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Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

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All subjects (including unvalidated):
subject book bibliographic info
lament Castagnoli and Ceccarelli (2019), Greek Memories: Theories and Practices, 7, 33, 34, 35, 60, 61, 64, 66, 104, 107, 193
Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 13, 14
Ernst (2009), Martha from the Margins: The Authority of Martha in Early Christian Tradition, 38, 58, 74, 75, 76, 93, 129
Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 7, 12, 14, 18, 32, 33, 37, 41, 50, 60, 75, 91, 92, 98, 104, 116, 130, 131, 134, 140, 141, 142, 144, 145, 146, 147, 150, 151, 153, 154, 155, 161, 172, 176, 186, 187, 192, 193, 197, 201, 227, 265, 266, 267, 268, 278, 302, 305, 311, 315, 321, 325, 336, 341, 344, 386, 391, 400
Ker and Wessels (2020), The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn, 193
Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 204, 205, 206, 224, 225
Mathews (2013), Riches, Poverty, and the Faithful: Perspectives on Wealth in the Second Temple Period and the Apocalypse of John, 212
Pillinger (2019), Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature, 78, 79, 88, 102, 103, 107, 121, 122, 215, 216, 217
Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 1, 4, 62, 72, 75, 78, 81, 84, 87, 88, 101, 149, 154, 155, 156, 165, 170
Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 192, 203, 209, 270, 291, 292, 452, 548, 568, 703, 706
Verhelst and Scheijnens (2022), Greek and Latin Poetry of Late Antiquity: Form, Tradition, and Context, 216
lament, aeschylus Pillinger (2019), Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature, 215, 216, 217
lament, animal Mackay (2022), Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica, 48, 52, 53, 56
lament, city Alexiou and Cairns (2017), Greek Laughter and Tears: Antiquity and After. 187, 188, 189, 190, 191, 192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 338, 339, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 350, 351, 352
lament, city, interpretation of suffering Alexiou and Cairns (2017), Greek Laughter and Tears: Antiquity and After. 192, 194, 340, 341, 343, 344, 345, 346
lament, city, urbs capta emotive techniques Alexiou and Cairns (2017), Greek Laughter and Tears: Antiquity and After. 190, 192, 193, 194
lament, erotic, folk imagery Alexiou and Cairns (2017), Greek Laughter and Tears: Antiquity and After. 358, 360, 361, 362, 372, 384
lament, excess, in Pillinger (2019), Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature, 217
lament, for achilles, iliad, phoenix’s Greensmith (2021), The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation, 213, 214
lament, for achilles, phoenix Greensmith (2021), The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation, 213, 214, 215, 216
lament, for adonis Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 51
lament, for bion Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 51
lament, for death of burials and mourning, poet, traditional Panoussi(2019), Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature, 239
lament, for the fallen city, oral forms Richlin (2018), Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy, 143
lament, for, iliad, achilles, phoenix’s Greensmith (2021), The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation, 213, 214
lament, funeral Eisenfeld (2022), Pindar and Greek Religion Theologies of Mortality in the Victory Odes, 219
Mathews (2013), Riches, Poverty, and the Faithful: Perspectives on Wealth in the Second Temple Period and the Apocalypse of John, 213
lament, funerals Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 140, 141, 144, 146
lament, gender, in Alexiou and Cairns (2017), Greek Laughter and Tears: Antiquity and After. 200, 313, 314, 327, 332, 333, 340, 341
lament, genre Bergmann et al. (2023), The Power of Psalms in Post-Biblical Judaism: Liturgy, Ritual and Community. 13, 39, 44, 45, 165, 175
lament, grief, analysis through Alexiou and Cairns (2017), Greek Laughter and Tears: Antiquity and After. 187, 188, 189, 190, 191, 192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 338, 339, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 350, 351, 352
lament, homer, gender and Joseph (2022), Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic, 13, 14, 228, 229, 243
lament, in apollonius rhodius Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 82
Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 82
lament, in statius, thebaid, ides Panoussi(2019), Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature, 240
lament, in valerius flaccus Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 82, 83, 84, 87, 88, 89
Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 82, 83, 84, 87, 88, 89
lament, isaeum campense, temple of isis, and Manolaraki (2012), Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus, 166, 167, 176, 177, 180
lament, lamentation, Maier and Waldner (2022), Desiring Martyrs: Locating Martyrs in Space and Time, 57, 58, 71, 74
lament, linking, war dead, burial of male epic and female Panoussi(2019), Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature, 104
lament, liturgical Alexiou and Cairns (2017), Greek Laughter and Tears: Antiquity and After. 200, 203, 204, 206, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214
lament, liturgical, gestures Alexiou and Cairns (2017), Greek Laughter and Tears: Antiquity and After. 211, 212, 213
lament, liturgical, use of biblical tragedy Alexiou and Cairns (2017), Greek Laughter and Tears: Antiquity and After. 203, 204, 206, 208, 209, 210, 211
lament, metres Alexiou and Cairns (2017), Greek Laughter and Tears: Antiquity and After. 206, 317, 320, 321, 328
lament, of 2 baruch, adamin Collins (2016), The Apocalyptic Imagination: An Introduction to Jewish Apocalyptic Literature, 273, 278
lament, of enslaved trojan women in troades Pucci (2016), Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79
lament, of enslaved trojan women in troades and, eros Pucci (2016), Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76
lament, of enslaved trojan women in troades, women in greek culture Pucci (2016), Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79
lament, of eve Levison (2023), The Greek Life of Adam and Eve. 402, 600, 940
lament, of orpheus and, philomela and procne Panoussi(2019), Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature, 93
lament, of trojan women in troades over, slavery Pucci (2016), Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79
lament, pompey, as object of Joseph (2022), Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic, 229, 230, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 236, 237, 238, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243
lament, tradition Neusner Green and Avery-Peck (2022), Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points, 63
lament, tradition, scripture Neusner Green and Avery-Peck (2022), Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points, 63
lament, virgin’s Alexiou and Cairns (2017), Greek Laughter and Tears: Antiquity and After. 211, 213, 331
lament, women, and Blum and Biggs (2019), The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature, 106, 140, 141, 142, 143, 183
lamentation Ekroth (2013), The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period, 106, 110, 333
Hachlili (2005), Practices And Rites In The Second Temple Period, 327
Hitch (2017), Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world, 231, 261
Repath and Whitmarsh (2022), Reading Heliodorus' Aethiopica, 14, 31, 73, 139
Seaford (2018), Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays, 75, 112, 113, 114, 121, 123, 238, 239, 243, 244, 248, 249, 250, 251, 252, 253
Stavrianopoulou (2006), Ritual and Communication in the Graeco-Roman World, 225, 246, 253, 254, 255, 256, 261, 262, 263
lamentation, and grief Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 29, 45, 70, 105, 109, 151, 174, 233, 239, 255, 284, 334
lamentation, and tragic discovery Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 437, 438, 439, 440, 441, 442, 443
lamentation, at wedding Seaford (2018), Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays, 269, 290
lamentation, burials and mourning, excessive female grief and pleasure in Panoussi(2019), Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature, 93, 95, 96, 109, 110, 236, 247
lamentation, elegy Fielding (2017), Transformations of Ovid in Late Antiquity. 11, 25, 76, 130, 138, 139, 141, 192
lamentation, in mystery cult Seaford (2018), Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays, 211
lamentation, in war dead, burial of poets assumption of female voice of Panoussi(2019), Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature, 104
lamentation, models, lament, city, biblical/near eastern Alexiou and Cairns (2017), Greek Laughter and Tears: Antiquity and After. 189, 190, 191, 193, 194, 195
lamentation, mourning Erker (2023), Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family, 40, 43, 119, 124, 125, 134, 138, 142, 163, 225
lamentation, pleasure arising from, war dead, burial of excessive Panoussi(2019), Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature, 109, 110
lamentation, protest, rebellion Toloni (2022), The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis, 24, 73, 83, 84, 98, 101, 119, 146, 171
lamentation, revenge, and Seaford (2018), Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays, 114
lamentation, song of Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 270, 271, 272, 273, 274, 276, 277
lamentation, war dead, burial of conclusion of narrative with proper burial and Panoussi(2019), Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature, 111, 112
lamentations Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer (2022), Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity, 315
Lupu (2005), Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) 76
Neusner Green and Avery-Peck (2022), Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points, 63, 64, 65
lamentations, abandonment in Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 149, 150
lamentations, and, jeremiah, book of Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 41, 43, 47
lamentations, and, rabbinic judaism Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 20, 31, 40, 41, 48, 50
lamentations, and, second isaiah Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 52, 53, 54, 55, 127
lamentations, at venosa, rabbis, performing funeral Kraemer (2020), The Mediterranean Diaspora in Late Antiquity: What Christianity Cost the Jews, 376, 377, 389, 399
lamentations, book of associated with ninth of av Lieber (2014), A Vocabulary of Desire: The Song of Songs in the Early Synagogue, 8, 34
lamentations, book of in piyyut Lieber (2014), A Vocabulary of Desire: The Song of Songs in the Early Synagogue, 15
lamentations, book of not embellished as the song of songs was Lieber (2014), A Vocabulary of Desire: The Song of Songs in the Early Synagogue, 43
lamentations, book of targum of Lieber (2014), A Vocabulary of Desire: The Song of Songs in the Early Synagogue, 38
lamentations, catastrophes in Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 44, 54
lamentations, consequences of transgression Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 40, 41
lamentations, consolation themes in Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 35, 36, 38
lamentations, despair in Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 37, 38, 39
lamentations, divine anger, in Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 31, 33, 34, 43, 54, 55
lamentations, divine control of history in Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 33, 34, 58
lamentations, exhortations in Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 74
lamentations, exile imagery in Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 53, 54, 55, 96
lamentations, impurity images in Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 45, 46, 53, 55, 56, 126, 138
lamentations, in second isaiah, allusions Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 52, 53, 54
lamentations, in tisha bav lectionary cycle Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 31, 40, 41, 43, 52
lamentations, isaiah parallels to Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 42, 43, 44
lamentations, jeremiah and Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 41, 43, 47
lamentations, jerusalem, in Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 31, 33, 34, 43, 54, 55
lamentations, kedushtot themes and Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 126, 127, 128
lamentations, nations, relationship with Cohen (2010), The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism, 42
lamentations, nations, reversing intent of Cohen (2010), The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism, 41, 42
lamentations, of zion Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 74, 137, 138, 141
lamentations, on jerusalem Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 31, 33, 34, 43, 54, 55
lamentations, on, catastrophe Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 44, 54
lamentations, optimism Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 35, 36, 38, 39
lamentations, parallels to, first isaiah Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 42, 43, 44
lamentations, placement of Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 43
lamentations, rabbah Avery-Peck, Chilton, and Scott Green (2014), A Legacy of Learning: Essays in Honor of Jacob Neusner , 49
Fonrobert and Jaffee (2007), The Cambridge Companion to the Talmud and Rabbinic Literature Cambridge Companions to Religion, 225
Lieber (2014), A Vocabulary of Desire: The Song of Songs in the Early Synagogue, 34
Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 371, 372, 373, 374, 375, 376, 377, 378, 379, 380, 381, 383, 384, 387
Spielman (2020), Jews and Entertainment in the Ancient World. 183, 188, 189, 190
lamentations, rabbah, authentic narrative in Neusner (2003), The Perfect Torah. 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 157, 159, 160, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 166, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 172
lamentations, rabbah, exegetical mashal, in Neusner (2003), The Perfect Torah. 177, 178, 179, 180, 181, 182, 183, 184
lamentations, rabbah, halakhic mashal, in Neusner (2003), The Perfect Torah. 176, 177
lamentations, rabbah, mashal/parable in Neusner (2003), The Perfect Torah. 176, 177, 178, 179, 180, 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187
lamentations, rabbah, ma’asim in Neusner (2003), The Perfect Torah. 187, 188, 189, 190
lamentations, rabbah, ma’asim, in Neusner (2003), The Perfect Torah. 187, 188, 189, 190
lamentations, rabbah, narrative character of Neusner (2003), The Perfect Torah. 191
lamentations, rabbah, narrative, in Neusner (2003), The Perfect Torah. 148, 155, 157, 159, 160, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 166, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 172
lamentations, rabbah, recapitulative parable, in Neusner (2003), The Perfect Torah. 185, 186
lamentations, rabbati, romans, misunderstanding of jews in Cohen (2010), The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism, 31
lamentations, rebuke, haftarot of Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 48
lamentations, second isaiah and Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 52, 53, 54, 55, 127
lamentations, sexual allusion in Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 45, 46, 47
lamentations, speakers in Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 35, 36, 72, 143
lamentations, speakers, in Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 72, 143
lamentations, suffering as consequence of disobedience Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 33
lamentations, targum Neusner Green and Avery-Peck (2022), Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points, 65
lamentations, temple destruction and Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 45
lamentations, the covenant in Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 34, 35, 36, 37
lamentations, tisha bav lectionary cycle Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 31, 40, 41, 43, 52
lamentations, tropes of destruction and, magen for kedushta to shabbat naḥamu Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 126
lamentations, zion in Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 31, 55, 56, 126
lamented, by sol, phaethon Sider (2001), Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian, 33
lamented, curio Joseph (2022), Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic, 166
lamenting, of orpheus, orpheus and eurydice, mourning and Panoussi(2019), Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature, 89, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97
laments Brenk and Lanzillotta (2023), Plutarch on Literature, Graeco-Roman Religion, Jews and Christians, 67
Cosgrove (2022), Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine, 214, 317
laments, and, lamentations, communal Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 36, 37, 72
laments, animals, communal Gera (2014), Judith, 183
laments, communal Gera (2014), Judith, 179, 180, 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, 301, 475
laments, for the fall of cities, alexandra, and Liapis and Petrides (2019), Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca, 113
laments, of community Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 36, 37
laments, plutarch, on Cosgrove (2022), Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine, 317
laments, slave Richlin (2018), Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy, 29, 86, 229, 324

List of validated texts:
35 validated results for "lament"
1. Septuagint, Tobit, 14.10 (th cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • communal laments • lamentation, protest, rebellion

 Found in books: Gera (2014), Judith, 475; Toloni (2022), The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis, 119

sup>
14.10 Bury me properly, and your mother with me. And do not live in Nineveh any longer. See, my son, what Nadab did to Ahikar who had reared him, how he brought him from light into darkness, and with what he repaid him. But Ahikar was saved, and the other received repayment as he himself went down into the darkness. Ahikar gave alms and escaped the deathtrap which Nadab had set for him; but Nadab fell into the trap and perished.'' None
2. Hebrew Bible, Deuteronomy, 28.1, 28.15, 28.49, 28.56 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Jerusalem, in Lamentations • Lament • Lamentations Rabbah • Lamentations Rabbah, Ma’asim in • Lamentations Rabbah, authentic narrative in • Lamentations, divine control of history in • Lamentations, on Jerusalem • Lamentations, suffering as consequence of disobedience • Ma’asim, in Lamentations Rabbah • divine anger, in Lamentations • narrative, in Lamentations Rabbah

 Found in books: Neusner (2003), The Perfect Torah. 167, 188; Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 373, 380; Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 33; Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 192, 548

sup>
28.1 וְהָיָה אִם־שָׁמוֹעַ תִּשְׁמַע בְּקוֹל יְהוָה אֱלֹהֶיךָ לִשְׁמֹר לַעֲשׂוֹת אֶת־כָּל־מִצְוֺתָיו אֲשֶׁר אָנֹכִי מְצַוְּךָ הַיּוֹם וּנְתָנְךָ יְהוָה אֱלֹהֶיךָ עֶלְיוֹן עַל כָּל־גּוֹיֵי הָאָרֶץ׃
28.1
וְרָאוּ כָּל־עַמֵּי הָאָרֶץ כִּי שֵׁם יְהוָה נִקְרָא עָלֶיךָ וְיָרְאוּ מִמֶּךָּ׃

28.15
וְהָיָה אִם־לֹא תִשְׁמַע בְּקוֹל יְהוָה אֱלֹהֶיךָ לִשְׁמֹר לַעֲשׂוֹת אֶת־כָּל־מִצְוֺתָיו וְחֻקֹּתָיו אֲשֶׁר אָנֹכִי מְצַוְּךָ הַיּוֹם וּבָאוּ עָלֶיךָ כָּל־הַקְּלָלוֹת הָאֵלֶּה וְהִשִּׂיגוּךָ׃
28.49
יִשָּׂא יְהוָה עָלֶיךָ גּוֹי מֵרָחוֹק מִקְצֵה הָאָרֶץ כַּאֲשֶׁר יִדְאֶה הַנָּשֶׁר גּוֹי אֲשֶׁר לֹא־תִשְׁמַע לְשֹׁנוֹ׃
28.56
הָרַכָּה בְךָ וְהָעֲנֻגָּה אֲשֶׁר לֹא־נִסְּתָה כַף־רַגְלָהּ הַצֵּג עַל־הָאָרֶץ מֵהִתְעַנֵּג וּמֵרֹךְ תֵּרַע עֵינָהּ בְּאִישׁ חֵיקָהּ וּבִבְנָהּ וּבְבִתָּהּ׃'' None
sup>
28.1 And it shall come to pass, if thou shalt hearken diligently unto the voice of the LORD thy God, to observe to do all His commandments which I command thee this day, that the LORD thy God will set thee on high above all the nations of the earth.

