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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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Please note: the results are produced through a computerized process which may frequently lead to errors, both in incorrect tagging and in other issues. Please use with caution.
Due to load times, full text fetching is currently attempted for validated results only.
Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

For a list of book indices included, see here.


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All subjects (including unvalidated):
subject book bibliographic info
dye Clay and Vergados (2022), Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry, 73, 74
Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 221, 222
dye, manufacture, chemical processes, in Goldman (2013), Color-Terms in Social and Cultural Context in Ancient Rome, 32, 34, 35, 36
dye, process, smell, of Goldman (2013), Color-Terms in Social and Cultural Context in Ancient Rome, 29, 30, 47, 48, 82
dye, purple Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 22, 23, 166, 167, 168, 169
dye, purple, origins of Pinheiro et al. (2012a), Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel, 117
dye, tyre, and production of purple Ashbrook Harvey et al. (2015), A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer, 264, 272
dye, vestorius maker Goldman (2013), Color-Terms in Social and Cultural Context in Ancient Rome, 34, 35
dyeing Blidstein (2017), Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature, 126, 127
Joosse (2021), Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher, 19
Porton (1988), Gentiles and Israelites in Mishnah-Tosefta, 92, 94, 103, 253
dyeing, and cleaning, cloth Eliav (2023), A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean, 25, 58, 220
dyes Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 33, 45, 46, 83, 175, 177, 182, 190, 191, 198, 219, 225, 226
Reed (2005), Fallen Angels and the History of Judaism and Christianity: The Reception of Enochic Literature. 31, 32, 36, 112, 178, 236, 263, 267, 268
dyes, / pigments Gazzarri and Weiner (2023), Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome. 133, 135, 136, 137, 144, 149, 210
dyes, and, dyeing, Goldman (2013), Color-Terms in Social and Cultural Context in Ancient Rome, 2, 19, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 40, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 56, 58, 61, 62, 64, 86, 133, 136, 137, 161
dyes, hair Goldman (2013), Color-Terms in Social and Cultural Context in Ancient Rome, 107, 108, 120, 121, 127, 128, 133

List of validated texts:
7 validated results for "dyes"
1. Hebrew Bible, Isaiah, 1.18 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • dyeing • purple dye,

 Found in books: Blidstein (2017), Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature, 127; Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 166

sup>
1.18 לְכוּ־נָא וְנִוָּכְחָה יֹאמַר יְהוָה אִם־יִהְיוּ חֲטָאֵיכֶם כַּשָּׁנִים כַּשֶּׁלֶג יַלְבִּינוּ אִם־יַאְדִּימוּ כַתּוֹלָע כַּצֶּמֶר יִהְיוּ׃'' None
sup>
1.18 Come now, and let us reason together, Saith the LORD; Though your sins be as scarlet, They shall be as white as snow; Though they be red like crimson, They shall be as wool.'' None
2. None, None, nan (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • dyes / pigments • dyes and dyeing

 Found in books: Gazzarri and Weiner (2023), Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome. 135; Goldman (2013), Color-Terms in Social and Cultural Context in Ancient Rome, 26, 27, 31

3. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, 7.7.1-7.7.2, 7.7.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • dyes / pigments • dyes and dyeing

 Found in books: Gazzarri and Weiner (2023), Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome. 135; Goldman (2013), Color-Terms in Social and Cultural Context in Ancient Rome, 33

