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Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

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subject book bibliographic info
psychic Despotis and Lohr (2022), Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions, 168, 170, 171, 173, 174, 175, 177, 178, 179, 180, 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, 197
Seim and Okland (2009), Metamorphoses: Resurrection, Body and Transformative Practices in Early Christianity, 12, 117, 118, 124, 125, 128, 193, 198, 233, 260
psychic, adam/eve/body Rasimus (2009), Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence, 121, 142, 145, 160, 161, 163, 164, 165, 166, 167, 168, 169, 170, 185
psychic, adam/eve/body, christ Rasimus (2009), Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence, 50, 72, 116, 181, 232, 233, 234
psychic, adam/eve/body, class Rasimus (2009), Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence, 50, 131, 142, 143, 234, 251, 253, 292
psychic, adam/eve/body, essence Rasimus (2009), Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence, 135, 161, 253
psychic, agreement Joosse (2021), Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher, 63, 96, 104
psychic, body of acts of peter and the twelve apostles, adam van den Broek (2013), Gnostic Religion in Antiquity, 175
psychic, disbalance, godlikeness, and Bartninkas (2023), Traditional and Cosmic Gods in Later Plato and the Early Academy. 144
psychic, essence Dunderberg (2008), Beyond Gnosticism: Myth, Lifestyle, and Society in the School of Valentinus. 121, 136, 144, 176
psychic, excellence, harmony, as model of Graver (2007), Stoicism and Emotion, 73
psychic, god, theoi, θεοί‎ d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 123, 132, 220
psychic, goods divine Laks (2022), Plato's Second Republic: An Essay on the Laws. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2022 75
psychic, goods, of the soul or Tsouni (2019), Antiochus and Peripatetic Ethics, 63, 174, 175, 179
psychic, health Graver (2007), Stoicism and Emotion, 65, 120, 144
psychic, humans/powers Linjamaa (2019), The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics, 15, 16, 17, 28, 36, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 81, 83, 84, 85, 86, 89, 90, 91, 100, 101, 102, 103, 106, 107, 124, 125, 130, 138, 140, 141, 142, 146, 149, 155, 160, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 166, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 176, 177, 178, 179, 186, 187, 188, 189, 198, 199, 200, 201, 202, 204, 207, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 222, 223, 224, 228, 232, 234, 235, 236, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 245, 246, 247, 249, 250, 251, 252, 253, 254, 266, 270
psychic, interpretation Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 306
psychic, movement, spirit, effects of Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 139, 140
psychic, of body, adam Corrigan and Rasimus (2013), Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World, 11, 14, 49
psychic, or of the soul, virtue Tsouni (2019), Antiochus and Peripatetic Ethics, 42, 52, 60, 121, 122, 131
psychic, order Ebrey and Kraut (2022), The Cambridge Companion to Plato, 2nd ed, 303
psychic, part, thumos, as Graver (2007), Stoicism and Emotion, 72, 73, 74
psychic, phenomena Luck (2006), Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts, 294, 365
psychic, pneuma van der EIjk (2005), Medicine and Philosophy in Classical Antiquity: Doctors and Philosophers on Nature, Soul, Health and Disease, 134
psychic, psychê substance Linjamaa (2019), The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics, 15, 16, 17, 48, 52, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 83, 100, 143, 161, 164, 166, 168, 178, 189, 198, 199, 202, 204, 237, 243, 252
psychic, psychiatry, psychological, psychology, also psychotherapeutic Singer and van Eijk (2018), Galen: Works on Human Nature: Volume 1, Mixtures (De Temperamentis), 2, 4, 6, 7, 9, 11, 13, 14, 21, 23, 29, 46, 60, 79, 92, 103, 106, 107, 112, 127, 138, 139, 146
psychic, readers Scopello (2008), The Gospel of Judas in Context: Proceedings of the First International Conference on the Gospel of Judas, 38
psychic, soma psychikon body Engberg-Pedersen (2010), Cosmology and Self in the Apostle Paul: The Material Spirit, 14, 27, 28, 29, 30
psychic, soma psychikon body, and sarx Engberg-Pedersen (2010), Cosmology and Self in the Apostle Paul: The Material Spirit, 104, 105
psychic, soma psychikon body, as flesh and blod Engberg-Pedersen (2010), Cosmology and Self in the Apostle Paul: The Material Spirit, 32
psychic, sosipatra, philosopher and Luck (2006), Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts, 78, 79, 201, 202, 203, 204, 366, 367
psychic, tyranny Laks (2022), Plato's Second Republic: An Essay on the Laws. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2022 99, 176, 195
psychic, vital, natural Inwood and Warren (2020), Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy, 15, 39, 40, 46, 64, 75, 85, 117, 147, 148, 150
psychic/fleshly, garment Corrigan and Rasimus (2013), Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World, 343, 344, 346, 347, 348, 351, 352, 355, 356
psychic/innate, logos/logoi, reason principle, λόγος‎/λόγοι‎ d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 60, 109, 131, 137, 191, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 204, 205, 261, 269
psychics Binder (2012), Tertullian, on Idolatry and Mishnah Avodah Zarah: Questioning the Parting of the Ways Between Christians and Jews, 55, 59, 93
Dunderberg (2008), Beyond Gnosticism: Myth, Lifestyle, and Society in the School of Valentinus. 167, 177
Iricinschi et al. (2013), Beyond the Gnostic Gospels: Studies Building on the Work of Elaine Pagels, 50, 51, 154
Tite (2009), Valentinian Ethics and Paraenetic Discourse: Determining the Social Function of Moral Exhortation in Valentinian Christianity, 198, 207, 218, 244
van den Broek (2013), Gnostic Religion in Antiquity, 183, 190, 193, 194
psychics, psychikoi Leão and Lanzillotta (2019), A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic, 192, 206