28.15
But it shall come to pass, if thou wilt not hearken unto the voice of the LORD thy God, to observe to do all His commandments and His statutes which I command thee this day; that all these curses shall come upon thee, and overtake thee.
28.49
The LORD will bring a nation against thee from far, from the end of the earth, as the vulture swoopeth down; a nation whose tongue thou shalt not understand;
28.56
The tender and delicate woman among you, who would not adventure to set the sole of her foot upon the ground for delicateness and tenderness, her eye shall be evil against the husband of her bosom, and against her son, and against her daughter;'' None
3. Hebrew Bible, Job, 3.20-3.23, 42.12 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Lamentations • Lamentations Rabbah, exemplarity of sages’ lives in • Scripture, lament tradition • lament tradition • lamentation, protest, rebellion

 Found in books: Neusner (2004), The Idea of History in Rabbinic Judaism, 187; Neusner Green and Avery-Peck (2022), Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points, 63; Toloni (2022), The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis, 83, 84, 101

sup>3.21 הַמְחַכִּים לַמָּוֶת וְאֵינֶנּוּ וַיַּחְפְּרֻהוּ מִמַּטְמוֹנִים׃ 3.22 הַשְּׂמֵחִים אֱלֵי־גִיל יָשִׂישׂוּ כִּי יִמְצְאוּ־קָבֶר׃ 3.23 לְגֶבֶר אֲשֶׁר־דַּרְכּוֹ נִסְתָּרָה וַיָּסֶךְ אֱלוֹהַּ בַּעֲדוֹ׃
42.12
וַיהוָה בֵּרַךְ אֶת־אַחֲרִית אִיּוֹב מֵרֵאשִׁתוֹ וַיְהִי־לוֹ אַרְבָּעָה עָשָׂר אֶלֶף צֹאן וְשֵׁשֶׁת אֲלָפִים גְּמַלִּים וְאֶלֶף־צֶמֶד בָּקָר וְאֶלֶף אֲתוֹנוֹת׃' ' None
sup>
3.20 Wherewith is light given to him that is in misery, And life unto the bitter in soul— 3.21 Who long for death, but it cometh not; And dig for it more than for hid treasures; 3.22 Who rejoice unto exultation, And are glad, when they can find the grave?— 3.23 To a man whose way is hid, And whom God hath hedged in?
42.12
So the LORD blessed the latter end of Job more than his beginning; and he had fourteen thousand sheep, and six thousand camels, and a thousand yoke of oxen, and a thousand she-asses. .'' None
4. Hebrew Bible, Leviticus, 22.28 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Lamentations Rabbah • Lamentations Rabbah, authentic narrative in

 Found in books: Neusner (2003), The Perfect Torah. 154; Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 380

sup>
22.28 וְשׁוֹר אוֹ־שֶׂה אֹתוֹ וְאֶת־בְּנוֹ לֹא תִשְׁחֲטוּ בְּיוֹם אֶחָד׃'' None
sup>
22.28 And whether it be cow or ewe, ye shall not kill it and its young both in one day.'' None
5. Hebrew Bible, Psalms, 137.5 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Lamentations, abandonment in • Zion, lamentations of • genre, lament

 Found in books: Bergmann et al. (2023), The Power of Psalms in Post-Biblical Judaism: Liturgy, Ritual and Community. 165; Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 141, 150

sup>
137.5 אִם־אֶשְׁכָּחֵךְ יְרוּשָׁלִָם תִּשְׁכַּח יְמִינִי׃'' None
sup>
137.5 If I forget thee, O Jerusalem, Let my right hand forget her cunning.'' None
6. Hebrew Bible, Isaiah, 51.12 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Jerusalem, in Lamentations • Lamentations, Second Isaiah and • Lamentations, Zion in • Lamentations, exile imagery in • Lamentations, impurity images in • Lamentations, kedushtot themes and • Lamentations, on Jerusalem • Magen for Kedushta to Shabbat Naḥamu, Lamentations tropes of destruction and • Second Isaiah, Lamentations and • allusions, Lamentations in Second Isaiah • divine anger, in Lamentations • nations, reversing intent of Lamentations

 Found in books: Cohen (2010), The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism, 41; Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 53, 55, 126

sup>
51.12 אָנֹכִי אָנֹכִי הוּא מְנַחֶמְכֶם מִי־אַתְּ וַתִּירְאִי מֵאֱנוֹשׁ יָמוּת וּמִבֶּן־אָדָם חָצִיר יִנָּתֵן׃'' None
sup>
51.12 I, even I, am He that comforteth you: Who art thou, that thou art afraid of man that shall die, And of the son of man that shall be made as grass;'' None
7. Hebrew Bible, Jeremiah, 8.23, 20.18, 31.15-31.17 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Lament • Lamentations • Lamentations Rabbah, Mashal/parable in • Lamentations Rabbah, authentic narrative in • Scripture, lament tradition • Targum Lamentations • exegetical mashal, in Lamentations Rabbah • lament tradition • lamentation, protest, rebellion • narrative, in Lamentations Rabbah

 Found in books: Neusner (2003), The Perfect Torah. 155, 180; Neusner Green and Avery-Peck (2022), Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points, 63, 65; Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 270; Toloni (2022), The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis, 84

sup>
8.23 מִי־יִתֵּן רֹאשִׁי מַיִם וְעֵינִי מְקוֹר דִּמְעָה וְאֶבְכֶּה יוֹמָם וָלַיְלָה אֵת חַלְלֵי בַת־עַמִּי׃
20.18
לָמָּה זֶּה מֵרֶחֶם יָצָאתִי לִרְאוֹת עָמָל וְיָגוֹן וַיִּכְלוּ בְּבֹשֶׁת יָמָי׃
31.15
כֹּה אָמַר יְהוָה קוֹל בְּרָמָה נִשְׁמָע נְהִי בְּכִי תַמְרוּרִים רָחֵל מְבַכָּה עַל־בָּנֶיהָ מֵאֲנָה לְהִנָּחֵם עַל־בָּנֶיהָ כִּי אֵינֶנּוּ׃ 31.16 כֹּה אָמַר יְהוָה מִנְעִי קוֹלֵךְ מִבֶּכִי וְעֵינַיִךְ מִדִּמְעָה כִּי יֵשׁ שָׂכָר לִפְעֻלָּתֵךְ נְאֻם־יְהוָה וְשָׁבוּ מֵאֶרֶץ אוֹיֵב׃ 31.17 וְיֵשׁ־תִּקְוָה לְאַחֲרִיתֵךְ נְאֻם־יְהוָה וְשָׁבוּ בָנִים לִגְבוּלָם׃'' None
sup>
8.23 Oh that my head were waters, and mine eyes a fountain of tears, that I might weep day and night for the slain of the daughter of my people!
20.18
Wherefore came I forth out of the womb To see labour and sorrow, That my days should be consumed in shame?
31.15
Thus saith the LORD: A voice is heard in Ramah, Lamentation, and bitter weeping, Rachel weeping for her children; She refuseth to be comforted for her children, Because they are not. 31.16 Thus saith the LORD: Refrain thy voice from weeping, And thine eyes from tears; For thy work shall be rewarded, saith the LORD; And they shall come back from the land of the enemy. 31.17 And there is hope for thy future, saith the LORD; And thy children shall return to their own border.'' None
8. Hebrew Bible, Lamentations, 1.1-1.5, 1.7-1.11, 1.14, 1.16-1.18, 1.21, 2.1, 2.3, 2.10-2.13, 2.18-2.20, 2.22, 3.1, 3.16-3.17, 3.21, 3.42, 4.2, 4.11, 4.18-4.19, 5.3-5.5, 5.7, 5.9-5.13, 5.16-5.22 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • First Isaiah, Lamentations, parallels to • Halakhic mashal, in Lamentations Rabbah • Jeremiah, book of, Lamentations and • Jerusalem, in Lamentations • Lament • Lamentations • Lamentations Rabbah • Lamentations Rabbah, Israel and the nations • Lamentations Rabbah, Mashal/parable in • Lamentations Rabbah, Ma’asim in • Lamentations Rabbah, Temple story in • Lamentations Rabbah, authentic narrative in • Lamentations Rabbah, history of • Lamentations, Isaiah parallels to • Lamentations, Jeremiah and • Lamentations, Second Isaiah and • Lamentations, Tisha bAv lectionary cycle • Lamentations, Zion in • Lamentations, abandonment in • Lamentations, catastrophes in • Lamentations, communal laments and • Lamentations, consolation themes in • Lamentations, despair in • Lamentations, divine control of history in • Lamentations, exhortations in • Lamentations, exile imagery in • Lamentations, impurity images in • Lamentations, kedushtot themes and • Lamentations, on Jerusalem • Lamentations, optimism • Lamentations, placement of • Lamentations, rebuke, haftarot of • Lamentations, sexual allusion in • Lamentations, speakers in • Lamentations, suffering as consequence of disobedience • Lamentations, temple destruction and • Lamentations, the covenant in • Magen for Kedushta to Shabbat Naḥamu, Lamentations tropes of destruction and • Ma’asim, in Lamentations Rabbah • Romans, misunderstanding of Jews in Lamentations Rabbati • Scripture, lament tradition • Second Isaiah, Lamentations and • Targum Lamentations • Tisha bAv lectionary cycle, Lamentations in • Zion, lamentations of • allusions, Lamentations in Second Isaiah • catastrophe, Lamentations on • communal laments • community, laments of • divine anger, in Lamentations • exegetical mashal, in Lamentations Rabbah • lament tradition • narrative, in Lamentations Rabbah • nations, relationship with Lamentations • nations, reversing intent of Lamentations • rabbinic Judaism, Lamentations and • speakers, in Lamentations

 Found in books: Cohen (2010), The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism, 31, 41, 42; Fonrobert and Jaffee (2007), The Cambridge Companion to the Talmud and Rabbinic Literature Cambridge Companions to Religion, 225; Gera (2014), Judith, 184; Neusner (2003), The Perfect Torah. 148, 157, 160, 166, 172, 177, 180, 181, 182, 184, 187, 189, 190; Neusner (2004), The Idea of History in Rabbinic Judaism, 136, 164; Neusner Green and Avery-Peck (2022), Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points, 63, 64, 65; Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 373, 381, 383, 384; Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 20, 31, 33, 34, 36, 37, 39, 42, 43, 45, 46, 47, 48, 53, 54, 55, 56, 58, 74, 126, 127, 138, 143, 149, 150; Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 270, 548

sup>
1.1 אֵיכָה יָשְׁבָה בָדָד הָעִיר רַבָּתִי עָם הָיְתָה כְּאַלְמָנָה רַּבָּתִי בַגּוֹיִם שָׂרָתִי בַּמְּדִינוֹת הָיְתָה לָמַס׃"
1.1
יָדוֹ פָּרַשׂ צָר עַל כָּל־מַחֲמַדֶּיהָ כִּי־רָאֲתָה גוֹיִם בָּאוּ מִקְדָּשָׁהּ אֲשֶׁר צִוִּיתָה לֹא־יָבֹאוּ בַקָּהָל לָךְ׃ 1.2 בָּכוֹ תִבְכֶּה בַּלַּיְלָה וְדִמְעָתָהּ עַל לֶחֱיָהּ אֵין־לָהּ מְנַחֵם מִכָּל־אֹהֲבֶיהָ כָּל־רֵעֶיהָ בָּגְדוּ בָהּ הָיוּ לָהּ לְאֹיְבִים׃ 1.2 רְאֵה יְהוָה כִּי־צַר־לִי מֵעַי חֳמַרְמָרוּ נֶהְפַּךְ לִבִּי בְּקִרְבִּי כִּי מָרוֹ מָרִיתִי מִחוּץ שִׁכְּלָה־חֶרֶב בַּבַּיִת כַּמָּוֶת׃ 1.3 גָּלְתָה יְהוּדָה מֵעֹנִי וּמֵרֹב עֲבֹדָה הִיא יָשְׁבָה בַגּוֹיִם לֹא מָצְאָה מָנוֹחַ כָּל־רֹדְפֶיהָ הִשִּׂיגוּהָ בֵּין הַמְּצָרִים׃ 1.4 דַּרְכֵי צִיּוֹן אֲבֵלוֹת מִבְּלִי בָּאֵי מוֹעֵד כָּל־שְׁעָרֶיהָ שׁוֹמֵמִין כֹּהֲנֶיהָ נֶאֱנָחִים בְּתוּלֹתֶיהָ נּוּגוֹת וְהִיא מַר־לָהּ׃ 1.5 הָיוּ צָרֶיהָ לְרֹאשׁ אֹיְבֶיהָ שָׁלוּ כִּי־יְהוָה הוֹגָהּ עַל רֹב־פְּשָׁעֶיהָ עוֹלָלֶיהָ הָלְכוּ שְׁבִי לִפְנֵי־צָר׃
1.7
זָכְרָה יְרוּשָׁלִַם יְמֵי עָנְיָהּ וּמְרוּדֶיהָ כֹּל מַחֲמֻדֶיהָ אֲשֶׁר הָיוּ מִימֵי קֶדֶם בִּנְפֹל עַמָּהּ בְּיַד־צָר וְאֵין עוֹזֵר לָהּ רָאוּהָ צָרִים שָׂחֲקוּ עַל מִשְׁבַּתֶּהָ׃ 1.8 חֵטְא חָטְאָה יְרוּשָׁלִַם עַל־כֵּן לְנִידָה הָיָתָה כָּל־מְכַבְּדֶיהָ הִזִּילוּהָ כִּי־רָאוּ עֶרְוָתָהּ גַּם־הִיא נֶאֶנְחָה וַתָּשָׁב אָחוֹר׃ 1.9 טֻמְאָתָהּ בְּשׁוּלֶיהָ לֹא זָכְרָה אַחֲרִיתָהּ וַתֵּרֶד פְּלָאִים אֵין מְנַחֵם לָהּ רְאֵה יְהוָה אֶת־עָנְיִי כִּי הִגְדִּיל אוֹיֵב׃' 1.11 כָּל־עַמָּהּ נֶאֱנָחִים מְבַקְּשִׁים לֶחֶם נָתְנוּ מחמודיהם מַחֲמַדֵּיהֶם בְּאֹכֶל לְהָשִׁיב נָפֶשׁ רְאֵה יְהוָה וְהַבִּיטָה כִּי הָיִיתִי זוֹלֵלָה׃

1.14
נִשְׂקַד עֹל פְּשָׁעַי בְּיָדוֹ יִשְׂתָּרְגוּ עָלוּ עַל־צַוָּארִי הִכְשִׁיל כֹּחִי נְתָנַנִי אֲדֹנָי בִּידֵי לֹא־אוּכַל קוּם׃

1.16
עַל־אֵלֶּה אֲנִי בוֹכִיָּה עֵינִי עֵינִי יֹרְדָה מַּיִם כִּי־רָחַק מִמֶּנִּי מְנַחֵם מֵשִׁיב נַפְשִׁי הָיוּ בָנַי שׁוֹמֵמִים כִּי גָבַר אוֹיֵב׃
1.17
פֵּרְשָׂה צִיּוֹן בְּיָדֶיהָ אֵין מְנַחֵם לָהּ צִוָּה יְהוָה לְיַעֲקֹב סְבִיבָיו צָרָיו הָיְתָה יְרוּשָׁלִַם לְנִדָּה בֵּינֵיהֶם׃
1.18
צַדִּיק הוּא יְהוָה כִּי פִיהוּ מָרִיתִי שִׁמְעוּ־נָא כָל־עמים הָעַמִּים וּרְאוּ מַכְאֹבִי בְּתוּלֹתַי וּבַחוּרַי הָלְכוּ בַשֶּׁבִי׃
1.21
שָׁמְעוּ כִּי נֶאֱנָחָה אָנִי אֵין מְנַחֵם לִי כָּל־אֹיְבַי שָׁמְעוּ רָעָתִי שָׂשׂוּ כִּי אַתָּה עָשִׂיתָ הֵבֵאתָ יוֹם־קָרָאתָ וְיִהְיוּ כָמוֹנִי׃
2.1
אֵיכָה יָעִיב בְּאַפּוֹ אֲדֹנָי אֶת־בַּת־צִיּוֹן הִשְׁלִיךְ מִשָּׁמַיִם אֶרֶץ תִּפְאֶרֶת יִשְׂרָאֵל וְלֹא־זָכַר הֲדֹם־רַגְלָיו בְּיוֹם אַפּוֹ׃
2.1
יֵשְׁבוּ לָאָרֶץ יִדְּמוּ זִקְנֵי בַת־צִיּוֹן הֶעֱלוּ עָפָר עַל־רֹאשָׁם חָגְרוּ שַׂקִּים הוֹרִידוּ לָאָרֶץ רֹאשָׁן בְּתוּלֹת יְרוּשָׁלִָם׃
2.3
גָּדַע בָּחֳרִי אַף כֹּל קֶרֶן יִשְׂרָאֵל הֵשִׁיב אָחוֹר יְמִינוֹ מִפְּנֵי אוֹיֵב וַיִּבְעַר בְּיַעֲקֹב כְּאֵשׁ לֶהָבָה אָכְלָה סָבִיב׃
2.11
כָּלוּ בַדְּמָעוֹת עֵינַי חֳמַרְמְרוּ מֵעַי נִשְׁפַּךְ לָאָרֶץ כְּבֵדִי עַל־שֶׁבֶר בַּת־עַמִּי בֵּעָטֵף עוֹלֵל וְיוֹנֵק בִּרְחֹבוֹת קִרְיָה׃
2.12
לְאִמֹּתָם יֹאמְרוּ אַיֵּה דָּגָן וָיָיִן בְּהִתְעַטְּפָם כֶּחָלָל בִּרְחֹבוֹת עִיר בְּהִשְׁתַּפֵּךְ נַפְשָׁם אֶל־חֵיק אִמֹּתָם׃
2.13
מָה־אֲעִידֵךְ מָה אֲדַמֶּה־לָּךְ הַבַּת יְרוּשָׁלִַם מָה אַשְׁוֶה־לָּךְ וַאֲנַחֲמֵךְ בְּתוּלַת בַּת־צִיּוֹן כִּי־גָדוֹל כַּיָּם שִׁבְרֵךְ מִי יִרְפָּא־לָךְ׃

