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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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All subjects (including unvalidated):
subject book bibliographic info
pergamum Alvar Ezquerra (2008), Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras, 241, 307, 308
Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 45
Borg (2008), Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic, 14, 15, 20, 68, 74, 78
Bremmer (2008), Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East, 290
Clackson et al. (2020), Migration, Mobility and Language Contact in and around the Ancient Mediterranean, 55, 62
Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 39, 52, 79, 80, 82, 83, 111, 135, 147
Dignas (2002), Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor, 45, 114, 115, 120, 135, 258, 259
Dignas Parker and Stroumsa (2013), Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians, 53, 54, 55, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78
Goodman (2006), Judaism in the Roman World: Collected Essays, 61
Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 10, 61, 63, 70, 139, 152, 164, 181
Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 249, 268
Johnston (2008), Ancient Greek Divination, 91, 92
Lester (2018), Prophetic Rivalry, Gender, and Economics: A Study in Revelation and Sibylline Oracles 4-5. 41, 44, 89
Levine (2005), The Ancient Synagogue, The First Thousand Years, 357, 531
Liapis and Petrides (2019), Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca, 118, 165, 340
MacDougall (2022), Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition. 34, 53, 54, 55
Mathews (2013), Riches, Poverty, and the Faithful: Perspectives on Wealth in the Second Temple Period and the Apocalypse of John, 161
Mitchell and Pilhofer (2019), Early Christianity in Asia Minor and Cyprus: From the Margins to the Mainstream, 207
Moss (2012), Ancient Christian Martyrdom: Diverse Practices, Theologies, and Traditions, 101, 107, 154
Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 24, 205
Naiden (2013), Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods, 43, 57, 93, 135, 144, 178, 213
Niehoff (2011), Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria, 2
Price, Finkelberg and Shahar (2021), Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity, 135
Rohland (2022), Carpe Diem: The Poetics of Presence in Greek and Latin Literature, 69
Rojas(2019), The Remains of the Past and the Invention of Archaeology in Roman Anatolia: Interpreters, Traces, Horizons, 194
Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 73, 148
Scott (2023), An Age of Iron and Rust: Cassius Dio and the History of His Time. 187
Shannon-Henderson (2019), Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s , 7, 32, 156, 186, 189, 198, 239
Singer and van Eijk (2018), Galen: Works on Human Nature: Volume 1, Mixtures (De Temperamentis), 141, 143, 163
Thonemann (2020), An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams, 154, 155, 156, 157, 210
Trapp et al. (2016), In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, 55, 58, 60, 61, 63, 67, 72, 73, 79, 80, 81, 90, 91, 94, 95, 103, 104, 105, 107, 111, 115, 119, 121, 129, 132, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 142
de Ste. Croix et al. (2006), Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy, 166
pergamum, acropolis, at Brodd and Reed (2011), Rome and Religion: A Cross-Disciplinary Dialogue on the Imperial Cult, 92
pergamum, aelius aristides, relationship with priests of asclepius at Dignas Parker and Stroumsa (2013), Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 72, 73, 74, 75
pergamum, and marcus aurelius, asclepieion in Dignas Parker and Stroumsa (2013), Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians, 78
pergamum, and pergamenes Brodd and Reed (2011), Rome and Religion: A Cross-Disciplinary Dialogue on the Imperial Cult, 4, 9, 92, 100, 103, 106, 107
pergamum, apollodorus of Pausch and Pieper (2023), The Scholia on Cicero’s Speeches: Contexts and Perspectives, 44
pergamum, aristocles of Borg (2008), Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic, 78, 79, 80
Kingsley Monti and Rood (2022), The Authoritative Historian: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Historiography, 299
pergamum, asclepieion in Dignas Parker and Stroumsa (2013), Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians, 53, 54, 55, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 66, 70, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77
pergamum, asclepium Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 209
pergamum, asclepius at Dignas (2002), Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor, 132, 258
pergamum, asclepius soter, in Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 92, 142, 159, 161
pergamum, asclepius, priesthood at Lupu (2005), Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) 45
pergamum, asclepius, sancuary at Lupu (2005), Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) 17, 63
pergamum, asia Bruun and Edmondson (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy, 606
pergamum, asklepiastai of yaylakale by Gabrielsen and Paganini (2021), Private Associations in the Ancient Greek World: Regulations and the Creation of Group Identity, 100, 101, 102, 103, 114, 116, 138, 142, 242, 251, 256
pergamum, athena, at Rojas(2019), The Remains of the Past and the Invention of Archaeology in Roman Anatolia: Interpreters, Traces, Horizons, 194
pergamum, attalos of Brodd and Reed (2011), Rome and Religion: A Cross-Disciplinary Dialogue on the Imperial Cult, 91, 92
pergamum, attalus i of Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 73, 148, 275
pergamum, attalus i soter of Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 79, 80, 83, 147
pergamum, attalus ii of Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 37, 42
pergamum, attalus iii of Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 306
Williams (2012), The Cosmic Viewpoint: A Study of Seneca's 'Natural Questions', 284, 285, 287
pergamum, augustus, celebrations for, in Brodd and Reed (2011), Rome and Religion: A Cross-Disciplinary Dialogue on the Imperial Cult, 106, 107
pergamum, eumenes i of Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 275
pergamum, eumenes ii, king of Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 52, 80
pergamum, eumenes of Long (2006), From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy, 10
pergamum, eumenes, king of Liapis and Petrides (2019), Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca, 340
pergamum, festival oration, in MacDougall (2022), Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition. 54, 55
pergamum, galen of Penniman (2017), Raised on Christian Milk: Food and the Formation of the Soul in Early Christianity, 34, 224, 230, 231, 233, 234, 235, 236, 237, 238, 239, 240, 241, 242
Rohland (2022), Carpe Diem: The Poetics of Presence in Greek and Latin Literature, 91
Yona (2018), Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire, 67
pergamum, great altar of Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 194
pergamum, keys of asclepieion in Dignas Parker and Stroumsa (2013), Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians, 60
pergamum, libraries Taylor (2012), The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea, 300
pergamum, library of Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 157
pergamum, lighting of asclepieion in Dignas Parker and Stroumsa (2013), Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians, 60, 76
pergamum, menippus of Konig and Wiater (2022), Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue, 270, 271
König and Wiater (2022), Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue, 270, 271
pergamum, mithradates of Dignas (2002), Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor, 295
pergamum, nero’s attempted looting of Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 52, 130, 275
pergamum, nicomedes of Borg (2008), Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic, 78, 79
pergamum, night festival MacDougall (2022), Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition. 34
pergamum, pergamene school Finkelberg (2019), Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays, 336, 345
pergamum, pergamus, a.k.a. Mueller (2002), Roman Religion in Valerius Maximus, 93
pergamum, pilgrimage to, asclepieion in Dignas Parker and Stroumsa (2013), Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians, 64, 66
pergamum, portrait, nicomedes of Borg (2008), Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic, 79
pergamum, quadratus of Borg (2008), Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic, 78
pergamum, relationship between initiates in asclepieion in Dignas Parker and Stroumsa (2013), Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians, 70
pergamum, sacrifices at asclepieion in Dignas Parker and Stroumsa (2013), Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians, 67
pergamum, sanctuary athena nikephoros of of Gabrielsen and Paganini (2021), Private Associations in the Ancient Greek World: Regulations and the Creation of Group Identity, 96, 97, 101, 111
pergamum, sanctuary of asclepius Borg (2008), Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic, 282, 283, 286, 287, 288, 329, 334, 337, 343
pergamum, satyrplay/satyr drama, at Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 80, 83
pergamum, soteria, festival, in Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 159
pergamum, structures of authority at asclepieion in Dignas Parker and Stroumsa (2013), Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians, 63, 64, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70
pergamum, technitai, artists of dionysus, ionian-hellespontine association teos Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 35, 39, 52, 79, 80
pergamum, temple wardens of asclepieion in Dignas Parker and Stroumsa (2013), Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians, 73, 74
pergamum, votives at asclepieion in Dignas Parker and Stroumsa (2013), Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians, 72, 73
pergamum, ‘school’ Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 275, 277

List of validated texts:
30 validated results for "pergamum"
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 336 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Night Festival (Pergamum) • Pergamum