List of validated texts:
11 validated results for "psychic"
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 1.26-1.27, 2.7, 3.21 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Body, psychic (of Adam) • Garment, psychic/fleshly • Psychê (psychic substance) • Psychic • Psychic Adam/Eve/body • Psychic Adam/Eve/body, essence • Psychic humans/powers • psychic essence • soma psychikon (psychic body)

 Found in books: Corrigan and Rasimus (2013), Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World, 11, 14, 344; Dunderberg (2008), Beyond Gnosticism: Myth, Lifestyle, and Society in the School of Valentinus. 136; Engberg-Pedersen (2010), Cosmology and Self in the Apostle Paul: The Material Spirit, 28, 29, 30; Linjamaa (2019), The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics, 54; Rasimus (2009), Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence, 160, 161, 163, 164, 165, 166, 167, 168, 169, 170, 185; Seim and Okland (2009), Metamorphoses: Resurrection, Body and Transformative Practices in Early Christianity, 117, 125, 260

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1.26 וַיֹּאמֶר אֱלֹהִים נַעֲשֶׂה אָדָם בְּצַלְמֵנוּ כִּדְמוּתֵנוּ וְיִרְדּוּ בִדְגַת הַיָּם וּבְעוֹף הַשָּׁמַיִם וּבַבְּהֵמָה וּבְכָל־הָאָרֶץ וּבְכָל־הָרֶמֶשׂ הָרֹמֵשׂ עַל־הָאָרֶץ׃ 1.27 וַיִּבְרָא אֱלֹהִים אֶת־הָאָדָם בְּצַלְמוֹ בְּצֶלֶם אֱלֹהִים בָּרָא אֹתוֹ זָכָר וּנְקֵבָה בָּרָא אֹתָם׃
2.7
וַיִּיצֶר יְהוָה אֱלֹהִים אֶת־הָאָדָם עָפָר מִן־הָאֲדָמָה וַיִּפַּח בְּאַפָּיו נִשְׁמַת חַיִּים וַיְהִי הָאָדָם לְנֶפֶשׁ חַיָּה׃
3.21
וַיַּעַשׂ יְהוָה אֱלֹהִים לְאָדָם וּלְאִשְׁתּוֹ כָּתְנוֹת עוֹר וַיַּלְבִּשֵׁם׃' ' None
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1.26 And God said: ‘Let us make man in our image, after our likeness; and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.’ 1.27 And God created man in His own image, in the image of God created He him; male and female created He them.
2.7
Then the LORD God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul. 2 And the LORD God took the man, and put him into the garden of Eden to dress it and to keep it.,and the gold of that land is good; there is bdellium and the onyx stone.,The name of the first is Pishon; that is it which compasseth the whole land of Havilah, where there is gold;,No shrub of the field was yet in the earth, and no herb of the field had yet sprung up; for the LORD God had not caused it to rain upon the earth, and there was not a man to till the ground;,And out of the ground made the LORD God to grow every tree that is pleasant to the sight, and good for food; the tree of life also in the midst of the garden, and the tree of the knowledge of good and evil.,And on the seventh day God finished His work which He had made; and He rested on the seventh day from all His work which He had made.,And a river went out of Eden to water the garden; and from thence it was parted, and became four heads.,And the name of the third river is Tigris; that is it which goeth toward the east of Asshur. And the fourth river is the Euphrates.,And the LORD God caused a deep sleep to fall upon the man, and he slept; and He took one of his ribs, and closed up the place with flesh instead thereof.,And God blessed the seventh day, and hallowed it; because that in it He rested from all His work which God in creating had made.,These are the generations of the heaven and of the earth when they were created, in the day that the LORD God made earth and heaven.,Then the LORD God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul.,And the man said: ‘This is now bone of my bones, and flesh of my flesh; she shall be called Woman, because she was taken out of Man.’,And the man gave names to all cattle, and to the fowl of the air, and to every beast of the field; but for Adam there was not found a help meet for him.,And the LORD God planted a garden eastward, in Eden; and there He put the man whom He had formed.,but there went up a mist from the earth, and watered the whole face of the ground.,And the name of the second river is Gihon; the same is it that compasseth the whole land of Cush.,And out of the ground the LORD God formed every beast of the field, and every fowl of the air; and brought them unto the man to see what he would call them; and whatsoever the man would call every living creature, that was to be the name thereof.,And they were both naked, the man and his wife, and were not ashamed.,Therefore shall a man leave his father and his mother, and shall cleave unto his wife, and they shall be one flesh.,but of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt not eat of it; for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die.’,And the LORD God commanded the man, saying: ‘of every tree of the garden thou mayest freely eat;,And the heaven and the earth were finished, and all the host of them.,And the LORD God said: ‘It is not good that the man should be alone; I will make him a help meet for him.’,And the rib, which the LORD God had taken from the man, made He a woman, and brought her unto the man.3.21 And the LORD God made for Adam and for his wife garments of skins, and clothed them. ' None
2. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Abraham, 120-122 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Psychic Adam/Eve/body, Christ • Psychic humans/powers

 Found in books: Linjamaa (2019), The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics, 171; Rasimus (2009), Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence, 116

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120 Let not any one then fancy that the word shadow is applied to God with perfect propriety. It is merely a catachrestical abuse of the name, by way of bringing before our eyes a more vivid representation of the matter intended to be intimated. '121 Since this is not the actual truth, but in order that one may when speaking keep as close to the truth as possible, the one in the middle is the Father of the universe, who in the sacred scriptures is called by his proper name, I am that I am; and the beings on each side are those most ancient powers which are always close to the living God, one of which is called his creative power, and the other his royal power. And the creative power is God, for it is by this that he made and arranged the universe; and the royal power is the Lord, for it is fitting that the Creator should lord it over and govern the creature. 122 Therefore, the middle person of the three, being attended by each of his powers as by body-guards, presents to the mind, which is endowed with the faculty of sight, a vision at one time of one being, and at another time of three; of one when the soul being completely purified, and having surmounted not only the multitudes of numbers, but also the number two, which is the neighbour of the unit, hastens onward to that idea which is devoid of all mixture, free from all combination, and by itself in need of nothing else whatever; and of three, when, not being as yet made perfect as to the important virtues, it is still seeking for initiation in those of less consequence, and is not able to attain to a comprehension of the living God by its own unassisted faculties without the aid of something else, but can only do so by judging of his deeds, whether as creator or as governor. ' None
3. New Testament, 1 Corinthians, 1.21, 2.12, 2.14-2.15, 3.1, 3.3, 15.35-15.55 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Psychê (psychic substance) • Psychic • Psychic Adam/Eve/body • Psychic Adam/Eve/body, Christ • Psychic Adam/Eve/body, class • Psychic humans/powers • Psychics • psychic essence • soma psychikon (psychic body) • soma psychikon (psychic body), and sarx • soma psychikon (psychic body), as flesh and blod