2.18
צָעַק לִבָּם אֶל־אֲדֹנָי חוֹמַת בַּת־צִיּוֹן הוֹרִידִי כַנַּחַל דִּמְעָה יוֹמָם וָלַיְלָה אַל־תִּתְּנִי פוּגַת לָךְ אַל־תִּדֹּם בַּת־עֵינֵךְ׃
2.19
קוּמִי רֹנִּי בליל בַלַּיְלָה לְרֹאשׁ אַשְׁמֻרוֹת שִׁפְכִי כַמַּיִם לִבֵּךְ נֹכַח פְּנֵי אֲדֹנָי שְׂאִי אֵלָיו כַּפַּיִךְ עַל־נֶפֶשׁ עוֹלָלַיִךְ הָעֲטוּפִים בְּרָעָב בְּרֹאשׁ כָּל־חוּצוֹת׃
2.22
תִּקְרָא כְיוֹם מוֹעֵד מְגוּרַי מִסָּבִיב וְלֹא הָיָה בְּיוֹם אַף־יְהוָה פָּלִיט וְשָׂרִיד אֲשֶׁר־טִפַּחְתִּי וְרִבִּיתִי אֹיְבִי כִלָּם׃
3.17
וַתִּזְנַח מִשָּׁלוֹם נַפְשִׁי נָשִׁיתִי טוֹבָה׃
3.21
זֹאת אָשִׁיב אֶל־לִבִּי עַל־כֵּן אוֹחִיל׃
3.42
נַחְנוּ פָשַׁעְנוּ וּמָרִינוּ אַתָּה לֹא סָלָחְתָּ׃
4.2
בְּנֵי צִיּוֹן הַיְקָרִים הַמְסֻלָּאִים בַּפָּז אֵיכָה נֶחְשְׁבוּ לְנִבְלֵי־חֶרֶשׂ מַעֲשֵׂה יְדֵי יוֹצֵר׃
4.2
רוּחַ אַפֵּינוּ מְשִׁיחַ יְהוָה נִלְכַּד בִּשְׁחִיתוֹתָם אֲשֶׁר אָמַרְנוּ בְּצִלּוֹ נִחְיֶה בַגּוֹיִם׃
4.11
כִּלָּה יְהוָה אֶת־חֲמָתוֹ שָׁפַךְ חֲרוֹן אַפּוֹ וַיַּצֶּת־אֵשׁ בְּצִיּוֹן וַתֹּאכַל יְסוֹדֹתֶיהָ׃
4.18
צָדוּ צְעָדֵינוּ מִלֶּכֶת בִּרְחֹבֹתֵינוּ קָרַב קִצֵּינוּ מָלְאוּ יָמֵינוּ כִּי־בָא קִצֵּינוּ׃ 4.19 קַלִּים הָיוּ רֹדְפֵינוּ מִנִּשְׁרֵי שָׁמָיִם עַל־הֶהָרִים דְּלָקֻנוּ בַּמִּדְבָּר אָרְבוּ לָנוּ׃
5.3
יְתוֹמִים הָיִינוּ אין וְאֵין אָב אִמֹּתֵינוּ כְּאַלְמָנוֹת׃ 5.4 מֵימֵינוּ בְּכֶסֶף שָׁתִינוּ עֵצֵינוּ בִּמְחִיר יָבֹאוּ׃ 5.5 עַל צַוָּארֵנוּ נִרְדָּפְנוּ יָגַעְנוּ לא וְלֹא הוּנַח לָנוּ׃
5.7
אֲבֹתֵינוּ חָטְאוּ אינם וְאֵינָם אנחנו וַאֲנַחְנוּ עֲוֺנֹתֵיהֶם סָבָלְנוּ׃
5.9
בְּנַפְשֵׁנוּ נָבִיא לַחְמֵנוּ מִפְּנֵי חֶרֶב הַמִּדְבָּר׃ 5.11 נָשִׁים בְּצִיּוֹן עִנּוּ בְּתֻלֹת בְּעָרֵי יְהוּדָה׃ 5.12 שָׂרִים בְּיָדָם נִתְלוּ פְּנֵי זְקֵנִים לֹא נֶהְדָּרוּ׃ 5.13 בַּחוּרִים טְחוֹן נָשָׂאוּ וּנְעָרִים בָּעֵץ כָּשָׁלוּ׃
5.16
נָפְלָה עֲטֶרֶת רֹאשֵׁנוּ אוֹי־נָא לָנוּ כִּי חָטָאנוּ׃ 5.17 עַל־זֶה הָיָה דָוֶה לִבֵּנוּ עַל־אֵלֶּה חָשְׁכוּ עֵינֵינוּ׃ 5.18 עַל הַר־צִיּוֹן שֶׁשָּׁמֵם שׁוּעָלִים הִלְּכוּ־בוֹ׃ 5.19 אַתָּה יְהוָה לְעוֹלָם תֵּשֵׁב כִּסְאֲךָ לְדֹר וָדוֹר׃ 5.21 הֲשִׁיבֵנוּ יְהוָה אֵלֶיךָ ונשוב וְנָשׁוּבָה חַדֵּשׁ יָמֵינוּ כְּקֶדֶם׃ 5.22 כִּי אִם־מָאֹס מְאַסְתָּנוּ קָצַפְתָּ עָלֵינוּ עַד־מְאֹד׃
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1.1 O how has the city that was once so populous remained lonely! She has become like a widow! She that was great among the nations, a princess among the provinces, has become tributary." 1.2 She weeps, yea, she weeps in the night, and her tears are on her cheek; she has no comforter among all her lovers; all her friends have betrayed her; they have become her enemies. 1.3 Judah went into exile because of affliction and great servitude; she settled among the nations, and found no rest; all her pursuers overtook her between the boundaries. 1.4 The roads of Zion are mournful because no one comes to the appointed season; all her gates are desolate, her priests moan; her maidens grieve while she herself suffers bitterly. 1.5 Her adversaries have become the head, her enemies are at ease; for the Lord has afflicted her because of the multitude of her sins; her young children went into captivity before the enemy. (PAUSE FOR REFLECTIONS)
1.7
Jerusalem recalls the days of her poverty and her miseries, and all her precious things that were from days of old; when her people fell into the hand of the adversary, and there was none to help her; the enemies gazed, gloating on her desolation. 1.8 Jerusalem sinned grievously, therefore she became a wanderer; all who honored her despised her, for they have seen her shame; moreover, she herself sighed and turned away.' "1.9 Her uncleanliness is in her skirts, she was not mindful of her end, and she fell astonishingly with none to comfort her. 'Behold, O Lord, my affliction, for the enemy has magnified himself.' \\t" 1.10 The adversary stretched forth his hand upon all her precious things, for she saw nations enter her Sanctuary, whom You did command not to enter into Your assembly. \\t
1.11
All her people are sighing as they search for bread; they gave away their treasures for food to revive the soul; see, O Lord, and behold, how I have become worthless.

1.14
The yoke of my transgressions was marked in His hand, they have become interwoven; they have come upon my neck and caused my strength to fail; the Lord delivered me into the hands of those I could not withstand.

1.16
For these things I weep; my eye, yea my eye, sheds tears, for the comforter to restore my soul is removed from me; my children are desolate, for the enemy has prevailed.
1.17
Zion spreads out her hands for help, but there is none to comfort her; the Lord has commanded concerning Jacob that his adversaries shall be round about him; Jerusalem has become an outcast among them.
1.18
The Lord is righteous, for I have rebelled against His word; hear, I pray, all you peoples, and behold my pain; my maidens and my youths have gone into captivity.
1.21
They have heard how I sigh, and there is none to comfort me, all my enemies have heard of my trouble and are glad that You have done it; if only You had brought the day that You proclaimed upon them and let them be like me.
2.1
How hath the Lord covered with a cloud The daughter of Zion in His anger! He hath cast down from heaven unto the earth The beauty of Israel, And hath not remembered His footstool In the day of His anger.
2.3
He hath cut off in fierce anger All the horn of Israel; He hath drawn back His right hand From before the enemy; And He hath burned in Jacob like a flaming fire, Which devoureth round about.

2.10
They sit upon the ground, and keep silence, The elders of the daughter of Zion; They have cast up dust upon their heads, They have girded themselves with sackcloth; The virgins of Jerusalem hang down Their heads to the ground.
2.11
Mine eyes do fail with tears, Mine inwards burn, My liver is poured upon the earth, For the breach of the daughter of my people; Because the young children and the sucklings swoon In the broad places of the city.
2.12
They say to their mothers: ‘Where is corn and wine?’ When they swoon as the wounded In the broad places of the city, When their soul is poured out Into their mothers’bosom.
2.13
What shall I take to witness for thee? What shall I liken to thee, O daughter of Jerusalem? What shall I equal to thee, that I may comfort thee, O virgin daughter of Zion? For thy breach is great like the sea; Who can heal thee?

2.18
Their heart cried unto the Lord: ‘O wall of the daughter of Zion, Let tears run down like a river Day and night; Give thyself no respite; Let not the apple of thine eye cease.
2.19
Arise, cry out in the night, At the beginning of the watches; Pour out thy heart like water Before the face of the Lord; Lift up thy hands toward Him For the life of thy young children, That faint for hunger At the head of every street.’ 2.20 ’See, O LORD, and consider, To whom Thou hast done thus! Shall the women eat their fruit, The children that are dandled in the hands? Shall the priest and the prophet be slain In the sanctuary of the Lord?
2.22
Thou hast called, as in the day of a solemn assembly, My terrors on every side, And there was none in the day of the LORD’S anger That escaped or remained; Those that I have dandled and brought up Hath mine enemy consumed.’
3.17
And my soul is removed far off from peace, I forgot prosperity.
3.21
This I recall to my mind, Therefore have I hope.
3.42
We have transgressed and have rebelled; Thou hast not pardoned.
4.2
The precious sons of Zion, Comparable to fine gold, How are they esteemed as earthen pitchers, The work of the hands of the potter!
4.11
The LORD hath accomplished His fury, He hath poured out His fierce anger; And He hath kindled a fire in Zion, Which hath devoured the foundations thereof.
4.18
They hunt our steps, That we cannot go in our broad places; Our end is near, our days are fulfilled; For our end is come. 4.19 Our pursuers were swifter Than the eagles of the heaven; They chased us upon the mountains, They lay in wait for us in the wilderness.
5.3
We are become orphans and fatherless, Our mothers are as widows. 5.4 We have drunk our water for money; Our wood cometh to us for price. 5.5 To our very necks we are pursued; We labour, and have no rest.
5.7
Our fathers have sinned, and are not; And we have borne their iniquities.
5.9
We get our bread with the peril of our lives Because of the sword of the wilderness. 5.10 Our skin is hot like an oven Because of the burning heat of famine. 5.11 They have ravished the women in Zion, The maidens in the cities of Judah. 5.12 Princes are hanged up by their hand; The faces of elders are not honoured. 5.13 The young men have borne the mill, And the children have stumbled under the wood.
5.16
The crown is fallen from our head; Woe unto us! for we have sinned. 5.17 For this our heart is faint, For these things our eyes are dim; 5.18 For the mountain of Zion, which is desolate, The foxes walk upon it. 5.19 Thou, O LORD, art enthroned for ever, Thy throne is from generation to generation. 5.20 Wherefore dost Thou forget us for ever, And forsake us so long time? 5.21 Turn Thou us unto Thee, O LORD, and we shall be turned; Renew our days as of old. 5.22 Thou canst not have utterly rejected us, And be exceeding wroth against us!
9. Homer, Iliad, 6.357-6.358, 22.304-22.305, 24.719-24.776, 24.785, 24.804 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Apollonius Rhodius, lament in • Homer, gender and lament • Lament • Pompey, as object of lament • Troades lament of enslaved Trojan women in • Valerius Flaccus, lament in • lament • slavery, lament of Trojan women in Troades over • war dead, burial of, conclusion of narrative with proper burial and lamentation • women in Greek culture lament of enslaved Trojan women in Troades

 Found in books: Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 82; Joseph (2022), Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic, 228, 231, 232, 234, 243; Panoussi(2019), Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature, 112; Pillinger (2019), Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature, 103; Pucci (2016), Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay, 79; Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 1; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 82

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6.357 οἷσιν ἐπὶ Ζεὺς θῆκε κακὸν μόρον, ὡς καὶ ὀπίσσω 6.358 ἀνθρώποισι πελώμεθʼ ἀοίδιμοι ἐσσομένοισι.
22.304
μὴ μὰν ἀσπουδί γε καὶ ἀκλειῶς ἀπολοίμην, 22.305 ἀλλὰ μέγα ῥέξας τι καὶ ἐσσομένοισι πυθέσθαι.
24.719
οἳ δʼ ἐπεὶ εἰσάγαγον κλυτὰ δώματα, τὸν μὲν ἔπειτα 24.720 τρητοῖς ἐν λεχέεσσι θέσαν, παρὰ δʼ εἷσαν ἀοιδοὺς 24.721 θρήνων ἐξάρχους, οἵ τε στονόεσσαν ἀοιδὴν 24.722 οἳ μὲν ἄρʼ ἐθρήνεον, ἐπὶ δὲ στενάχοντο γυναῖκες. 24.723 τῇσιν δʼ Ἀνδρομάχη λευκώλενος ἦρχε γόοιο 24.724 Ἕκτορος ἀνδροφόνοιο κάρη μετὰ χερσὶν ἔχουσα· 24.725 ἆνερ ἀπʼ αἰῶνος νέος ὤλεο, κὰδ δέ με χήρην 24.726 λείπεις ἐν μεγάροισι· πάϊς δʼ ἔτι νήπιος αὔτως 24.727 ὃν τέκομεν σύ τʼ ἐγώ τε δυσάμμοροι, οὐδέ μιν οἴω 24.728 ἥβην ἵξεσθαι· πρὶν γὰρ πόλις ἥδε κατʼ ἄκρης 24.729 πέρσεται· ἦ γὰρ ὄλωλας ἐπίσκοπος, ὅς τέ μιν αὐτὴν 24.730 ῥύσκευ, ἔχες δʼ ἀλόχους κεδνὰς καὶ νήπια τέκνα, 24.731 αἳ δή τοι τάχα νηυσὶν ὀχήσονται γλαφυρῇσι, 24.732 καὶ μὲν ἐγὼ μετὰ τῇσι· σὺ δʼ αὖ τέκος ἢ ἐμοὶ αὐτῇ 24.733 ἕψεαι, ἔνθά κεν ἔργα ἀεικέα ἐργάζοιο 24.734 ἀθλεύων πρὸ ἄνακτος ἀμειλίχου, ἤ τις Ἀχαιῶν 24.735 ῥίψει χειρὸς ἑλὼν ἀπὸ πύργου λυγρὸν ὄλεθρον 24.736 χωόμενος, ᾧ δή που ἀδελφεὸν ἔκτανεν Ἕκτωρ 24.737 ἢ πατέρʼ ἠὲ καὶ υἱόν, ἐπεὶ μάλα πολλοὶ Ἀχαιῶν 24.738 Ἕκτορος ἐν παλάμῃσιν ὀδὰξ ἕλον ἄσπετον οὖδας. 24.739 οὐ γὰρ μείλιχος ἔσκε πατὴρ τεὸς ἐν δαῒ λυγρῇ· 24.740 τὼ καί μιν λαοὶ μὲν ὀδύρονται κατὰ ἄστυ, 24.741 ἀρητὸν δὲ τοκεῦσι γόον καὶ πένθος ἔθηκας 24.742 Ἕκτορ· ἐμοὶ δὲ μάλιστα λελείψεται ἄλγεα λυγρά. 24.743 οὐ γάρ μοι θνῄσκων λεχέων ἐκ χεῖρας ὄρεξας, 24.744 οὐδέ τί μοι εἶπες πυκινὸν ἔπος, οὗ τέ κεν αἰεὶ 24.745 μεμνῄμην νύκτάς τε καὶ ἤματα δάκρυ χέουσα. 24.746 ὣς ἔφατο κλαίουσʼ, ἐπὶ δὲ στενάχοντο γυναῖκες. 24.747 τῇσιν δʼ αὖθʼ Ἑκάβη ἁδινοῦ ἐξῆρχε γόοιο· 24.748 Ἕκτορ ἐμῷ θυμῷ πάντων πολὺ φίλτατε παίδων, 24.749 ἦ μέν μοι ζωός περ ἐὼν φίλος ἦσθα θεοῖσιν· 24.750 οἳ δʼ ἄρα σεῦ κήδοντο καὶ ἐν θανάτοιό περ αἴσῃ. 24.751 ἄλλους μὲν γὰρ παῖδας ἐμοὺς πόδας ὠκὺς Ἀχιλλεὺς 24.752 πέρνασχʼ ὅν τινʼ ἕλεσκε πέρην ἁλὸς ἀτρυγέτοιο, 24.753 ἐς Σάμον ἔς τʼ Ἴμβρον καὶ Λῆμνον ἀμιχθαλόεσσαν· 24.754 σεῦ δʼ ἐπεὶ ἐξέλετο ψυχὴν ταναήκεϊ χαλκῷ, 24.755 πολλὰ ῥυστάζεσκεν ἑοῦ περὶ σῆμʼ ἑτάροιο 24.756 Πατρόκλου, τὸν ἔπεφνες· ἀνέστησεν δέ μιν οὐδʼ ὧς. 24.757 νῦν δέ μοι ἑρσήεις καὶ πρόσφατος ἐν μεγάροισι 24.758 κεῖσαι, τῷ ἴκελος ὅν τʼ ἀργυρότοξος Ἀπόλλων 24.759 οἷς ἀγανοῖσι βέλεσσιν ἐποιχόμενος κατέπεφνεν. 24.760 ὣς ἔφατο κλαίουσα, γόον δʼ ἀλίαστον ὄρινε. 24.761 τῇσι δʼ ἔπειθʼ Ἑλένη τριτάτη ἐξῆρχε γόοιο· 24.762 Ἕκτορ ἐμῷ θυμῷ δαέρων πολὺ φίλτατε πάντων, 24.763 ἦ μέν μοι πόσις ἐστὶν Ἀλέξανδρος θεοειδής, 24.764 ὅς μʼ ἄγαγε Τροίηνδʼ· ὡς πρὶν ὤφελλον ὀλέσθαι. 24.765 ἤδη γὰρ νῦν μοι τόδε εἰκοστὸν ἔτος ἐστὶν 24.766 ἐξ οὗ κεῖθεν ἔβην καὶ ἐμῆς ἀπελήλυθα πάτρης· 24.767 ἀλλʼ οὔ πω σεῦ ἄκουσα κακὸν ἔπος οὐδʼ ἀσύφηλον· 24.768 ἀλλʼ εἴ τίς με καὶ ἄλλος ἐνὶ μεγάροισιν ἐνίπτοι 24.769 δαέρων ἢ γαλόων ἢ εἰνατέρων εὐπέπλων, 24.770 ἢ ἑκυρή, ἑκυρὸς δὲ πατὴρ ὣς ἤπιος αἰεί, 24.771 ἀλλὰ σὺ τὸν ἐπέεσσι παραιφάμενος κατέρυκες 24.772 σῇ τʼ ἀγανοφροσύνῃ καὶ σοῖς ἀγανοῖς ἐπέεσσι. 24.773 τὼ σέ θʼ ἅμα κλαίω καὶ ἔμʼ ἄμμορον ἀχνυμένη κῆρ· 24.774 οὐ γάρ τίς μοι ἔτʼ ἄλλος ἐνὶ Τροίῃ εὐρείῃ 24.775 ἤπιος οὐδὲ φίλος, πάντες δέ με πεφρίκασιν. 24.776 ὣς ἔφατο κλαίουσʼ, ἐπὶ δʼ ἔστενε δῆμος ἀπείρων.
24.804
ὣς οἵ γʼ ἀμφίεπον τάφον Ἕκτορος ἱπποδάμοιο.' ' None
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6.357 my brother, since above all others has trouble encompassed thy heart because of shameless me, and the folly of Alexander; on whom Zeus hath brought an evil doom, that even in days to come we may be a song for men that are yet to be. Then made answer to her great Hector of the flashing helm:
22.304
Now of a surety is evil death nigh at hand, and no more afar from me, neither is there way of escape. So I ween from of old was the good pleasure of Zeus, and of the son of Zeus, the god that smiteth afar, even of them that aforetime were wont to succour me with ready hearts; but now again is my doom come upon me. Nay, but not without a struggle let me die, neither ingloriously, 22.305 but in the working of some great deed for the hearing of men that are yet to be. So saying, he drew his sharp sword that hung beside his flank, a great sword and a mighty, and gathering himself together swooped like an eagle of lofty flight that darteth to the plain through the dark clouds to seize a tender lamb or a cowering hare;
24.719
had not the old man spoken amid the folk from out the car:Make me way for the mules to pass through; thereafter shall ye take your fill of wailing, when I have brought him to the house. So spake he, and they stood apart and made way for the waggon. But the others, when they had brought him to the glorious house, 24.720 laid him on a corded bedstead, and by his side set singers, leaders of the dirge, who led the song of lamentation—they chanted the dirge, and thereat the women made lament. And amid these white-armed Andromache led the wailing, holding in her arms the while the head of man-slaying Hector: 24.725 Husband, perished from out of life art thou, yet in thy youth, and leavest me a widow in thy halls; and thy son is still but a babe, the son born of thee and me in our haplessness; neither do I deem that he will come to manhood, for ere that shall this city be wasted utterly. For thou hast perished that didst watch thereover, 24.730 thou that didst guard it, and keep safe its noble wives and little children. These, I ween, shall soon be riding upon the hollow ships, and I among them; and thou, my child, shalt follow with me to a place where thou shalt labour at unseemly tasks, toiling before the face of some ungentle master, or else some Achaean shall seize thee by the arm 24.735 and hurl thee from the wall, a woeful death, being wroth for that Hector slew his brother haply, or his father, or his son, seeing that full many Achaeans at the hands of Hector have bitten the vast earth with their teeth; for nowise gentle was thy father in woeful war. 24.740 Therefore the folk wail for him throughout the city, and grief unspeakable and sorrow hast thou brought upon thy parents, Hector; and for me beyond all others shall grievous woes be left. For at thy death thou didst neither stretch out thy hands to me from thy bed, nor speak to me any word of wisdom whereon 24.745 /I might have pondered night and day with shedding of tears. 24.749 I might have pondered night and day with shedding of tears. So spake she wailing, and thereat the women made lament. And among them Hecabe in turns led the vehement wailing:Hector, far dearest to my heart of all my children, lo, when thou livedst thou wast dear to the gods, 24.750 and therefore have they had care of thee for all thou art in the doom of death. For of other sons of mine whomsoever he took would swift-footed Achilles sell beyond the unresting sea, unto Samos and Imbros and Lemnos, shrouded in smoke, but, when from thee he had taken away thy life with the long-edged bronze 24.755 oft would he drag thee about the barrow of his comrade, Patroclus, whom thou didst slay; howbeit even so might he not raise him up. all dewy-fresh thou liest in my halls as wert thou g newly slain, like as one whom Apollo of the silver bow assaileth with his gentle shafts and slayeth. 24.759 oft would he drag thee about the barrow of his comrade, Patroclus, whom thou didst slay; howbeit even so might he not raise him up. all dewy-fresh thou liest in my halls as wert thou g newly slain, like as one whom Apollo of the silver bow assaileth with his gentle shafts and slayeth.' "24.760 So spake she wailing, and roused unabating lament. And thereafter Helen was the third to lead the wailing:Hector, far dearest to my heart of all my husband's brethren! In sooth my husband is godlike Alexander, that brought me to Troy-land —would I died ere then! " "24.765 For this is now the twentieth year from the time when I went from thence and am gone from my native land, but never yet heard I evil or despiteful word from thee; nay, if so be any other spake reproachfully of me in the halls, a brother of thine or a sister, or brother's fair-robed wife, " "24.769 For this is now the twentieth year from the time when I went from thence and am gone from my native land, but never yet heard I evil or despiteful word from thee; nay, if so be any other spake reproachfully of me in the halls, a brother of thine or a sister, or brother's fair-robed wife, " '24.770 /or thy mother—but thy father was ever gentle as he had been mine own—yet wouldst thou turn them with speech and restrain them by the gentleness of thy spirit and thy gentle words. Wherefore I wail alike for thee and for my hapless self with grief at heart; for no longer have I anyone beside in broad Troy 24.775 /that is gentle to me or kind; but all men shudder at me.
24.804
lest the well-greaved Achaeans should set upon them before the time. And when they had piled the barrow they went back, and gathering together duly feasted a glorious feast in the palace of Priam, the king fostered of Zeus.On this wise held they funeral for horse-taming Hector. ' ' None
10. None, None, nan (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Apollonius Rhodius, lament in • Orpheus and Eurydice, mourning and lamenting of Orpheus • Philomela and Procne, lament of Orpheus and • Valerius Flaccus, lament in • burials and mourning, excessive female grief and pleasure in lamentation • lamentation

