ σῶμα αὐτοῦ, τὸ πλήρωμα τοῦ τὰ πάντα ἐν πᾶσιν πληρουμένου.
2.5
καὶ ὄντας ἡμᾶς νεκροὺς τοῖς παραπτώμασιν συνεζωοποίησεν τῷ χριστῷ,— χάριτί ἐστε σεσωσμένοι, καὶ 2.6 — συνήγειρεν καὶ συνεκάθισεν ἐν τοῖς ἐπουρανίοις ἐν Χριστῷ Ἰησοῦ,
2.11
Διὸ μνημονεύετε ὅτι ποτὲ ὑμεῖς τὰ ἔθνη ἐν σαρκί, οἱ λεγόμενοι ἀκροβυστία ὑπὸ τῆς λεγομένης περιτομῆς ἐν σαρκὶ χειροποιήτου, 2.12 — ὅτι ἦτε τῷ καιρῷ ἐκείνῳ χωρὶς Χριστοῦ, ἀπηλλοτριωμένοι τῆς πολιτείας τοῦ Ἰσραὴλ καὶ ξένοι τῶν διαθηκῶν τῆς ἐπαγγελίας, ἐλπίδα μὴ ἔχοντες καὶ ἄθεοι ἐν τῷ κόσμῳ. 2.13 νυνὶ δὲ ἐν Χριστῷ Ἰησοῦ ὑμεῖς οἵ ποτε ὄντες μακρὰν ἐγενήθητε ἐγγὺς ἐν τῷ αἵματι τοῦ χριστοῦ. 2.14 Αὐτὸς γάρ ἐστιν ἡ εἰρήνη ἡμῶν, ὁ ποιήσας τὰ ἀμφότερα ἓν καὶ τὸ μεσότοιχον τοῦ φραγμοῦ λύσας, τὴν ἔχθραν 2.15 ἐν τῇ σαρκὶ αὐτοῦ, τὸν νόμον τῶν ἐντολῶν ἐν δόγμασιν καταργήσας, ἵνα τοὺς δύο κτίσῃ ἐν αὑτῷ εἰς ἕνα καινὸν ἄνθρωπον ποιῶν εἰρήνην, 2.16 καὶ ἀποκαταλλάξῃ τοὺς ἀμφοτέρους ἐν ἑνὶ σώματι τῷ θεῷ διὰ τοῦ σταυροῦ ἀποκτείνας τὴν ἔχθραν ἐν αὐτῷ· 2.17 καὶ ἐλθὼν εὐηγγελίσατο εἰρήνην ὑμῖν τοῖς μακρὰν καὶ εἰρήνην τοῖς ἐγγύς· 2.18 ὅτι διʼ αὐτοῦ ἔχομεν τὴν προσαγωγὴν οἱ ἀμφότεροι ἐν ἑνὶ πνεύματι πρὸς τὸν πατέρα. 2.19 Ἄρα οὖν οὐκέτι ἐστὲ ξένοι καὶ πάροικοι, ἀλλὰ ἐστὲ συνπολῖται τῶν ἁγίων καὶ οἰκεῖοι τοῦ θεοῦ, 2.20 ἐποικοδομηθέντες ἐπὶ τῷ θεμελίῳ τῶν ἀποστόλων καὶ προφητῶν, ὄντος ἀκρογωνιαίου αὐτοῦ Χριστοῦ Ἰησοῦ, 2.21 ἐν ᾧ πᾶσα οἰκοδομὴ συναρμολογουμένη αὔξει εἰς ναὸν ἅγιον ἐν κυρίῳ, 2.22 ἐν ᾧ καὶ ὑμεῖς συνοικοδομεῖσθε εἰς κατοικητήριον τοῦ θεοῦ ἐν πνεύματι.
4.3
σπουδάζοντες τηρεῖν τὴν ἑνότητα τοῦ πνεύματος ἐν τῷ συνδέσμῳ τῆς εἰρήνης· 4.4 ἓν σῶμα καὶ ἓν πνεῦμα, καθὼς καὶ ἐκλήθητε ἐν μιᾷ ἐλπίδι τῆς κλήσεως ὑμῶν·
4.6
ὁ ἐπὶ πάντων καὶ διὰ πάντων καὶ ἐν πᾶσιν.
4.11
καὶ αὐτὸς ἔδωκεν τοὺς μὲν ἀποστόλους, τοὺς δὲ προφήτας, τοὺς δὲ εὐαγγελιστάς, τοὺς δὲ ποιμένας καὶ διδασκάλους,
4.13
μέχρι καταντήσωμεν οἱ πάντες εἰς τὴν ἑνότητα τῆς πίστεως καὶ τῆς ἐπιγνώσεως τοῦ υἱοῦ τοῦ θεοῦ, εἰς ἄνδρα τέλειον, εἰς μέτρον ἡλικίας τοῦ πληρώματος τοῦ χριστοῦ,'' None
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1.22 He put all things in subjection under his feet, and gave him to be head over all things for the assembly, 1.23 which is his body, the fullness of him who fills all in all.
2.5
even when we were dead through our trespasses, made us alive together with Christ (by grace you have been saved), 2.6 and raised us up with him, and made us to sit with him in the heavenly places in Christ Jesus,
2.11
Therefore remember that once you, the Gentiles in the flesh, who are called "uncircumcision" by that which is called "circumcision," (in the flesh, made by hands); 2.12 that you were at that time separate from Christ, alienated from the commonwealth of Israel, and strangers from the covets of the promise, having no hope and without God in the world. 2.13 But now in Christ Jesus you who once were far off are made near in the blood of Christ. 2.14 For he is our peace, who made both one, and broke down the middle wall of partition, 2.15 having abolished in the flesh the hostility, the law of commandments contained in ordices, that he might create in himself one new man of the two, making peace; 2.16 and might reconcile them both in one body to God through the cross, having killed the hostility thereby. 2.17 He came and preached peace to you who were far off and to those who were near. 2.18 For through him we both have our access in one Spirit to the Father. 2.19 So then you are no longer strangers and sojourners, but you are fellow citizens with the saints, and of the household of God, 2.20 being built on the foundation of the apostles and prophets, Christ Jesus himself being the chief cornerstone; 2.21 in whom the whole building, fitted together, grows into a holy temple in the Lord; 2.22 in whom you also are built together for a habitation of God in the Spirit.
4.3
being eager to keep the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace. 4.4 There is one body, and one Spirit, even as you also were called in one hope of your calling;
4.6
one God and Father of all, who is over all, and through all, and in us all.
4.11
He gave some to be apostles; and some, prophets; and some, evangelists; and some, shepherds and teachers;
4.13
until we all attain to the unity of the faith, and of the knowledge of the Son of God, to a full grown man, to the measure of the stature of the fullness of Christ; '' None
40. New Testament, Galatians, 3.27 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Paul, the apostle, universalism of • Universalism, Pauline • universalism