 Found in books: Dunderberg (2008), Beyond Gnosticism: Myth, Lifestyle, and Society in the School of Valentinus. 144; Engberg-Pedersen (2010), Cosmology and Self in the Apostle Paul: The Material Spirit, 14, 27, 28, 29, 30, 32, 104; Linjamaa (2019), The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics, 86, 161, 202, 210; Rasimus (2009), Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence, 50, 72, 131, 160, 163, 166, 167, 170, 251; Seim and Okland (2009), Metamorphoses: Resurrection, Body and Transformative Practices in Early Christianity, 12, 117, 118, 124, 125; Tite (2009), Valentinian Ethics and Paraenetic Discourse: Determining the Social Function of Moral Exhortation in Valentinian Christianity, 207

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1.21 ἐπειδὴ γὰρ ἐν τῇ σοφίᾳ τοῦ θεοῦ οὐκ ἔγνω ὁ κόσμος διὰ τῆς σοφίας τὸν θεόν, εὐδόκησεν ὁ θεὸς διὰ τῆς μωρίας τοῦ κηρύγματος σῶσαι τοὺς πιστεύοντας.
2.12
ἡμεῖς δὲ οὐ τὸ πνεῦμα τοῦ κόσμου ἐλάβομεν ἀλλὰ τὸ πνεῦμα τὸ ἐκ τοῦ θεοῦ, ἵνα εἰδῶμεν τὰ ὑπὸ τοῦ θεοῦ χαρισθέντα ἡμῖν·
2.14
ψυχικὸς δὲ ἄνθρωπος οὐ δέχεται τὰ τοῦ πνεύματος τοῦ θεοῦ, μωρία γὰρ αὐτῷ ἐστίν, καὶ οὐ δύναται γνῶναι, ὅτι πνευματικῶς ἀνακρίνεται· 2.15 ὁ δὲ πνευματικὸς ἀνακρίνει μὲν πάντα, αὐτὸς δὲ ὑπʼ οὐδενὸς ἀνακρίνεται.
3.1
Κἀγώ, ἀδελφοί, οὐκ ἠδυνήθην λαλῆσαι ὑμῖν ὡς πνευματικοῖς ἀλλʼ ὡς σαρκίνοις, ὡς νηπίοις ἐν Χριστῷ.
3.3
Ἀλλʼ οὐδὲ ἔτι νῦν δύνασθε, ἔτι γὰρ σαρκικοί ἐστε. ὅπου γὰρ ἐν ὑμῖν ζῆλος καὶ ἔρις, οὐχὶ σαρκικοί ἐστε καὶ κατὰ ἄνθρωπον περιπατεῖτε;
15.35
Ἀλλὰ ἐρεῖ τις Πῶς ἐγείρονται οἱ νεκροί, ποίῳ δὲ σώματι ἔρχονται; 15.36 ἄφρων, σὺ ὃ σπείρεις οὐ ζωοποιεῖται ἐὰν μὴ ἀποθάνῃ· 15.37 καὶ ὃ σπείρεις, οὐ τὸ σῶμα τὸ γενησόμενον σπείρεις ἀλλὰ γυμνὸν κόκκον εἰ τύχοι σίτου ἤ τινος τῶν λοιπῶν· 15.38 ὁ δὲ θεὸς δίδωσιν αὐτῷ σῶμα καθὼς ἠθέλησεν, καὶ ἑκάστῳ τῶν σπερμάτων ἴδιον σῶμα. 15.39 οὐ πᾶσα σὰρξ ἡ αὐτὴ σάρξ, ἀλλὰ ἄλλη μὲν ἀνθρώπων, ἄλλη δὲ σὰρξ κτηνῶν, ἄλλη δὲ σὰρξ πτηνῶν, ἄλλη δὲ ἰχθύων. 15.40 καὶ σώματα ἐπουράνια, καὶ σώματα ἐπίγεια· ἀλλὰ ἑτέρα μὲν ἡ τῶν ἐπουρανίων δόξα, ἑτέρα δὲ ἡ τῶν ἐπιγείων. 15.41 ἄλλη δόξα ἡλίου, καὶ ἄλλη δόξα σελήνης, καὶ ἄλλη δόξα ἀστέρων, ἀστὴρ γὰρ ἀστέρος διαφέρει ἐν δόξῃ. 15.42 οὕτως καὶ ἡ ἀνάστασις τῶν νεκρῶν. 15.43 σπείρεται ἐν φθορᾷ, ἐγείρεται ἐν ἀφθαρσίᾳ· σπείρεται ἐν ἀτιμίᾳ, ἐγείρεται ἐν δόξῃ· σπείρεται ἐν ἀσθενείᾳ, ἐγείρεται ἐν δυνάμει· 15.44 σπείρεται σῶμα ψυχικόν, ἐγείρεται σῶμα πνευματικόν. Εἰ ἔστιν σῶμα ψυχικόν, ἔστιν καὶ πνευματικόν. 15.45 οὕτως καὶ γέγραπταιἘγένετο ὁ πρῶτος ἄνθρωπος Ἀδὰμ εἰς ψυχὴν ζῶσαν·ὁ ἔσχατος Ἀδὰμ εἰς πνεῦμα ζωοποιοῦν. 15.46 ἀλλʼ οὐ πρῶτον τὸ πνευματικὸν ἀλλὰ τὸ ψυχικόν, ἔπειτα τὸ πνευματικόν. ὁ πρῶτοςἄνθρωπος ἐκ γῆς Χοϊκός, 15.47 ὁ δεύτερος ἄνθρωπος ἐξ οὐρανοῦ. 15.48 οἷος ὁ χοϊκός, τοιοῦτοι καὶ οἱ χοϊκοί, καὶ οἷος ὁ ἐπουράνιος, τοιοῦτοι καὶ οἱ ἐπουράνιοι· 15.49 καὶ καθὼς ἐφορέσαμεν τὴν εἰκόνα τοῦ χοϊκοῦ φορέσωμεν καὶ τὴν εἰκόνα τοῦ ἐπουρανίου. 15.50 Τοῦτο δέ φημι, ἀδελφοί, ὅτι σὰρξ καὶ αἷμα βασιλείαν θεοῦ κληρονομῆσαι οὐ δύναται, οὐδὲ ἡ φθορὰ τὴν ἀφθαρσίαν κληρονομεῖ. 15.51 ἰδοὺ μυστήριον ὑμῖν λέγω· πάντες οὐ κοιμηθησόμεθα πάντες δὲ ἀλλαγησόμεθα, 15.52 ἐν ἀτόμῳ, ἐν ῥιπῇ ὀφθαλμοῦ, ἐν τῇ ἐσχάτῃ σάλπιγγι· σαλπίσει γάρ, καὶ οἱ νεκροὶ ἐγερθήσονται ἄφθαρτοι, καὶ ἡμεῖς ἀλλαγησόμεθα. 15.53 δεῖ γὰρ τὸ φθαρτὸν τοῦτο ἐνδύσασθαι ἀφθαρσίαν καὶ τὸ θνητὸν τοῦτο ἐνδύσασθαι ἀθανασίαν. 15.54 ὅταν δὲ τὸ θνητὸν τοῦτο ἐνδύσηται τὴν ἀθανασίαν, τότε γενήσεται ὁ λόγος ὁ γεγραμμένος Κατεπόθη ὁ θάνατος εἰς νῖκος. 15.55 ποῦ σου, θάνατε, τὸ νῖκος; ποῦ σου, θάνατε, τὸ κέντρον;' ' None
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1.21 For seeing that in the wisdom of God, the world through its wisdomdidn't know God, it was God's good pleasure through the foolishness ofthe preaching to save those who believe." 2.12 But we received, not the spirit of the world, but theSpirit which is from God, that we might know the things that werefreely given to us by God.' "
2.14
Now thenatural man doesn't receive the things of God's Spirit, for they arefoolishness to him, and he can't know them, because they arespiritually discerned." '2.15 But he who is spiritual discerns allthings, and he himself is judged by no one.' "2 When I came to you, brothers, I didn\'t come with excellence ofspeech or of wisdom, proclaiming to you the testimony of God.,ForI determined not to know anything among you, except Jesus Christ, andhim crucified.,I was with you in weakness, in fear, and in muchtrembling.,My speech and my preaching were not in persuasivewords of human wisdom, but in demonstration of the Spirit and of power,,that your faith wouldn\'t stand in the wisdom of men, but in thepower of God.,We speak wisdom, however, among those who are fullgrown; yet a wisdom not of this world, nor of the rulers of this world,who are coming to nothing.,But we speak God\'s wisdom in amystery, the wisdom that has been hidden, which God foreordained beforethe worlds to our glory,,which none of the rulers of this