 Found in books: Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 82; Kazantzidis and Spatharas (2018), Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art, 330; Panoussi(2019), Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature, 92, 93; Repath and Whitmarsh (2022), Reading Heliodorus' Aethiopica, 14; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 82

11. Euripides, Trojan Women, 343-347, 349-353, 355-356, 614, 1070, 1242-1245 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Aeschylus, lament • Troades lament of enslaved Trojan women in • eros, lament of enslaved Trojan women in Troades and • lament • lamentation • slavery, lament of Trojan women in Troades over • women in Greek culture lament of enslaved Trojan women in Troades

 Found in books: Kazantzidis and Spatharas (2018), Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art, 64, 65, 67; Pillinger (2019), Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature, 103, 107, 215; Pucci (2016), Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay, 72, 77, 78, 79

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343 ̔́Ηφαιστε, δᾳδουχεῖς μὲν ἐν γάμοις βροτῶν,' "344 ἀτὰρ λυγράν γε τήνδ' ἀναιθύσσεις φλόγα" '345 ἔξω τε μεγάλων ἐλπίδων. 346 οἴμοι, τέκνον,' "347 ὡς οὐχ ὑπ' αἰχμῆς ς' οὐδ' ὑπ' ̓Αργείου δορὸς" 349 παράδος ἐμοὶ φῶς: οὐ γὰρ ὀρθὰ πυρφορεῖς' "350 μαινὰς θοάζους', οὐδέ ς' αἱ τύχαι, τέκνον," "350 † ἐσωφρονήκας' †, ἀλλ' ἔτ' ἐν ταὐτῷ μένεις." "351 ἐσφέρετε πεύκας, δάκρυά τ' ἀνταλλάξατε" '352 τοῖς τῆσδε μέλεσι, Τρῳάδες, γαμηλίοις.' "353 μῆτερ, πύκαζε κρᾶτ' ἐμὸν νικηφόρον," "
355
καὶ πέμπε, κἂν μὴ τἀμά σοι πρόθυμά γ' ᾖ," '356 ὤθει βιαίως: εἰ γὰρ ἔστι Λοξίας,' "
614
ἀγόμεθα λεία σὺν τέκνῳ: τὸ δ' εὐγενὲς" 1070 τὰν καταλαμπομέναν ζαθέαν θεράπναν.1242 μάτην δ' ἐβουθυτοῦμεν. εἰ δὲ μὴ θεὸς" '1243 ἔστρεψε τἄνω περιβαλὼν κάτω χθονός, 1244 ἀφανεῖς ἂν ὄντες οὐκ ἂν ὑμνήθημεν ἂν 1245 μούσαις ἀοιδὰς δόντες ὑστέρων βροτῶν. " None
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343 You god of fire, it is yours to light the bridal torch for men, but piteous is the flame you kindle here, 345 beyond my blackest expectation. Ah, my child! how little did I ever dream that such would be your marriage, a captive, and of Argos too! Give up the torch to me; you do not bear its blaze aright in your wild frantic course, nor have your afflictions left you in your sober senses, 350 but still you are as frantic as before. Take in those torches, Trojan friends, and for her wedding madrigals weep your tears instead. Cassandra 353 O mother, crown my head with victor’s wreaths; rejoice in my royal match; lead me
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and if you find me unwilling at all, thrust me there by force; for if Loxias is indeed a prophet, Agamemnon, that famous king of the Achaeans, will find in me a bride more vexatious than Helen. For I will slay him and lay waste his home
614
Hence with my child as booty am I borne; the noble
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and takes the god’s first rays! Choru1242 It seems the only things that heaven concerns itself about are my troubles and Troy hateful in their eyes above all other cities. In vain did we sacrifice to them. But if the god had not caught us in his grip and plunged us headlong beneath the earth, we should have been unheard of, and not ever sung in Muses’ songs, 1245 furnishing to bards of after-days a subject for their minstrelsy. Go, bury now in his poor tomb the dead, wreathed all duly as befits a corpse. And yet I think it makes little difference to the dead, if they get a gorgeous funeral; ' None
12. Sophocles, Antigone, 821-822 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • lamentation • lamentation, song of

 Found in books: Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 273; Seaford (2018), Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays, 239

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821 nor having won the wages of the sword. No, guided by your own laws and still alive, unlike any mortal before, you will descend to Hades.'822 nor having won the wages of the sword. No, guided by your own laws and still alive, unlike any mortal before, you will descend to Hades. ' None
13. Sophocles, Electra, 1239-1242, 1246-1255 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • lamentation • lamentation, song of

 Found in books: Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 270; Seaford (2018), Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays, 251

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1239 No, by ever-virgin Artemis,'1240 I will never think it right to tremble before eternally house-bound women, that useless burden on the ground! Oreste
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oh, no! ah, me! You have reminded me of my sorrow, one which by its nature cannot be veiled, 1250 cannot be done away with, cannot be forgotten! Oreste 1251 I know this, too; but when occasion prompts, we must recall those crimes. Electra 1253 Each moment of all time, as it comes, would be a proper occasion 1255 for me to make these just complaints. Scarcely now have I had my lips set free. Oreste ' None
14. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • communal laments • lamentation, protest, rebellion

 Found in books: Gera (2014), Judith, 185; Toloni (2022), The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis, 73

15. None, None, nan (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Lament for Adonis • Lament for Bion • lament

 Found in books: Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 32, 51; Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 204, 205, 206

16. None, None, nan (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • lament • lamentation, song of

 Found in books: Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 276; Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 315

17. None, None, nan (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • lament • lamenting, as a distortive evocation of bucolic song

 Found in books: Kazantzidis (2021), Lucretius on Disease: The Poetics of Morbidity in "De rerum natura", 138; Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 315

18. None, None, nan (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Alexandra, and laments for the fall of cities • lament

 Found in books: Liapis and Petrides (2019), Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca, 113; Pillinger (2019), Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature, 121, 122

19. Anon., 1 Enoch, 1-11, 17-36 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Eve, Lament of • Lament

 Found in books: Levison (2023), The Greek Life of Adam and Eve. 402, 940; Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 209, 703

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1 The words of the blessing of Enoch, wherewith he blessed the elect and righteous, who will be,living in the day of tribulation, when all the wicked and godless are to be removed. And he took up his parable and said -Enoch a righteous man, whose eyes were opened by God, saw the vision of the Holy One in the heavens, which the angels showed me, and from them I heard everything, and from them I understood as I saw, but not for this generation, but for a remote one which is,for to come. Concerning the elect I said, and took up my parable concerning them:The Holy Great One will come forth from His dwelling,,And the eternal God will tread upon the earth, (even) on Mount Sinai, And appear from His camp And appear in the strength of His might from the heaven of heavens.,And all shall be smitten with fear And the Watchers shall quake, And great fear and trembling shall seize them unto the ends of the earth.,And the high mountains shall be shaken, And the high hills shall be made low, And shall melt like wax before the flame,And the earth shall be wholly rent in sunder, And all that is upon the earth shall perish, And there shall be a judgement upon all (men).,But with the righteous He will make peace.And will protect the elect, And mercy shall be upon them.And they shall all belong to God, And they shall be prospered, And they shall all be blessed.And He will help them all, And light shall appear unto them, And He will make peace with them'.,And behold! He cometh with ten thousands of His holy ones To execute judgement upon all, And to destroy all the ungodly:And to convict all flesh of all the works of their ungodliness which they have ungodly committed, And of all the hard things which ungodly sinners have spoken against Him."2 Observe ye everything that takes place in the heaven, how they do not change their orbits, and the luminaries which are in the heaven, how they all rise and set in order each in its season, and,transgress not against their appointed order. Behold ye the earth, and give heed to the things which take place upon it from first to last, how steadfast they are, how none of the things upon earth,change, but all the works of God appear to you. Behold the summer and the winter, how the whole earth is filled with water, and clouds and dew and rain lie upon it. 3 Observe and see how (in the winter) all the trees seem as though they had withered and shed all their leaves, except fourteen trees, which do not lose their foliage but retain the old foliage from two to three years till the new comes. 4 And again, observe ye the days of summer how the sun is above the earth over against it. And you seek shade and shelter by reason of the heat of the sun, and the earth also burns with growing heat, and so you cannot tread on the earth, or on a rock by reason of its heat. 5 Observe ye how the trees cover themselves with green leaves and bear fruit: wherefore give ye heed and know with regard to all His works, and recognize how He that liveth for ever hath made them so.,And all His works go on thus from year to year for ever, and all the tasks which they accomplish for Him, and their tasks change not, but according as God hath ordained so is it done.,And behold how the sea and the rivers in like manner accomplish and change not their tasks from His commandments\'.",But ye -ye have not been steadfast, nor done the commandments of the Lord, But ye have turned away and spoken proud and hard words With your impure mouths against His greatness. Oh, ye hard-hearted, ye shall find no peace.,Therefore shall ye execrate your days, And the years of your life shall perish, And the years of your destruction shall be multiplied in eternal execration, And ye shall find no mercy.,In those days ye shall make your names an eternal execration unto all the righteous, b And by you shall all who curse, curse, And all the sinners and godless shall imprecate by you,,And for you the godless there shall be a curse.",And all the . . . shall rejoice, e And there shall be forgiveness of sins, f And every mercy and peace and forbearance: g There shall be salvation unto them, a goodly light.I And for all of you sinners there shall be no salvation, j But on you all shall abide a curse.,But for the elect there shall be light and joy and peace, b And they shall inherit the earth.,And then there shall be bestowed upon the elect wisdom, And they shall all live and never again sin, Either through ungodliness or through pride: But they who are wise shall be humble.,And they shall not again transgress, Nor shall they sin all the days of their life, Nor shall they die of (the divine) anger or wrath, But they shall complete the number of the days of their life.And their lives shall be increased in peace, And the years of their joy shall be multiplied, In eternal gladness and peace, All the days of their life. 6 And it came to pass when the children of men had multiplied that in those days were born unto",them beautiful and comely daughters. And the angels, the children of the heaven, saw and lusted after them, and said to one another: \'Come, let us choose us wives from among the children of men,and beget us children.\' And Semjaza, who was their leader, said unto them: \'I fear ye will not,indeed agree to do this deed, and I alone shall have to pay the penalty of a great sin.\' And they all answered him and said: \'Let us all swear an oath, and all bind ourselves by mutual imprecations,not to abandon this plan but to do this thing.\' Then sware they all together and bound themselves",by mutual imprecations upon it. And they were in all two hundred; who descended in the days of Jared on the summit of Mount Hermon, and they called it Mount Hermon, because they had sworn,and bound themselves by mutual imprecations upon it. And these are the names of their leaders: Samlazaz, their leader, Araklba, Rameel, Kokablel, Tamlel, Ramlel, Danel, Ezeqeel, Baraqijal,,Asael, Armaros, Batarel, Ael, Zaq
1el, Samsapeel, Satarel, Turel, Jomjael, Sariel. These are their chiefs of tens.' "7 And all the others together with them took unto themselves wives, and each chose for himself one, and they began to go in unto them and to defile themselves with them, and they taught them charms,and enchantments, and the cutting of roots, and made them acquainted with plants. And they,became pregt, and they bare great giants, whose height was three thousand ells: Who consumed,all the acquisitions of men. And when men could no longer sustain them, the giants turned against,them and devoured mankind. And they began to sin against birds, and beasts, and reptiles, and,fish, and to devour one another's flesh, and drink the blood. Then the earth laid accusation against the lawless ones." "8 And Azazel taught men to make swords, and knives, and shields, and breastplates, and made known to them the metals of the earth and the art of working them, and bracelets, and ornaments, and the use of antimony, and the beautifying of the eyelids, and all kinds of costly stones, and all,colouring tinctures. And there arose much godlessness, and they committed fornication, and they,were led astray, and became corrupt in all their ways. Semjaza taught enchantments, and root-cuttings, 'Armaros the resolving of enchantments, Baraqijal (taught) astrology, Kokabel the constellations, Ezeqeel the knowledge of the clouds, Araqiel the signs of the earth, Shamsiel the signs of the sun, and Sariel the course of the moon. And as men perished, they cried, and their cry went up to heaven . . ." "9 And then Michael, Uriel, Raphael, and Gabriel looked down from heaven and saw much blood being,shed upon the earth, and all lawlessness being wrought upon the earth. And they said one to another: 'The earth made without inhabitant cries the voice of their cryingst up to the gates of heaven.,And now to you, the holy ones of heaven, the souls of men make their suit, saying, 'Bring our cause,before the Most High.' And they said to the Lord of the ages: 'Lord of lords, God of gods, King of kings, and God of the ages, the throne of Thy glory (standeth) unto all the generations of the,ages, and Thy name holy and glorious and blessed unto all the ages! Thou hast made all things, and power over all things hast Thou: and all things are naked and open in Thy sight, and Thou seest all,things, and nothing can hide itself from Thee. Thou seest what Azazel hath done, who hath taught all unrighteousness on earth and revealed the eternal secrets which were (preserved) in heaven, which,men were striving to learn: And Semjaza, to whom Thou hast given authority to bear rule over his associates. And they have gone to the daughters of men upon the earth, and have slept with the,women, and have defiled themselves, and revealed to them all kinds of sins. And the women have,borne giants, and the whole earth has thereby been filled with blood and unrighteousness. And now, behold, the souls of those who have died are crying and making their suit to the gates of heaven, and their lamentations have ascended: and cannot cease because of the lawless deeds which are,wrought on the earth. And Thou knowest all things before they come to pass, and Thou seest these things and Thou dost suffer them, and Thou dost not say to us what we are to do to them in regard to these.'" "
10
Then said the Most High, the Holy and Great One spake, and sent Uriel to the son of Lamech,,and said to him: \'Go to Noah and tell him in my name \'Hide thyself!\' and reveal to him the end that is approaching: that the whole earth will be destroyed, and a deluge is about to come,upon the whole earth, and will destroy all that is on it. And now instruct him that he may escape,and his seed may be preserved for all the generations of the world.\' And again the Lord said to Raphael: \'Bind Azazel hand and foot, and cast him into the darkness: and make an opening,in the desert, which is in Dudael, and cast him therein. And place upon him rough and jagged rocks, and cover him with darkness, and let him abide there for ever, and cover his face that he may,not see light. And on the day of the great judgement he shall be cast into the fire. And heal the earth which the angels have corrupted, and proclaim the healing of the earth, that they may heal the plague, and that all the children of men may not perish through all the secret things that the,Watchers have disclosed and have taught their sons. And the whole earth has been corrupted",through the works that were taught by Azazel: to him ascribe all sin.\' And to Gabriel said the Lord: \'Proceed against the bastards and the reprobates, and against the children of fornication: and destroy the children of fornication and the children of the Watchers from amongst men and cause them to go forth: send them one against the other that they may destroy each other in,battle: for length of days shall they not have. And no request that they (i.e. their fathers) make of thee shall be granted unto their fathers on their behalf; for they hope to live an eternal life, and,that each one of them will live five hundred years.\' And the Lord said unto Michael: \'Go, bind Semjaza and his associates who have united themselves with women so as to have defiled themselves,with them in all their uncleanness. And when their sons have slain one another, and they have seen the destruction of their beloved ones, bind them fast for seventy generations in the valleys of the earth, till the day of their judgement and of their consummation, till the judgement that is,for ever and ever is consummated. In those days they shall be led off to the abyss of fire: and",to the torment and the prison in which they shall be confined for ever. And whosoever shall be condemned and destroyed will from thenceforth be bound together with them to the end of all",generations. And destroy all the spirits of the reprobate and the children of the Watchers, because,they have wronged mankind. Destroy all wrong from the face of the earth and let every evil work come to an end: and let the plant of righteousness and truth appear: and it shall prove a blessing; the works of righteousness and truth\' shall be planted in truth and joy for evermore.",And then shall all the righteous escape, And shall live till they beget thousands of children, And all the days of their youth and their old age Shall they complete in peace.,And then shall the whole earth be tilled in righteousness, and shall all be planted with trees and,be full of blessing. And all desirable trees shall be planted on it, and they shall plant vines on it: and the vine which they plant thereon shall yield wine in abundance, and as for all the seed which is sown thereon each measure (of it) shall bear a thousand, and each measure of olives shall yield,ten presses of oil. And cleanse thou the earth from all oppression, and from all unrighteousness, and from all sin, and from all godlessness: and all the uncleanness that is wrought upon the earth,destroy from off the earth. And all the children of men shall become righteous, and all nations,shall offer adoration and shall praise Me, and all shall worship Me. And the earth shall be cleansed from all defilement, and from all sin, and from all punishment, and from all torment, and I will never again send (them) upon it from generation to generation and for ever.
1
1
And in those days I will open the store chambers of blessing which are in the heaven, so as to send,them down upon the earth over the work and labour of the children of men. And truth and peace shall be associated together throughout all the days of the world and throughout all the generations of men.\'"