 Found in books: Dawson (2001), Christian Figural Reading and the Fashioning of Identity, 269; Langworthy (2019), Gregory of Nazianzus’ Soteriological Pneumatology, 64

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3.27 ὅσοι γὰρ εἰς Χριστὸν ἐβαπτίσθητε, Χριστὸν ἐνεδύσασθε·'' None
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3.27 For as many of you as werebaptized into Christ have put on Christ. '' None
41. New Testament, Romans, 8.29 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Fulfillment, universality of • Identity, and universal fulfillment • Judgment, final universal • Paul, the apostle, universalism of • Universalism, Pauline

 Found in books: Dawson (2001), Christian Figural Reading and the Fashioning of Identity, 178, 269; Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 239

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8.29 ὅτι οὓς προέγνω, καὶ προώρισεν συμμόρφους τῆς εἰκόνος τοῦ υἱοῦ αὐτοῦ, εἰς τὸ εἶναι αὐτὸν πρωτότοκον ἐν πολλοῖς ἀδελφοῖς·'' None
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8.29 For whom he foreknew, he also predestined to be conformed to the image of his Son, that he might be the firstborn among many brothers. '' None
42. New Testament, John, 4.23, 14.6 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Church, Universality of • Paul, the apostle, universalism of • Universal way of salvation • Universalism, Pauline • universalism, Christian

 Found in books: Dawson (2001), Christian Figural Reading and the Fashioning of Identity, 222; DeMarco, (2021), Augustine and Porphyry: A Commentary on De ciuitate Dei 10, 276, 282, 297; Elsner (2007), Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text, 270; Graham (2022), The Church as Paradise and the Way Therein: Early Christian Appropriation of Genesis 3:22–24, 73

