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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

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All subjects (including unvalidated):
subject book bibliographic info
dialectic/metaphysics, hypothesis in d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 178
metaphysic, of mind Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 165, 166, 167, 177
metaphysical Garcia (2021), On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition, 24, 64, 77, 82, 107, 108, 112, 115, 122, 125, 127, 128, 133, 137, 145, 146, 150, 152, 162, 165, 183, 194, 205, 270
Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová (2016), Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria , 19, 153, 159, 273, 277, 285, 288
metaphysical, and curse, pollution Petrovic and Petrovic (2016), Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion, 215
metaphysical, and erotic madness, pollution Petrovic and Petrovic (2016), Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion, 215
metaphysical, and killing, pollution Petrovic and Petrovic (2016), Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion, 133, 147
metaphysical, and oath-breaking, pollution Petrovic and Petrovic (2016), Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion, 86, 122, 123, 278
metaphysical, and political regimes of bureaucratic modes of knowing Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 593, 594, 595
metaphysical, assumptions, propositional trust, as defence of Morgan (2022), The New Testament and the Theology of Trust: 'This Rich Trust', 353
metaphysical, background of ethics d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 270, 271, 272, 273
metaphysical, conversion conversion, epistrophe Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020), Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity, 337, 346
metaphysical, disposition category Ebrey and Kraut (2022), The Cambridge Companion to Plato, 2nd ed, 191, 337, 531, 547
metaphysical, interpretation of parmenides, iamblichus d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 208
metaphysical, multiplicity Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020), Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity, 16, 304, 308, 326, 327, 328, 329, 335, 338, 339, 340, 356, 362, 364
metaphysical, one Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020), Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity, 16, 28, 243, 301, 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 307, 308, 309, 310, 320, 330, 341, 356, 361
metaphysical, one-being, one Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020), Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity, 16, 301, 304, 305, 306, 307, 310, 361
metaphysical, philosophy MacDougall (2022), Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition. 2
metaphysical, philosophy/philosophers Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová (2016), Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria , 159
metaphysical, pollution Petrovic and Petrovic (2016), Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion, 21, 23, 29, 30, 31, 32, 34, 51, 62, 167, 169, 182, 233, 234, 239, 260, 282, 283, 290
metaphysical, pollution, agos, as Petrovic and Petrovic (2016), Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34
metaphysical, principle, all-one as a Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135
metaphysical, principle, difference as a Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 85, 111, 112, 113, 240, 249
metaphysical, principle, life as Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 132, 133, 159, 224, 225, 228, 232, 234, 235, 236, 239, 240, 246
metaphysical, principle, meadow as Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 228, 231, 234, 235, 238, 239, 240, 241, 246, 247
metaphysical, principle, power as Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 48, 51, 54, 81, 83, 105, 106, 108, 115, 116, 120, 129, 131, 132, 133, 134, 136, 137, 173, 174, 177, 180, 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, 187, 190, 191, 200, 205, 209, 211, 212, 213, 223, 224, 225, 227, 229, 232, 233, 234, 235, 237, 238, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 246, 248, 249, 260, 264
metaphysical, principle, subordination, and inferiority, of the female as a Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 59, 60, 104, 108, 111, 115, 134, 136, 139, 140, 148, 149, 158, 161, 162, 166, 184, 185, 223, 234, 265
metaphysical, procession proodos Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020), Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity, 304, 308, 327, 330, 336, 342, 374
metaphysical, system, σύστηµα/συστήµατα, of philosophy, of doctrine / Motta and Petrucci (2022), Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity, 4, 14, 15, 21, 34, 48, 68, 92, 94, 95, 96, 97, 99, 100, 102, 103, 104, 105, 108, 109, 110, 118
metaphysical, unity, unity Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020), Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity, 16, 33, 34, 310, 323, 326, 328, 329, 330, 331, 332, 333, 334, 335, 344, 346, 356, 360, 362
metaphysical, vulnerability Legaspi (2018), Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition, 63, 64, 79, 80, 81, 106, 107, 251
metaphysical, works, aristotle, metaphysics Singer and van Eijk (2018), Galen: Works on Human Nature: Volume 1, Mixtures (De Temperamentis), 78, 80, 123
metaphysically, inclined skepticism, skepticism Vogt (2015), Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius. 11
metaphysics Corrigan and Rasimus (2013), Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World, 8, 82, 203, 299, 301, 326, 382, 386, 420, 427, 428, 437, 468, 472, 482, 502, 504, 506, 527, 534, 537, 544, 545, 547, 549, 551, 553, 555, 556, 558, 581, 582
