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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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Please note: the results are produced through a computerized process which may frequently lead to errors, both in incorrect tagging and in other issues. Please use with caution.
Due to load times, full text fetching is currently attempted for validated results only.
Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

For a list of book indices included, see here.


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All subjects (including unvalidated):
subject book bibliographic info
deucalion Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 339
Birnbaum and Dillon (2020), Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 175, 185
Bloch (2022), Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism, 165
Greensmith (2021), The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation, 194, 338, 339
Iricinschi et al. (2013), Beyond the Gnostic Gospels: Studies Building on the Work of Elaine Pagels, 226, 227
Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 133, 206, 257, 291
Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020), Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity, 22, 54
Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 339
deucalion, and pyrrha Graf and Johnston (2007), Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets, 202
Segev (2017), Aristotle on Religion, 155, 156, 158, 159
deucalion, and pyrrha, metamorphoses Williams and Vol (2022), Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher, 188, 189, 190, 191, 318, 341, 342
deucalion, in georgics, vergil, on Williams and Vol (2022), Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher, 191
deucalions, as aition for chytroi, flood Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 295, 296, 316
deucalions, flood, myth, of Albrecht (2014), The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity, 372

List of validated texts:
8 validated results for "deucalion"
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 137-139, 143-145, 157-159, 168-170, 180 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Deucalion and Pyrrha • Myth, of Deucalions flood

 Found in books: Albrecht (2014), The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity, 372; Graf and Johnston (2007), Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets, 202

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137 ἣ θέμις ἀνθρώποις κατὰ ἤθεα. τοὺς μὲν ἔπειτα'138 Ζεὺς Κρονίδης ἔκρυψε χολούμενος, οὕνεκα τιμὰς 139 οὐκ ἔδιδον μακάρεσσι θεοῖς, οἳ Ὄλυμπον ἔχουσιν.
143
Ζεὺς δὲ πατὴρ τρίτον ἄλλο γένος μερόπων ἀνθρώπων 144 χάλκειον ποίησʼ, οὐκ ἀργυρέῳ οὐδὲν ὁμοῖον, 145 ἐκ μελιᾶν, δεινόν τε καὶ ὄβριμον· οἷσιν Ἄρηος
157
αὖτις ἔτʼ ἄλλο τέταρτον ἐπὶ χθονὶ πουλυβοτείρῃ 158 Ζεὺς Κρονίδης ποίησε, δικαιότερον καὶ ἄρειον, 159 ἀνδρῶν ἡρώων θεῖον γένος, οἳ καλέονται
168
Ζεὺς Κρονίδης κατένασσε πατὴρ ἐς πείρατα γαίης. 169 Πέμπτον δʼ αὖτις ἔτʼ ἄ λλο γένος θῆκʼ εὐρύοπα Ζεὺς 169 ἀνδρῶν, οἳ γεγάασιν ἐπὶ χθονὶ πουλυβοτείρῃ. 169 τοῖσι δʼ ὁμῶς ν εάτοις τιμὴ καὶ κῦδος ὀπηδεῖ. 169 τοῦ γὰρ δεσμὸ ν ἔλυσε πα τὴρ ἀνδρῶν τε θεῶν τε. 169 τηλοῦ ἀπʼ ἀθανάτων· τοῖσιν Κρόνος ἐμβασιλεύει. 170 καὶ τοὶ μὲν ναίουσιν ἀκηδέα θυμὸν ἔχοντες
180
Ζεὺς δʼ ὀλέσει καὶ τοῦτο γένος μερόπων ἀνθρώπων, ' None
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137 A large bairn, in his mother’s custody,'138 Just playing inside for a hundred years. 139 But when they all reached their maturity,
143
To sacrifice (a law kept everywhere). 144 Then Zeus, since they would not give gods their due, 145 In rage hid them, as did the earth – all men
157
Chill Hades’ mouldy house, without a name. 158 Yes, black death took them off, although they’d been 159 Impetuous, and they the sun’s bright flame
168
The flocks of Oedipus, found death. The sea 169 Took others as they crossed to Troy fight 170 For fair-tressed Helen. They were screened as well
180
That bound him. Though the lowest race, its gain ' None
2. None, None, nan (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Deucalion • Deucalion and Pyrrha

 Found in books: Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 117; Graf and Johnston (2007), Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets, 202

3. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.319, 1.324-1.326, 1.348-1.353, 1.357-1.358, 1.360, 1.366-1.379, 1.381-1.387, 1.390-1.394, 1.398-1.415 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Deucalion • Deucalion and Pyrrha • Metamorphoses, Deucalion and Pyrrha • Vergil, on Deucalion in Georgics