 Found in books: MacDougall (2022), Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition. 34; Trapp et al. (2016), In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns, 60

sup>
336 κὰδ δύναμιν δʼ ἔρδειν ἱέρʼ ἀθανάτοισι θεοῖσιν'' None
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336 Should not be seized – god-sent, it’s better far.'' None
2. Polybius, Histories, 2.56, 9.12.1, 16.28.2 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Menippus of Pergamum

 Found in books: Konig and Wiater (2022), Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue, 270, 271; König and Wiater (2022), Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue, 270, 271

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9.12.1 πολλὴν μὲν ἐπισκέψεως χρείαν ἔχει τὰ συμβαίνοντα περὶ τὰς πολεμικὰς ἐπιβολάς· ἔστι δὲ δυνατὸν ἐν ἑκάστοις αὐτῶν εὐστοχεῖν, ἐὰν σὺν νῷ τις πράττῃ τὸ προτεθέν.
16.28.2
τὸ δʼ ἐπὶ τέλος ἀγαγεῖν τὸ προτεθὲν καί που καὶ τῆς τύχης ἀντιπιπτούσης συνεκπληρῶσαι τῷ λογισμῷ τὸ τῆς προθυμίας ἐλλιπὲς ἐπʼ ὀλίγων γίνεσθαι.' ' None
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2.56 1. \xa0Since, among those authors who were contemporaries of Aratus, Phylarchus, who on many points is at variance and in contradiction with him, is by some received as trustworthy,,2. \xa0it will be useful or rather necessary for me, as I\xa0have chosen to rely on Aratus' narrative for the history of the Cleomenic war, not to leave the question of their relative credibility undiscussed, so that truth and falsehood in their writings may no longer be of equal authority.,3. \xa0In general Phylarchus through his whole work makes many random and careless statements;,4. \xa0but while perhaps it is not necessary for me at present to criticize in detail the rest of these, I\xa0must minutely examine such as relate to events occurring in the period with which I\xa0am now dealing, that of the Cleomenic war.,5. \xa0This partial examination will however be quite sufficient to convey an idea of the general purpose and character of his work.,6. \xa0Wishing, for instance, to insist on the cruelty of Antigonus and the Macedonians and also on that of Aratus and the Achaeans, he tells us that the Mantineans, when they surrendered, were exposed to terrible sufferings and that such were the misfortunes that overtook this, the most ancient and greatest city in Arcadia, as to impress deeply and move to tears all the Greeks.,7. \xa0In his eagerness to arouse the pity and attention of his readers he treats us to a picture of clinging women with their hair dishevelled and their breasts bare, or again of crowds of both sexes together with their children and aged parents weeping and lamenting as they are led away to slavery.,8. \xa0This sort of thing he keeps up throughout his history, always trying to bring horrors vividly before our eyes.,9. \xa0Leaving aside the ignoble and womanish character of such a treatment of his subject, let us consider how far it is proper or serviceable to history.,10. \xa0A\xa0historical author should not try to thrill his readers by such exaggerated pictures, nor should he, like a tragic poet, try to imagine the probable utterances of his characters or reckon up all the consequences probably incidental to the occurrences with which he deals, but simply record what really happened and what really was said, however commonplace.,11. \xa0For the object of tragedy is not the same as that of history but quite the opposite. The tragic poet should thrill and charm his audience for the moment by the verisimilitude of the words he puts into his characters' mouths, but it is the task of the historian to instruct and convince for all time serious students by the truth of the facts and the speeches he narrates,,12. \xa0since in the one case it is the probable that takes precedence, even if it be untrue, in the other it is the truth, the purpose being to confer benefit on learners.,13. \xa0Apart from this, Phylarchus simply narrates most of such catastrophes and does not even suggest their causes or the nature of these causes, without which it is impossible in any case to feel either legitimate pity or proper anger.,14. \xa0Who, for instance, does not think it an outrage for a free man to be beaten? but if this happen to one who was the first to resort to violence, we consider that he got only his desert, while where it is done for the purpose of correction or discipline, those who strike free men are not only excused but deemed worthy of thanks and praise.,15. \xa0Again, to kill a citizen is considered the greatest of crimes and that deserving the highest penalty, but obviously he who kills a thief or adulterer is left untouched, and the slayer of a traitor or tyrant everywhere meets with honour and distinction.,16. \xa0So in every such case the final criterion of good and evil lies not in what is done, but in the different reasons and different purposes of the doer. " 9.12.1 \xa0The accidents attendant on military projects require much circumspection, but success is in every case possible if the steps we take to carry out our plan are soundly reasoned out. <
16.28.2
\xa0those who have succeeded in bringing their designs to a conclusion, and even when fortune has been adverse to them, have compensated for deficiency in ardour by the exercise of reason, are few. <'" None
3. None, None, nan (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Pergamum

 Found in books: Clackson et al. (2020), Migration, Mobility and Language Contact in and around the Ancient Mediterranean, 55; Dignas (2002), Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor, 115

4. New Testament, Apocalypse, 18.3 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Pergamum

 Found in books: Lester (2018), Prophetic Rivalry, Gender, and Economics: A Study in Revelation and Sibylline Oracles 4-5. 44; Mathews (2013), Riches, Poverty, and the Faithful: Perspectives on Wealth in the Second Temple Period and the Apocalypse of John, 161

sup>
18.3 ὅτιἐκ τοῦ οἴνου τοῦ θυμοῦ τῆς πορνείαςαὐτῆς πέπτωκανπάντατὰ ἔθνη,καὶ οἱ βασιλεῖς τῆς γῆς μετʼ αὐτῆς ἐπόρνευσαν, καὶ οἱ ἔμποροι τῆς γῆς ἐκ τῆς δυνάμεως τοῦ στρήνους αὐτῆς ἐπλούτησαν.'' None
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18.3 For all the nations have drunk of the wine of the wrath of her sexual immorality, the kings of the earth committed sexual immorality with her, and the merchants of the earth grew rich from the abundance of her luxury."'' None
5. Plutarch, Julius Caesar, 48.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Mithradates of Pergamum • Mithridates, son of Menodotos, of Pergamon

 Found in books: Dignas (2002), Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor, 295; Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 300

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48.1 Καῖσαρ δὲ τῷ Θετταλῶν ἔθνει τὴν ἐλευθερίαν ἀναθεὶς νικητήριον ἐδίωκε Πομπήϊον· ἁψάμενος δὲ τῆς · Ἀσίας Κνιδίους τε Θεοπόμπῳ τῷ συναγαγόντι τοὺς μύθους χαριζόμενος ἠλευθέρωσε, καὶ πᾶσι τοῖς τὴν Ἀσίαν κατοικοῦσι τὸ τρίτον τῶν φόρων ἀνῆκεν.'' None
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48.1 '' None
6. Tacitus, Annals, 4.37.3, 4.56.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Attalos I of Pergamon • Pergamon • Pergamon, Asklepieion • Pergamon, senators • Pergamum • Rhodes/Rhodians, alliance with Pergamon and Rome against Philip V and Antiochos III

 Found in books: Edelmann-Singer et al. (2020), Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions, 95; Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 222, 473; Shannon-Henderson (2019), Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s , 32, 198, 239

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4.37.3 \xa0About the same time, Further Spain sent a deputation to the senate, asking leave to follow the example of Asia by erecting a shrine to Tiberius and his mother. On this occasion, the Caesar, sturdily disdainful of compliments at any time, and now convinced that an answer was due to the gossip charging him with a declension into vanity, began his speech in the following vein:â\x80\x94 "I\xa0know, Conscript Fathers, that many deplored by want of consistency because, when a little while ago the cities of Asia made this identical request, I\xa0offered no opposition. I\xa0shall therefore state both the case for my previous silence and the rule I\xa0have settled upon for the future. Since the deified Augustus had not forbidden the construction of a temple at Pergamum to himself and the City of Rome, observing as I\xa0do his every action and word as law, I\xa0followed the precedent already sealed by his approval, with all the more readiness that with worship of myself was associated veneration of the senate. But, though once to have accepted may be pardonable, yet to be consecrated in the image of deity through all the provinces would be vanity and arrogance, and the honour paid to Augustus will soon be a mockery, if it is vulgarized by promiscuous experiments in flattery. <
4.56.1
\xa0The deputies from Smyrna, on the other hand, after retracing the antiquity of their town â\x80\x94 whether founded by Tantalus, the seed of Jove; by Theseus, also of celestial stock; or by one of the Amazons â\x80\x94 passed on to the arguments in which they rested most confidence: their good offices towards the Roman people, to whom they had sent their naval force to aid not merely in foreign wars but in those with which we had to cope in Italy, while they had also been the first to erect a temple to the City of Rome, at a period (the consulate of Marcus Porcius) when the Roman fortunes stood high indeed, but had not yet mounted to their zenith, as the Punic capital was yet standing and the kings were still powerful in Asia. At the same time, Sulla was called to witness that "with his army in a most critical position through the inclement winter and scarcity of clothing, the news had only to be announced at a public meeting in Smyrna, and the whole of the bystanders stripped the garments from their bodies and sent them to our legions." The Fathers accordingly, when their opinion was taken, gave Smyrna the preference. Vibius Marsus proposed that a supernumerary legate, to take responsibility for the temple, should be assigned to Manius Lepidus, to whom the province of Asia had fallen; and since Lepidus modestly declined to make the selection himself, Valerius Naso was chosen by lot among the ex-praetors and sent out.'' None
7. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Augustus, celebrations for, in Pergamum • Pergamon • Pergamum and Pergamenes