worldhas known. For had they known it, they wouldn\'t have crucified the Lordof glory.,But as it is written,"Things which an eye didn\'t see, and an ear didn\'t hear,Which didn\'t enter into the heart of man,These God has prepared for those who love him.",But to us, God revealed them through the Spirit. For theSpirit searches all things, yes, the deep things of God.,For whoamong men knows the things of a man, except the spirit of the man,which is in him? Even so, no one knows the things of God, except God\'sSpirit.,But we received, not the spirit of the world, but theSpirit which is from God, that we might know the things that werefreely given to us by God.,Which things also we speak, not inwords which man\'s wisdom teaches, but which the Holy Spirit teaches,comparing spiritual things with spiritual things.,Now thenatural man doesn\'t receive the things of God\'s Spirit, for they arefoolishness to him, and he can\'t know them, because they arespiritually discerned.,But he who is spiritual discerns allthings, and he himself is judged by no one.,"For who has knownthe mind of the Lord, that he should instruct him?" But we haveChrist\'s mind.3.1 Brothers, I couldn't speak to you as to spiritual, but as tofleshly, as to babies in Christ." "
3.3
for you are still fleshly. For insofar as there is jealousy,strife, and factions among you, aren't you fleshly, and don't you walkin the ways of men?" 15.35 But someone will say, "Howare the dead raised?" and, "With what kind of body do they come?" 15.36 You foolish one, that which you yourself sow is not made aliveunless it dies.' "15.37 That which you sow, you don't sow the body thatwill be, but a bare grain, maybe of wheat, or of some other kind." '15.38 But God gives it a body even as it pleased him, and to eachseed a body of its own. 15.39 All flesh is not the same flesh, butthere is one flesh of men, another flesh of animals, another of fish,and another of birds. 15.40 There are also celestial bodies, andterrestrial bodies; but the glory of the celestial differs from that ofthe terrestrial. 15.41 There is one glory of the sun, another gloryof the moon, and another glory of the stars; for one star differs fromanother star in glory. 15.42 So also is the resurrection of the dead.It is sown in corruption; it is raised in incorruption. 15.43 It issown in dishonor; it is raised in glory. It is sown in weakness; it israised in power. 15.44 It is sown a natural body; it is raised aspiritual body. There is a natural body and there is also a spiritualbody. 15.45 So also it is written, "The first man, Adam, became a livingsoul." The last Adam became a life-giving spirit.' "15.46 However thatwhich is spiritual isn't first, but that which is natural, then thatwhich is spiritual." '15.47 The first man is of the earth, made ofdust. The second man is the Lord from heaven. 15.48 As is the onemade of dust, such are those who are also made of dust; and as is theheavenly, such are they also that are heavenly.' "15.49 As we haveborne the image of those made of dust, let's also bear the image of theheavenly." "15.50 Now I say this, brothers, that flesh and blood can'tinherit the Kingdom of God; neither does corruption inheritincorruption." '15.51 Behold, I tell you a mystery. We will not all sleep, but wewill all be changed, 15.52 in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye,at the last trumpet. For the trumpet will sound, and the dead will beraised incorruptible, and we will be changed. 15.53 For thiscorruptible must put on incorruption, and this mortal must put onimmortality. 15.54 But when this corruptible will have put onincorruption, and this mortal will have put on immortality, then whatis written will happen: "Death is swallowed up in victory." 15.55 "Death, where is your sting?Hades, where is your victory?" 15 Now I declare to you, brothers, the gospel which I preachedto you, which also you received, in which you also stand,,bywhich also you are saved, if you hold firmly the word which I preachedto you -- unless you believed in vain.,For I delivered to youfirst of all that which I also received: that Christ died for our sinsaccording to the Scriptures,,that he was buried, that he wasraised on the third day according to the Scriptures,,and that heappeared to Cephas, then to the twelve.,Then he appeared to overfive hundred brothers at once, most of whom remain until now, but somehave also fallen asleep.,Then he appeared to James, then to allthe apostles,,and last of all, as to the child born at the wrongtime, he appeared to me also.,For I am the least of theapostles, who is not worthy to be called an apostle, because Ipersecuted the assembly of God.,But by the grace of God I amwhat I am. His grace which was bestowed on me was not futile, but Iworked more than all of them; yet not I, but the grace of God which waswith me.,Whether then it is I or they, so we preach, and so youbelieved.,Now if