Edelmann-Singer et al. (2020), Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions, 7, 45, 50, 89, 131, 241
Erler et al. (2021), Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition, 17, 18, 32, 33, 34, 144, 173, 175, 203, 205, 209, 213, 214, 223, 243, 244
Horkey (2019), Cosmos in the Ancient World, 20, 33, 62, 66, 96, 112, 286, 295
Long (2006), From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy, 239, 240, 251, 264, 274, 275, 364
Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 818, 819, 876
Motta and Petrucci (2022), Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity, 7, 17, 35, 79, 83, 105, 106, 107, 117, 185
Novenson (2020), Monotheism and Christology in Greco-Roman Antiquity, 27, 38, 60, 144, 145, 146, 165, 251, 252, 258, 259, 260, 261, 275, 282, 297
Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 159
Seaford, Wilkins, Wright (2017), Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill. 6, 37, 40, 41, 42, 46, 73, 76, 81, 85, 131, 205, 264
Singer and van Eijk (2018), Galen: Works on Human Nature: Volume 1, Mixtures (De Temperamentis), 155 n. 6
d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 31, 108, 184
metaphysics, a, aristotelianism Osborne (1996), Eros Unveiled: Plato and the God of Love. 137
metaphysics, apuleius’s treatment of Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 144
metaphysics, aristotle Celykte (2020), The Stoic Theory of Beauty. 178
Erler et al. (2021), Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition, 163, 164, 166, 175
Gerson and Wilberding (2022), The New Cambridge Companion to Plotinus, 16, 36, 100, 120, 181, 194, 208, 272, 310
Harte (2017), Rereading Ancient Philosophy: Old Chestnuts and Sacred Cows, 29, 185
Joosse (2021), Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher, 34
Neusner Green and Avery-Peck (2022), Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points, 48
Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 40
Tsouni (2019), Antiochus and Peripatetic Ethics, 142, 147
Walter (2020), Time in Ancient Stories of Origin, 11
Zachhuber (2022), Time and Soul: From Aristotle to St. Augustine. 19, 23, 24, 25, 42, 43, 48
metaphysics, commentary on aristotles d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 29, 169, 170, 172, 195
metaphysics, creation Yates and Dupont (2023), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part II: Consolidation of the Canon to the Arab Conquest (ca. 393 to 650 CE).. 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112
metaphysics, demiurge, in plotinus' Marmodoro and Prince (2015), Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity, 53
metaphysics, dualism, of plato’s Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 251
metaphysics, epistemology in relation to d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 28, 60
metaphysics, in calcidius’s commentary Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 208
metaphysics, in platonic curriculum Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 107
metaphysics, influence on augustine Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 249, 250, 251, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 257, 258, 259, 260, 261, 262, 263, 264, 265, 266, 267, 268, 269, 270
metaphysics, nature Rüpke and Woolf (2013), Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE. 4, 6, 8, 13, 78, 97
metaphysics, new musicians, aristotle Cosgrove (2022), Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine, 88
metaphysics, of identity Seaford, Wilkins, Wright (2017), Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill. 78, 81, 83, 85, 86
metaphysics, of plotinus Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 143
metaphysics, of tyranny Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 36, 37, 92, 93, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 130, 153, 154, 155, 179, 184, 188, 189, 190, 193, 196, 197, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 218, 221, 222, 224, 225
metaphysics, plato’s, in timaeus Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 251
metaphysics, plotinian Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 24
metaphysics, prepositional Novenson (2020), Monotheism and Christology in Greco-Roman Antiquity, 27, 144, 145, 146, 165, 169
metaphysics, proclus diadochus, survey of proclus’ Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 595, 596, 597, 598
metaphysics, sight and, melchizedek Birnbaum and Dillon (2020), Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 299
metaphysics, simplified Joosse (2021), Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher, 2, 212, 217
metaphysics, theophrastus Tsouni (2019), Antiochus and Peripatetic Ethics, 194
metaphysics, trinitarian Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 252, 258, 279
metaphysics, unmoved mover in Marmodoro and Prince (2015), Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity, 132
metaphysics, xii, themistius, paraphrase of aristotle’s Zachhuber (2022), Time and Soul: From Aristotle to St. Augustine. 42, 43
metaphysics/-al, and aesthetics d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 277, 280, 282, 285, 286
metaphysics/-al, and mathematics d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 168, 169, 173, 174, 178, 179
metaphysics/-al, in relation to theology d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 213
metaphysics/-al, reading of the parmenides d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 112
metaphysics/-al, relevance to politics d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 273
metaphysics/-al, unhypothetical d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 178
spiritual/metaphysical, self-motion d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 54, 55, 58, 63, 69, 126

