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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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Please note: the results are produced through a computerized process which may frequently lead to errors, both in incorrect tagging and in other issues. Please use with caution.
Due to load times, full text fetching is currently attempted for validated results only.
Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

For a list of book indices included, see here.


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All subjects (including unvalidated):
subject book bibliographic info
kos Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 6, 13
Bremmer (2008), Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East, 81, 159, 258
Ekroth (2013), The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period, 31, 123, 137, 263
Gaifman (2012), Aniconism in Greek Antiquity, 209, 210
Grzesik (2022), Honorific Culture at Delphi in the Hellenistic and Roman Periods. 29, 71, 76, 97, 142
Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 557, 609, 642, 774, 803
Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 118, 193, 233, 274, 275
Papazarkadas (2011), Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens, 20
Rüpke and Woolf (2013), Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE. 158
Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020), Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity, 146
Williamson (2021), Urban Rituals in Sacred Landscapes in Hellenistic Asia Minor, 91, 97, 120, 124, 156, 273, 299, 300, 327, 393
kos, aegean island Stavrianopoulou (2013), Shifting Social Imaginaries in the Hellenistic Period: Narrations, Practices and Images, 225, 356, 357, 358, 359
kos, and ptolemy i Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 343
kos, apollo delios/dalios, delos Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 77
kos, argos, oulios, delos, ephesos, rhodes Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 124
kos, asklepieion Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 146, 148, 202, 203, 204, 205
kos, asklepieion, antiochos iii epigram recording cure Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 204
kos, asklepieion, antiochos iii, the great seleucid king, epigram recording cure at Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 204
kos, asklepieion, associated with asklepiads and medical school Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 203, 226
kos, asklepieion, associated with hippocrates and hippocratic school Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 203, 204
kos, asklepieion, building d Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 146, 148, 153
kos, asklepieion, clientele Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 120, 123
kos, asklepieion, epigraphical evidence forphysicians Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 226, 227
kos, asklepieion, hippocrates, and inscribed cures at Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 25, 204
kos, asklepieion, hippocrates, association with Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 203
kos, asklepieion, hygieia, at Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 204
kos, asklepieion, inscribed records of cures Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 25, 202, 203, 204, 229
kos, asklepieion, leges sacrae possibly pertaining to incubation Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 16, 204
kos, asklepieion, literary evidence for incubation Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 203, 204, 205
kos, asklepieion, offshoot of trikka asklepieion Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 178, 203
kos, asklepieion, oracles pertaining to sanctuary improvements Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 117
kos, asklepieion, porticoes Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 146, 153
kos, asklepieion, problem of where incubation practiced Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 146, 148, 149, 204, 205
kos, asklepieion, thesauros Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 253
kos, asklepieion, trikka asklepieion, linked to Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 178, 203
kos, asklepieion, triple-portico Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 148
kos, asklepieion, water sources Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 153
kos, asklepios, at Papazarkadas (2011), Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens, 90, 311
kos, astypalaia Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 77
kos, battle of c. Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 212
kos, cyrus and john, saints, daikrates dream relief from Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 656, 657, 658
kos, foundations of private cults, diomedon Ekroth (2013), The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period, 31, 137
kos, isis, at Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 331, 369
kos, kos, asklepieion, cults establishment on Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 178, 180
kos, leto Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 77, 97, 98
kos, meropes, early inhabitants of Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 98
kos, sacrificial calendars Ekroth (2013), The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period, 131, 135, 319, 320, 321, 322
kos, sent theoroi to itonos Lalone (2019), Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 74, 75, 76, 78
kos, shrine of graces and nymphs Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 295, 656, 657, 658

List of validated texts:
5 validated results for "kos"
1. None, None, nan (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Kos • Leto, Kos • Meropes, early inhabitants of Kos

 Found in books: Bremmer (2008), Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East, 81; Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 98