 Found in books: Birnbaum and Dillon (2020), Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 175, 185; Mayor (2017), Religion and Memory in Tacitus’ Annals, 264; Williams and Vol (2022), Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher, 188, 189, 190, 191, 318, 341

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1.319 cum consorte tori parva rate vectus adhaesit,
1.324
Iuppiter ut liquidis stagnare paludibus orbem 1.325 et superesse virum de tot modo milibus unum, 1.326 et superesse videt de tot modo milibus unam,
1.348
Redditus orbis erat. Quem postquam vidit iem 1.350 Deucalion lacrimis ita Pyrrham adfatur obortis: 1.351 “O soror, o coniunx, o femina sola superstes, 1.352 quam commune mihi genus et patruelis origo, 1.353 deinde torus iunxit, nunc ipsa pericula iungunt,
1.357
certa satis; terrent etiam nunc nubila mentem. 1.358 Quis tibi, si sine me fatis erepta fuisses,
1.360
ferre modo posses? quo consolante doleres?
1.366
(sic visum superis) hominumque exempla manemus.” 1.367 Dixerat, et flebant. Placuit caeleste precari 1.368 numen et auxilium per sacras quaerere sortes. 1.369 Nulla mora est: adeunt pariter Cephisidas undas, 1.370 ut nondum liquidas, sic iam vada nota secantes. 1.371 Inde ubi libatos inroravere liquores 1.372 vestibus et capiti, flectunt vestigia sanctae 1.373 ad delubra deae, quorum fastigia turpi 1.374 pallebant musco stabantque sine ignibus arae. 1.376 pronus humi gelidoque pavens dedit oscula saxo 1.377 atque ita “si precibus” dixerunt “numina iustis 1.378 victa remollescunt, si flectitur ira deorum, 1.379 dic, Themi, qua generis damnum reparabile nostri
1.381
Mota dea est sortemque dedit: “Discedite templo 1.382 et velate caput cinctasque resolvite vestes 1.383 ossaque post tergum magnae iactate parentis.” 1.384 Obstipuere diu, rumpitque silentia voce 1.385 Pyrrha prior iussisque deae parere recusat, 1.386 detque sibi veniam pavido rogat ore, pavetque 1.387 laedere iactatis maternas ossibus umbras.
1.390
Inde Promethides placidis Epimethida dictis 1.391 mulcet et “aut fallax” ait “est sollertia nobis, 1.392 aut pia sunt nullumque nefas oracula suadent. 1.393 Magna parens terra est, lapides in corpore terrae 1.394 ossa reor dici; iacere hos post terga iubemur.”
1.398
Discedunt velantque caput tunicasque recingunt 1.399 et iussos lapides sua post vestigia mittunt. 1.400 Saxa (quis hoc credat, nisi sit pro teste vetustas?) 1.401 ponere duritiem coepere suumque rigorem 1.402 mollirique mora mollitaque ducere formam. 1.403 Mox ubi creverunt naturaque mitior illis 1.404 contigit, ut quaedam, sic non manifesta, videri 1.405 forma potest hominis, sed, uti de marmore coepta, 1.406 non exacta satis rudibusque simillima signis. 1.407 Quae tamen ex illis aliquo pars umida suco 1.408 et terrena fuit, versa est in corporis usum; 1.409 quod solidum est flectique nequit, mutatur in ossa; 1.410 quae modo vena fuit, sub eodem nomine mansit; 1.411 inque brevi spatio superorum numine saxa 1.412 missa viri manibus faciem traxere virorum, 1.414 Inde genus durum sumus experiensque laborum 1.415 et documenta damus qua simus origine nati.' ' None
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1.319 in evil. Let them therefore feel the weight
1.324
while others gave assent: but all deplored 1.325 and questioned the estate of earth deprived 1.326 of mortals. Who could offer frankincense
1.348
the gathering clouds. He bade the Southwind blow:— 1.350 concealing in the gloom his awful face: 1.351 the drenching rain descends from his wet beard 1.352 and hoary locks; dark clouds are on his brow 1.353 and from his wings and garments drip the dews:
1.357
in many coloured raiment, upward draw 1.358 the steaming moisture to renew the clouds.' "
1.360
the rustic's crops are scattered in the mire," 1.366 and when they entered his impearled abode, 1.367 Neptune , their ancient ruler, thus began; 1.368 “A long appeal is needless; pour ye forth 1.369 in rage of power; open up your fountains; 1.370 rush over obstacles; let every stream 1.371 pour forth in boundless floods.” Thus he commands, 1.372 and none dissenting all the River God 1.373 return, and opening up their fountains roll 1.374 tumultuous to the deep unfruitful sea. 1.376 which trembling with unwonted throes heaved up 1.377 the sources of her waters bare; and through 1.378 her open plains the rapid rivers rushed 1.379 resistless, onward bearing the waving grain,
1.381
and holy temples, and their sacred urns. 1.382 The mansions that remained, resisting vast 1.383 and total ruin, deepening waves concealed 1.384 and whelmed their tottering turrets in the flood 1.385 and whirling gulf. And now one vast expanse, 1.386 the land and sea were mingled in the waste 1.387 of endless waves—a sea without a shore.
1.390
plied the long oar where he was wont to plow; 1.391 another sailed above his grain, above 1.392 his hidden dwelling; and another hooked 1.393 a fish that sported in a leafy elm. 1.394 Perchance an anchor dropped in verdant fields,
1.398
were wondering Nereids, viewing cities, grove 1.399 and houses. Dolphins darting mid the trees, 1.400 meshed in the twisted branches, beat against 1.401 the shaken oak trees. There the sheep, affrayed, 1.402 wim with the frightened wolf, the surging wave 1.403 float tigers and lions: availeth naught 1.404 his lightning shock the wild boar, nor avail' "1.405 the stag's fleet footed speed. The wandering bird," '1.406 eeking umbrageous groves and hidden vales, 1.407 with wearied pinion droops into the sea. 1.408 The waves increasing surge above the hills, 1.409 and rising waters dash on mountain tops. 1.410 Myriads by the waves are swept away, 1.411 and those the waters spare, for lack of food, 1.412 tarvation slowly overcomes at last. 1.414 beneath a wilderness of rising waves,' "1.415 'Twixt Oeta and Aonia , Phocis lies," ' None
4. Philo of Alexandria, On Curses, 23 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Deucalion