17
And they took and brought me to a place in which those who were there were like flaming fire,,and, when they wished, they appeared as men. And they brought me to the place of darkness, and to a mountain the point of whose summit reached to heaven. And I saw the places of the luminaries and the treasuries of the stars and of the thunder and in the uttermost depths, where were,a fiery bow and arrows and their quiver, and a fiery sword and all the lightnings. And they took,me to the living waters, and to the fire of the west, which receives every setting of the sun. And I came to a river of fire in which the fire flows like water and discharges itself into the great sea towards,the west. I saw the great rivers and came to the great river and to the great darkness, and went,to the place where no flesh walks. I saw the mountains of the darkness of winter and the place",whence all the waters of the deep flow. I saw the mouths of all the rivers of the earth and the mouth of the deep."
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I saw the treasuries of all the winds: I saw how He had furnished with them the whole creation",and the firm foundations of the earth. And I saw the corner-stone of the earth: I saw the four",winds which bear the earth and the firmament of the heaven. And I saw how the winds stretch out the vaults of heaven, and have their station between heaven and earth: these are the pillars,of the heaven. I saw the winds of heaven which turn and bring the circumference of the sun and",all the stars to their setting. I saw the winds on the earth carrying the clouds: I saw the paths",of the angels. I saw at the end of the earth the firmament of the heaven above. And I proceeded and saw a place which burns day and night, where there are seven mountains of magnificent stones,,three towards the east, and three towards the south. And as for those towards the east, was of coloured stone, and one of pearl, and one of jacinth, and those towards the south of red stone.,But the middle one reached to heaven like the throne of God, of alabaster, and the summit of the,throne was of sapphire. And I saw a flaming fire. And beyond these mountains Is a region the end of the great earth: there the heavens were completed. And I saw a deep abyss, with columns of heavenly fire, and among them I saw columns of fire fall, which were beyond measure alike towards,the height and towards the depth. And beyond that abyss I saw a place which had no firmament of the heaven above, and no firmly founded earth beneath it: there was no water upon it, and no,birds, but it was a waste and horrible place. I saw there seven stars like great burning mountains,,and to me, when I inquired regarding them, The angel said: \'This place is the end of heaven and earth: this has become a prison for the stars and the host of heaven. And the stars which roll over the fire are they which have transgressed the commandment of the Lord in the beginning of,their rising, because they did not come forth at their appointed times. And He was wroth with them, and bound them till the time when their guilt should be consummated (even) for ten thousand years.\'
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And Uriel said to me: \'Here shall stand the angels who have connected themselves with women, and their spirits assuming many different forms are defiling mankind and shall lead them astray into sacrificing to demons as gods, (here shall they stand,) till the day of the great judgement in,which they shall be judged till they are made an end of. And the women also of the angels who",went astray shall become sirens.\' And I, Enoch, alone saw the vision, the ends of all things: and no man shall see as I have seen. 20 And these are the names of the holy angels who watch. Uriel, one of the holy angels, who is,over the world and over Tartarus. Raphael, one of the holy angels, who is over the spirits of men.,Raguel, one of the holy angels who takes vengeance on the world of the luminaries. Michael, one,of the holy angels, to wit, he that is set over the best part of mankind and over chaos. Saraqael,,one of the holy angels, who is set over the spirits, who sin in the spirit. Gabriel, one of the holy,angels, who is over Paradise and the serpents and the Cherubim. Remiel, one of the holy angels, whom God set over those who rise. 2
1
And I proceeded to where things were chaotic. And I saw there something horrible: I saw neither",a heaven above nor a firmly founded earth, but a place chaotic and horrible. And there I saw,seven stars of the heaven bound together in it, like great mountains and burning with fire. Then,I said: \'For what sin are they bound, and on what account have they been cast in hither\' Then said Uriel, one of the holy angels, who was with me, and was chief over them, and said: \'Enoch, why,dost thou ask, and why art thou eager for the truth These are of the number of the stars of heaven, which have transgressed the commandment of the Lord, and are bound here till ten thousand years,,the time entailed by their sins, are consummated.\' And from thence I went to another place, which was still more horrible than the former, and I saw a horrible thing: a great fire there which burnt and blazed, and the place was cleft as far as the abyss, being full of great descending columns of,fire: neither its extent or magnitude could I see, nor could I conjecture. Then I said: \'How,fearful is the place and how terrible to look upon!\' Then Uriel answered me, one of the holy angels who was with me, and said unto me: \'Enoch, why hast thou such fear and affright\' And,I answered: \'Because of this fearful place, and because of the spectacle of the pain.\' And he said unto me: \'This place is the prison of the angels, and here they will be imprisoned for ever.\' 22 And thence I went to another place, and he mountain and of hard rock.,And there was in it four hollow places, deep and wide and very smooth. How smooth are the hollow places and deep and dark to look at.,Then Raphael answered, one of the holy angels who was with me, and said unto me: \'These hollow places have been created for this very purpose, that the spirits of the souls of the dead should,assemble therein, yea that all the souls of the children of men should assemble here. And these places have been made to receive them till the day of their judgement and till their appointed period till the period appointed, till the great judgement (comes) upon them.\' I saw (the spirit of) a dead man making suit,,and his voice went forth to heaven and made suit. And I asked Raphael the angel who was",with me, and I said unto him: \'This spirit which maketh suit, whose is it, whose voice goeth forth and maketh suit to heaven \',And he answered me saying: \'This is the spirit which went forth from Abel, whom his brother Cain slew, and he makes his suit against him till his seed is destroyed from the face of the earth, and his seed is annihilated from amongst the seed of men.\',The I asked regarding it, and regarding all the hollow places: \'Why is one separated from the other\',And he answered me and said unto me: \'These three have been made that the spirits of the dead might be separated. And such a division has been make (for) the spirits of the righteous, in which there is the bright spring of,water. And such has been made for sinners when they die and are buried in the earth and judgement has not been executed on them in their",lifetime. Here their spirits shall be set apart in this great pain till the great day of judgement and punishment and torment of those who curse for ever and retribution for their spirits. There",He shall bind them for ever. And such a division has been made for the spirits of those who make their suit, who make disclosures concerning their destruction, when they were slain in the days,of the sinners. Such has been made for the spirits of men who were not righteous but sinners, who were complete in transgression, and of the transgressors they shall be companions: but their spirits shall not be slain in the day of judgement nor shall they be raised from thence.\',The I blessed the Lord of glory and said: \'Blessed be my Lord, the Lord of righteousness, who ruleth for ever.\' 23 From thence I went to another place to the west of the ends of the earth. And I saw a burning",fire which ran without resting, and paused not from its course day or night but (ran) regularly. And,I asked saying: \'What is this which rests not\' Then Raguel, one of the holy angels who was with me, answered me and said unto me: \'This course of fire which thou hast seen is the fire in the west which persecutes all the luminaries of heaven.\'' "24 And from thence I went to another place of the earth, and he showed me a mountain range of,fire which burnt day and night. And I went beyond it and saw seven magnificent mountains all differing each from the other, and the stones (thereof) were magnificent and beautiful, magnificent as a whole, of glorious appearance and fair exterior: three towards the east, one founded on the other, and three towards the south, one upon the other, and deep rough ravines, no one of which,joined with any other. And the seventh mountain was in the midst of these, and it excelled them,in height, resembling the seat of a throne: and fragrant trees encircled the throne. And amongst them was a tree such as I had never yet smelt, neither was any amongst them nor were others like it: it had a fragrance beyond all fragrance, and its leaves and blooms and wood wither not for ever:,and its fruit is beautiful, and its fruit n resembles the dates of a palm. Then I said: 'How beautiful is this tree, and fragrant, and its leaves are fair, and its blooms very delightful in appearance.',Then answered Michael, one of the holy and honoured angels who was with me, and was their leader." '25 And he said unto me: \'Enoch, why dost thou ask me regarding the fragrance of the tree,,and why dost thou wish to learn the truth\' Then I answered him saying: \'I wish to",know about everything, but especially about this tree.\' And he answered saying: \'This high mountain which thou hast seen, whose summit is like the throne of God, is His throne, where the Holy Great One, the Lord of Glory, the Eternal King, will sit, when He shall come down to visit,the earth with goodness. And as for this fragrant tree no mortal is permitted to touch it till the great judgement, when He shall take vengeance on all and bring (everything) to its consummation,for ever. It shall then be given to the righteous and holy. Its fruit shall be for food to the elect: it shall be transplanted to the holy place, to the temple of the Lord, the Eternal King.,Then shall they rejoice with joy and be glad, And into the holy place shall they enter; And its fragrance shall be in their bones, And they shall live a long life on earth, Such as thy fathers lived:And in their days shall no sorrow or plague Or torment or calamity touch them.\',Then blessed I the God of Glory, the Eternal King, who hath prepared such things for the righteous, and hath created them and promised to give to them. 26 And I went from thence to the middle of the earth, and I saw a blessed place in which there were,trees with branches abiding and blooming of a dismembered tree. And there I saw a holy mountain,,and underneath the mountain to the east there was a stream and it flowed towards the south. And I saw towards the east another mountain higher than this, and between them a deep and narrow,ravine: in it also ran a stream underneath the mountain. And to the west thereof there was another mountain, lower than the former and of small elevation, and a ravine deep and dry between them: and another deep and dry ravine was at the extremities of the three mountains. And all the ravines were deep rand narrow, (being formed) of hard rock, and trees were not planted upon,them. And I marveled at the rocks, and I marveled at the ravine, yea, I marveled very much. 27 Then said I: \'For what object is this blessed land, which is entirely filled with trees, and this,accursed valley between\' Then Uriel, one of the holy angels who was with me, answered and said: \'This accursed valley is for those who are accursed for ever: Here shall all the accursed be gathered together who utter with their lips against the Lord unseemly words and of His glory speak hard things. Here shall they be gathered together, and here,shall be their place of judgement. In the last days there shall be upon them the spectacle of righteous judgement in the presence of the righteous for ever: here shall the merciful bless the Lord of glory, the Eternal King.,In the days of judgement over the former, they shall bless Him for the mercy in accordance with,which He has assigned them (their lot).\' Then I blessed the Lord of Glory and set forth His glory and lauded Him gloriously." 28 And thence I went towards the east, into the midst of the mountain range of the desert, and,I saw a wilderness and it was solitary, full of trees and plants. And water gushed forth from,above. Rushing like a copious watercourse which flowed towards the north-west it caused clouds and dew to ascend on every side." 29 And thence I went to another place in the desert, and approached to the east of this mountain,range. And there I saw aromatic trees exhaling the fragrance of frankincense and myrrh, and the trees also were similar to the almond tree. 30 And beyond these, I went afar to the east, and I saw another place, a valley (full) of water. And,therein there was a tree, the colour () of fragrant trees such as the mastic. And on the sides of those valleys I saw fragrant cinnamon. And beyond these I proceeded to the east. 3
1
And I saw other mountains, and amongst them were groves of trees, and there flowed forth from,them nectar, which is named sarara and galbanum. And beyond these mountains I saw another mountain to the east of the ends of the earth, whereon were aloe-trees, and all the trees were full,of stacte, being like almond-trees. And when one burnt it, it smelt sweeter than any fragrant odour.' "32 And after these fragrant odours, as I looked towards the north over the mountains I saw seven mountains full of choice nard and fragrant trees and cinnamon and pepper.,And thence I went over the summits of all these mountains, far towards the east of the earth, and passed above the Erythraean sea and went far from it, and passed over the angel Zotiel. And I came to the Garden of Righteousness,,I and from afar off trees more numerous than I these trees and great-two trees there, very great, beautiful, and glorious, and magnificent, and the tree of knowledge, whose holy fruit they eat and know great wisdom.,That tree is in height like the fir, and its leaves are like (those of) the Carob tree: and its fruit,is like the clusters of the vine, very beautiful: and the fragrance of the tree penetrates afar. Then,I said: 'How beautiful is the tree, and how attractive is its look!' Then Raphael the holy angel, who was with me, answered me and said: 'This is the tree of wisdom, of which thy father old (in years) and thy aged mother, who were before thee, have eaten, and they learnt wisdom and their eyes were opened, and they knew that they were naked and they were driven out of the garden.'" '33 And from thence I went to the ends of the earth and saw there great beasts, and each differed from the other; and (I saw) birds also differing in appearance and beauty and voice, the one differing from the other. And to the east of those beasts I saw the ends of the earth whereon the heaven,rests, and the portals of the heaven open. And I saw how the stars of heaven come forth, and,I counted the portals out of which they proceed, and wrote down all their outlets, of each individual star by itself, according to their number and their names, their courses and their positions, and their,times and their months, as Uriel the holy angel who was with me showed me. He showed all things to me and wrote them down for me: also their names he wrote for me, and their laws and their companies. 34 And from thence I went towards the north to the ends of the earth, and there I saw a great and,glorious device at the ends of the whole earth. And here I saw three portals of heaven open in the heaven: through each of them proceed north winds: when they blow there is cold, hail, frost,,snow, dew, and rain. And out of one portal they blow for good: but when they blow through the other two portals, it is with violence and affliction on the earth, and they blow with violence. 35 And from thence I went towards the west to the ends of the earth, and saw there three portals of the heaven open such as I had seen in the east, the same number of portals, and the same number of outlets. 36 And from thence I went to the south to the ends of the earth, and saw there three open portals,of the heaven: and thence there come dew, rain, and wind. And from thence I went to the east to the ends of the heaven, and saw here the three eastern portals of heaven open and small portals,above them. Through each of these small portals pass the stars of heaven and run their course to the west on the path which is shown to them. And as often as I saw I blessed always the Lord of Glory, and I continued to bless the Lord of Glory who has wrought great and glorious wonders, to show the greatness of His work to the angels and to spirits and to men, that they might praise His work and all His creation: that they might see the work of His might and praise the great work of His hands and bless Him for ever. ' None
20. None, None, nan (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Apollonius Rhodius, lament in • Valerius Flaccus, lament in

 Found in books: Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 82, 83, 84, 87, 88, 89; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 82, 83, 84, 87, 88, 89

21. Hebrew Bible, Daniel, 12.3 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Eve, Lament of • Lament

 Found in books: Levison (2023), The Greek Life of Adam and Eve. 402; Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 568

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12.3 וְהַמַּשְׂכִּלִים יַזְהִרוּ כְּזֹהַר הָרָקִיעַ וּמַצְדִּיקֵי הָרַבִּים כַּכּוֹכָבִים לְעוֹלָם וָעֶד׃'' None
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12.3 And they that are wise shall shine as the brightness of the firmament; and they that turn the many to righteousness as the stars for ever and ever.'' None
22. Ovid, Fasti, 4.223-4.244 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Phaethon; lamented by Sol • lamentation and grief

 Found in books: Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 109; Sider (2001), Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian, 33

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4.223 ‘Phryx puer in silvis, facie spectabilis, Attis 4.224 turrigeram casto vinxit amore deam. 4.225 hunc sibi servari voluit, sua templa tueri, 4.226 et dixit semper fac puer esse velis. 4.227 ille fidem iussis dedit et si mentiar, inquit 4.228 ultima, qua fallam, sit Venus illa mihi. 4.229 fallit et in nympha Sagaritide desinit esse 4.230 quod fuit: hinc poenas exigit ira deae. 4.231 Naida volneribus succidit in arbore factis, 4.232 illa perit: fatum Naidos arbor erat. 4.233 hic furit et credens thalami procumbere tectum 4.234 effugit et cursu Dindyma summa petit 4.235 et modo tolle faces! remove modo verbera! clamat; 4.236 saepe Palaestinas iurat adesse deas. 4.237 ille etiam saxo corpus laniavit acuto, 4.238 longaque in immundo pulvere tracta coma est, 4.239 voxque fuit ‘merui! meritas do sanguine poenas. 4.240 a! pereant partes, quae nocuere mihi! 4.241 a! pereant’ dicebat adhuc, onus inguinis aufert, 4.242 nullaque sunt subito signa relicta viri. 4.243 venit in exemplum furor hic, mollesque ministri 4.244 caedunt iactatis vilia membra comis.’'' None
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4.223 ‘In the woods, a Phrygian boy, Attis, of handsome face, 4.224 Won the tower-bearing goddess with his chaste passion. 4.225 She desired him to serve her, and protect her temple, 4.226 And said: “Wish, you might be a boy for ever.” 4.227 He promised to be true, and said: “If I’m lying 4.228 May the love I fail in be my last love.” 4.229 He did fail, and in meeting the nymph Sagaritis, 4.230 Abandoned what he was: the goddess, angered, avenged it. 4.231 She destroyed the Naiad, by wounding a tree, 4.232 Since the tree contained the Naiad’s fate. 4.233 Attis was maddened, and thinking his chamber’s roof 4.234 Was falling, fled for the summit of Mount Dindymus. 4.235 Now he cried: “Remove the torches”, now he cried: 4.236 “Take the whips away”: often swearing he saw the Furies. 4.237 He tore at his body too with a sharp stone, 4.238 And dragged his long hair in the filthy dust, 4.239 Shouting: “I deserved this! I pay the due penalty 4.240 In blood! Ah! Let the parts that harmed me, perish! 4.241 Let them perish!” cutting away the burden of his groin, 4.242 And suddenly bereft of every mark of manhood. 4.243 His madness set a precedent, and his unmanly servant 4.244 Toss their hair, and cut off their members as if worthless.’'' None
23. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 2.547-2.550, 10.8-10.10, 10.196-10.208, 10.214-10.216, 11.2, 11.52-11.53, 11.474-11.489, 11.491-11.496, 11.498-11.500, 11.502-11.506, 11.508-11.513, 11.515-11.519, 11.521-11.524, 11.526-11.536, 11.538-11.556, 11.558-11.569, 11.571-11.572 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Aeschylus, lament • Apollonius Rhodius, lament in • Orpheus and Eurydice, mourning and lamenting of Orpheus • Valerius Flaccus, lament in • burials and mourning, excessive female grief and pleasure in lamentation • burials and mourning, poet,traditional lament for death of • elegy, lamentation • lament • lamentation • lamentation (as a distinguishing feature of elegy