List of validated texts:
26 validated results for "metaphysical"
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 1.1-1.3, 1.26, 2.7, 2.20 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Metaphysics • creation, metaphysics • metaphysical • metaphysical vulnerability • metaphysics • prepositional metaphysics

 Found in books: Corrigan and Rasimus (2013), Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World, 8, 382; Garcia (2021), On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition, 64, 150, 270; Horkey (2019), Cosmos in the Ancient World, 20; Legaspi (2018), Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition, 106; Novenson (2020), Monotheism and Christology in Greco-Roman Antiquity, 145, 165; Yates and Dupont (2023), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part II: Consolidation of the Canon to the Arab Conquest (ca. 393 to 650 CE).. 109, 111

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1.1 בְּרֵאשִׁית בָּרָא אֱלֹהִים אֵת הַשָּׁמַיִם וְאֵת הָאָרֶץ׃
1.1
וַיִּקְרָא אֱלֹהִים לַיַּבָּשָׁה אֶרֶץ וּלְמִקְוֵה הַמַּיִם קָרָא יַמִּים וַיַּרְא אֱלֹהִים כִּי־טוֹב׃ 1.2 וְהָאָרֶץ הָיְתָה תֹהוּ וָבֹהוּ וְחֹשֶׁךְ עַל־פְּנֵי תְהוֹם וְרוּחַ אֱלֹהִים מְרַחֶפֶת עַל־פְּנֵי הַמָּיִם׃ 1.2 וַיֹּאמֶר אֱלֹהִים יִשְׁרְצוּ הַמַּיִם שֶׁרֶץ נֶפֶשׁ חַיָּה וְעוֹף יְעוֹפֵף עַל־הָאָרֶץ עַל־פְּנֵי רְקִיעַ הַשָּׁמָיִם׃ 1.3 וַיֹּאמֶר אֱלֹהִים יְהִי אוֹר וַיְהִי־אוֹר׃ 1.3 וּלְכָל־חַיַּת הָאָרֶץ וּלְכָל־עוֹף הַשָּׁמַיִם וּלְכֹל רוֹמֵשׂ עַל־הָאָרֶץ אֲשֶׁר־בּוֹ נֶפֶשׁ חַיָּה אֶת־כָּל־יֶרֶק עֵשֶׂב לְאָכְלָה וַיְהִי־כֵן׃
1.26
וַיֹּאמֶר אֱלֹהִים נַעֲשֶׂה אָדָם בְּצַלְמֵנוּ כִּדְמוּתֵנוּ וְיִרְדּוּ בִדְגַת הַיָּם וּבְעוֹף הַשָּׁמַיִם וּבַבְּהֵמָה וּבְכָל־הָאָרֶץ וּבְכָל־הָרֶמֶשׂ הָרֹמֵשׂ עַל־הָאָרֶץ׃
2.7
וַיִּיצֶר יְהוָה אֱלֹהִים אֶת־הָאָדָם עָפָר מִן־הָאֲדָמָה וַיִּפַּח בְּאַפָּיו נִשְׁמַת חַיִּים וַיְהִי הָאָדָם לְנֶפֶשׁ חַיָּה׃' ' None
sup>
1.1 In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. 1.2 Now the earth was unformed and void, and darkness was upon the face of the deep; and the spirit of God hovered over the face of the waters. 1.3 And God said: ‘Let there be light.’ And there was light.
1.26
And God said: ‘Let us make man in our image, after our likeness; and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.’ 1 And there was evening and there was morning, a fifth day.,And God saw every thing that He had made, and, behold, it was very good. And there was evening and there was morning, the sixth day.,And God said: ‘Let there be a firmament in the midst of the waters, and let it divide the waters from the waters.’,And God made the two great lights: the greater light to rule the day, and the lesser light to rule the night; and the stars.,And the earth brought forth grass, herb yielding seed after its kind, and tree bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after its kind; and God saw that it was good.,And God said: ‘Let the waters under the heaven be gathered together unto one place, and let the dry land appear.’ And it was so.,And God called the light Day, and the darkness He called Night. And there was evening and there was morning, one day.,And God made the firmament, and divided the waters which were under the firmament from the waters which were above the firmament; and it was so.,And God called the firmament Heaven. And there was evening and there was morning, a second day.,And there was evening and there was morning, a third day.,And there was evening and there was morning, a fourth day.,And God set them in the firmament of the heaven to give light upon the earth,,and to every beast of the earth, and to every fowl of the air, and to every thing that creepeth upon the earth, wherein there is a living soul, I have given every green herb for food.’ And it was so.,and to rule over the day and over the night, and to divide the light from the darkness; and God saw that it was good.,And God called the dry land Earth, and the gathering together of the waters called He Seas; and God saw that it was good.,And God said: ‘Let the earth put forth grass, herb yielding seed, and fruit-tree bearing fruit after its kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth.’ And it was so.,And God saw the light, that it was good; and God divided the light from the darkness.,And God blessed them; and God said unto them: ‘Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth, and subdue it; and have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over every living thing that creepeth upon the earth.’,In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.,And God said: ‘Let the waters swarm with swarms of living creatures, and let fowl fly above the earth in the open firmament of heaven.’,And God said: ‘Let the earth bring forth the living creature after its kind, cattle, and creeping thing, and beast of the earth after its kind.’ And it was so.,And God said: ‘Let there be lights in the firmament of the heaven to divide the day from the night; and let them be for signs, and for seasons, and for days and years;,And God blessed them, saying: ‘Be fruitful, and multiply, and fill the waters in the seas, and let fowl multiply in the earth.’,And God created man in His own image, in the image of God created He him; male and female created He them.,And God said: ‘Let there be light.’ And there was light.,And God said: ‘Behold, I have given you every herb yielding seed, which is upon the face of all the earth, and every tree, in which is the fruit of a tree yielding seed—to you it shall be for food;,And God said: ‘Let us make man in our image, after our likeness; and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.’,And God created the great sea-monsters, and every living creature that creepeth, wherewith the waters swarmed, after its kind, and every winged fowl after its kind; and God saw that it was good.,And God made the beast of the earth after its kind, and the cattle after their kind, and every thing that creepeth upon the ground after its kind; and God saw that it was good.,Now the earth was unformed and void, and darkness was upon the face of the deep; and the spirit of God hovered over the face of the waters.,and let them be for lights in the firmament of the heaven to give light upon the earth.’ And it was so.2.7 Then the LORD God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul.
2.20
And the man gave names to all cattle, and to the fowl of the air, and to every beast of the field; but for Adam there was not found a help meet for him. 2 And the LORD God took the man, and put him into the garden of Eden to dress it and to keep it.,and the gold of that land is good; there is bdellium and the onyx stone.,The name of the first is Pishon; that is it which compasseth the whole land of Havilah, where there is gold;,No shrub of the field was yet in the earth, and no herb of the field had yet sprung up; for the LORD God had not caused it to rain upon the earth, and there was not a man to till the ground;,And out of the ground made the LORD God to grow every tree that is pleasant to the sight, and good for food; the tree of life also in the midst of the garden, and the tree of the knowledge of good and evil.,And on the seventh day God finished His work which He had made; and He rested on the seventh day from all His work which He had made.,And a river went out of Eden to water the garden; and from thence it was parted, and became four heads.,And the name of the third river is Tigris; that is it which goeth toward the east of Asshur. And the fourth river is the Euphrates.,And the LORD God caused a deep sleep to fall upon the man, and he slept; and He took one of his ribs, and closed up the place with flesh instead thereof.,And God blessed the seventh day, and hallowed it; because that in it He rested from all His work which God in creating had made.,These are the generations of the heaven and of the earth when they were created, in the day that the LORD God made earth and heaven.,Then the LORD God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul.,And the man said: ‘This is now bone of my bones, and flesh of my flesh; she shall be called Woman, because she was taken out of Man.’,And the man gave names to all cattle, and to the fowl of the air, and to every beast of the field; but for Adam there was not found a help meet for him.,And the LORD God planted a garden eastward, in Eden; and there He put the man whom He had formed.,but there went up a mist from the earth, and watered the whole face of the ground.,And the name of the second river is Gihon; the same is it that compasseth the whole land of Cush.,And out of the ground the LORD God formed every beast of the field, and every fowl of the air; and brought them unto the man to see what he would call them; and whatsoever the man would call every living creature, that was to be the name thereof.,And they were both naked, the man and his wife, and were not ashamed.,Therefore shall a man leave his father and his mother, and shall cleave unto his wife, and they shall be one flesh.,but of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt not eat of it; for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die.’,And the LORD God commanded the man, saying: ‘of every tree of the garden thou mayest freely eat;,And the heaven and the earth were finished, and all the host of them.,And the LORD God said: ‘It is not good that the man should be alone; I will make him a help meet for him.’,And the rib, which the LORD God had taken from the man, made He a woman, and brought her unto the man. ' None
2. None, None, nan (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Aristotle, Metaphysics, • pollution, metaphysical • pollution, metaphysical, and oath-breaking