Christ is preached, that he has been raised from thedead, how do some among you say that there is no resurrection of thedead?,But if there is no resurrection of the dead, neither hasChrist been raised.,If Christ has not been raised, then ourpreaching is in vain, and your faith also is in vain.,Yes, weare found false witnesses of God, because we testified about God thathe raised up Christ, whom he didn\'t raise up, if it is so that the deadare not raised.,For if the dead aren\'t raised, neither hasChrist been raised.,If Christ has not been raised, your faithis vain; you are still in your sins.,Then they also who arefallen asleep in Christ have perished.,If we have only hoped inChrist in this life, we are of all men most pitiable.,But now Christ has been raised from the dead. He became thefirst fruits of those who are asleep.,For since death came byman, the resurrection of the dead also came by man.,For as inAdam all die, so also in Christ all will be made alive.,Buteach in his own order: Christ the first fruits, then those who areChrist\'s, at his coming.,Then the end comes, when he willdeliver up the Kingdom to God, even the Father; when he will haveabolished all rule and all authority and power.,For he mustreign until he has put all his enemies under his feet.,The lastenemy that will be abolished is death.,For, "He put all thingsin subjection under his feet." But when he says, "All things are put insubjection," it is evident that he is excepted who subjected all thingsto him.,When all things have been subjected to him, then theSon will also himself be subjected to him who subjected all things tohim, that God may be all in all.,Or else what will they do whoare baptized for the dead? If the dead aren\'t raised at all, why thenare they baptized for the dead?,Why do we also stand injeopardy every hour?,I affirm, by the boasting in you which Ihave in Christ Jesus our Lord, I die daily.,If I fought withanimals at Ephesus for human purposes, what does it profit me? If thedead are not raised, then "let us eat and drink, for tomorrow we die.",Don\'t be deceived! "Evil companionships corrupt good morals.",Wake up righteously, and don\'t sin, for some have no knowledgeof God. I say this to your shame.,But someone will say, "Howare the dead raised?" and, "With what kind of body do they come?",You foolish one, that which you yourself sow is not made aliveunless it dies.,That which you sow, you don\'t sow the body thatwill be, but a bare grain, maybe of wheat, or of some other kind.,But God gives it a body even as it pleased him, and to eachseed a body of its own.,All flesh is not the same flesh, butthere is one flesh of men, another flesh of animals, another of fish,and another of birds.,There are also celestial bodies, andterrestrial bodies; but the glory of the celestial differs from that ofthe terrestrial.,There is one glory of the sun, another gloryof the moon, and another glory of the stars; for one star differs fromanother star in glory.,So also is the resurrection of the dead.It is sown in corruption; it is raised in incorruption.,It issown in dishonor; it is raised in glory. It is sown in weakness; it israised in power.,It is sown a natural body; it is raised aspiritual body. There is a natural body and there is also a spiritualbody.,So also it is written, "The first man, Adam, became a livingsoul." The last Adam became a life-giving spirit.,However thatwhich is spiritual isn\'t first, but that which is natural, then thatwhich is spiritual.,The first man is of the earth, made ofdust. The second man is the Lord from heaven.,As is the onemade of dust, such are those who are also made of dust; and as is theheavenly, such are they also that are heavenly.,As we haveborne the image of those made of dust, let\'s also bear the image of theheavenly.,Now I say this, brothers, that flesh and blood can\'tinherit the Kingdom of God; neither does corruption inheritincorruption.,Behold, I tell you a mystery. We will not all sleep, but wewill all be changed,,in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye,at the last trumpet. For the trumpet will sound, and the dead will beraised incorruptible, and we will be changed.,For thiscorruptible must put on incorruption, and this mortal must put onimmortality.,But when this corruptible will have put onincorruption, and this mortal will have put on immortality, then whatis written will happen: "Death is swallowed up in victory.","Death, where is your sting?Hades, where is your victory?",The sting of death is sin, and the power of sin is the law.,But thanks be to God, who gives us the victory through our LordJesus Christ.,Therefore, my beloved brothers, be steadfast,immovable, always abounding in the Lord\'s work, because you know thatyour labor is not in vain in the Lord. " None
4. New Testament, Colossians, 1.18, 2.19 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Psychic humans/powers • Psychics