 Found in books: Birnbaum and Dillon (2020), Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 175, 185; Bloch (2022), Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism, 165

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23 But the connection of the consequence affects me in no moderate degree; for it happens that that which comes near to him who is standing still longs for tranquillity, as being something which resembles itself. Now that which stands still without any deviation is God, and that which is moved is the creature, so that he who comes near to God desires stability; but he who departs from him, as by so doing he is approaching a creature easily overturned, is borne towards that which resembles it. VIII. '' None
5. None, None, nan (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Deucalion • Metamorphoses, Deucalion and Pyrrha • Vergil, on Deucalion in Georgics

 Found in books: Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 60, 71, 117; Perkell (1989), The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics, 176; Williams and Vol (2022), Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher, 191

6. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Deucalion

 Found in books: Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 339; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 339

7. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.18.7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Deucalion • flood, Deucalions, as aition for Chytroi

 Found in books: Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 296; Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020), Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity, 54

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1.18.7 ἔστι δὲ ἀρχαῖα ἐν τῷ περιβόλῳ Ζεὺς χαλκοῦς καὶ ναὸς Κρόνου καὶ Ῥέας καὶ τέμενος Γῆς τὴν ἐπίκλησιν Ὀλυμπίας. ἐνταῦθα ὅσον ἐς πῆχυν τὸ ἔδαφος διέστηκε, καὶ λέγουσι μετὰ τὴν ἐπομβρίαν τὴν ἐπὶ Δευκαλίωνος συμβᾶσαν ὑπορρυῆναι ταύτῃ τὸ ὕδωρ, ἐσβάλλουσί τε ἐς αὐτὸ ἀνὰ πᾶν ἔτος ἄλφιτα πυρῶν μέλιτι μίξαντες.'' None
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1.18.7 Within the precincts are antiquities: a bronze Zeus, a temple of Cronus and Rhea and an enclosure of Earth surnamed Olympian. Here the floor opens to the width of a cubit, and they say that along this bed flowed off the water after the deluge that occurred in the time of Deucalion, and into it they cast every year wheat meal mixed with honey.'' None
8. Vergil, Georgics, 1.61-1.63
 Tagged with subjects: • Deucalion • Metamorphoses, Deucalion and Pyrrha • Vergil, on Deucalion in Georgics

 Found in books: Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 60, 71, 117, 205; Perkell (1989), The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics, 176; Williams and Vol (2022), Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher, 191

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1.61 inposuit natura locis, quo tempore primum 1.62 Deucalion vacuum lapides iactavit in orbem, 1.63 unde homines nati, durum genus. Ergo age, terrae'' None
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1.61 That land the craving farmer's prayer fulfils," '1.62 Which twice the sunshine, twice the frost has felt;' "1.63 Ay, that's the land whose boundless harvest-crop"" None



Please note: the results are produced through a computerized process which may frequently lead to errors, both in incorrect tagging and in other issues. Please use with caution.
Due to load times, full text fetching is currently attempted for validated results only.
Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

For a list of book indices included, see here.