 Found in books: Bowie (2021), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, 271; Petrovic and Petrovic (2016), Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion, 122, 123, 283

3. None, None, nan (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • pollution, metaphysical, and killing • tyranny, metaphysics of

 Found in books: Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 193; Petrovic and Petrovic (2016), Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion, 147

4. Plato, Phaedrus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • System (σύστηµα/συστήµατα), of Philosophy, of doctrine / metaphysical • metaphysics/-al and aesthetics

 Found in books: Motta and Petrucci (2022), Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity, 4; d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 285

264c οὕτως ἀκριβῶς διιδεῖν. ΣΩ. ἀλλὰ τόδε γε οἶμαί σε φάναι ἄν, δεῖν πάντα λόγον ὥσπερ ζῷον συνεστάναι σῶμά τι ἔχοντα αὐτὸν αὑτοῦ, ὥστε μήτε ἀκέφαλον εἶναι μήτε ἄπουν, ἀλλὰ μέσα τε ἔχειν καὶ ἄκρα, πρέποντα ἀλλήλοις καὶ τῷ ὅλῳ γεγραμμένα. ΦΑΙ. πῶς γὰρ οὔ; ΣΩ. σκέψαι τοίνυν τὸν τοῦ ἑταίρου σου λόγον εἴτε οὕτως εἴτε ἄλλως ἔχει, καὶ εὑρήσεις τοῦ ἐπιγράμματος οὐδὲν διαφέροντα, ὃ Μίδᾳ τῷ Φρυγί φασίν τινες ἐπιγεγράφθαι.'' None264c Phaedrus. You flatter me in thinking that I can discern his motives so accurately. Socrates. But I do think you will agree to this, that every discourse must be organized, like a living being, with a body of its own, as it were, so as not to be headless or footless, but to have a middle and members, composed in fitting relation to each other and to the whole. Phaedrus. Certainly. Socrates. See then whether this is the case with your friend’s discourse, or not. You will find'' None
5. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Metaphysics • Plotinus, metaphysics of • metaphysics • metaphysics/-al and mathematics