 Found in books: Linjamaa (2019), The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics, 86, 187; Tite (2009), Valentinian Ethics and Paraenetic Discourse: Determining the Social Function of Moral Exhortation in Valentinian Christianity, 207

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1.18 καὶ αὐτός ἐστιν ἡ κεφαλὴ τοῦ σώματος, τῆς ἐκκλησίας· ὅς ἐστιν ἡ ἀρχή, πρωτότοκος ἐκ τῶν νεκρῶν, ἵνα γένηται ἐν πᾶσιν αὐτὸς πρωτεύων,
2.19
καὶ οὐ κρατῶν τὴν κεφαλήν, ἐξ οὗ πᾶν τὸ σῶμα διὰ τῶν ἁφῶν καὶ συνδέσμων ἐπιχορηγούμενον καὶ συνβιβαζόμενον αὔξει τὴν αὔξησιν τοῦ θεοῦ.'' None
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1.18 He is the head of the body, the assembly, who is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead; that in all things he might have the preeminence. ' "
2.19
and not holding firmly to the Head, from whom all the body, being supplied and knit together through the joints and ligaments, grows with God's growth. "' None
5. New Testament, Ephesians, 4.15 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Psychic humans/powers • Psychics

 Found in books: Linjamaa (2019), The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics, 187; Tite (2009), Valentinian Ethics and Paraenetic Discourse: Determining the Social Function of Moral Exhortation in Valentinian Christianity, 207

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4.15 ἀληθεύοντες δὲ ἐν ἀγάπῃ αὐξήσωμεν εἰς αὐτὸν τὰ πάντα, ὅς ἐστιν ἡ κεφαλή, Χριστός,'' None
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4.15 but speaking truth in love, we may grow up in all things into him, who is the head, Christ; '' None
6. New Testament, Romans, 7.22-7.23, 8.9-8.11 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Psychic • Psychic Adam/Eve/body • Psychic Adam/Eve/body, essence • soma psychikon (psychic body), and sarx

 Found in books: Engberg-Pedersen (2010), Cosmology and Self in the Apostle Paul: The Material Spirit, 104, 105; Rasimus (2009), Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence, 161; Seim and Okland (2009), Metamorphoses: Resurrection, Body and Transformative Practices in Early Christianity, 12

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7.22 συνήδομαι γὰρ τῷ νόμῳ τοῦ θεοῦ κατὰ τὸν ἔσω ἄνθρωπον, 7.23 βλέπω δὲ ἕτερον νόμον ἐν τοῖς μέλεσίν μου ἀντιστρατευόμενον τῷ νόμῳ τοῦ νοός μου καὶ αἰχμαλωτίζοντά με ἐν τῷ νόμῳ τῆς ἁμαρτίας τῷ ὄντι ἐν τοῖς μέλεσίν μου.
8.9
Ὑμεῖς δὲ οὐκ ἐστὲ ἐν σαρκὶ ἀλλὰ ἐν πνεύματι. εἴπερ πνεῦμα θεοῦ οἰκεῖ ἐν ὑμῖν. εἰ δέ τις πνεῦμα Χριστοῦ οὐκ ἔχει, οὗτος οὐκ ἔστιν αὐτοῦ. 8.10 εἰ δὲ Χριστὸς ἐν ὑμῖν, τὸ μὲν σῶμα νεκρὸν διὰ ἁμαρτίαν, τὸ δὲ πνεῦμα ζωὴ διὰ δικαιοσύνην. 8.11 εἰ δὲ τὸ πνεῦμα τοῦ ἐγείραντος τὸν Ἰησοῦν ἐκ νεκρῶν οἰκεῖ ἐν ὑμῖν, ὁ ἐγείρας ἐκ νεκρῶν Χριστὸν Ἰησοῦν ζωοποιήσει καὶ τὰ θνητὰ σώματα ὑμῶν διὰ τοῦ ἐνοικοῦντος αὐτοῦ πνεύματος ἐν ὑμῖν.'' None
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7.22 For I delight in God's law after the inward man, " '7.23 but I see a different law in my members, warring against the law of my mind, and bringing me into captivity under the law of sin which is in my members. ' "
8.9
But you are not in the flesh but in the Spirit, if it is so that the Spirit of God dwells in you. But if any man doesn't have the Spirit of Christ, he is not his. " '8.10 If Christ is in you, the body is dead because of sin, but the spirit is alive because of righteousness. 8.11 But if the Spirit of him who raised up Jesus from the dead dwells in you, he who raised up Christ Jesus from the dead will also give life to your mortal bodies through his Spirit who dwells in you. '" None
7. Irenaeus, Refutation of All Heresies, 1.6.1-1.6.2, 1.7.2, 1.30.6-1.30.9 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Acts of Peter and the Twelve Apostles, Adam, psychic body of • Psychê (psychic substance) • Psychic Adam/Eve/body • Psychic Adam/Eve/body, Christ • Psychic Adam/Eve/body, class • Psychic Adam/Eve/body, essence • Psychic humans/powers • psychics • psychikoi, psychics

 Found in books: Leão and Lanzillotta (2019), A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic, 192; Linjamaa (2019), The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics, 64, 124, 125, 142, 146; Rasimus (2009), Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence, 135, 143, 163, 164, 234; van den Broek (2013), Gnostic Religion in Antiquity, 175, 193, 194