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4.23 ἀλλὰ ἔρχεται ὥρα καὶ νῦν ἐστίν, ὅτε οἱ ἀληθινοὶ προσκυνηταὶ προσκυνήσουσιν τῷ πατρὶ ἐν πνεύματι καὶ ἀληθείᾳ, καὶ γὰρ ὁ πατὴρ τοιούτους ζητεῖ τοὺς προσκυνοῦντας αὐτόν·
14.6
λέγει αὐτῷ Ἰησοῦς Ἐγώ εἰμι ἡ ὁδὸς καὶ ἡ ἀλήθεια καὶ ἡ ζωή· οὐδεὶς ἔρχεται πρὸς τὸν πατέρα εἰ μὴ διʼ ἐμοῦ.'' None
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4.23 But the hour comes, and now is, when the true worshippers will worship the Father in spirit and truth, for the Father seeks such to be his worshippers.
14.6
Jesus said to him, "I am the way, the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father, except through me. '' None
43. New Testament, Luke, 2.32, 2.34, 3.8, 4.18-4.19 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Acts and universalism • Holy Spirit, Ethnic universalism • Holy Spirit, Geographic universalism • restoration, universal • universality

 Found in books: Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 129, 262, 265; Despotis and Lohr (2022), Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions, 258; Matthews (2010), Perfect Martyr: The Stoning of Stephen and the Construction of Christian Identity, 32, 41; Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 586, 588

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2.32 Φῶς εἰς ἀποκάλυψιν ἐθνῶν καὶ δόξαν λαοῦ σου Ἰσραήλ.
2.34
καὶ εὐλόγησεν αὐτοὺς Συμεὼν καὶ εἶπεν πρὸς Μαριὰμ τὴν μητέρα αὐτοῦ Ἰδοὺ οὗτος κεῖται εἰς πτῶσιν καὶ ἀνάστασιν πολλῶν ἐν τῷ Ἰσραὴλ καὶ εἰς σημεῖον ἀντιλεγόμενον,
3.8
ποιήσατε οὖν καρποὺς ἀξίους τῆς μετανοίας· καὶ μὴ ἄρξησθε λέγειν ἐν ἑαυτοῖς Πατέρα ἔχομεν τὸν Ἀβραάμ, λέγω γὰρ ὑμῖν ὅτι δύναται ὁ θεὸς ἐκ τῶν λίθων τούτων ἐγεῖραι τέκνα τῷ Ἀβραάμ.
4.18
Πνεῦμα Κυρίου ἐπʼ ἐμέ, οὗ εἵνεκεν ἔχρισέν με εὐαγγελίσασθαι πτωχοῖς, ἀπέσταλκέν με κηρύξαι αἰχμαλώτοις ἄφεσιν καὶ τυφλοῖς ἀνάβλεψιν, ἀποστεῖλαι τεθραυσμένους ἐν ἀφέσει, 4.19 κηρύξαι ἐνιαυτὸν Κυρίου δεκτόν.' ' None
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2.32 A light for revelation to the Gentiles, And the glory of your people Israel."
2.34
and Simeon blessed them, and said to Mary, his mother, "Behold, this child is set for the falling and the rising of many in Israel, and for a sign which is spoken against. ' "
3.8
Bring forth therefore fruits worthy of repentance, and don't begin to say among yourselves, 'We have Abraham for our father;' for I tell you that God is able to raise up children to Abraham from these stones! " 4.18 "The Spirit of the Lord is on me, Because he has anointed me to preach good news to the poor. He has sent me to heal the brokenhearted, To proclaim release to the captives, Recovering of sight to the blind, To deliver those who are crushed, 4.19 And to proclaim the acceptable year of the Lord."' ' None
44. New Testament, Matthew, 3.8, 11.25, 13.43 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Universe (of God) • Universe, single cause • restoration, universal • universality

 Found in books: Crabb (2020), Luke/Acts and the End of History, 262; Despotis and Lohr (2022), Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions, 257, 258; Langstaff, Stuckenbruck, and Tilly, (2022), The Lord’s Prayer, 156; Lynskey (2021), Tyconius’ Book of Rules: An Ancient Invitation to Ecclesial Hermeneutics, 293; Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 631