 Found in books: Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 143; Corrigan and Rasimus (2013), Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World, 582; Erler et al. (2021), Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition, 32; Novenson (2020), Monotheism and Christology in Greco-Roman Antiquity, 251; d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 168

509d he said. Conceive then, said I, as we were saying, that there are these two entities, and that one of them is sovereign over the intelligible order and region and the other over the world of the eye-ball, not to say the sky-ball, but let that pass. You surely apprehend the two types, the visible and the intelligible. I do. Represent them then, as it were, by a line divided into two unequal sections and cut each section again in the same ratio (the section, that is, of the visible and that of the intelligible order), and then as an expression of the ratio of their comparative clearness and obscurity you will have, as one of the section' ' None
6. Plato, Timaeus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Metaphysics • Metaphysics, unmoved mover in • Power as Metaphysical Principle • Subordination (and inferiority), of the female as a metaphysical principle • metaphysical • metaphysics • metaphysics, Plotinian • theology, metaphysics

 Found in books: Corrigan and Rasimus (2013), Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World, 8; Erler et al. (2021), Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition, 32; Fowler (2014), Plato in the Third Sophistic, 187, 197; Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 24; Marmodoro and Prince (2015), Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity, 132; Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 223; Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová (2016), Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria , 288

28a ἀεί, ὂν δὲ οὐδέποτε; τὸ μὲν δὴ νοήσει μετὰ λόγου περιληπτόν, ἀεὶ κατὰ ταὐτὰ ὄν, τὸ δʼ αὖ δόξῃ μετʼ αἰσθήσεως ἀλόγου δοξαστόν, γιγνόμενον καὶ ἀπολλύμενον, ὄντως δὲ οὐδέποτε ὄν. πᾶν δὲ αὖ τὸ γιγνόμενον ὑπʼ αἰτίου τινὸς ἐξ ἀνάγκης γίγνεσθαι· παντὶ γὰρ ἀδύνατον χωρὶς αἰτίου γένεσιν σχεῖν. ὅτου μὲν οὖν ἂν ὁ δημιουργὸς πρὸς τὸ κατὰ ταὐτὰ ἔχον βλέπων ἀεί, τοιούτῳ τινὶ προσχρώμενος παραδείγματι, τὴν ἰδέαν καὶ δύναμιν αὐτοῦ ἀπεργάζηται, καλὸν ἐξ ἀνάγκης' 28c δʼ αἰσθητά, δόξῃ περιληπτὰ μετʼ αἰσθήσεως, γιγνόμενα καὶ γεννητὰ ἐφάνη. τῷ δʼ αὖ γενομένῳ φαμὲν ὑπʼ αἰτίου τινὸς ἀνάγκην εἶναι γενέσθαι. ΤΙ. τὸν μὲν οὖν ποιητὴν καὶ πατέρα τοῦδε τοῦ παντὸς εὑρεῖν τε ἔργον καὶ εὑρόντα εἰς πάντας ἀδύνατον λέγειν· τόδε δʼ οὖν πάλιν ἐπισκεπτέον περὶ αὐτοῦ, πρὸς πότερον τῶν παραδειγμάτων ὁ τεκταινόμενος αὐτὸν ' None28a and has no Becoming? And what is that which is Becoming always and never is Existent? Now the one of these is apprehensible by thought with the aid of reasoning, since it is ever uniformly existent; whereas the other is an object of opinion with the aid of unreasoning sensation, since it becomes and perishes and is never really existent. Again, everything which becomes must of necessity become owing to some Cause; for without a cause it is impossible for anything to attain becoming. But when the artificer of any object, in forming its shape and quality, keeps his gaze fixed on that which is uniform, using a model of this kind, that object, executed in this way, must of necessity' 28c and things sensible, being apprehensible by opinion with the aid of sensation, come into existence, as we saw, and are generated. And that which has come into existence must necessarily, as we say, have come into existence by reason of some Cause. Tim. Now to discover the Maker and Father of this Universe were a task indeed; and having discovered Him, to declare Him unto all men were a thing impossible. However, let us return and inquire further concerning the Cosmos,—after which of the Models did its Architect construct it? ' None
7. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Power as Metaphysical Principle • metaphysical background of ethics

 Found in books: Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 173; d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 270

8. None, None, nan (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Aristotle, Metaphysics • theology, metaphysics

 Found in books: Fowler (2014), Plato in the Third Sophistic, 187; Gerson and Wilberding (2022), The New Cambridge Companion to Plotinus, 120

9. None, None, nan (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Aristotle, Metaphysics • Metaphysics • Metaphysics, unmoved mover in • identity, metaphysics of