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1.6.1 There being thus three kinds of substances, they declare of all that is material (which they also describe as being "on the left hand") that it must of necessity perish, inasmuch as it is incapable of receiving any afflatus of incorruption. As to every animal existence (which they also denominate "on the right hand"), they hold that, inasmuch as it is a mean between the spiritual and the material, it passes to the side to which inclination draws it. Spiritual substance, again, they describe as having been sent forth for this end, that, being here united with that which is animal, it might assume shape, the two elements being simultaneously subjected to the same discipline. And this they declare to be "the salt" and "the light of the world." For the animal substance had need of training by means of the outward senses; and on this account they affirm that the world was created, as well as that the Saviour came to the animal substance (which was possessed of free-will), that He might secure for it salvation. For they affirm that He received the first-fruits of those whom He was to save as follows, from Achamoth that which was spiritual, while He was invested by the Demiurge with the animal Christ, but was begirt by a special dispensation with a body endowed with an animal nature, yet constructed with unspeakable skill, so that it might be visible and tangible, and capable of enduring suffering. At the same time, they deny that He assumed anything material into His nature, since indeed matter is incapable of salvation. They further hold that the consummation of all things will take place when all that is spiritual has been formed and perfected by Gnosis (knowledge); and by this they mean spiritual men who have attained to the perfect knowledge of God, and been initiated into these mysteries by Achamoth. And they represent themselves to be these persons. 1.6.2 Animal men, again, are instructed in animal things; such men, namely, as are established by their works, and by a mere faith, while they have not perfect knowledge. We of the Church, they say, are these persons. Wherefore also they maintain that good works are necessary to us, for that otherwise it is impossible we should be saved. But as to themselves, they hold that they shall be entirely and undoubtedly saved, not by means of conduct, but because they are spiritual by nature. For, just as it is impossible that material substance should partake of salvation (since, indeed, they maintain that it is incapable of receiving it), so again it is impossible that spiritual substance (by which they mean themselves) should ever come under the power of corruption, whatever the sort of actions in which they indulged. For even as gold, when submersed in filth, loses not on that account its beauty, but retains its own native qualities, the filth having no power to injure the gold, so they affirm that they cannot in any measure suffer hurt, or lose their spiritual substance, whatever the material actions in which they may be involved.
1.7.2
There are also some who maintain that he also produced Christ as his own proper son, but of an animal nature, and that mention was made of him by the prophets. This Christ passed through Mary just as water flows through a tube; and there descended upon him in the form of a dove it the time of his baptism, that Saviour who belonged to the Pleroma, and was formed by the combined efforts of all its inhabit ants. In him there existed also that spiritual seed which proceeded from Achamoth. They hold, accordingly, that our Lord, while preserving the type of the first-begotten and primary tetrad, was compounded of these four substances,--of that which is spiritual, in so far as He was from Achamoth; of that which is animal, as being from the Demiurge by a special dispensation, inasmuch as He was formed corporeally with unspeakable skill; and of the Saviour, as respects that dove which descended upon Him. He also continued free from all suffering, since indeed it was not possible that He should suffer who was at once incomprehensible and invisible. And for this reason the Spirit of Christ, who had been placed within Him, was taken away when He was brought before Pilate. They maintain, further, that not even the seed which He had received from the mother Achamoth was subject to suffering; for it, too, was impassible, as being spiritual, and invisible even to the Demiurge himself. It follows, then, according to them, that the animal Christ, and that which had been formed mysteriously by a special dispensation, underwent suffering, that the mother might exhibit through him a type of the Christ above, namely, of him who extended himself through Stauros, and imparted to Achamoth shape, so far as substance was concerned. For they declare that all these transactions were counterparts of what took place above.
1.30.6
On this account, Ialdabaoth, becoming uplifted in spirit, boasted himself over all those things that were below him, and exclaimed, "I am father, and God, and above me there is no one." But his mother, hearing him speak thus, cried out against him, "Do not lie, Ialdabaoth: for the father of all, the first Anthropos (man), is above thee; and so is Anthropos the son of Anthropos." Then, as all were disturbed by this new voice, and by the unexpected proclamation, and as they were inquiring whence the noise proceeded, in order to lead them away and attract them to himself, they affirm that Ialdabaoth exclaimed, "Come, let us make man after our image." The six powers, on hearing this, and their mother furnishing them with the idea of a man (in order that by means of him she might empty them of their original power), jointly formed a man of immense size, both in regard to breadth and length. But as he could merely writhe along the ground, they carried him to their father; Sophia so labouring in this matter, that she might empty him (Ialdabaoth) of the light with which he had been sprinkled, so that he might no longer, though still powerful, be able to lift up himself against the powers above. They declare, then, that by breathing into man the spirit of life, he was secretly emptied of his power; that hence man became a possessor of nous (intelligence) and enthymesis (thought); and they affirm that these are the faculties which partake in salvation. He they further assert at once gave thanks to the first Anthropos (man), forsaking those who had created him. 1.30.7 But Ialdabaoth, feeling envious at this, was pleased to form the design of again emptying man by means of woman, and produced a woman from his own enthymesis, whom that Prunicus above mentioned laying hold of, imperceptibly emptied her of power. But the others coming and admiring her beauty, named her Eve, and falling in love with her, begat sons by her, whom they also declare to be the angels. But their mother (Sophia) cunningly devised a scheme to seduce Eve and Adam, by means of the serpent, to transgress the command of Ialdabaoth. Eve listened to this as if it had proceeded from a son of God, and yielded an easy belief. She also persuaded Adam to eat of the tree regarding which God had said that they should not eat of it. They then declare that, on their thus eating, they attained to the knowledge of that power which is above all, and departed from those who had created them. When Prunicus perceived that the powers were thus baffled by their own creature, she greatly rejoiced, and again cried out, that since the father was incorruptible, he (Ialdabaoth) who formerly called himself the father was a liar; and that, while Anthropos and the first woman (the Spirit) existed previously, this one (Eve) sinned by committing adultery. 1.30.8 Ialdabaoth, however, through that oblivion in which he was involved, and not paying any regard to these things, cast Adam and Eve out of Paradise, because they had transgressed his commandment. For he had a desire to beget sons by Eve, but did not accomplish his wish, because his mother opposed him in every point, and secretly emptied Adam and Eve of the light with which they had been sprinkled, in order that that spirit which proceeded from the supreme power might participate neither in the curse nor opprobrium caused by transgression. They also teach that, thus being emptied of the divine substance, they were cursed by him, and cast down from heaven to this world. But the serpent also, who was acting against the father, was cast down by him into this lower world; he reduced, however, under his power the angels here, and begat six sons, he himself forming the seventh person, after the example of that Hebdomad which surrounds the father. They further declare that these are the seven mundane demons, who always oppose and resist the human race, because it was on their account that their father was cast down to this lower world. 1.30.9 Adam and Eve previously had light, and clear, and as it were spiritual bodies, such as they were at their creation; but when they came to this world, these changed into bodies more opaque, and gross, and sluggish. Their soul also was feeble and languid, inasmuch as they had received from their creator a merely mundane inspiration. This continued until Prunicus, moved with compassion towards them, restored to them the sweet savour of the besprinkling of light, by means of which they came to a remembrance of themselves, and knew that they were naked, as well as that the body was a material substance, and thus recognised that they bore death about with them. They thereupon became patient, knowing that only for a time they would be enveloped in the body. They also found out food, through the guidance of Sophia; and when they were satisfied, they had carnal knowledge of each other, and begat Cain, whom the serpent, that had been cast down along with his sons, immediately laid hold of and destroyed by filling him with mundane oblivion, and urging into folly and audacity, so that, by slaying his brother Abel, he was the first to bring to light envy and death. After these, they affirm that, by the forethought of Prunicus, Seth was begotten, and then Norea, from whom they represent all the rest of mankind as being descended. They were urged on to all kinds of wickedness by the inferior Hebdomad, and to apostasy, idolatry, and a general contempt for everything by the superior holy Hebdomad, since the mother was always secretly opposed to them, and carefully preserved what was peculiarly her own, that is, the besprinkling of light. They maintain, moreover, that the holy Hebdomad is the seven stars which they call planets; and they affirm that the serpent cast down has two names, Michael and Samael.'' None
8. None, None, nan (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • psychic, vital, natural • psychology (also psychic, psychiatry, psychological, psychotherapeutic)