 Found in books: Brodd and Reed (2011), Rome and Religion: A Cross-Disciplinary Dialogue on the Imperial Cult, 107; Edelmann-Singer et al. (2020), Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions, 95; Faßbeck and Killebrew (2016), Viewing Ancient Jewish Art and Archaeology: VeHinnei Rachel - Essays in honor of Rachel Hachlili, 355

8. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Pergamon Asklepieion • Pergamon Asklepieion, in Artemidorus • Pergamum

 Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 25, 27, 235, 337, 338; Thonemann (2020), An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams, 155, 156, 157

9. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Pergamene boy, tale of • Pergamum

 Found in books: Pinheiro Bierl and Beck (2013), Anton Bierl? and Roger Beck?, Intende, Lector - Echoes of Myth, Religion and Ritual in the Ancient Novel, 239; Stephens and Winkler (1995), Ancient Greek Novels: The Fragments: Introduction, Text, Translation, and Commentary, 359

10. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Archias of Pergamon, founder of Asklepios cult • Attalos III of Pergamon • Attalus II of Pergamum • Pergamon, altar • Pergamon, library • Pergamon, polis and royal residence • Pergamum • Pergamum, Nero’s attempted looting of • palaces, Pergamon

 Found in books: Dignas (2002), Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor, 120; Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 244; Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 37, 42, 130

11. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Menippus of Pergamum

 Found in books: Konig and Wiater (2022), Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue, 270; König and Wiater (2022), Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue, 270

12. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 51.20.6-51.20.7, 77.15.6-77.15.7 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Asclepius at Pergamum • Augustus, celebrations for, in Pergamum • Caracalla, visit to Pergamon Asklepieion • Hadrian, and Pergamon Asklepieion • Pergamon • Pergamon Asklepieion • Pergamon Asklepieion, Imperial-period expansion • Pergamon Asklepieion, visited by Hadrian(?) • Pergamon Asklepieion, visits of Lucius Verus and Caracalla • Pergamon, Imperial cult • Pergamum and Pergamenes

 Found in books: Brodd and Reed (2011), Rome and Religion: A Cross-Disciplinary Dialogue on the Imperial Cult, 106; Dignas (2002), Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor, 132; Edelmann-Singer et al. (2020), Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions, 95; Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 314; Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 120

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51.20.6 \xa0Caesar, meanwhile, besides attending to the general business, gave permission for the dedication of sacred precincts in Ephesus and in Nicaea to Rome and to Caesar, his father, whom he named the hero Julius. These cities had at that time attained chief place in Asia and in Bithynia respectively. 51.20.7 \xa0He commanded that the Romans resident in these cities should pay honour to these two divinities; but he permitted the aliens, whom he styled Hellenes, to consecrate precincts to himself, the Asians to have theirs in Pergamum and the Bithynians theirs in Nicomedia. This practice, beginning under him, has been continued under other emperors, not only in the case of the Hellenic nations but also in that of all the others, in so far as they are subject to the Romans.
77.15.6
1. \xa0When the inhabitants of the island again revolted, he summoned the soldiers and ordered them to invade the rebels\' country, killing everybody they met; and he quoted these words: "Let no one escape sheer destruction, No one our hands, not even the babe in the womb of the mother, If it be male; let it nevertheless not escape sheer destruction.",2. \xa0When this had been done, and the Caledonians had joined the revolt of the Maeatae, he began preparing to make war upon them in person. While he was thus engaged, his sickness carried him off on the fourth of February, not without some help, they say, from Antoninus. At all events, before Severus died, he is reported to have spoken thus to his sons (I\xa0give his exact words without embellishment): "Be harmonious, enrich the soldiers, and scorn all other men.",3. \xa0After this his body, arrayed in military garb, was placed upon a pyre, and as a mark of honour the soldiers and his sons ran about it; and as for the soldiers\' gifts, those who had things at hand to offer as gifts threw them upon it, and his sons applied the fire.,4. \xa0Afterwards his bones were put in an urn of purple stone, carried to Rome, and deposited in the tomb of the Antonines. It is said that Severus sent for the urn shortly before his death, and after feeling of it, remarked: "Thou shalt hold a man that the world could not hold." 77.15.7 1. \xa0When the inhabitants of the island again revolted, he summoned the soldiers and ordered them to invade the rebels\' country, killing everybody they met; and he quoted these words: "Let no one escape sheer destruction, No one our hands, not even the babe in the womb of the mother, If it be male; let it nevertheless not escape sheer destruction.",2. \xa0When this had been done, and the Caledonians had joined the revolt of the Maeatae, he began preparing to make war upon them in person. While he was thus engaged, his sickness carried him off on the fourth of February, not without some help, they say, from Antoninus. At all events, before Severus died, he is reported to have spoken thus to his sons (I\xa0give his exact words without embellishment): "Be harmonious, enrich the soldiers, and scorn all other men.",3. \xa0After this his body, arrayed in military garb, was placed upon a pyre, and as a mark of honour the soldiers and his sons ran about it; and as for the soldiers\' gifts, those who had things at hand to offer as gifts threw them upon it, and his sons applied the fire.,4. \xa0Afterwards his bones were put in an urn of purple stone, carried to Rome, and deposited in the tomb of the Antonines. It is said that Severus sent for the urn shortly before his death, and after feeling of it, remarked: "Thou shalt hold a man that the world could not hold."'' None
13. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.34.4, 2.26.8-2.26.9, 2.27.7, 5.13.3, 8.4.8-8.4.9, 10.7.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Aelius Aristides, comments on bathing and hydrotherapy at Pergamon Asklepieion • Aelius Aristides, relationship with priests of Asclepius at Pergamum • Archias of Pergamon, founder of Asklepios cult • Asclepieion in Pergamum • Asclepieion in Pergamum, structures of authority at • Attalos III of Pergamon • Attalus I of Pergamum • Peiraeus Asklepieion, Pergamene Chronicle • Pergamon Asklepieion, Felsbarre • Pergamon Asklepieion, Sacred Well and other water sources • Pergamon Asklepieion, establishment and early history • Pergamon Asklepieion, hydrotherapy • Pergamon Asklepieion, leges sacrae pertaining to incubation • Pergamon Asklepieion, linked to Smyrna Asklepieion • Pergamon Asklepieion, purity requirement for entrance • Pergamon, altar • Pergamon, library • Pergamon, polis and royal residence • Pergamum • Pergamum, sanctuary of Asclepius • cult, Pergamene cult • palaces, Pergamon

 Found in books: Borg (2008), Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic, 334; Dignas (2002), Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor, 120; Dignas Parker and Stroumsa (2013), Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians, 63; Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 244; Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 24; Naiden (2013), Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods, 43; Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 163, 181, 210, 241, 245, 262; Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 73; Trapp et al. (2016), In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns, 58, 60, 90, 91, 103, 107