 Found in books: Fowler (2014), Plato in the Third Sophistic, 206; Gerson and Wilberding (2022), The New Cambridge Companion to Plotinus, 120, 181, 194, 208; Joosse (2021), Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher, 34; Marmodoro and Prince (2015), Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity, 132; Seaford, Wilkins, Wright (2017), Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill. 83; Tsouni (2019), Antiochus and Peripatetic Ethics, 142

10. Anon., 1 Enoch, 9.5 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • metaphysical • metaphysics • prepositional metaphysics

 Found in books: Garcia (2021), On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition, 146; Novenson (2020), Monotheism and Christology in Greco-Roman Antiquity, 146

sup>
9.5 ages, and Thy name holy and glorious and blessed unto all the ages! Thou hast made all things, and power over all things hast Thou: and all things are naked and open in Thy sight, and Thou seest all'' None
11. None, None, nan (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • metaphysical • metaphysics

 Found in books: Garcia (2021), On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition, 150; Horkey (2019), Cosmos in the Ancient World, 286

12. New Testament, John, 1.1-1.18 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Metaphysics • metaphysical • metaphysics • prepositional metaphysics

 Found in books: Corrigan and Rasimus (2013), Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World, 437; Novenson (2020), Monotheism and Christology in Greco-Roman Antiquity, 145; Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová (2016), Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria , 277, 285, 288

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1.1 ΕΝ ΑΡΧΗ ἦν ὁ λόγος, καὶ ὁ λόγος ἦν πρὸς τὸν θεόν, καὶ θεὸς ἦν ὁ λόγος. 1.2 Οὗτος ἦν ἐν ἀρχῇ πρὸς τὸν θεόν. 1.3 πάντα διʼ αὐτοῦ ἐγένετο, καὶ χωρὶς αὐτοῦ ἐγένετο οὐδὲ ἕν. 1.4 ὃ γέγονεν ἐν αὐτῷ ζωὴ ἦν, καὶ ἡ ζωὴ ἦν τὸ φῶς τῶν ἀνθρώπων· 1.5 καὶ τὸ φῶς ἐν τῇ σκοτίᾳ φαίνει, καὶ ἡ σκοτία αὐτὸ οὐ κατέλαβεν. 1.6 Ἐγένετο ἄνθρωπος ἀπεσταλμένος παρὰ θεοῦ, ὄνομα αὐτῷ Ἰωάνης· 1.7 οὗτος ἦλθεν εἰς μαρτυρίαν, ἵνα μαρτυρήσῃ περὶ τοῦ φωτός, ἵνα πάντες πιστεύσωσιν διʼ αὐτοῦ. 1.8 οὐκ ἦν ἐκεῖνος τὸ φῶς, ἀλλʼ ἵνα μαρτυρήσῃ περὶ τοῦ φωτός. 1.9 Ἦν τὸ φῶς τὸ ἀληθινὸν ὃ φωτίζει πάντα ἄνθρωπον ἐρχόμενον εἰς τὸν κόσμον.
1.10
ἐν τῷ κόσμῳ ἦν, καὶ ὁ κόσμος διʼ αὐτοῦ ἐγένετο, καὶ ὁ κόσμος αὐτὸν οὐκ ἔγνω.
1.11
Εἰς τὰ ἴδια ἦλθεν, καὶ οἱ ἴδιοι αὐτὸν οὐ παρέλαβον.
1.12
ὅσοι δὲ ἔλαβον αὐτόν, ἔδωκεν αὐτοῖς ἐξουσίαν τέκνα θεοῦ γενέσθαι, τοῖς πιστεύουσιν εἰς τὸ ὄνομα αὐτοῦ,
1.13
οἳ οὐκ ἐξ αἱμάτων οὐδὲ ἐκ θελήματος σαρκὸς οὐδὲ ἐκ θελήματος ἀνδρὸς ἀλλʼ ἐκ θεοῦ ἐγεννήθησαν.
1.14
Καὶ ὁ λόγος σὰρξ ἐγένετο καὶ ἐσκήνωσεν ἐν ἡμῖν, καὶ ἐθεασάμεθα τὴν δόξαν αὐτοῦ, δόξαν ὡς μονογενοῦς παρὰ πατρός, πλήρης χάριτος καὶ ἀληθείας·?̔
1.15
Ἰωάνης μαρτυρεῖ περὶ αὐτοῦ καὶ κέκραγεν λέγων — οὗτος ἦν ὁ εἰπών — Ὁ ὀπίσω μου ἐρχόμενος ἔμπροσθέν μου γέγονεν, ὅτι πρῶτός μου ἦν·̓
1.16
ὅτι ἐκ τοῦ πληρώματος αὐτοῦ ἡμεῖς πάντες ἐλάβομεν, καὶ χάριν ἀντὶ χάριτος·
1.17
ὅτι ὁ νόμος διὰ Μωυσέως ἐδόθη, ἡ χάρις καὶ ἡ ἀλήθεια διὰ Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ ἐγένετο.
1.18
θεὸν οὐδεὶς ἑώρακεν πώποτε· μονογενὴς θεὸς ὁ ὢν εἰς τὸν κόλπον τοῦ πατρὸς ἐκεῖνος ἐξηγήσατο.'' None
sup>
1.1 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. 1.2 The same was in the beginning with God. 1.3 All things were made through him. Without him was not anything made that has been made. 1.4 In him was life, and the life was the light of men. ' "1.5 The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness hasn't overcome it. " '1.6 There came a man, sent from God, whose name was John. 1.7 The same came as a witness, that he might testify about the light, that all might believe through him. 1.8 He was not the light, but was sent that he might testify about the light. 1.9 The true light that enlightens everyone was coming into the world. ' "
1.10
He was in the world, and the world was made through him, and the world didn't recognize him. " "
1.11
He came to his own, and those who were his own didn't receive him. " "
1.12
But as many as received him, to them he gave the right to become God's children, to those who believe in his name: " 1.13 who were born not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God.
1.14
The Word became flesh, and lived among us. We saw his glory, such glory as of the one and only Son of the Father, full of grace and truth.
1.15
John testified about him. He cried out, saying, "This was he of whom I said, \'He who comes after me has surpassed me, for he was before me.\'"
1.16
From his fullness we all received grace upon grace.
1.17
For the law was given through Moses. Grace and truth came through Jesus Christ.
1.18
No one has seen God at any time. The one and only Son, who is in the bosom of the Father, he has declared him. '' None
13. Plutarch, On Isis And Osiris, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Aristotle, Metaphysics • System (σύστηµα/συστήµατα), of Philosophy, of doctrine / metaphysical