 Found in books: Inwood and Warren (2020), Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy, 85; Singer and van Eijk (2018), Galen: Works on Human Nature: Volume 1, Mixtures (De Temperamentis), 146

9. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 7.111, 7.127, 7.157 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Psychic humans/powers • Spirit, effects of, psychic movement • psychic • psychic, vital, natural

 Found in books: Despotis and Lohr (2022), Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions, 174, 175; Inwood and Warren (2020), Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy, 147; Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 140; Linjamaa (2019), The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics, 91, 177

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7.111 They hold the emotions to be judgements, as is stated by Chrysippus in his treatise On the Passions: avarice being a supposition that money is a good, while the case is similar with drunkenness and profligacy and all the other emotions.And grief or pain they hold to be an irrational mental contraction. Its species are pity, envy, jealousy, rivalry, heaviness, annoyance, distress, anguish, distraction. Pity is grief felt at undeserved suffering; envy, grief at others' prosperity; jealousy, grief at the possession by another of that which one desires for oneself; rivalry, pain at the possession by another of what one has oneself." 7.127 It is a tenet of theirs that between virtue and vice there is nothing intermediate, whereas according to the Peripatetics there is, namely, the state of moral improvement. For, say the Stoics, just as a stick must be either straight or crooked, so a man must be either just or unjust. Nor again are there degrees of justice and injustice; and the same rule applies to the other virtues. Further, while Chrysippus holds that virtue can be lost, Cleanthes maintains that it cannot. According to the former it may be lost in consequence of drunkenness or melancholy; the latter takes it to be inalienable owing to the certainty of our mental apprehension. And virtue in itself they hold to be worthy of choice for its own sake. At all events we are ashamed of bad conduct as if we knew that nothing is really good but the morally beautiful. Moreover, they hold that it is in itself sufficient to ensure well-being: thus Zeno, and Chrysippus in the first book of his treatise On Virtues, and Hecato in the second book of his treatise On Goods:
7.157
Zeno of Citium and Antipater, in their treatises De anima, and Posidonius define the soul as a warm breath; for by this we become animate and this enables us to move. Cleanthes indeed holds that all souls continue to exist until the general conflagration; but Chrysippus says that only the souls of the wise do so.They count eight parts of the soul: the five senses, the generative power in us, our power of speech, and that of reasoning. They hold that we see when the light between the visual organ and the object stretches in the form of a cone: so Chrysippus in the second book of his Physics and Apollodorus. The apex of the cone in the air is at the eye, the base at the object seen. Thus the thing seen is reported to us by the medium of the air stretching out towards it, as if by a stick.'" None
10. None, None, nan (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Psychic Adam/Eve/body • Psychic Adam/Eve/body, class • psychikoi, psychics

 Found in books: Leão and Lanzillotta (2019), A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic, 206; Rasimus (2009), Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence, 142

11. None, None, nan (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Psychê (psychic substance) • Psychic Adam/Eve/body • Psychic Adam/Eve/body, class • Psychic humans/powers • psychic essence • psychics

 Found in books: Dunderberg (2008), Beyond Gnosticism: Myth, Lifestyle, and Society in the School of Valentinus. 176; Linjamaa (2019), The Ethics of The Tripartite Tractate (NHC I, 5): A Study of Determinism and Early Christian Philosophy of Ethics, 16, 17, 52, 64, 65, 84, 100, 101, 102, 103, 124, 140, 187, 236, 242; Rasimus (2009), Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence, 142; van den Broek (2013), Gnostic Religion in Antiquity, 183




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