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1.34.4 ἔστι δὲ Ὠρωπίοις πηγὴ πλησίον τοῦ ναοῦ, ἣν Ἀμφιαράου καλοῦσιν, οὔτε θύοντες οὐδὲν ἐς αὐτὴν οὔτʼ ἐπὶ καθαρσίοις ἢ χέρνιβι χρῆσθαι νομίζοντες· νόσου δὲ ἀκεσθείσης ἀνδρὶ μαντεύματος γενομένου καθέστηκεν ἄργυρον ἀφεῖναι καὶ χρυσὸν ἐπίσημον ἐς τὴν πηγήν, ταύτῃ γὰρ ἀνελθεῖν τὸν Ἀμφιάραον λέγουσιν ἤδη θεόν. Ἰοφῶν δὲ Κνώσσιος τῶν ἐξηγητῶν χρησμοὺς ἐν ἑξαμέτρῳ παρείχετο, Ἀμφιάραον χρῆσαι φάμενος τοῖς ἐς Θήβας σταλεῖσιν Ἀργείων. ταῦτα τὰ ἔπη τὸ ἐς τοὺς πολλοὺς ἐπαγωγὸν ἀκρατῶς εἶχε· χωρὶς δὲ πλὴν ὅσους ἐξ Ἀπόλλωνος μανῆναι λέγουσι τὸ ἀρχαῖον, μάντεών γʼ οὐδεὶς χρησμολόγος ἦν, ἀγαθοὶ δὲ ὀνείρατα ἐξηγήσασθαι καὶ διαγνῶναι πτήσεις ὀρνίθων καὶ σπλάγχνα ἱερείων.
2.26.8
μαρτυρεῖ δέ μοι καὶ τόδε ἐν Ἐπιδαύρῳ τὸν θεὸν γενέσθαι· τὰ γὰρ Ἀσκληπιεῖα εὑρίσκω τὰ ἐπιφανέστατα γεγονότα ἐξ Ἐπιδαύρου. τοῦτο μὲν γὰρ Ἀθηναῖοι, τῆς τελετῆς λέγοντες Ἀσκληπιῷ μεταδοῦναι, τὴν ἡμέραν ταύτην Ἐπιδαύρια ὀνομάζουσι καὶ θεὸν ἀπʼ ἐκείνου φασὶν Ἀσκληπιόν σφισι νομισθῆναι· τοῦτο δὲ Ἀρχίας ὁ Ἀρισταίχμου, τὸ συμβὰν σπάσμα θηρεύοντί οἱ περὶ τὸν Πίνδασον ἰαθεὶς ἐν τῇ Ἐπιδαυρίᾳ, τὸν θεὸν ἐπηγάγετο ἐς Πέργαμον. 2.26.9 ἀπὸ δὲ τοῦ Περγαμηνῶν Σμυρναίοις γέγονεν ἐφʼ ἡμῶν Ἀσκληπιεῖον τὸ ἐπὶ θαλάσσῃ. τὸ δʼ ἐν Βαλάγραις ταῖς Κυρηναίων ἐστὶν Ἀσκληπιὸς καλούμενος Ἰατρὸς ἐξ Ἐπιδαύρου καὶ οὗτος. ἐκ δὲ τοῦ παρὰ Κυρηναίοις τὸ ἐν Λεβήνῃ τῇ Κρητῶν ἐστιν Ἀσκληπιεῖον. διάφορον δὲ Κυρηναίοις τοσόνδε ἐς Ἐπιδαυρίους ἐστίν, ὅτι αἶγας οἱ Κυρηναῖοι θύουσιν, Ἐπιδαυρίοις οὐ καθεστηκότος.
2.27.7
ὄρη δέ ἐστιν ὑπὲρ τὸ ἄλσος τό τε Τίτθιον καὶ ἕτερον ὀνομαζόμενον Κυνόρτιον, Μαλεάτου δὲ Ἀπόλλωνος ἱερὸν ἐν αὐτῷ. τοῦτο μὲν δὴ τῶν ἀρχαίων· τὰ δὲ ἄλλα ὅσα περὶ τὸ ἱερὸν τοῦ Μαλεάτου καὶ ἔλυτρον κρήνης, ἐς ὃ τὸ ὕδωρ συλλέγεταί σφισι τὸ ἐκ τοῦ θεοῦ, Ἀντωνῖνος καὶ ταῦτα Ἐπιδαυρίοις ἐποίησεν.
5.13.3
ἔστι δὲ ὁ ξυλεὺς ἐκ τῶν οἰκετῶν τοῦ Διός, ἔργον δὲ αὐτῷ πρόσκειται τὰ ἐς τὰς θυσίας ξύλα τεταγμένου λήμματος καὶ πόλεσι παρέχειν καὶ ἀνδρὶ ἰδιώτῃ· τὰ δὲ λεύκης μόνης ξύλα καὶ ἄλλου δένδρου ἐστὶν οὐδενός· ὃς δʼ ἂν ἢ αὐτῶν Ἠλείων ἢ ξένων τοῦ θυομένου τῷ Πέλοπι ἱερείου φάγῃ τῶν κρεῶν, οὐκ ἔστιν οἱ ἐσελθεῖν παρὰ τὸν Δία. τὸ δὲ αὐτὸ καὶ ἐν τῇ Περγάμῳ τῇ ὑπὲρ ποταμοῦ Καΐκου πεπόνθασιν οἱ τῷ Τηλέφῳ θύοντες· ἔστι γὰρ δὴ οὐδὲ τούτοις ἀναβῆναι πρὸ λουτροῦ παρὰ τὸν Ἀσκληπιόν.
8.4.8
μετὰ δὲ Αἴπυτον ἔσχεν Ἄλεος τὴν ἀρχήν· Ἀγαμήδης μὲν γὰρ καὶ Γόρτυς οἱ Στυμφήλου τέταρτον γένος ἦσαν ἀπὸ Ἀρκάδος, Ἄλεος δὲ τρίτον ὁ Ἀφείδαντος. Ἄλεος δὲ τῇ τε Ἀθηνᾷ τῇ Ἀλέᾳ τὸ ἱερὸν ᾠκοδόμησεν ἐν Τεγέᾳ τὸ ἀρχαῖον καὶ αὐτῷ κατεσκεύαστο αὐτόθι ἡ βασιλεία· Γόρτυς δὲ ὁ Στυμφήλου πόλιν Γόρτυνα ᾤκισεν ἐπὶ ποταμῷ· καλεῖται δὲ Γορτύνιος καὶ ὁ ποταμός. Ἀλέῳ δὲ ἄρσενες μὲν παῖδες Λυκοῦργός τε καὶ Ἀμφιδάμας καὶ Κηφεύς, θυγάτηρ δὲ ἐγένετο Αὔγη. 8.4.9 ταύτῃ τῇ Αὔγῃ τῷ Ἑκαταίου λόγῳ συνεγίνετο Ἡρακλῆς, ὁπότε ἀφίκοιτο ἐς Τεγέαν· τέλος δὲ καὶ ἐφωράθη τετοκυῖα ἐκ τοῦ Ἡρακλέους, καὶ αὐτὴν ὁ Ἄλεος ἐσθέμενος ὁμοῦ τῷ παιδὶ ἐς λάρνακα ἀφίησεν ἐς θάλασσαν, καὶ ἡ μὲν ἀφίκετο ἐς Τεύθραντα δυνάστην ἄνδρα ἐν Καΐκου πεδίῳ καὶ συνῴκησεν ἐρασθέντι τῷ Τεύθραντι· καὶ νῦν ἔστι μὲν Αὔγης μνῆμα ἐν Περγάμῳ τῇ ὑπὲρ τοῦ Καΐκου, γῆς χῶμα λίθου περιεχόμενον κρηπῖδι, ἔστι δὲ ἐν τῷ μνήματι ἐπίθημα χαλκοῦ πεποιημένον, γυνὴ γυμνή.
10.7.1
ἔοικε δὲ ἐξ ἀρχῆς τὸ ἱερὸν τὸ ἐν Δελφοῖς ὑπὸ ἀνθρώπων ἐπιβεβουλεῦσθαι πλείστων ἤδη. οὗτός τε ὁ Εὐβοεὺς λῃστὴς καὶ ἔτεσιν ὕστερον τὸ ἔθνος τὸ Φλεγυῶν, ἔτι δὲ Πύρρος ὁ Ἀχιλλέως ἐπεχείρησεν αὐτῷ, καὶ δυνάμεως μοῖρα τῆς Ξέρξου, καὶ οἱ χρόνον τε ἐπὶ πλεῖστον καὶ μάλιστα τοῦ θεοῦ τοῖς χρήμασιν ἐπελθόντες οἱ ἐν Φωκεῦσι δυνάσται, καὶ ἡ Γαλατῶν στρατιά. ἔμελλε δὲ ἄρα οὐδὲ τῆς Νέρωνος ἐς πάντα ὀλιγωρίας ἀπειράτως ἕξειν, ὃς τὸν Ἀπόλλωνα πεντακοσίας θεῶν τε ἀναμὶξ ἀφείλετο καὶ ἀνθρώπων εἰκόνας χαλκᾶς.'' None
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1.34.4 The Oropians have near the temple a spring, which they call the Spring of Amphiaraus; they neither sacrifice into it nor are wont to use it for purifications or for lustral water. But when a man has been cured of a disease through a response the custom is to throw silver and coined gold into the spring, for by this way they say that Amphiaraus rose up after he had become a god. Iophon the Cnossian, a guide, produced responses in hexameter verse, saying that Amphiaraus gave them to the Argives who were sent against Thebes . These verses unrestrainedly appealed to popular taste. Except those whom they say Apollo inspired of old none of the seers uttered oracles, but they were good at explaining dreams and interpreting the flights of birds and the entrails of victims.
2.26.8
There is other evidence that the god was born in Epidaurus for I find that the most famous sanctuaries of Asclepius had their origin from Epidaurus . In the first place, the Athenians, who say that they gave a share of their mystic rites to Asclepius, call this day of the festival Epidauria, and they allege that their worship of Asclepius dates from then. Again, when Archias, son of Aristaechmus, was healed in Epidauria after spraining himself while hunting about Pindasus, he brought the cult to Pergamus . 2.26.9 From the one at Pergamus has been built in our own day the sanctuary of Asclepius by the sea at Smyrna . Further, at Balagrae of the Cyreneans there is an Asclepius called Healer, who like the others came from Epidaurus . From the one at Cyrene was founded the sanctuary of Asclepius at Lebene, in Crete . There is this difference between the Cyreneans and the Epidaurians, that whereas the former sacrifice goats, it is against the custom of the Epidaurians to do so.
2.27.7
Above the grove are the Nipple and another mountain called Cynortium; on the latter is a sanctuary of Maleatian Apollo. The sanctuary itself is an ancient one, but among the things Antoninus made for the Epidaurians are various appurteces for the sanctuary of the Maleatian, including a reservoir into which the rain-water collects for their use.
5.13.3
The woodman is one of the servants of Zeus, and the task assigned to him is to supply cities and private individuals with wood for sacrifices at a fixed rate, wood of the white poplar, but of no other tree, being allowed. If anybody, whether Elean or stranger, eat of the meat of the victim sacrificed to Pelops, he may not enter the temple of Zeus. The same rule applies to those who sacrifice to Telephus at Pergamus on the river Caicus ; these too may not go up to the temple of Asclepius before they have bathed.
8.4.8
After Aepytus Aleus came to the throne. For Agamedes and Gortys, the sons of Stymphalus, were three generations removed from Arcas, and Aleus, the son of Apheidas, two generations. Aleus built the old sanctuary in Tegea of Athena Alea, and made Tegea the capital of his kingdom. Gortys the son of Stymphalus founded the city Gortys on a river which is also called after him. The sons of Aleus were Lycurgus, Amphidamas and Cepheus; he also had a daughter Auge. 8.4.9 Hecataeus says that this Auge used to have intercourse with Heracles when he came to Tegea . At last it was discovered that she had borne a child to Heracles, and Aleus, putting her with her infant son in a chest, sent them out to sea. She came to Teuthras, lord of the plain of the Caicus, who fell in love with her and married her. The tomb of Auge still exists at Pergamus above the Calcus; it is a mound of earth surrounded by a basement of stone and surmounted by a figure of a naked woman in bronze.
10.7.1
It seems that from the beginning the sanctuary at Delphi has been plotted against by a vast number of men. Attacks were made against it by this Euboean pirate, and years afterwards by the Phlegyan nation; furthermore by Pyrrhus, son of Achilles, by a portion of the army of Xerxes, by the Phocian chieftains, whose attacks on the wealth of the god were the longest and fiercest, and by the Gallic invaders. It was fated too that Delphi was to suffer from the universal irreverence of Nero, who robbed Apollo of five hundred bronze statues, some of gods, some of men.'' None
14. Philostratus The Athenian, Life of Apollonius, 4.11 (2nd cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Apollonius of Tyana, advice on ensuring useful dreams at Pergamon Asklepieion • Pergamon Asklepieion, anatomical relief • Pergamon Asklepieion, dedicatory formulas and incubation • Pergamon Asklepieion, dedicatory inscriptions pertaining to incubation • Pergamon Asklepieion, leges sacrae pertaining to incubation • Pergamon Asklepieion, literary sources for incubation (excluding Aristides) • Pergamum