 Found in books: Erler et al. (2021), Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition, 164; Motta and Petrucci (2022), Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity, 104

382d they lay it away and guard it, unseen and untouched. But the robes of Isis they use many times over; for in use those things that are perceptible and ready at hand afford many disclosures of themselves and opportunities to view them as they are changed about in various ways. But the apperception of the conceptual, the pure, and the simple, shining through the soul like a flash of lightning, affords an opportunity to touch and see it but once. For this reason Plato and Aristotle call this part of philosophy the epoptic or mystic part, inasmuch as those who have passed beyond these conjectural and confused matters of all sorts by means of Reason proceed by leaps and bounds to that primary, simple, and immaterial principle;'' None
14. Irenaeus, Refutation of All Heresies, 1.2.4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Metaphysics • metaphysics

 Found in books: Corrigan and Rasimus (2013), Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World, 420; Novenson (2020), Monotheism and Christology in Greco-Roman Antiquity, 259

sup>
1.2.4 The Father afterwards produces, in his own image, by means of Monogenes, the above-mentioned Horos, without conjunction, masculo-feminine. For they maintain that sometimes the Father acts in conjunction with Sige, but that at other times he shows himself independent both of male and female. They term this Horos both Stauros and Lytrotes, and Carpistes, and Horothetes, and Metagoges. And by this Horos they declare that Sophia was purified and established, while she was also restored to her proper conjunction. For her enthymesis (or inborn idea) having been taken away from her, along with its supervening passion, she herself certainly remained within the Pleroma; but her enthymesis, with its passion, was separated from her by Horos, fenced off, and expelled from that circle. This enthymesis was, no doubt, a spiritual substance, possessing some of the natural tendencies of an AEon, but at the same time shapeless and without form, because it had received nothing. And on this account they say that it was an imbecile and feminine production.'' None
15. None, None, nan (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Metaphysics • theology, metaphysics

 Found in books: Corrigan and Rasimus (2013), Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World, 386; Fowler (2014), Plato in the Third Sophistic, 187

16. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 7.135-7.136 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Metaphysics • metaphysics

 Found in books: Corrigan and Rasimus (2013), Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World, 386; Long (2006), From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy, 239

sup>
7.135 Body is defined by Apollodorus in his Physics as that which is extended in three dimensions, length, breadth, and depth. This is also called solid body. But surface is the extremity of a solid body, or that which has length and breadth only without depth. That surface exists not only in our thought but also in reality is maintained by Posidonius in the third book of his Celestial Phenomena. A line is the extremity of a surface or length without breadth, or that which has length alone. A point is the extremity of a line, the smallest possible mark or dot.God is one and the same with Reason, Fate, and Zeus; he is also called by many other names. 7.136 In the beginning he was by himself; he transformed the whole of substance through air into water, and just as in animal generation the seed has a moist vehicle, so in cosmic moisture God, who is the seminal reason of the universe, remains behind in the moisture as such an agent, adapting matter to himself with a view to the next stage of creation. Thereupon he created first of all the four elements, fire, water, air, earth. They are discussed by Zeno in his treatise On the Whole, by Chrysippus in the first book of his Physics, and by Archedemus in a work On Elements. An element is defined as that from which particular things first come to be at their birth and into which they are finally resolved.'' None
17. Porphyry, Life of Plotinus, 9.12-9.16 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Metaphysics • Subordination (and inferiority), of the female as a metaphysical principle