2. None, None, nan (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Hippocrates, association with Kos Asklepieion • Kos • Kos Asklepieion • Kos Asklepieion, associated with Asklepiads and medical school • Kos Asklepieion, associated with Hippocrates and Hippocratic school • Kos Asklepieion, cults establishment on Kos • Kos Asklepieion, inscribed records of cures • Kos Asklepieion, literary evidence for incubation • Kos Asklepieion, offshoot of Trikka Asklepieion • Trikka Asklepieion, linked to Kos Asklepieion

 Found in books: Beck (2021), Repetition, Communication, and Meaning in the Ancient World, 310; Bremmer (2008), Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East, 258; Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 178, 203

3. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Kos • Leto, Kos • Meropes, early inhabitants of Kos

 Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 98; Stephens and Winkler (1995), Ancient Greek Novels: The Fragments: Introduction, Text, Translation, and Commentary, 171

4. Strabo, Geography, 14.2.19
 Tagged with subjects: • Antiochos III (the Great) (Seleucid king), epigram recording cure at Kos Asklepieion • Hippocrates, and inscribed cures at Kos Asklepieion • Hygieia, at Kos Asklepieion • Kos • Kos Asklepieion • Kos Asklepieion, Antiochos III epigram recording cure • Kos Asklepieion, associated with Hippocrates and Hippocratic school • Kos Asklepieion, inscribed records of cures • Kos Asklepieion, leges sacrae possibly pertaining to incubation • Kos Asklepieion, literary evidence for incubation • Kos Asklepieion, problem of where incubation practiced

 Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 204; Stephens and Winkler (1995), Ancient Greek Novels: The Fragments: Introduction, Text, Translation, and Commentary, 171

sup>
14.2.19 The city of the Coans was in ancient times called Astypalaea; and its people lived on another site, which was likewise on the sea. And then, on account of a sedition, they changed their abode to the present city, near Scandarium, and changed the name to Cos, the same as that of the island. Now the city is not large, but it is the most beautifully settled of all, and is most pleasing to behold as one sails from the high sea to its shore. The size of the island is about five hundred and fifty stadia. It is everywhere well supplied with fruits, but like Chios and Lesbos it is best in respect to its wine. Towards the south it has a promontory, Laceter, whence the distance to Nisyros is sixty stadia (but near Laceter there is a place called Halisarna), and on the west it has Drecanum and a village called Stomalimne. Now Drecanum is about two hundred stadia distant from the city, but Laceter adds thirty-five stadia to the length of the voyage. In the suburb is the Asclepieium, a sanctuary exceedingly famous and full of numerous votive offerings, among which is the Antigonus of Apelles. And Aphrodite Anadyomene used to be there, but it is now dedicated to the deified Caesar in Rome, Augustus thus having dedicated to his father the female founder of his family. It is said that the Coans got a remission of one hundred talents of the appointed tribute in return for the painting. And it is said that the dietetics practised by Hippocrates were derived mostly from the cures recorded on the votive tablets there. He, then, is one of the famous men from Cos; and so is Simus the physician; as also Philetas, at the same time poet and critic; and, in my time, Nicias, who also reigned as tyrant over the Coans; and Ariston, the pupil and heir of the Peripatetic; and Theomnestus, a renowned harper, who was a political opponent of Nicias, was a native of the island.'' None
5. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Apollo Delios/Dalios (Delos), Kos • Artemis, cults of, Pergaia (Kos) • Astypalaia, Kos • Kos • Kos, sacrificial calendars • Leto, Kos

 Found in books: Connelly (2007), Portrait of a Priestess: Women and Ritual in Ancient Greece, 181, 200; Ekroth (2013), The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period, 320, 321; Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 77




Please note: the results are produced through a computerized process which may frequently lead to errors, both in incorrect tagging and in other issues. Please use with caution.
Due to load times, full text fetching is currently attempted for validated results only.
Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

For a list of book indices included, see here.