 Found in books: Petridou (2016), Homo Patiens: Approaches to the Patient in the Ancient World, 456; Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 199, 261

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4.11 καθήρας δὲ τοὺς ̓Εφεσίους τῆς νόσου καὶ τῶν κατὰ τὴν ̓Ιωνίαν ἱκανῶς ἔχων ἐς τὴν ̔Ελλάδα ὥρμητο. βαδίσας οὖν ἐς τὸ Πέργαμον καὶ ἡσθεὶς τῷ τοῦ ̓Ασκληπιοῦ ἱερῷ τοῖς τε ἱκετεύουσι τὸν θεὸν ὑποθέμενος, ὁπόσα δρῶντες εὐξυμβόλων ὀνειράτων τεύξονται, πολλοὺς δὲ καὶ ἰασάμενος ἦλθεν ἐς τὴν ̓Ιλιάδα καὶ πάσης τῆς περὶ αὐτῶν ἀρχαιολογίας ἐμφορηθεὶς ἐφοίτησεν ἐπὶ τοὺς τῶν ̓Αχαιῶν τάφους, καὶ πολλὰ μὲν εἰπὼν ἐπ' αὐτοῖς, πολλὰ δὲ τῶν ἀναίμων τε καὶ καθαρῶν καθαγίσας τοὺς μὲν ἑταίρους ἐκέλευσεν ἐπὶ τὴν ναῦν χωρεῖν, αὐτὸς δὲ ἐπὶ τοῦ κολωνοῦ τοῦ ̓Αχιλλέως ἐννυχεύσειν ἔφη. δεδιττομένων οὖν τῶν ἑταίρων αὐτόν, καὶ γὰρ δὴ καὶ οἱ Διοσκορίδαι καὶ οἱ Φαίδιμοι καὶ ἡ τοιάδε ὁμιλία πᾶσα ξυνῆσαν ἤδη τῷ ̓Απολλωνίῳ, τόν τε ̓Αχιλλέα φοβερὸν ἔτι φασκόντων φαίνεσθαι, τουτὶ γὰρ καὶ τοὺς ἐν τῷ ̓Ιλίῳ περὶ αὐτοῦ πεπεῖσθαι “καὶ μὴν ἐγὼ” ἔφη “τὸν ̓Αχιλλέα σφόδρα οἶδα ταῖς ξυνουσίαις χαίροντα, τόν τε γὰρ Νέστορα τὸν ἐκ τῆς Πύλου μάλα ἠσπάζετο, ἐπειδὴ ἀεί τι αὐτῷ διῄει χρηστόν, τόν τε Φοίνικα τροφέα καὶ ὀπαδὸν καὶ τὰ τοιαῦτα τιμᾶν ἐνόμιζεν, ἐπειδὴ διῆγεν αὐτὸν ὁ Φοῖνιξ λόγοις, καὶ τὸν Πρίαμον δὲ καίτοι πολεμιώτατον αὐτῷ ὄντα πρᾳότατα εἶδεν, ἐπειδὴ διαλεγομένου ἤκουσε, καὶ ̓Οδυσσεῖ δὲ ἐν διχοστασίᾳ ξυγγενόμενος οὕτω μέτριος ὤφθη, ὡς καλὸς τῷ ̓Οδυσσεῖ μᾶλλον ἢ φοβερὸς δόξαι. τὴν μὲν δὴ ἀσπίδα καὶ τὴν κόρυν τὴν δεινόν, ὥς φασι, νεύουσαν, ἐπὶ τοὺς Τρῶας οἶμαι αὐτῷ εἶναι μεμνημένῳ, ἃ ὑπ' αὐτῶν ἔπαθεν ἀπιστησάντων πρὸς αὐτὸν ὑπὲρ τοῦ γάμου, ἐγὼ δὲ οὔτε μετέχω τι τοῦ ̓Ιλίου διαλέξομαί τε αὐτῷ χαριέστερον ἢ οἱ τότε ἑταῖροι, κἂν ἀποκτείνῃ με, ὥς φατε, μετὰ Μέμνονος δήπου καὶ Κύκνου κείσομαι καὶ ἴσως με ἐν καπέτῳ κοίλῃ, καθάπερ τὸν ̔́Εκτορα, ἡ Τροία θάψει.” τοιαῦτα πρὸς τοὺς ἑταίρους ἀναμὶξ παίξας τε καὶ σπουδάσας προσέβαινε τῷ κολωνῷ μόνος, οἱ δὲ ἐβάδιζον ἐπὶ τὴν ναῦν ἑσπέρας ἤδη."" None
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4.11 Having purged the Ephesians of the plague, and having had enough of the people of Ionia, he started for Hellas. Having made his way then to Pergamum, and being pleased with the sanctuary of Asclepius, he gave hints to the supplicants of the god, what to do in order to obtain favorable dreams; and having healed many of them he came to the land of Ilium. And when his mind was glutted with all the traditions of their past, he went to visit the tombs of the Achaeans, and he delivered himself of many speeches over them, and he offered many sacrifices of a bloodless and pure kind; and then he bade his companions go on board ship, for he himself, he said, must spend a night on the mound of Achilles. Now his companions tried to deter him — for in fact the Dioscoridae and the Phaedimi, and a whole company of such already followed in the train of Apollonius — alleging that Achilles was still dreadful as a phantom; for such was the conviction about him of the inhabitants of Ilium. Nevertheless, said Apollonius, I know Achilles well and that he thoroughly delights in company; for he heartily welcomed Nestor when he came from Pylos, because he always had something useful to tell him; and he used to honor Phoenix with the title of foster-father and companion and so forth, because Phoenix entertained him with his talk; and he looked most mildly upon Priam also, although he was his bitterest enemy, so soon as he heard him talk; and when in the course of a quarrel he had an interview with Odysseus, he made himself so gracious that Odysseus thought him more handsome than terrible.For, I think that his shield and his plumes that wave so terribly, as they say, are a menace to the Trojans, because he can never forget what he suffered at their hands, when they played him false over the marriage. But I have nothing in common with Ilium, and I shall talk to him more pleasantly than his former companions; and if he slays me, as you say he will, why then I shall repose with Memnon and Cycnus, and perhaps Troy will bury me in a hollow sepulcher as they did Hector. Such were his words to his companions, half playful and half serious, as he went up alone to the barrow; but they went on board ship, for it was already evening.'' None
15. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 10.33-10.34 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Pergamon • Pergamum