 Found in books: Corrigan and Rasimus (2013), Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World, 468, 506; Motta and Petrucci (2022), Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity, 106; Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 60

sup>
9.12 Several women were greatly attached to him, amongst them Gemina, in whose house he lived, and her daughter, called Gemina, too, after the mother, and Amphiclea, the wife Ariston, son Iamblichus; all three devoted themselves assiduously to philosophy. Not a few men and women of position, on the approach of death, had left their boys and girls, with all their property, in his care, feeling that with Plotinus for guardian the children would be in holy hands. His house therefore was filled with lads lasses, amongst them Potamon, in whose education he took such interest as often to hear the boy recite verses of his own composition. He always found time for those that came to submit returns of the children's property, and he looked closely to the accuracy of the accounts: 'Until the young people take to philosophy,' he used to say, 'their fortunes and revenues must be kept intact for them.' And yet all this labour and thought over the worldly interests of so many people never interrupted, during waking hours, his intention towards the Supreme. He was gentle, and always at the call of those having the slightest acquaintance with him. After spending twenty-six years in Rome, acting, too, as arbiter in many differences, he had never made an enemy of any citizen. " "9.16 Several women were greatly attached to him, amongst them Gemina, in whose house he lived, and her daughter, called Gemina, too, after the mother, and Amphiclea, the wife Ariston, son Iamblichus; all three devoted themselves assiduously to philosophy. Not a few men and women of position, on the approach of death, had left their boys and girls, with all their property, in his care, feeling that with Plotinus for guardian the children would be in holy hands. His house therefore was filled with lads lasses, amongst them Potamon, in whose education he took such interest as often to hear the boy recite verses of his own composition. He always found time for those that came to submit returns of the children's property, and he looked closely to the accuracy of the accounts: 'Until the young people take to philosophy,' he used to say, 'their fortunes and revenues must be kept intact for them.' And yet all this labour and thought over the worldly interests of so many people never interrupted, during waking hours, his intention towards the Supreme. He was gentle, and always at the call of those having the slightest acquaintance with him. After spending twenty-six years in Rome, acting, too, as arbiter in many differences, he had never made an enemy of any citizen. " " None
18. None, None, nan (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Metaphysics • One (metaphysical) • Power as Metaphysical Principle • creation, metaphysics • metaphysics

 Found in books: Corrigan and Rasimus (2013), Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World, 326, 420, 427, 428, 468, 504, 581; Novenson (2020), Monotheism and Christology in Greco-Roman Antiquity, 252; Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 54; Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020), Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity, 243; Yates and Dupont (2023), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part II: Consolidation of the Canon to the Arab Conquest (ca. 393 to 650 CE).. 108

19. None, None, nan (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Commentary on Aristotles Metaphysics • Metaphysics • One (metaphysical) • metaphysics/-al in relation to theology • theology, metaphysics

 Found in books: Fowler (2014), Plato in the Third Sophistic, 64; Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020), Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity, 28; d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 29, 170, 213

20. None, None, nan (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Commentary on Aristotles Metaphysics • dualism, of Plato’s metaphysics • metaphysics • metaphysics, Apuleius’s treatment of • metaphysics, Plato’s, in Timaeus • metaphysics, in Calcidius’s commentary • metaphysics, in Platonic curriculum • metaphysics, influence on Augustine • metaphysics, trinitarian • spiritual/metaphysical self-motion

 Found in books: Erler et al. (2021), Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition, 223; Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 107, 144, 208, 249, 250, 251, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 257, 258, 259, 260, 261, 262, 263, 264, 265, 266, 267, 268, 269, 270, 279; d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 29, 126

21. None, None, nan (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Proclus Diadochus, survey of Proclus’ metaphysics • multiplicity (metaphysical) • spiritual/metaphysical self-motion • unity, metaphysical unity

 Found in books: Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 596, 597; Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020), Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity, 328; d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 54, 55, 69

22. None, None, nan (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Metaphysics • metaphysics

 Found in books: Corrigan and Rasimus (2013), Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World, 549; Erler et al. (2021), Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition, 213, 214, 223, 243, 244

23. None, None, nan (6th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Metaphysics, simplified • theology, metaphysics

 Found in books: Fowler (2014), Plato in the Third Sophistic, 82; Joosse (2021), Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher, 2

24. None, None, nan (missingth cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Aristotle, Metaphysics • metaphysic of mind

 Found in books: Erler et al. (2021), Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition, 163; Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 38

25. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Metaphysics • Metaphysics, unmoved mover in

 Found in books: Corrigan and Rasimus (2013), Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World, 386, 537; Marmodoro and Prince (2015), Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity, 132

26. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Aristotle, Metaphysics • Metaphysics • System (σύστηµα/συστήµατα), of Philosophy, of doctrine / metaphysical • metaphysics/-al reading of the Parmenides

 Found in books: Corrigan and Rasimus (2013), Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World, 544, 555; Joosse (2021), Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher, 34; Motta and Petrucci (2022), Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity, 99, 107; d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 31, 112




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