 Found in books: Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 82; Fielding (2017), Transformations of Ovid in Late Antiquity. 138; Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 192, 344; Mayor (2017), Religion and Memory in Tacitus’ Annals, 173; Panoussi(2019), Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature, 89, 96, 97, 239; Pillinger (2019), Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature, 216; Stephens and Winkler (1995), Ancient Greek Novels: The Fragments: Introduction, Text, Translation, and Commentary, 170; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 82

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2.547 ad dominum tendebat iter. Quem garrula motis 2.548 consequitur pennis, scitetur ut omnia, cornix, 2.549 auditaque viae causa “non utile carpis” 2.550 inquit “iter: ne sperne meae praesagia linguae.
10.8
Exitus auspicio gravior: nam nupta per herbas 10.9 dum nova naiadum turba comitata vagatur, 10.10 occidit in talum serpentis dente recepto.
10.196
“Laberis, Oebalide, prima fraudate iuventa,” 10.197 Phoebus ait “videoque tuum, mea crimina, vulnus. 10.198 Tu dolor es facinusque meum: mea dextera leto 10.199 inscribenda tuo est! Ego sum tibi funeris auctor. 10.200 Quae mea culpa tamen? Nisi si lusisse vocari 10.201 culpa potest, nisi culpa potest et amasse vocari. 10.202 Atque utinam merito vitam tecumque liceret 10.203 reddere! Quod quoniam fatali lege tenemur, 10.204 semper eris mecum memorique haerebis in ore. 10.205 Te lyra pulsa manu, te carmina nostra sonabunt, 10.206 flosque novus scripto gemitus imitabere nostros. 10.207 Tempus et illud erit, quo se fortissimus heros 10.208 addat in hunc florem folioque legatur eodem.”
10.214
Non satis hoc Phoebo est (is enim fuit auctor honoris): 10.215 ipse suos gemitus foliis inscribit, et AI AI 10.216 flos habet inscriptum, funestaque littera dicta est.
11.2
Threicius vates et saxa sequentia ducit,
11.52
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua 11.53 murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae.
11.474
Portibus exierant, et moverat aura rudentes: 11.475 obvertit lateri pendentes navita remos 11.476 cornuaque in summa locat arbore totaque malo 11.477 carbasa deducit venientesque accipit auras. 11.478 Aut minus, aut certe medium non amplius aequor 11.479 puppe secabatur, longeque erat utraque tellus, 11.480 cum mare sub noctem tumidis albescere coepit 11.481 fluctibus et praeceps spirare valentius eurus. 11.483 clamat “et antemnis totum subnectite velum.” 11.484 Hic iubet: impediunt adversae iussa procellae, 11.485 nec sinit audiri vocem fragor aequoris ullam. 11.486 Sponte tamen properant alii subducere remos, 11.487 pars munire latus, pars ventis vela negare. 11.488 Egerit hic fluctus aequorque refundit in aequor, 11.489 hic rapit antemnas. Quae dum sine lege geruntur,
11.491
bella gerunt venti fretaque indigtia miscent. 11.492 Ipse pavet nec se, qui sit status, ipse fatetur 11.493 scire ratis rector, nec, quid iubeatve velitve: 11.494 tanta mali moles tantoque potentior arte est. 11.495 Quippe sot clamore viri, stridore rudentes, 11.496 undarum incursu gravis unda, tonitribus aether.
11.498
pontus et inductas adspergine tangere nubes; 11.499 et modo, cum fulvas ex imo vertit harenas, 11.500 concolor est illis, Stygia modo nigrior unda,
11.502
Ipsa quoque his agitur vicibus Trachinia puppis, 11.503 et nunc sublimis veluti de vertice montis 11.504 despicere in valles imumque Acheronta videtur, 11.505 nunc, ubi demissam curvum circumstetit aequor, 11.506 suspicere inferno summum de gurgite caelum.
11.508
nec levius pulsata sonat, quam ferreus olim 11.509 cum laceras aries ballistave concutit arces. 11.510 Utque solent sumptis incursu viribus ire 11.511 pectore in arma feri protentaque tela leones, 11.512 sic ubi se ventis admiserat unda coortis, 11.513 ibat in arma ratis multoque erat altior illis.
11.515
rima patet praebetque viam letalibus undis. 11.516 Ecce cadunt largi resolutis nubibus imbres, 11.517 inque fretum credas totum descendere caelum, 11.518 inque plagas caeli tumefactum adscendere pontum. 11.519 Vela madent nimbis, et cum caelestibus undis

11.521
caecaque nox premitur tenebris hiemisque suisque.
11.522
Discutiunt tamen has praebentque micantia lumen
11.523
fulmina: fulmineis ardescunt ignibus ignes.
11.524
Dat quoque iam saltus intra cava texta carinae

11.526
cum saepe adsiluit defensae moenibus urbis,
11.527
spe potitur tandem laudisque accensus amore
11.528
inter mille viros murum tamen occupat unus,
11.529
sic, ubi pulsarunt noviens latera ardua fluctus, 11.530 vastius insurgens decimae ruit impetus undae; 11.531 nec prius absistit fessam oppugnare carinam, 11.532 quam velut in captae descendat moenia navis. 11.533 Pars igitur temptabat adhuc invadere pinum, 11.534 pars maris intus erat. Trepidant haud segnius omnes, 11.535 quam solet urbs, aliis murum fodientibus extra 11.536 atque aliis murum, trepidare, tenentibus intus.
11.538
quot veniunt fluctus, ruere atque inrumpere mortes. 11.539 Non tenet hic lacrimas, stupet hic, vocat ille beatos, 11.540 funera quos maneant: hic votis numen adorat 11.541 bracchiaque ad caelum, quod non videt, inrita tollens 11.542 poscit opem, subeunt illi fraterque parensque, 11.543 huic cum pignoribus domus et quodcumque relictum est. 11.544 Alcyone Ceyca movet, Ceycis in ore 11.545 nulla nisi Alcyone est; et cum desideret unam, 11.546 gaudet abesse tamen. Patriae quoque vellet ad oras 11.547 respicere inque domum supremos vertere vultus, 11.548 verum ubi sit, nescit; tanta vertigine pontus 11.549 fervet, et inducta piceis e nubibus umbra 11.550 omne latet caelum, duplicataque noctis imago est. 11.551 Frangitur incursu nimbosi turbinis arbor, 11.552 frangitur et regimen, spoliisque animosa superstes 11.553 unda, velut victrix, sinuataque despicit undas, 11.554 nec levius, quam siquis Athon Pindumve revulsos 11.555 sede sua totos in apertum everterit aequor, 11.556 praecipitata cadit pariterque et pondere et ictu
11.558
gurgite pressa gravi neque in aera reddita, fato 11.559 functa suo est: alii partes et membra carinae 11.560 trunca tenent: tenet ipse manu, qua sceptra solebat, 11.561 fragmina navigii Ceyx socerumque patremque 11.562 invocat heu! frustra. Sed plurima tis in ore 11.563 Alcyone coniunx: illam meminitque refertque, 11.564 illius ante oculos ut agant sua corpora fluctus, 11.565 optat et exanimis manibus tumuletur amicis. 11.566 Dum natat, absentem, quotiens sinit hiscere fluctus, 11.567 nominat Alcyonen ipsisque inmurmurat undis. 11.568 Ecce super medios fluctus niger arcus aquarum 11.569 frangitur et rupta mersum caput obruit unda.
11.571
illa luce fuit, quoniamque excedere caelo 11.572 non licuit, densis texit sua nubibus ora.' ' None
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2.547 “Avoid me not!” “Avoid me not!” returns. 2.548 encircle Phoebus as he makes complaint, 2.549 and with their supplications they entreat 2.549 by this alternate voice, and calls aloud; 2.550 him not to plunge the world in darkness. Jove 2.550 “Oh let us come together!” Echo cries,
10.8
no happy omen, neither hallowed word 10.9 nor joyful glances; and the torch he held 10.10 would only sputter, fill the eyes with smoke,
10.196
was then reclining on the grassy earth 10.197 and, wearied of all action, found relief 10.198 under the cool shade of the forest trees; 10.199 that as he lay there Cyparissus pierced 10.200 him with a javelin: and although it wa 10.201 quite accidental, when the shocked youth saw 10.202 his loved stag dying from the cruel wound 10.203 he could not bear it, and resolved on death. 10.204 What did not Phoebus say to comfort him? 10.205 He cautioned him to hold his grief in check, 10.206 consistent with the cause. But still the lad 10.207 lamented, and with groans implored the God 10.208 that he might mourn forever. His life force
10.214
up to the starry heavens. And the God, 10.215 groaning with sorrow, said; “You shall be mourned 10.216 incerely by me, surely as you mourn
11.2
allured the trees, the savage animals,
11.52
worked for the harvest as they dug hard fields; 11.53 and all those peasants, when they saw the troop
11.474
o beautiful she pleased a thousand men, 11.475 when she had reached the marriageable age 11.476 of twice seven years. It happened by some chance 11.477 that Phoebus and the son of Maia, who 11.478 returned—one from his Delphi , the other from' "11.479 Cyllene's heights—beheld this lovely maid" '11.480 both at the same time, and were both inflamed 11.481 with passion. Phoebus waited till the night. 11.483 the magic of his wand, that causes sleep,' "11.484 he touched the virgin's face; and instantly," '11.485 as if entranced, she lay there fast asleep, 11.486 and suffered violence from the ardent god. 11.487 When night bespangled the wide heaven with stars, 11.488 Phoebus became an aged crone and gained 11.489 the joy he had deferred until that hour.
11.491
Autolycus was born, a crafty son, 11.492 who certainly inherited the skill 11.493 of wingfoot Mereury, his artful sire, 11.494 notorious now; for every kind of theft.' "11.495 In fact, Autolycus with Mercury's craft," '11.496 loved to make white of black, and black of white.
11.498
was named Philammon, like his sire, well known. 11.499 To all men for the beauty of his song. 11.500 And famous for his handling of the lyre.
11.502
because she pleased! two gods and bore such twins? 11.503 Was she blest by good fortune then because 11.504 he was the daughter of a valiant father, 11.505 and even the grandchild of the Morning Star ? 11.506 Can glory be a curse? often it is.
11.508
It was a prejudice that harmed her day 11.509 because she vaunted that she did surpa' "11.510 Diana 's beauty and decried her charms:" '11.511 the goddess in hot anger answered her, 11.512 arcastically, ‘If my face cannot 11.513 give satisfaction, let me try my deeds.’
11.515
and from the string an arrow swiftly flew, 11.516 and pierced the vaunting tongue of Chione. 11.517 Her tongue was silenced, and she tried in vain 11.518 to speak or make a sound, and while she tried 11.519 her life departed with the flowing blood.

11.521
I spoke consoling words to my dear brother,
11.522
he heard them as a cliff might hear the sea.
11.523
And he lamented bitterly the lo
11.524
of his dear daughter, snatched away from him.

11.526
with such an uncontrolled despair, he rushed
11.527
four times to leap upon the blazing pyre;
11.528
and after he had been four times repulsed,
11.529
he turned and rushed away in headlong flight 11.530 through trackless country, as a bullock flees, 11.531 his swollen neck pierced with sharp hornet-stings, 11.532 it seemed to me he ran beyond the speed 11.533 of any human being. You would think 11.534 his feet had taken wings, he left us far 11.535 behind and swift in his desire for death' "11.536 he stood at last upon Parnassus ' height." "
11.538
leaped over the steep cliff, Apollo's power" '11.539 transformed him to a bird; supported him 11.540 while he was hovering in the air upon 11.541 uncertain wings, of such a sudden growth. 11.542 Apollo, also, gave him a curved beak, 11.543 and to his slender toes gave crooked claws. 11.544 His former courage still remains, with strength 11.545 greater than usual in birds. He changed 11.546 to a fierce hawk; cruel to all, he vent 11.547 his rage on other birds. Grieving himself 11.548 he is a cause of grief to all his kind.” 11.549 While Ceyx, the royal son of Lucifer ,' "11.550 told these great wonders of his brother's life;" '11.551 Onetor, who had watched the while those herd 11.552 which Peleus had assigned to him, ran up 11.553 with panting speed; and cried out as he ran, 11.554 “Peleus, Peleus! I bring you dreadful news!” 11.555 Peleus asked him to tell what had gone wrong 11.556 and with King Ceyx he listened in suspense.
11.558
Onetor then began, “About the time 11.559 when the high burning Sun in middle course, 11.560 could look back on as much as might be seen 11.561 remaining: and some cattle had then bent 11.562 their knees on yellow sand; and as they lay 11.563 might view the expanse of water stretched beyond. 11.564 Some with slow steps were wandering here and there, 11.565 and others swimming, stretched their lofty neck 11.566 above the waves. A temple near that sea' "11.567 was fair to view, although 'twas not adorned" '11.568 with gold nor marble. It was richly made 11.569 of beams, and shaded with an ancient grove.
11.571
the shore nearby, declared that aged Nereu 11.572 possessed it with his Nereids, as the god' ' None
24. None, None, nan (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • elegy, lamentation • funerals, lament • lament • lamentation (as a distinguishing feature of elegy

 Found in books: Fielding (2017), Transformations of Ovid in Late Antiquity. 11; Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 140, 141; Mayor (2017), Religion and Memory in Tacitus’ Annals, 245

25. None, None, nan (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • elegy, lamentation • lament

 Found in books: Fielding (2017), Transformations of Ovid in Late Antiquity. 130; Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 197

26. Lucan, Pharsalia, 5.560-5.677 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Apollonius Rhodius, lament in • Valerius Flaccus, lament in

 Found in books: Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 82; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 82

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5.560 Untried to which I call? To unknown risks Art thou commanded? Caesar bids thee come, Thou sluggard, not to leave him. Long ago I ran my ships midway through sands and shoals To harbours held by foes; and dost thou fear My friendly camp? I mourn the waste of days Which fate allotted us. Upon the waves And winds I call unceasing: hold not back Thy willing troops, but let them dare the sea; Here gladly shall they come to join my camp, 5.570 Though risking shipwreck. Not in equal shares The world has fallen between us: thou alone Dost hold Italia, but Epirus I And all the lords of Rome." Twice called and thrice Antonius lingered still: but Caesar thought To reap in full the favour of the gods, Not sit supine; and knowing danger yields To whom heaven favours, he upon the waves Feared by Antonius\' fleets, in shallow boat Embarked, and daring sought the further shore. 5.579 Though risking shipwreck. Not in equal shares The world has fallen between us: thou alone Dost hold Italia, but Epirus I And all the lords of Rome." Twice called and thrice Antonius lingered still: but Caesar thought To reap in full the favour of the gods, Not sit supine; and knowing danger yields To whom heaven favours, he upon the waves Feared by Antonius\' fleets, in shallow boat Embarked, and daring sought the further shore. ' "5.580 Now gentle night had brought repose from arms; And sleep, blest guardian of the poor man's couch, Restored the weary; and the camp was still. The hour was come that called the second watch When mighty Caesar, in the silence vast With cautious tread advanced to such a deed As slaves should dare not. Fortune for his guide, Alone he passes on, and o'er the guard Stretched in repose he leaps, in secret wrath At such a sleep. Pacing the winding beach, " "5.589 Now gentle night had brought repose from arms; And sleep, blest guardian of the poor man's couch, Restored the weary; and the camp was still. The hour was come that called the second watch When mighty Caesar, in the silence vast With cautious tread advanced to such a deed As slaves should dare not. Fortune for his guide, Alone he passes on, and o'er the guard Stretched in repose he leaps, in secret wrath At such a sleep. Pacing the winding beach, " '5.590 Fast to a sea-worn rock he finds a boat On ocean\'s marge afloat. Hard by on shore Its master dwelt within his humble home. No solid front it reared, for sterile rush And marshy reed enwoven formed the walls, Propped by a shallop with its bending sides Turned upwards. Caesar\'s hand upon the door Knocks twice and thrice until the fabric shook. Amyclas from his couch of soft seaweed Arising, calls: "What shipwrecked sailor seeks 5.600 My humble home? Who hopes for aid from me, By fates adverse compelled?" He stirs the heap Upon the hearth, until a tiny spark Glows in the darkness, and throws wide the door. Careless of war, he knew that civil strife Stoops not to cottages. Oh! happy life That poverty affords! great gift of heaven Too little understood! what mansion wall, What temple of the gods, would feel no fear When Caesar called for entrance? Then the chief: 5.610 Enlarge thine hopes and look for better things. Do but my bidding, and on yonder shore Place me, and thou shalt cease from one poor boat To earn thy living; and in years to come Look for a rich old age: and trust thy fates To those high gods whose wont it is to bless The poor with sudden plenty. So he spake E\'en at such time in accents of command, For how could Caesar else? Amyclas said, "\'Twere dangerous to brave the deep to-night. 5.620 The sun descended not in ruddy clouds Or peaceful rays to rest; part of his beams Presaged a southern gale, the rest proclaimed A northern tempest; and his middle orb, Shorn of its strength, permitted human eyes To gaze upon his grandeur; and the moon Rose not with silver horns upon the night Nor pure in middle space; her slender points Not drawn aright, but blushing with the track of raging tempests, till her lurid light 5.629 The sun descended not in ruddy clouds Or peaceful rays to rest; part of his beams Presaged a southern gale, the rest proclaimed A northern tempest; and his middle orb, Shorn of its strength, permitted human eyes To gaze upon his grandeur; and the moon Rose not with silver horns upon the night Nor pure in middle space; her slender points Not drawn aright, but blushing with the track of raging tempests, till her lurid light ' "5.630 Was sadly veiled within the clouds. Again The forest sounds; the surf upon the shore; The dolphin's mood, uncertain where to play; The sea-mew on the land; the heron used To wade among the shallows, borne aloft And soaring on his wings — all these alarm; The raven, too, who plunged his head in spray, As if to anticipate the coming rain, And trod the margin with unsteady gait. But if the cause demands, behold me thine. " "5.639 Was sadly veiled within the clouds. Again The forest sounds; the surf upon the shore; The dolphin's mood, uncertain where to play; The sea-mew on the land; the heron used To wade among the shallows, borne aloft And soaring on his wings — all these alarm; The raven, too, who plunged his head in spray, As if to anticipate the coming rain, And trod the margin with unsteady gait. But if the cause demands, behold me thine. " '5.640 Either we reach the bidden shore, or else Storm and the deep forbid — we can no more." Thus said he loosed the boat and raised the sail. No sooner done than stars were seen to fall In flaming furrows from the sky: nay, more; The pole star trembled in its place on high: Black horror marked the surging of the sea; The main was boiling in long tracts of foam, Uncertain of the wind, yet seized with storm. Then spake the captain of the trembling bark: 5.649 Either we reach the bidden shore, or else Storm and the deep forbid — we can no more." Thus said he loosed the boat and raised the sail. No sooner done than stars were seen to fall In flaming furrows from the sky: nay, more; The pole star trembled in its place on high: Black horror marked the surging of the sea; The main was boiling in long tracts of foam, Uncertain of the wind, yet seized with storm. Then spake the captain of the trembling bark: ' "5.650 See what remorseless ocean has in store! Whether from east or west the storm may come Is still uncertain, for as yet confused The billows tumble. Judged by clouds and sky A western tempest: by the murmuring deep A wild south-eastern gale shall sweep the sea. Nor bark nor man shall reach Hesperia's shore In this wild rage of waters. To return Back on our course forbidden by the gods, Is our one refuge, and with labouring boat " "5.659 See what remorseless ocean has in store! Whether from east or west the storm may come Is still uncertain, for as yet confused The billows tumble. Judged by clouds and sky A western tempest: by the murmuring deep A wild south-eastern gale shall sweep the sea. Nor bark nor man shall reach Hesperia's shore In this wild rage of waters. To return Back on our course forbidden by the gods, Is our one refuge, and with labouring boat " '5.660 To reach the shore ere yet the nearest land Way be too distant." But great Caesar\'s trust Was in himself, to make all dangers yield. And thus he answered: "Scorn the threatening sea, Spread out thy canvas to the raging wind; If for thy pilot thou refusest heaven, Me in its stead receive. Alone in thee One cause of terror just — thou dost not know Thy comrade, ne\'er deserted by the gods, Whom fortune blesses e\'en without a prayer. 5.669 To reach the shore ere yet the nearest land Way be too distant." But great Caesar\'s trust Was in himself, to make all dangers yield. And thus he answered: "Scorn the threatening sea, Spread out thy canvas to the raging wind; If for thy pilot thou refusest heaven, Me in its stead receive. Alone in thee One cause of terror just — thou dost not know Thy comrade, ne\'er deserted by the gods, Whom fortune blesses e\'en without a prayer. ' "5.670 Break through the middle storm and trust in me. The burden of this fight fails not on us But on the sky and ocean; and our bark Shall swim the billows safe in him it bears. Nor shall the wind rage long: the boat itself Shall calm the waters. Flee the nearest shore, Steer for the ocean with unswerving hand: Then in the deep, when to our ship and us No other port is given, believe thou hast Calabria's harbours. And dost thou not know " "5.677 Break through the middle storm and trust in me. The burden of this fight fails not on us But on the sky and ocean; and our bark Shall swim the billows safe in him it bears. Nor shall the wind rage long: the boat itself Shall calm the waters. Flee the nearest shore, Steer for the ocean with unswerving hand: Then in the deep, when to our ship and us No other port is given, believe thou hast Calabria's harbours. And dost thou not know "' None
27. New Testament, Acts, 9.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • labor, and rest, lament, psalms of • lament • psalms, of lament