 Found in books: Goodman (2006), Judaism in the Roman World: Collected Essays, 61; Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 241

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10.33 To Trajan. While I was visiting a distant part of the province a most desolating fire broke out at Nicomedia and destroyed a number of private houses and two public buildings, the almshouse * and temple of Isis, although a road ran between them. The fire was allowed to spread farther than it need have done, first, owing to the violence of the wind, and, secondly, to the laziness of the inhabitants, it being generally agreed that they stood idly by without moving and merely watched the catastrophe. Moreover, there is not a single public fire-engine ** or bucket in the place, and not one solitary appliance for mastering an outbreak of fire. However, these will be provided in accordance with the orders I have already given. But, Sir, I would have you consider whether you think a guild of firemen, of about 150 men, should be instituted. I will take care that no one who is not a genuine fireman should be admitted, and that the guild should not misapply the charter granted to it, and there would be no difficulty in keeping an eye on so small a body. 0 10.34 Trajan to Pliny. You have conceived the idea that a guild of firemen might be formed in Nicomedia on the model of various others already existing. But it is to be remembered that your province of Bithynia, and especially city states like Nicomedia, are the prey of factions. Whatever name we may give to those who form an association, and whatever the reason of the association may be, they will soon degenerate into secret societies. It is better policy to provide appliances for mastering conflagrations and encourage property owners to make use of them, and, if occasion demands, press the crowd which collects into the same service. '' None
16. None, None, nan (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Aelius Aristides, comments on bathing and hydrotherapy at Pergamon Asklepieion • Aelius Aristides, comments on patients at Pergamon Asklepieion sharing experiences • Aelius Aristides, relationship with priests of Asclepius at Pergamum • Asclepieion in Pergamum • Asclepieion in Pergamum, keys of • Asclepieion in Pergamum, lighting of • Asclepieion in Pergamum, pilgrimage to • Asclepieion in Pergamum, sacrifices at • Asclepieion in Pergamum, structures of authority at • Asclepieion in Pergamum, temple wardens of • Asclepieion in Pergamum, votives at • Hygieia, at Pergamon Asklepieion • Peiraeus Asklepieion, Pergamene Chronicle • Pergamon • Pergamon Asklepieion, Felsbarre • Pergamon Asklepieion, Sacred Well and other water sources • Pergamon Asklepieion, accounts of cures spread orally • Pergamon Asklepieion, anatomical relief • Pergamon Asklepieion, and cult of Telesphoros • Pergamon Asklepieion, dedication recording prescription • Pergamon Asklepieion, dedicatory formulas and incubation • Pergamon Asklepieion, dedicatory inscriptions pertaining to incubation • Pergamon Asklepieion, establishment and early history • Pergamon Asklepieion, hydrotherapy • Pergamon Asklepieion, linked to Smyrna Asklepieion • Pergamon Asklepieion, literary sources for incubation (excluding Aristides) • Pergamon Asklepieion, oracle about reincarnated citizen • Pergamon Asklepieion, presence of nakoroi/neokoroi • Pergamon, Asklepieion • Pergamon, neocorate • Pergamum • Pergamum, sanctuary of Asclepius • cult, Pergamene cult

 Found in books: Borg (2008), Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic, 14, 15, 286, 287, 288, 329, 337; Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 135; Dignas Parker and Stroumsa (2013), Priests and Prophets Among Pagans, Jews and Christians, 53, 54, 55, 59, 60, 63, 66, 67, 69, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77; Edelmann-Singer et al. (2020), Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions, 129, 132; Hallmannsecker (2022), Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor, 48, 77; Heller and van Nijf (2017), The Politics of Honour in the Greek Cities of the Roman Empire, 355, 356; Lipka (2021), Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus, 173, 174, 176; Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 477; Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 117, 173, 181, 199, 210, 218, 227, 228, 230, 245, 246, 247, 248, 616, 684, 734; Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 42, 49, 60, 241; Trapp et al. (2016), In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns, 3, 4, 5, 6, 61, 63, 67, 73, 107, 111, 132, 135

17. None, None, nan (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Asclepius Soter, in Pergamum • Pergamon Asklepieion, Asklepios Sōtēr

 Found in books: Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 142; Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 118

18. None, None, nan (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Caracalla, visit to Pergamon Asklepieion • Hadrian, and Pergamon Asklepieion • Pergamon Asklepieion • Pergamon Asklepieion, Imperial-period expansion • Pergamon Asklepieion, visited by Hadrian(?) • Pergamon Asklepieion, visits of Lucius Verus and Caracalla • Pergamum,

 Found in books: Bowersock (1997), Fiction as History: Nero to Julian, 78; Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 120

19. None, None, nan (2nd cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Pergamon Asklepieion, anatomical relief • Pergamon Asklepieion, dedication recording prescription • Pergamon Asklepieion, dedicatory formulas and incubation • Pergamon Asklepieion, dedicatory inscriptions pertaining to incubation • Pergamon Asklepieion, literary sources for incubation (excluding Aristides) • Pergamum

 Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 199, 230, 231; Trapp et al. (2016), In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns, 4

20. Porphyry, On Abstinence, 2.19.5 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Asclepius, sancuary at Pergamum • Pergamon Asklepieion, great and small incubation structures