sup>
7.7.1 1.\xa0Some are found in certain places in a native state, and thence dug up, whilst others are composed of different substances, ground and mixed together, so as to answer the same purpose. First we shall explain the nature of that which is found native, called by the Greeks ὦÏ\x87Ï\x81α. This, as in Italy, is discovered in many places, but the best is the Attic sort, which cannot now be procured, for in working the silver mines at Athens, if by chance they fell upon a vein of ochre, they followed it up as they would one of silver. Hence the ancients used abundance of ochre in their finishings. 7.7.2 2.\xa0Red ochre is also found in many places, but the best only in a\xa0few, as at Sinope, in Pontus; in Egypt; in the Balearic Islands, near the coast of Spain; also in Lemnos, the revenue of which island the senate and people of Rome granted to the Athenians. The Parætonion takes its name from the place where it is dug up. The Melinon on a similar account is so called, from its abundance in Melos, one of the Cyclades. Green chalk is also found in many places; but the best comes from Smyrna, and is called by the Greeks θεοδÏ\x8cÏ\x84ιον, because Theodotus was the owner of the land in which it was first discovered. Orpiment, which is called á¼\x80Ï\x81Ï\x83Î\xadνικον in Greek, is obtained from Pontus. Red lead is also obtained from many places, but the best comes from Pontus, near the river Hypanis. In other spots as in the country between the borders of Magnesia and Ephesus, it is procured from the earth in such a state as to want neither grinding nor sifting, but quite as fine as that which is ground and pounded by hand.
7.7.5
1.\xa0Some are found in certain places in a native state, and thence dug up, whilst others are composed of different substances, ground and mixed together, so as to answer the same purpose. First we shall explain the nature of that which is found native, called by the Greeks ὦÏ\x87Ï\x81α. This, as in Italy, is discovered in many places, but the best is the Attic sort, which cannot now be procured, for in working the silver mines at Athens, if by chance they fell upon a vein of ochre, they followed it up as they would one of silver. Hence the ancients used abundance of ochre in their finishings.,2.\xa0Red ochre is also found in many places, but the best only in a\xa0few, as at Sinope, in Pontus; in Egypt; in the Balearic Islands, near the coast of Spain; also in Lemnos, the revenue of which island the senate and people of Rome granted to the Athenians. The Parætonion takes its name from the place where it is dug up. The Melinon on a similar account is so called, from its abundance in Melos, one of the Cyclades. Green chalk is also found in many places; but the best comes from Smyrna, and is called by the Greeks θεοδÏ\x8cÏ\x84ιον, because Theodotus was the owner of the land in which it was first discovered. Orpiment, which is called á¼\x80Ï\x81Ï\x83Î\xadνικον in Greek, is obtained from Pontus. Red lead is also obtained from many places, but the best comes from Pontus, near the river Hypanis. In other spots as in the country between the borders of Magnesia and Ephesus, it is procured from the earth in such a state as to want neither grinding nor sifting, but quite as fine as that which is ground and pounded by hand.'' None
4. New Testament, Acts, 16.14 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • dye • purple dye,

 Found in books: Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 169; Keddie (2019), Class and Power in Roman Palestine: The Socioeconomic Setting of Judaism and Christian Origins, 222

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16.14 καί τις γυνὴ ὀνόματι Λυδία, πορφυρόπωλις πόλεως Θυατείρων σεβομένη τὸν θεόν, ἤκουεν, ἧς ὁ κύριος διήνοιξεν τὴν καρδίαν προσέχειν τοῖς λαλουμένοις ὑπὸ Παύλου.'' None
sup>
16.14 A certain woman named Lydia, a seller of purple, of the city of Thyatira, one who worshiped God, heard us; whose heart the Lord opened to listen to the things which were spoken by Paul. '' None
5. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • dyes • dyes / pigments • dyes and dyeing

 Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 182; Gazzarri and Weiner (2023), Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome. 135; Goldman (2013), Color-Terms in Social and Cultural Context in Ancient Rome, 56

6. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • dyes • dyes and dyeing • smell, of dye process

 Found in books: Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 45, 46; Goldman (2013), Color-Terms in Social and Cultural Context in Ancient Rome, 29

7. Vergil, Aeneis, 11.772-11.777
 Tagged with subjects: • dyes / pigments • dyes and dyeing

 Found in books: Gazzarri and Weiner (2023), Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome. 137; Goldman (2013), Color-Terms in Social and Cultural Context in Ancient Rome, 42, 62

sup>
11.772 Ipse, peregrina ferrugine clarus et ostro, 11.773 spicula torquebat Lycio Gortynia cornu; 11.774 aureus ex umeris erat arcus et aurea vati 11.775 cassida; tum croceam chlamydemque sinusque crepantis 11.776 carbaseos fulvo in nodum collegerat auro 11.777 pictus acu tunicas et barbara tegmina crurum.'' None
sup>
11.772 Strymonian cranes or swans of spotless wing. 11.773 From Tuscan towns proud matrons oft in vain 11.774 ought her in marriage for their sons; but she 11.775 to Dian only turned her stainless heart, ' "11.776 her virgin freedom and her huntress' arms " '11.777 with faithful passion serving. Would that now '' None



Please note: the results are produced through a computerized process which may frequently lead to errors, both in incorrect tagging and in other issues. Please use with caution.
Due to load times, full text fetching is currently attempted for validated results only.
Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

For a list of book indices included, see here.