 Found in books: Ernst (2009), Martha from the Margins: The Authority of Martha in Early Christian Tradition, 75; Grove (2021), Augustine on Memory, 216

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9.4 καὶ πεσὼν ἐπὶ τὴν γῆν ἤκουσεν φωνὴν λέγουσαν αὐτῷ Σαούλ Σαούλ, τί με διώκεις;'' None
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9.4 He fell on the earth, and heard a voice saying to him, "Saul, Saul, why do you persecute me?"'' None
28. New Testament, Apocalypse, 17.16-17.17, 18.9-18.19 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • funeral lament • lament • lament, lamentation

 Found in books: Maier and Waldner (2022), Desiring Martyrs: Locating Martyrs in Space and Time, 57; Mathews (2013), Riches, Poverty, and the Faithful: Perspectives on Wealth in the Second Temple Period and the Apocalypse of John, 212, 213

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17.16 καὶ τὰ δέκα κέρατα ἃ εἶδες καὶ τὸ θηρίον, οὗτοι μισήσουσι τὴν πόρνην, καὶ ἠρημωμένην ποιήσουσιν αὐτὴν καὶ γυμνήν, καὶ τὰς σάρκας αὐτῆς φάγονται, καὶ αὐτὴν κατακαύσουσιν ἐν πυρί· 17.17 ὁ γὰρ θεὸς ἔδωκεν εἰς τὰς καρδίας αὐτῶν ποιῆσαι τὴν γνώμην αὐτοῦ, καὶ ποιῆσαι μίαν γνώμην καὶ δοῦναι τὴν βασιλείαν αὐτῶν τῷ θηρίῳ, ἄχρι τελεσθήσονται οἱ λόγοι τοῦ θεοῦ.
18.9
καὶ κλαύσουσιν καὶ κόψονται ἐπ̓αὐτὴνοἱ βασιλεῖς τῆς γῆς οἱ μετʼ αὐτῆς πορνεύσαντεςκαὶ στρηνιάσαντες, ὅταν βλέπωσιν τὸν καπνὸν τῆς πυρώσεως αὐτῆς, 18.10 ἀπὸ μακρόθεν ἑστηκότες διὰ τὸν φόβον τοῦ βασανισμοῦ αὐτῆς, λέγοντες Οὐαί οὐαί, ἡ πόλις ἡ μεγάλη, Βαβυλὼνἡ πόλις ἡ ἰσχυρά,ὅτι μιᾷ ὥρᾳ ἦλθενlt*gt ἡ κρίσις σου. 18.11 καὶοἱ ἔμποροιτῆς γῆςκλαίουσιν καὶ πενθοῦσινἐπʼ αὐτήν, ὅτι τὸν γόμον αὐτῶν οὐδεὶς ἀγοράζει οὐκέτι, 18.12 γόμον χρυσοῦ καὶ ἀργύρου καὶ λίθου τιμίου καὶμαργαριτῶν καὶ βυσσίνου καὶ πορφύρας καὶ σιρικοῦ καὶ κοκκίνου, καὶ πᾶν ξύλον θύινον καὶ πᾶν σκεῦος ἐλεφάντινον καὶ πᾶν σκεῦος ἐκ ξύλου τιμιωτάτου καὶ χαλκοῦ καὶ σιδήρου καὶ μαρμάρου, 18.13 καὶ κιννάμωμον καὶ ἄμωμον καὶ θυμιάματα καὶ μύρον καὶ λίβανον καὶ οἶνον καὶ ἔλαιον καὶ σεμίδαλιν καὶ σῖτον καὶ κτήνη καὶ πρόβατα, καὶ ἵππων καὶ ῥεδῶν καὶ σωμάτων, καὶψυχας ἀνθρώπων. 18.14 καὶ ἡ ὀπώρα σου τῆς ἐπιθυμίας τῆς ψυχῆς ἀπῆλθεν ἀπὸ σοῦ, καὶ πάντα τὰ λιπαρὰ καὶ τὰ λαμπρὰ ἀπώλετο ἀπὸ σοῦ, καὶ οὐκέτι οὐ μὴ αὐτὰ εὑρήσουσιν. 18.15 οἱ ἔμποροιτούτων, οἱ πλουτήσαντες ἀπʼ αὐτῆς, ἀπὸ μακρόθεν στήσονται διὰ τὸν φόβον τοῦ βασανισμοῦ αὐτῆςκλαίοντες καὶ πενθοῦντες, 18.16 λέγοντες Οὐαί οὐαί, ἡ πόλις ἡ μεγάλη, ἡ περιβεβλημένη βύσσινον καὶ πορφυροῦν καὶ κόκκινον, καὶ κεχρυσωμένη ἐν χρυσίῳ καὶ λίθῳ τιμίῳ καὶ μαργαρίτῃ, ὅτι μιᾷ ὥρᾳ ἠρημώθη ὁ τοσοῦτος πλοῦτος. 18.17 καὶ πᾶςκυβερνήτηςκαὶ πᾶς ὁ ἐπὶ τόπον πλέων,καὶ ναῦται καὶ ὅσοι τὴν θάλασσανἐργάζονται, ἀπὸ μακρόθενἔστησαν 18.18 καὶ ἔκραξαν βλέποντες τὸν καπνὸν τῆς πυρώσεως αὐτῆς λέγοντεςΤίς ὁμοίατῇ πόλει τῇ μεγάλῃ; 18.19 καὶ ἔβαλον χοῦν ἐπὶ τὰς κεφαλὰς αὐτῶν καὶ ἔκραξαν κλαίοντες καὶ πενθοῦντες, λέγοντες Οὐαί οὐαί, ἡ πόλις ἡ μεγάλη, ἐν ᾗἐπλούτησαν πάντεςοἱ ἔχοντεςτὰ πλοῖα ἐν τῇ θαλάσσῃ ἐκ τῆς τιμιότητοςαὐτῆς, ὅτι μιᾷ ὥρᾳἠρημώθη.'' None
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17.16 The ten horns which you saw, and the beast, these will hate the prostitute, and will make her desolate, and will make her naked, and will eat her flesh, and will burn her utterly with fire. 17.17 For God has put in their hearts to do what he has in mind, and to come to unity of mind, and to give their kingdom to the beast, until the words of God should be accomplished.
18.9
The kings of the earth, who committed sexual immorality and lived wantonly with her, will weep and wail over her, when they look at the smoke of her burning,' "18.10 standing far away for the fear of her torment, saying, 'Woe, woe, the great city, Babylon, the strong city! For your judgment has come in one hour.'" '18.11 The merchants of the earth weep and mourn over her, for no one buys their merchandise any more; 18.12 merchandise of gold, silver, precious stones, pearls, fine linen, purple, silk, scarlet, all expensive wood, every vessel of ivory, every vessel made of most precious wood, and of brass, and iron, and marble;' "18.13 and cinnamon, incense, perfume, frankincense, wine, olive oil, fine flour, wheat, sheep, horses, chariots, bodies, and people's souls." '18.14 The fruits which your soul lusted after have been lost to you, and all things that were dainty and sumptuous have perished from you, and you will find them no more at all. 18.15 The merchants of these things, who were made rich by her, will stand far away for the fear of her torment, weeping and mourning;' "18.16 saying, 'Woe, woe, the great city, she who was dressed in fine linen, purple, and scarlet, and decked with gold and precious stones and pearls!" "18.17 For in an hour such great riches are made desolate.' Every shipmaster, and everyone who sails anywhere, and mariners, and as many as gain their living by sea, stood far away," "18.18 and cried out as they looked at the smoke of her burning, saying, 'What is like the great city?'" "18.19 They cast dust on their heads, and cried, weeping and mourning, saying, 'Woe, woe, the great city, in which all who had their ships in the sea were made rich by reason of her great wealth!' For in one hour is she made desolate."' None
29. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Lament • Statius, Thebaid, Ides lament in • burials and mourning, excessive female grief and pleasure in lamentation • lamentation • war dead, burial of, conclusion of narrative with proper burial and lamentation • war dead, burial of, excessive lamentation, pleasure arising from • war dead, burial of, male epic and female lament, linking • war dead, burial of, poets assumption of female voice of lamentation in

 Found in books: Kazantzidis and Spatharas (2018), Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art, 198; Panoussi(2019), Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature, 104, 109, 110, 111, 112, 240; Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 78, 154, 155, 156

30. Lucian, On Mourning, 19 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Lamentation • lamentation

 Found in books: Stavrianopoulou (2006), Ritual and Communication in the Graeco-Roman World, 263; Waldner et al. (2016), Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire, 74

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19 But all this lamentation, now; this fluting and beating of breasts; these wholly disproportionate wailings: how am I the better for it all? And what do I want with a garlanded column over my grave? And what good do you suppose you are going to do by pouring wine on it? do you expect it to filter through all the way to Hades? As to the victims, you must surely see for yourselves that all the solid nutriment is whisked away heavenwards in the form of smoke, leaving us Shades precisely as we were; the residue, being dust, is useless; or is it your theory that Shades batten on ashes? Pluto’s realm is not so barren, nor asphodel so scarce with us, that we must apply to you for provisions.— What with this winding sheet and these woollen bandages, my jaws have been effectually sealed up, or, by Tisiphone, I should have burst out laughing long before this at the stuff you talk and the things you do.’'' None
31. None, None, nan (2nd cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Lamentations Rabbah • Lamentations Rabbah, Temple story in • Lamentations Rabbah, authentic narrative in • Lamentations, abandonment in • narrative, in Lamentations Rabbah

 Found in books: Fonrobert and Jaffee (2007), The Cambridge Companion to the Talmud and Rabbinic Literature Cambridge Companions to Religion, 225; Neusner (2003), The Perfect Torah. 171; Neusner (2004), The Idea of History in Rabbinic Judaism, 162; Stern (2004), From Rebuke to Consolation: Exegesis and Theology in the Liturgical Anthology of the Ninth of Av Season, 150

32. None, None, nan (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Phaethon; lamented by Sol • lamentation and grief

 Found in books: Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 109; Sider (2001), Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian, 33

33. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.50-1.88, 1.90-1.102, 1.104-1.109, 1.111-1.134, 1.136-1.156, 4.667, 5.613-5.615, 9.481-9.497
 Tagged with subjects: • Apollonius Rhodius, lament in • Homer, gender and lament • Pompey, as object of lament • Valerius Flaccus, lament in • burials and mourning, excessive female grief and pleasure in lamentation • burials and mourning, poet,traditional lament for death of • lament • women, and lament

 Found in books: Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 82; Blum and Biggs (2019), The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature, 142; Joseph (2022), Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic, 228, 233, 234; Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 98, 150, 151, 267; Panoussi(2019), Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature, 236, 239; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 82