 Found in books: Lupu (2005), Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) 17; Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 211

sup>
2.19.5 19.But those who have written concerning sacred operations and sacrifices, admonish us to be accurate in preserving what pertains to the popana, because these are more acceptable to the Gods than the sacrifice which is performed through the mactation of animals. Sophocles also, in describing a sacrifice which is pleasing to divinity, says in his Polyidus: The skins of sheep in sacrifice were used, Libations too of wine, grapes well preserved, And fruits collected in a heap of every kind; The olive's pinguid juice, and waxen work Most variegated, of the yellow bee. Formerly, also, there were venerable monuments in Delos of those who came from the Hyperboreans, bearing handfuls of fruits. It is necessary, therefore, that, being purified in our manners, we should make oblations, offering to the Gods those sacrifices which are pleasing to them, and not such as are attended with great expense. Now, however, if a man's body is not pure and invested with a splendid garment, he does not think it is qualified for the sanctity of sacrifice. But when he has rendered his body splendid, together with his garment, though his soul at the same time is not, purified from vice, yet he betakes himself to sacrifice, and thinks that it is a thing of no consequence; as if divinity did not especially rejoice in that which is most divine in our nature, when it is in a pure condition, as being allied to his essence. In Epidaurus, therefore, there was the following inscription on the doors of the temple: Into an odorous temple, he who goes Should pure and holy be; but to be wise In what to sanctity pertains, is to be pure.
21. Strabo, Geography, 8.6.23, 12.3.37, 13.4.2, 14.1.38
 Tagged with subjects: • Archias of Pergamon, founder of Asklepios cult • Aristonikos, pretender to the throne in Pergamon (Eumenes III) • Athena, goddess, in Pergamon • Attalos I of Pergamon • Attalos II of Pergamon • Attalos III of Pergamon • Attalus II of Pergamum • Chios, part of Pergamene conventus district • Eumenes II of Pergamon, makes Pergamon center of erudition • Eumenes II of Pergamon, rebuilding of capital Pergamon • Galatia/Galatians/Celts, Attalos of Pergamon’s victories over • Hera, in Pergamon • Pergamon, Athena temple • Pergamon, Attalos’s sucesses against Galatians and Seleucids • Pergamon, Eumenian New city and wall • Pergamon, Galatians’ monuments • Pergamon, Roman province of Asia • Pergamon, altar • Pergamon, architecture • Pergamon, conventus centre • Pergamon, foundation story • Pergamon, gymnasium • Pergamon, library • Pergamon, polis and royal residence • Pergamum • Philetairos of Pergamon • altar, in Pergamon • art/artists, Pergamon • gymnasium, Hellenistic-Roman structure in Pergamon • libraries, Pergamon • palaces, Pergamon • reliefs, Pergamon altar • statuary/sculpture, Pergamon altar • temple, Athena of Pergamon • temple, Demeter of Pergamon • temple, Hera of Pergamon

 Found in books: Borg (2008), Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic, 20; Clackson et al. (2020), Migration, Mobility and Language Contact in and around the Ancient Mediterranean, 55; Hallmannsecker (2022), Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor, 41; Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 214, 238, 242, 244, 252; Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 37, 42

sup>
8.6.23 The Corinthians, when they were subject to Philip, not only sided with him in his quarrel with the Romans, but individually behaved so contemptuously towards the Romans that certain persons ventured to pour down filth upon the Roman ambassadors when passing by their house. For this and other offences, however, they soon paid the penalty, for a considerable army was sent thither, and the city itself was razed to the ground by Leucius Mummius; and the other countries as far as Macedonia became subject to the Romans, different commanders being sent into different countries; but the Sikyonians obtained most of the Corinthian country. Polybius, who speaks in a tone of pity of the events connected with the capture of Corinth, goes on to speak of the disregard shown by the army for the works of art and votive offerings; for he says that he was present and saw paintings that had been flung to the ground and saw the soldiers playing dice on these. Among the paintings he names that of Dionysus by Aristeides, to which, according to some writers, the saying, Nothing in comparison with the Dionysus, referred; and also the painting of Heracles in torture in the robe of Deianeira. Now I have not seen the latter, but I saw the Dionysus, a most beautiful work, on the walls of the sanctuary of Ceres in Rome; but when recently the temple was burned, the painting perished with it. And I may almost say that the most and best of the other dedicatory offerings at Rome came from there; and the cities in the neighborhood of Rome also obtained some; for Mummius, being magimous rather than fond of art, as they say, readily shared with those who asked. And when Lucullus built the sanctuary of Good Fortune and a portico, he asked Mummius for the use of the statues which he had, saying that he would adorn the sanctuary with them until the dedication and then give them back. However, he did not give them back, but dedicated them to the goddess, and then bade Mummius to take them away if he wished. But Mummius took it lightly, for he cared nothing about them, so that he gained more repute than the man who dedicated them. Now after Corinth had remained deserted for a long time, it was restored again, because of its favorable position, by the deified Caesar, who colonized it with people that belonged for the most part to the freedmen class. And when these were removing the ruins and at the same time digging open the graves, they found numbers of terra-cotta reliefs, and also many bronze vessels. And since they admired the workmanship they left no grave unransacked; so that, well supplied with such things and disposing of them at a high price, they filled Rome with Corinthian mortuaries, for thus they called the things taken from the graves, and in particular the earthenware. Now at the outset the earthenware was very highly prized, like the bronzes of Corinthian workmanship, but later they ceased to care much for them, since the supply of earthen vessels failed and most of them were not even well executed. The city of the Corinthians, then, was always great and wealthy, and it was well equipped with men skilled both in the affairs of state and in the craftsman's arts; for both here and in Sikyon the arts of painting and modelling and all such arts of the craftsman flourished most. The city had territory, however, that was not very fertile, but rifted and rough; and from this fact all have called Corinth beetling, and use the proverb, Corinth is both beetle-browed and full of hollows." 12.3.37 The whole of the country around is held by Pythodoris, to whom belong, not only Phanaroea, but also Zelitis and Megalopolitis. Concerning Phanaroea I have already spoken. As for Zelitis, it has a city Zela, fortified on a mound of Semiramis, with the sanctuary of Anaitis, who is also revered by the Armenians. Now the sacred rites performed here are characterized by greater sanctity; and it is here that all the people of Pontus make their oaths concerning their matters of greatest importance. The large number of temple-servants and the honors of the priests were, in the time of the kings, of the same type as I have stated before, but at the present time everything is in the power of Pythodoris. Many persons had abused and reduced both the multitude of temple-servants and the rest of the resources of the sanctuary. The adjacent territory, also, was reduced, having been divided into several domains — I mean Zelitis, as it is called (which has the city Zela on a mound); for in, early times the kings governed Zela, not as a city, but as a sacred precinct of the Persian gods, and the priest was the master of the whole thing. It was inhabited by the multitude of temple-servants, and by the priest, who had an abundance of resources; and the sacred territory as well as that of the priest was subject to him and his numerous attendants. Pompey added many provinces to the boundaries of Zelitis, and named Zela, as he did Megalopolis, a city, and he united the latter and Culupene and Camisene into one state; the latter two border on both Lesser Armenia and Laviansene, and they contain rock-salt, and also an ancient fortress called Camisa, now in ruins. The later Roman prefects assigned a portion of these two governments to the priests of Comana, a portion to the priest of Zela, and a portion to Ateporix, a dynast of the family of tetrarchs of Galatia; but now that Ateporix has died, this portion, which is not large, is subject to the Romans, being called a province (and this little state is a political organization of itself, the people having incorporated Carana into it, from which fact its country is called Caranitis), whereas the rest is held by Pythodoris and Dyteutus.
13.4.2
He had two brothers, the elder of whom was Eumenes, the younger Attalus. Eumenes had a son of the same name, who succeeded to the rule of Pergamum, and was by this time sovereign of the places round about, so that he even joined battle with Antiochus the son of Seleucus near Sardeis and conquered him. He died after a reign of twenty-two years. Attalus, the son of Attalus and Antiochis, daughter of Achaeus, succeeded to the throne and was the first to be proclaimed king, after conquering the Galatians in a great battle. Attalus not only became a friend of the Romans but also fought on their side against Philip along with the fleet of the Rhodians. He died in old age, having reigned as king forty-three years; and he left four sons by Apollonis, a woman from Cyzicus, Eumenes, Attalus, Philetaerus, and Athenaeus. Now the two younger sons remained private citizens, but Eumenes, the elder of the other two, reigned as king. Eumenes fought on the side of the Romans against Antiochus the Great and against Perseus, and he received from the Romans all the country this side the Taurus that had been subject to Antiochus. But before that time the territory of Pergamum did not include many places that extended as far as the sea at the Elaitic and Adramyttene Gulfs. He built up the city and planted Nicephorium with a grove, and the other elder brother, from love of splendor, added sacred buildings and libraries and raised the settlement of Pergamum to what it now is. After a reign of forty-nine years Eumenes left his empire to Attalus, his son by Stratonice, the daughter of Ariathres, king of the Cappadocians. He appointed his brother Attalus as guardian both of his son, who was extremely young, and of the empire. After a reign of twenty-one years, his brother died an old man, having won success in many undertakings; for example, he helped Demetrius, the son of Seleucus, to defeat in war Alexander, the son of Antiochus, and he fought on the side of the Romans against the Pseudo-Philip, and in an expedition against Thrace he defeated Diegylis the king of the Caeni, and he slew Prusias, having incited his son Nicomedes against him, and he left his empire, under a guardian, to Attalus. Attalus, surnamed Philometor, reigned five years, died of disease, and left the Romans his heirs. The Romans proclaimed the country a province, calling it Asia, by the same name as the continent. The Caicus flows past Pergamum, through the Caicus Plain, as it is called, traversing land that is very fertile and about the best in Mysia.
14.1.38
After Smyrna one comes to Leucae, a small town, which after the death of Attalus Philometor was caused to revolt by Aristonicus, who was reputed to belong to the royal family and intended to usurp the kingdom. Now he was banished from Smyrna, after being defeated in a naval battle near the Cymaean territory by the Ephesians, but he went up into the interior and quickly assembled a large number of resourceless people, and also of slaves, invited with a promise of freedom, whom he called Heliopolitae. Now he first fell upon Thyateira unexpectedly, and then got possession of Apollonis, and then set his efforts against other fortresses. But he did not last long; the cities immediately sent a large number of troops against him, and they were assisted by Nicomedes the Bithynian and by the kings of the Cappadocians. Then came five Roman ambassadors, and after that an army under Publius Crassus the consul, and after that Marcus Perpernas, who brought the war to an end, having captured Aristonicus alive and sent him to Rome. Now Aristonicus ended his life in prison; Perpernas died of disease; and Crassus, attacked by certain people in the neighborhood of Leucae, fell in battle. And Manius Aquillius came over as consul with ten lieutets and organized the province into the form of government that still now endures. After Leucae one comes to Phocaea, on a gulf, concerning which I have already spoken in my account of Massalia. Then to the boundaries of the Ionians and the Aeolians; but I have already spoken of these. In the interior above the Ionian Sea board there remain to be described the places in the neighborhood of the road that leads from Ephesus to Antiocheia and the Maeander River. These places are occupied by Lydians and Carians mixed with Greeks.'" None
22. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Isis, in Pergamon • Pergamon • Pergamon, Asclepius in, Iseum in