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3.8 ποιήσατε οὖν καρπὸν ἄξιον τῆς μετανοίας·
11.25
Ἐν ἐκείνῳ τῷ καιρῷ ἀποκριθεὶς ὁ Ἰησοῦς εἶπεν Ἐξομολογοῦμαί σοι, πάτερ κύριε τοῦ οὐρανοῦ καὶ τῆς γῆς, ὅτι ἔκρυψας ταῦτα ἀπὸ σοφῶν καὶ συνετῶν, καὶ ἀπεκάλυψας αὐτὰ νηπίοις·
13.43
Τότε οἱ δίκαιοι ἐκλάμψουσιν ὡς ὁ ἥλιος ἐν τῇ βασιλείᾳ τοῦ πατρὸς αὐτῶν. Ὁ ἔχων ὦτα ἀκουέτω.'' None
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3.8 Therefore bring forth fruit worthy of repentance!
11.25
At that time, Jesus answered, "I thank you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that you hid these things from the wise and understanding, and revealed them to infants.
13.43
Then the righteous will shine forth like the sun in the kingdom of their Father. He who has ears to hear, let him hear. '' None
45. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Church, universal • church (ejkklhsiva), local and universal

 Found in books: Lieu (2004), Christian Identity in the Jewish and Graeco-Roman World, 234; Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 7, 185

46. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • God and the universe • Universe, harmony of the • universal

 Found in books: Papadodima (2022), Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II, 69; Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 245

47. None, None, nan (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Consolation writings, Even the universe doesn't last • Zeno of Citium, treatise On the Universe

 Found in books: Graver (2007), Stoicism and Emotion, 225; Sorabji (2000), Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation, 242

48. None, None, nan (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • cosmos (kosmos, κόσμος‎)/universe and human soul • cosmos (kosmos, κόσμος‎)/universe and matter/body • universe • universe (τό πάν/ τών őλων)

 Found in books: Schibli (2002), Hierocles of Alexandria, 181; Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020), Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity, 313; d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 135

49. None, None, nan (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • coming to be, of universe • cosmos (kosmos, κόσμος‎)/universe as living being • creator, motivation of for creating universe • elements, four in universe • gods, as one ???? of Timaean universe • gods, mind of, ordered universe • limit of cosmos (kosmos, κόσμος‎)/universe • universe • universe, as copy of something eternal • universe, as perishable but everlasting • universe, created vs. uncreated • universe, demiurge as creator of Timaean • universe, distinct from intelligible sphere • universe, reason for creation of • universe, ruled by highest god • universe, uncreated and everlasting (Neoplatonists)

 Found in books: Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 27, 31, 32, 34, 73, 79, 80, 86, 87, 88, 92, 93, 96, 97, 98, 100, 101, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135, 155, 177, 178, 183, 197, 208, 209, 210, 228, 248, 263, 279; d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 126

50. Strabo, Geography, 1.4.9
 Tagged with subjects: • universal rule, and Greeks, said to be a law of nature • universalism

 Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 185; Niehoff (2011), Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria, 91

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1.4.9 At the close of the book Eratosthenes blames the system of those who would divide all mankind into Greeks and Barbarians, and likewise those who recommended Alexander to treat the Greeks as friends, but the Barbarians as enemies. He suggests, as a better course, to distinguish them according to their virtues and their vices, since amongst the Greeks there are many worthless characters, and many highly civilized are to be found amongst the Barbarians; witness the Indians and Ariani, or still better the Romans and Carthaginians, whose political system is so beautifully perfect. Alexander, considering this, disregarded the advice which had been offered him, and patronized without distinction any man he considered to be deserving. But we would inquire whether those men who thus divided the human race, abandoning one portion to contempt, and exalting to dignity the other, were not actuated to this because they found that on one side justice, knowledge, and the force of reason reigned supreme, but their contraries on the other. Alexander did not disregard the advice tendered him, but gladly embraced and followed it, respecting the wisdom of those who gave it; and so far from taking the opposite course, he closely pursued that which they pointed out.'' None
51. Vergil, Aeneis, 8.302
 Tagged with subjects: • invocation, universal • peace, universal desire for

 Found in books: Hickson (1993), Roman prayer language: Livy and the Aneid of Vergil, 35; O'Daly (2020), Augustine's City of God: A Reader's Guide (2nd edn), 231, 232

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8.302 et nos et tua dexter adi pede sacra secundo.'' None
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8.302 and dropped the huge rock which was pendent there '' None



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