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1.50 Talia flammato secum dea corde volutans 1.51 nimborum in patriam, loca feta furentibus austris, 1.52 Aeoliam venit. Hic vasto rex Aeolus antro 1.53 luctantes ventos tempestatesque sonoras 1.54 imperio premit ac vinclis et carcere frenat. 1.55 Illi indigtes magno cum murmure montis 1.56 circum claustra fremunt; celsa sedet Aeolus arce 1.57 sceptra tenens, mollitque animos et temperat iras. 1.58 Ni faciat, maria ac terras caelumque profundum 1.59 quippe ferant rapidi secum verrantque per auras. 1.60 Sed pater omnipotens speluncis abdidit atris, 1.61 hoc metuens, molemque et montis insuper altos 1.62 imposuit, regemque dedit, qui foedere certo 1.63 et premere et laxas sciret dare iussus habenas. 1.64 Ad quem tum Iuno supplex his vocibus usa est: 1.65 Aeole, namque tibi divom pater atque hominum rex 1.66 et mulcere dedit fluctus et tollere vento, 1.67 gens inimica mihi Tyrrhenum navigat aequor, 1.68 Ilium in Italiam portans victosque Penates: 1.69 incute vim ventis submersasque obrue puppes, 1.71 Sunt mihi bis septem praestanti corpore nymphae, 1.72 quarum quae forma pulcherrima Deiopea, 1.73 conubio iungam stabili propriamque dicabo, 1.74 omnis ut tecum meritis pro talibus annos 1.75 exigat, et pulchra faciat te prole parentem. 1.76 Aeolus haec contra: Tuus, O regina, quid optes 1.77 explorare labor; mihi iussa capessere fas est. 1.78 Tu mihi, quodcumque hoc regni, tu sceptra Iovemque 1.79 concilias, tu das epulis accumbere divom, 1.80 nimborumque facis tempestatumque potentem. 1.81 Haec ubi dicta, cavum conversa cuspide montem 1.82 impulit in latus: ac venti, velut agmine facto, 1.83 qua data porta, ruunt et terras turbine perflant. 1.84 Incubuere mari, totumque a sedibus imis 1.85 una Eurusque Notusque ruunt creberque procellis 1.86 Africus, et vastos volvunt ad litora fluctus. 1.87 Insequitur clamorque virum stridorque rudentum. 1.88 Eripiunt subito nubes caelumque diemque
1.90
Intonuere poli, et crebris micat ignibus aether, 1.91 praesentemque viris intentant omnia mortem. 1.92 Extemplo Aeneae solvuntur frigore membra: 1.93 ingemit, et duplicis tendens ad sidera palmas 1.94 talia voce refert: O terque quaterque beati, 1.95 quis ante ora patrum Troiae sub moenibus altis 1.96 contigit oppetere! O Danaum fortissime gentis 1.97 Tydide! Mene Iliacis occumbere campis 1.98 non potuisse, tuaque animam hanc effundere dextra, 1.99 saevus ubi Aeacidae telo iacet Hector, ubi ingens 1.100 Sarpedon, ubi tot Simois correpta sub undis 1.101 scuta virum galeasque et fortia corpora volvit? 1.102 Talia iactanti stridens Aquilone procella
1.104
Franguntur remi; tum prora avertit, et undis 1.105 dat latus; insequitur cumulo praeruptus aquae mons. 1.106 Hi summo in fluctu pendent; his unda dehiscens 1.107 terram inter fluctus aperit; furit aestus harenis. 1.108 Tris Notus abreptas in saxa latentia torquet— 1.109 saxa vocant Itali mediis quae in fluctibus aras—
1.111
in brevia et Syrtis urguet, miserabile visu, 1.112 inliditque vadis atque aggere cingit harenae. 1.113 Unam, quae Lycios fidumque vehebat Oronten, 1.114 ipsius ante oculos ingens a vertice pontus 1.115 in puppim ferit: excutitur pronusque magister 1.116 volvitur in caput; ast illam ter fluctus ibidem 1.117 torquet agens circum, et rapidus vorat aequore vortex. 1.118 Adparent rari tes in gurgite vasto, 1.119 arma virum, tabulaeque, et Troia gaza per undas. 1.120 Iam validam Ilionei navem, iam fortis Achati, 1.121 et qua vectus Abas, et qua grandaevus Aletes, 1.122 vicit hiems; laxis laterum compagibus omnes 1.123 accipiunt inimicum imbrem, rimisque fatiscunt. 1.124 Interea magno misceri murmure pontum, 1.125 emissamque hiemem sensit Neptunus, et imis 1.126 stagna refusa vadis, graviter commotus; et alto 1.127 prospiciens, summa placidum caput extulit unda. 1.128 Disiectam Aeneae, toto videt aequore classem, 1.129 fluctibus oppressos Troas caelique ruina, 1.130 nec latuere doli fratrem Iunonis et irae. 1.131 Eurum ad se Zephyrumque vocat, dehinc talia fatur: 1.132 Tantane vos generis tenuit fiducia vestri? 1.133 Iam caelum terramque meo sine numine, venti, 1.134 miscere, et tantas audetis tollere moles?
1.136
Post mihi non simili poena commissa luetis. 1.137 Maturate fugam, regique haec dicite vestro: 1.138 non illi imperium pelagi saevumque tridentem, 1.139 sed mihi sorte datum. Tenet ille immania saxa, 1.140 vestras, Eure, domos; illa se iactet in aula 1.141 Aeolus, et clauso ventorum carcere regnet. 1.142 Sic ait, et dicto citius tumida aequora placat, 1.143 collectasque fugat nubes, solemque reducit. 1.144 Cymothoe simul et Triton adnixus acuto 1.145 detrudunt navis scopulo; levat ipse tridenti; 1.146 et vastas aperit syrtis, et temperat aequor, 1.147 atque rotis summas levibus perlabitur undas. 1.148 Ac veluti magno in populo cum saepe coorta est 1.149 seditio, saevitque animis ignobile volgus, 1.150 iamque faces et saxa volant—furor arma ministrat; 1.151 tum, pietate gravem ac meritis si forte virum quem 1.152 conspexere, silent, arrectisque auribus adstant; 1.153 ille regit dictis animos, et pectora mulcet,— 1.154 sic cunctus pelagi cecidit fragor, aequora postquam 1.155 prospiciens genitor caeloque invectus aperto 1.156 flectit equos, curruque volans dat lora secundo.
4.667
Lamentis gemituque et femineo ululatu
5.613
At procul in sola secretae Troades acta 5.614 amissum Anchisen flebant, cunctaeque profundum 5.615 pontum adspectabant flentes. Heu tot vada fessis
9.481
Hunc ego te, Euryale, aspicio? Tune illa senectae 9.482 sera meae requies, potuisti linquere solam, 9.483 crudelis? Nec te, sub tanta pericula missum, 9.484 adfari extremum miserae data copia matri? 9.485 Heu, terra ignota canibus data praeda Latinis 9.486 alitibusque iaces, nec te, tua funera mater 9.487 produxi pressive oculos aut volnera lavi, 9.488 veste tegens, tibi quam noctes festina diesque 9.489 urgebam et tela curas solabar anilis. 9.490 Quo sequar, aut quae nunc artus avolsaque membra 9.491 et funus lacerum tellus habet? Hoc mihi de te, 9.492 nate, refers? Hoc sum terraque marique secuta? 9.493 Figite me, siqua est pietas, in me omnia tela 9.494 conicite, o Rutuli, me primam absumite ferro: 9.495 aut tu, magne pater divom, miserere tuoque 9.496 invisum hoc detrude caput sub Tartara telo, 9.497 quando aliter nequeo crudelem abrumpere vitam.' ' None
sup>
1.50 Below th' horizon the Sicilian isle " '1.51 just sank from view, as for the open sea 1.52 with heart of hope they sailed, and every ship 1.53 clove with its brazen beak the salt, white waves. 1.54 But Juno of her everlasting wound 1.55 knew no surcease, but from her heart of pain 1.56 thus darkly mused: “Must I, defeated, fail 1.57 of what I will, nor turn the Teucrian King 1.58 from Italy away? Can Fate oppose? 1.59 Had Pallas power to lay waste in flame 1.60 the Argive fleet and sink its mariners, 1.61 revenging but the sacrilege obscene ' "1.62 by Ajax wrought, Oileus' desperate son? " "1.63 She, from the clouds, herself Jove's lightning threw, " '1.64 cattered the ships, and ploughed the sea with storms. 1.65 Her foe, from his pierced breast out-breathing fire, 1.66 in whirlwind on a deadly rock she flung. 1.67 But I, who move among the gods a queen, ' "1.68 Jove's sister and his spouse, with one weak tribe " '1.69 make war so long! Who now on Juno calls? 1.71 So, in her fevered heart complaining still, 1.72 unto the storm-cloud land the goddess came, 1.73 a region with wild whirlwinds in its womb, 1.74 Aeolia named, where royal Aeolus 1.75 in a high-vaulted cavern keeps control ' "1.76 o'er warring winds and loud concourse of storms. " '1.77 There closely pent in chains and bastions strong, 1.78 they, scornful, make the vacant mountain roar, 1.79 chafing against their bonds. But from a throne 1.80 of lofty crag, their king with sceptred hand 1.81 allays their fury and their rage confines. 1.82 Did he not so, our ocean, earth, and sky 1.83 were whirled before them through the vast ie. 1.84 But over-ruling Jove, of this in fear, ' "1.85 hid them in dungeon dark: then o'er them piled " '1.86 huge mountains, and ordained a lawful king 1.87 to hold them in firm sway, or know what time, ' "1.88 with Jove's consent, to loose them o'er the world. " 1.90 “Thou in whose hands the Father of all gods 1.91 and Sovereign of mankind confides the power 1.92 to calm the waters or with winds upturn, 1.93 great Aeolus! a race with me at war 1.94 now sails the Tuscan main towards Italy, 1.95 bringing their Ilium and its vanquished powers. 1.96 Uprouse thy gales. Strike that proud navy down! 1.97 Hurl far and wide, and strew the waves with dead! 1.98 Twice seven nymphs are mine, of rarest mould; 1.99 of whom Deiopea, the most fair, 1.100 I give thee in true wedlock for thine own, 1.101 to mate thy noble worth; she at thy side 1.102 hall pass long, happy years, and fruitful bring ' "
1.104
Then Aeolus: “'T is thy sole task, O Queen, " '1.105 to weigh thy wish and will. My fealty 1.106 thy high behest obeys. This humble throne 1.107 is of thy gift. Thy smiles for me obtain 1.108 authority from Jove. Thy grace concedes 1.109 my station at your bright Olympian board,
1.111
Replying thus, he smote with spear reversed ' "1.112 the hollow mountain's wall; then rush the winds " '1.113 through that wide breach in long, embattled line, 1.114 and sweep tumultuous from land to land: ' "1.115 with brooding pinions o'er the waters spread, " '1.116 east wind and south, and boisterous Afric gale 1.117 upturn the sea; vast billows shoreward roll; 1.118 the shout of mariners, the creak of cordage, 1.119 follow the shock; low-hanging clouds conceal 1.120 from Trojan eyes all sight of heaven and day; ' "1.121 night o'er the ocean broods; from sky to sky " '1.122 the thunders roll, the ceaseless lightnings glare; 1.123 and all things mean swift death for mortal man. 1.124 Straightway Aeneas, shuddering with amaze, 1.125 groaned loud, upraised both holy hands to Heaven, 1.126 and thus did plead: “O thrice and four times blest, 1.127 ye whom your sires and whom the walls of Troy 1.128 looked on in your last hour! O bravest son 1.129 Greece ever bore, Tydides! O that I 1.130 had fallen on Ilian fields, and given this life 1.131 truck down by thy strong hand! where by the spear 1.132 of great Achilles, fiery Hector fell, 1.133 and huge Sarpedon; where the Simois 1.134 in furious flood engulfed and whirled away
1.136
While thus he cried to Heaven, a shrieking blast 1.137 mote full upon the sail. Up surged the waves 1.138 to strike the very stars; in fragments flew 1.139 the shattered oars; the helpless vessel veered 1.140 and gave her broadside to the roaring flood, 1.141 where watery mountains rose and burst and fell. 1.142 Now high in air she hangs, then yawning gulfs ' "1.143 lay bare the shoals and sands o'er which she drives. " '1.144 Three ships a whirling south wind snatched and flung 1.145 on hidden rocks,—altars of sacrifice 1.146 Italians call them, which lie far from shore 1.147 a vast ridge in the sea; three ships beside 1.148 an east wind, blowing landward from the deep, 1.149 drove on the shallows,—pitiable sight,— 1.150 and girdled them in walls of drifting sand. 1.151 That ship, which, with his friend Orontes, bore 1.152 the Lycian mariners, a great, plunging wave ' "1.153 truck straight astern, before Aeneas' eyes. " "1.154 Forward the steersman rolled and o'er the side " '1.155 fell headlong, while three times the circling flood 1.156 pun the light bark through swift engulfing seas.
4.667
to bring him back to Iove, or set me free.
5.613
the helmet and the sword—but left behind ' "5.614 Entellus' prize of victory, the bull. " '5.615 He, then, elate and glorying, spoke forth:
9.481
the youth thrust home his sword, then drew it back 9.482 death-dripping, while the bursting purple stream 9.483 of life outflowed, with mingling blood and wine. 9.484 Then, flushed with stealthy slaughter, he crept near 9.485 the followers of Messapus, where he saw 9.486 their camp-fire dying down, and tethered steeds 9.487 upon the meadow feeding. Nisus then 9.488 knew the hot lust of slaughter had swept on 9.489 too far, and cried, “Hold off! For, lo, 9.490 the monitory dawn is nigh. Revenge 9.491 has fed us to the full. We have achieved 9.492 clean passage through the foe.” Full many a prize 9.493 was left untaken: princely suits of mail 9.494 enwrought with silver pure, huge drinking-bowls, 9.495 and broideries fair. Yet grasped Euryalus ' "9.496 the blazonry at Rhamnes' corselet hung, " '9.497 and belt adorned with gold: which were a gift ' " None
34. Vergil, Georgics, 2.490, 2.493, 4.453-4.527, 4.564-4.565
 Tagged with subjects: • Orpheus and Eurydice, mourning and lamenting of Orpheus • Philomela and Procne, lament of Orpheus and • Virgil, brother Flaccus lamented as ‘Daphnis’ • burials and mourning, excessive female grief and pleasure in lamentation • burials and mourning, poet,traditional lament for death of • elegy, lamentation • lament • ‘Pseudo-Moschus’/the Epitaphist, Lament for Bion

 Found in books: Fielding (2017), Transformations of Ovid in Late Antiquity. 139; Goldschmidt (2019), Biofiction and the Reception of Latin Poetry, 17; Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 14, 41, 155, 186, 192, 311; Panoussi(2019), Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature, 92, 93, 239; Thorsen et al. (2021), Greek and Latin Love: The Poetic Connection, 56

sup>
2.490 Felix, qui potuit rerum cognoscere causas,
2.493
Fortunatus et ille, deos qui novit agrestis,
4.453
“Non te nullius exercent numinis irae; 4.454 magna luis commissa: tibi has miserabilis Orpheus 4.455 haudquaquam ob meritum poenas, ni fata resistant, 4.456 suscitat et rapta graviter pro coniuge saevit. 4.457 Illa quidem, dum te fugeret per flumina praeceps, 4.458 immanem ante pedes hydrum moritura puella 4.459 servantem ripas alta non vidit in herba. 4.460 At chorus aequalis Dryadum clamore supremos 4.461 implerunt montes; flerunt Rhodopeiae arces 4.462 altaque Pangaea et Rhesi mavortia tellus 4.463 atque Getae atque Hebrus et Actias Orithyia. 4.464 Ipse cava solans aegrum testudine amorem 4.465 te, dulcis coniunx, te solo in litore secum, 4.466 te veniente die, te decedente canebat. 4.467 Taenarias etiam fauces, alta ostia Ditis, 4.468 et caligantem nigra formidine lucum 4.469 ingressus manesque adiit regemque tremendum 4.470 nesciaque humanis precibus mansuescere corda. 4.471 At cantu commotae Erebi de sedibus imis 4.472 umbrae ibant tenues simulacraque luce carentum, 4.473 quam multa in foliis avium se milia condunt 4.474 vesper ubi aut hibernus agit de montibus imber, 4.475 matres atque viri defunctaque corpora vita 4.476 magimum heroum, pueri innuptaeque puellae, 4.477 impositique rogis iuvenes ante ora parentum, 4.478 quos circum limus niger et deformis harundo 4.479 Cocyti tardaque palus inamabilis unda 4.480 alligat et noviens Styx interfusa coercet. 4.481 Quin ipsae stupuere domus atque intima Leti 4.482 tartara caeruleosque implexae crinibus angues 4.483 Eumenides, tenuitque inhians tria Cerberus ora 4.484 atque Ixionii vento rota constitit orbis. 4.485 Iamque pedem referens casus evaserat omnes; 4.486 redditaque Eurydice superas veniebat ad auras, 4.487 pone sequens, namque hanc dederat Proserpina legem, 4.488 cum subita incautum dementia cepit amantem, 4.489 ignoscenda quidem, scirent si ignoscere manes. 4.490 Restitit Eurydicenque suam iam luce sub ipsa 4.491 immemor heu! victusque animi respexit. Ibi omnis 4.492 effusus labor atque immitis rupta tyranni 4.493 foedera, terque fragor stagnis auditus Avernis. 4.494 Illa, “Quis et me,” inquit, “miseram et te perdidit, Orpheu, 4.495 quis tantus furor? En iterum crudelia retro 4.496 Fata vocant, conditque natantia lumina somnus. 4.497 Iamque vale: feror ingenti circumdata nocte 4.498 invalidasque tibi tendens, heu non tua, palmas!” 4.499 dixit et ex oculis subito, ceu fumus in auras 4.500 commixtus tenues, fugit diversa, neque illum, 4.501 prensantem nequiquam umbras et multa volentem 4.502 dicere, praeterea vidit, nec portitor Orci 4.503 amplius obiectam passus transire paludem. 4.504 Quid faceret? Quo se rapta bis coniuge ferret? 4.505 Quo fletu Manis, quae numina voce moveret? 4.506 Illa quidem Stygia nabat iam frigida cumba. 4.507 Septem illum totos perhibent ex ordine menses 4.508 rupe sub aeria deserti ad Strymonis undam 4.509 flesse sibi et gelidis haec evolvisse sub antris 4.510 mulcentem tigres et agentem carmine quercus; 4.511 qualis populea maerens philomela sub umbra 4.512 amissos queritur fetus, quos durus arator 4.513 observans nido implumes detraxit; at illa 4.514 flet noctem ramoque sedens miserabile carmen 4.515 integrat et maestis late loca questibus implet. 4.516 Nulla Venus, non ulli animum flexere hymenaei. 4.517 Solus Hyperboreas glacies Tanaimque nivalem 4.518 arvaque Rhipaeis numquam viduata pruinis 4.519 lustrabat raptam Eurydicen atque inrita Ditis 4.520 dona querens; spretae Ciconum quo munere matres 4.521 inter sacra deum nocturnique orgia Bacchi 4.522 discerptum latos iuvenem sparsere per agros. 4.523 Tum quoque marmorea caput a cervice revulsum 4.524 gurgite cum medio portans Oeagrius Hebrus 4.525 volveret, Eurydicen vox ipsa et frigida lingua 4.526 “ah miseram Eurydicen!” anima fugiente vocabat: 4.527 “Eurydicen” toto referebant flumine ripae.”
4.564
Parthenope studiis florentem ignobilis oti, 4.565 carmina qui lusi pastorum audaxque iuventa,'' None
sup>
2.490 Till hollow vale o'erflows, and gorge profound," 2.493 Meet honour with ancestral hymns, and cate
4.453
Exclaimed, “Cyrene, sister, not for naught' "4.454 Scared by a groan so deep, behold! 'tis he," "4.455 Even Aristaeus, thy heart's fondest care," '4.456 Here by the brink of the Peneian sire 4.457 Stands woebegone and weeping, and by name 4.458 Cries out upon thee for thy cruelty.” 4.459 To whom, strange terror knocking at her heart, 4.460 “Bring, bring him to our sight,” the mother cried; 4.461 “His feet may tread the threshold even of Gods.” 4.462 So saying, she bids the flood yawn wide and yield 4.463 A pathway for his footsteps; but the wave 4.464 Arched mountain-wise closed round him, and within 4.465 Its mighty bosom welcomed, and let speed 4.466 To the deep river-bed. And now, with eye' "4.467 of wonder gazing on his mother's hall" '4.468 And watery kingdom and cave-prisoned pool 4.469 And echoing groves, he went, and, stunned by that 4.470 Stupendous whirl of waters, separate saw 4.471 All streams beneath the mighty earth that glide, 4.472 Phasis and Lycus, and that fountain-head 4.473 Whence first the deep Enipeus leaps to light, 4.474 Whence father 4.475 And Hypanis that roars amid his rocks, 4.476 And Mysian Caicus, and, bull-browed' "4.477 'Twixt either gilded horn, 4.480 Soon as the chamber's hanging roof of stone" '4.481 Was gained, and now Cyrene from her son 4.482 Had heard his idle weeping, in due course 4.483 Clear water for his hands the sisters bring, 4.484 With napkins of shorn pile, while others heap 4.485 The board with dainties, and set on afresh 4.486 The brimming goblets; with Panchaian fire 4.487 Upleap the altars; then the mother spake, 4.488 “Take beakers of Maconian wine,” she said, 4.489 “Pour we to Ocean.” Ocean, sire of all, 4.490 She worships, and the sister-nymphs who guard 4.491 The hundred forests and the hundred streams;' "4.492 Thrice Vesta's fire with nectar clear she dashed," '4.493 Thrice to the roof-top shot the flame and shone: 4.494 Armed with which omen she essayed to speak:' "4.495 “In Neptune's gulf Carpathian dwells a seer," '4.496 Caerulean Proteus, he who metes the main 4.497 With fish-drawn chariot of two-footed steeds; 4.498 Now visits he his native home once more, 4.499 Pallene and the Emathian ports; to him 4.500 We nymphs do reverence, ay, and Nereus old; 4.501 For all things knows the seer, both those which are 4.502 And have been, or which time hath yet to bring; 4.503 So willed it Neptune, whose portentous flocks,' "4.504 And loathly sea-calves 'neath the surge he feeds." '4.505 Him first, my son, behoves thee seize and bind 4.506 That he may all the cause of sickness show, 4.507 And grant a prosperous end. For save by force 4.508 No rede will he vouchsafe, nor shalt thou bend 4.509 His soul by praying; whom once made captive, ply 4.510 With rigorous force and fetters; against these 4.511 His wiles will break and spend themselves in vain. 4.512 I, when the sun has lit his noontide fires, 4.513 When the blades thirst, and cattle love the shade,' "4.514 Myself will guide thee to the old man's haunt," '4.515 Whither he hies him weary from the waves, 4.516 That thou mayst safelier steal upon his sleep. 4.517 But when thou hast gripped him fast with hand and gyve, 4.518 Then divers forms and bestial semblance 4.519 Shall mock thy grasp; for sudden he will change 4.520 To bristly boar, fell tigress, dragon scaled, 4.521 And tawny-tufted lioness, or send forth 4.522 A crackling sound of fire, and so shake of 4.523 The fetters, or in showery drops anon 4.524 Dissolve and vanish. But the more he shift 4.525 His endless transformations, thou, my son, 4.526 More straitlier clench the clinging bands, until' "4.527 His body's shape return to that thou sawest," 4.564 But when no trickery found a path for flight, 4.565 Baffled at length, to his own shape returned,'" None
35. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Apollonius Rhodius, lament in • Lament • Valerius Flaccus, lament in

 Found in books: Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 82, 83, 84, 87, 88, 89; Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 81; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 82, 83, 84, 87, 88, 89




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