 Found in books: Bortolani et al. (2019), William Furley, Svenja Nagel, and Joachim Friedrich Quack, Cultural Plurality in Ancient Magical Texts and Practices: Graeco-Egyptian Handbooks and Related Traditions, 165; Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 271

23. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Aelius Aristides, comments on bathing and hydrotherapy at Pergamon Asklepieion • Alexandra, Athena Nikephoros at Pergamon • Arsinoe, Athena Nikephoros at Pergamon • Asclepius Soter, in Pergamum • Asklepias, Athena Nikephoros at Pergamon • Asklepiastai of Yaylakale by Pergamum, • Athena Nikephoros of Pergamum, sanctuary of, • Athena, cults of, Nikephoros (Pergamon) • Athena, goddess, in Pergamon • Attalos I of Pergamon • Attalos, nephew of Philetairos of Pergamon • Bito, Athena Nikephoros at Pergamon • Caracalla, visit to Pergamon Asklepieion • Cowherds at Pergamon • Dionysus, and the Cowherds at Pergamon • Eumenes I of Pergamon • Galatia/Galatians/Celts, Attalos of Pergamon’s victories over • Hadrian, and Pergamon Asklepieion • Hygieia, at Pergamon Asklepieion • Laodike, Athena Nikephoros at Pergamon • Lysandra, Athena Nikephoros at Pergamon • Metris, d. Artemidoros, Athena Nikephoros at Pergamon • Metrodora, Athena Nikephoros at Pergamon • Moschion, d. Choreios, Athena Nikephoros at Pergamon • Moschion, d. Kausilos, Athena Nikephoros at Pergamon • Olympias, Athena Nikephoros at Pergamon • Otacilia Faustina (Pergamon), • Pergamon • Pergamon Asklepieion • Pergamon Asklepieion, Buildings 27/28 and incubation • Pergamon Asklepieion, Imperial-period expansion • Pergamon Asklepieion, Sacred Well and other water sources • Pergamon Asklepieion, great and small incubation structures • Pergamon Asklepieion, hydrotherapy • Pergamon Asklepieion, leges sacrae pertaining to incubation • Pergamon Asklepieion, therapeutai • Pergamon Asklepieion, visited by Hadrian(?) • Pergamon Asklepieion, visits of Lucius Verus and Caracalla • Pergamon, Attalids • Pergamon, Attalos’s sucesses against Galatians and Seleucids • Pergamon, Galatians’ monuments • Pergamon,, base for statue of Metris • Pergamon,, statues of priestesses from • Pergamum, • Phila,Mother of Gods at Pergamon • Philetairos of Pergamon • Philetairos of Pergamon, Cult of • Sosipatra, Athena Nikephoros at Pergamon • Thale, Athena Nikephoros at Pergamon • Theophilo, Athena Nikephoros at Pergamon • choruses, and the Cowherds of Pergamon • soteria (festival), in Pergamum • stelae, and the Cowherds at Pergamon • temple, Athena of Pergamon

 Found in books: Connelly (2007), Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece, 140, 329; Cosgrove (2022), Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine, 192; Gabrielsen and Paganini (2021), Private Associations in the Ancient Greek World: Regulations and the Creation of Group Identity, 97, 103; Horster and Klöckner (2014), Cult Personnel in Asia Minor and the Aegean Islands from the Hellenistic to the Imperial Period, 159; Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 181; Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 159; Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 210, 214, 215; Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 120, 138, 146, 193, 194, 195, 242, 249, 250, 253, 254, 262, 264

24. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Asclepius at Pergamum • Asclepius, priesthood at Pergamum • Pergamon • Pergamum

 Found in books: Connelly (2007), Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece, 182; Dignas (2002), Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor, 258; Lupu (2005), Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) 45

25. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Asclepius, sancuary at Pergamum • Pergamon

 Found in books: Lupu (2005), Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) 17; Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 152

26. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Pergamon

 Found in books: Bricault and Bonnet (2013), Panthée: Religious Transformations in the Graeco-Roman Empire, 34; Heller and van Nijf (2017), The Politics of Honour in the Greek Cities of the Roman Empire, 331

27. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Aelius Aristides, comments on patients at Pergamon Asklepieion sharing experiences • Hygieia, at Pergamon Asklepieion • Pergamon • Pergamon Asklepieion, accounts of cures spread orally • Pergamon Asklepieion, dedication recording prescription • Pergamon Asklepieion, dedicatory inscriptions pertaining to incubation • Pergamon Asklepieion, literary sources for incubation (excluding Aristides)

 Found in books: Bricault and Bonnet (2013), Panthée: Religious Transformations in the Graeco-Roman Empire, 176; Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 173, 203, 218

28. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Pergamon • Pergamum,

 Found in books: Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 139; Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 192

29. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Asclepius Soter, in Pergamum • Attalos III of Pergamon • Pergamon • Pergamon, Roman province of Asia • Pergamon, kingdom • Pergamum • soteria (festival), in Pergamum • technitai (Artists of Dionysus), Ionian-Hellespontine association (Pergamum, Teos)

 Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 39; Dignas (2002), Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor, 115; Henderson (2020), The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus, 274, 275, 276; Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 159; Liapis and Petrides (2019), Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca, 165; Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 251

30. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Aelius Aristides, comments on patients at Pergamon Asklepieion sharing experiences • Hygieia, at Pergamon Asklepieion • Pergamon • Pergamon Asklepieion, dedication recording prescription • Pergamon Asklepieion, dedicatory formulas and incubation • Pergamon Asklepieion, dedicatory inscriptions pertaining to incubation • Pergamon Asklepieion, leges sacrae pertaining to incubation • Pergamon Asklepieion, literary sources for incubation (excluding Aristides)

 Found in books: Bricault and Bonnet (2013), Panthée: Religious Transformations in the Graeco-Roman Empire, 176; Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 198, 218, 231, 236




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