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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

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All subjects (including unvalidated):
subject book bibliographic info
deceit Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer (2022) 315
Blidstein (2017) 47, 66, 136, 137
Geljon and Runia (2013) 102, 105, 106, 108, 136, 137, 249
Klawans (2019) 32, 33, 34, 35, 169
Langlands (2018) 54, 55, 56
deSilva (2022) 36, 215, 216, 234, 235, 236
deceit, and divination Johnston (2008) 44, 50, 79, 80, 81, 138, 157, 169, 176
deceit, angel, joseph, on Klawans (2019) 32, 33
deceit, by the doctor Jouanna (2012) 272
deceit, dishonesty Thonemann (2020) 18, 36, 45, 48, 49, 54, 93, 94, 138, 144, 155, 156, 159, 160, 163, 164, 171
deceit, foundation, of sin and Stuckenbruck (2007) 194, 261, 419, 420, 421
deceit, fraud Lampe (2003) 91, 93, 94, 103, 224
deceit, hearts, of Stuckenbruck (2007) 167
deceit, heresy, as Azar (2016) 119
deceit, in identifying himself as esau, josephus, avoids jacob’s Feldman (2006) 300
deceit, justified Klawans (2019) 33, 34, 35
deceit, mucius scaevola, and Langlands (2018) 54, 55, 56
deceit, of leaders, josephus’ attitude toward Feldman (2006) 473, 474
deceit, of leaders, josephus’ attitude toward, demagogues, josephus’ disdain for Feldman (2006) 452, 453, 454
deceit, philo, overlooks Feldman (2006) 288, 289
deceit, sons, of Levison (2009) 387, 388, 389
deceit, spirits, of Stuckenbruck (2007) 248
Tellbe Wasserman and Nyman (2019) 50, 63
deceit, ways/paths, of Stuckenbruck (2007) 248
deceit/deception Ker and Wessels (2020) 12, 35, 41, 42, 73, 177, 224
deceitful, speech Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer (2022) 241
deceitfully, sought conversion to christianity recounted by, sokrates of constantinople, jewish man who Kraemer (2020) 234
deception/deceit Stuckenbruck (2007) 90, 91, 92, 93, 99, 121, 129, 130, 133, 135, 142, 148, 167, 169, 178, 193, 194, 248, 254, 255, 261, 275, 280, 294, 301, 368, 375, 419, 420, 421, 554, 596, 621, 684
‘deceit’, apatē personification Marincola et al (2021) 340

List of validated texts:
23 validated results for "deceit"
1. Hebrew Bible, Joel, 2.19 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Deception/Deceit • Judith, deceives and lies

 Found in books: Gera (2014) 358; Stuckenbruck (2007) 368


2.19. וַיַּעַן יְהוָה וַיֹּאמֶר לְעַמּוֹ הִנְנִי שֹׁלֵחַ לָכֶם אֶת־הַדָּגָן וְהַתִּירוֹשׁ וְהַיִּצְהָר וּשְׂבַעְתֶּם אֹתוֹ וְלֹא־אֶתֵּן אֶתְכֶם עוֹד חֶרְפָּה בַּגּוֹיִם׃''. None
2.19. And the LORD answered and said unto His people: ‘Behold, I will send you corn, and wine, and oil, And ye shall be satisfied therewith; And I will no more make you a reproach among the nations;''. None
2. Hebrew Bible, Leviticus, 17.10-17.14 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Judith, deceives and lies • Spirits, of Deceit

 Found in books: Gera (2014) 358; Tellbe Wasserman and Nyman (2019) 50


17.11. כִּי נֶפֶשׁ הַבָּשָׂר בַּדָּם הִוא וַאֲנִי נְתַתִּיו לָכֶם עַל־הַמִּזְבֵּחַ לְכַפֵּר עַל־נַפְשֹׁתֵיכֶם כִּי־הַדָּם הוּא בַּנֶּפֶשׁ יְכַפֵּר׃ 17.12. עַל־כֵּן אָמַרְתִּי לִבְנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל כָּל־נֶפֶשׁ מִכֶּם לֹא־תֹאכַל דָּם וְהַגֵּר הַגָּר בְּתוֹכְכֶם לֹא־יֹאכַל דָּם׃ 17.13. וְאִישׁ אִישׁ מִבְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל וּמִן־הַגֵּר הַגָּר בְּתוֹכָם אֲשֶׁר יָצוּד צֵיד חַיָּה אוֹ־עוֹף אֲשֶׁר יֵאָכֵל וְשָׁפַךְ אֶת־דָּמוֹ וְכִסָּהוּ בֶּעָפָר׃ 17.14. כִּי־נֶפֶשׁ כָּל־בָּשָׂר דָּמוֹ בְנַפְשׁוֹ הוּא וָאֹמַר לִבְנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל דַּם כָּל־בָּשָׂר לֹא תֹאכֵלוּ כִּי נֶפֶשׁ כָּל־בָּשָׂר דָּמוֹ הִוא כָּל־אֹכְלָיו יִכָּרֵת׃' '. None
17.10. And whatsoever man there be of the house of Israel, or of the strangers that sojourn among them, that eateth any manner of blood, I will set My face against that soul that eateth blood, and will cut him off from among his people. 17.11. For the life of the flesh is in the blood; and I have given it to you upon the altar to make atonement for your souls; for it is the blood that maketh atonement by reason of the life. 17.12. Therefore I said unto the children of Israel: No soul of you shall eat blood, neither shall any stranger that sojourneth among you eat blood. 17.13. And whatsoever man there be of the children of Israel, or of the strangers that sojourn among them, that taketh in hunting any beast or fowl that may be eaten, he shall pour out the blood thereof, and cover it with dust. 17.14. For as to the life of all flesh, the blood thereof is all one with the life thereof; therefore I said unto the children of Israel: Ye shall eat the blood of no manner of flesh; for the life of all flesh is the blood thereof; whosoever eateth it shall be cut off.''. None
3. Hebrew Bible, Micah, 6.4 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Deception/Deceit • Judith, deceives and lies

 Found in books: Gera (2014) 363; Stuckenbruck (2007) 368


6.4. כִּי הֶעֱלִתִיךָ מֵאֶרֶץ מִצְרַיִם וּמִבֵּית עֲבָדִים פְּדִיתִיךָ וָאֶשְׁלַח לְפָנֶיךָ אֶת־מֹשֶׁה אַהֲרֹן וּמִרְיָם׃''. None
6.4. For I brought thee up out of the land of Egypt, And redeemed thee out of the house of bondage, And I sent before thee Moses, Aaron, and Miriam.''. None
4. Hebrew Bible, Proverbs, 8.13 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Deception/Deceit • Judith, deceives and lies • deception

 Found in books: Gera (2014) 103, 288; Stuckenbruck (2007) 254; Wilson (2012) 411


8.13. יִרְאַת יְהוָה שְׂנֹאת רָע גֵּאָה וְגָאוֹן וְדֶרֶךְ רָע וּפִי תַהְפֻּכוֹת שָׂנֵאתִי׃' '. None
8.13. The fear of the LORD is to hate evil; Pride, and arrogancy, and the evil way, And the froward mouth, do I hate.' '. None
5. None, None, nan (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Deception • Deception/Deceit • Judith, deceives and lies • biblical women, lie and deceive • deception

 Found in books: Bull Lied and Turner (2011) 63; Gera (2014) 319; Lidonnici and Lieber (2007) 214; Stuckenbruck (2007) 92


6. Hesiod, Theogony, 27-28 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Homer, and deceit • Zeus, deception of • deception, and Athenian paideia • deception, and tragedy • deception, relationship to truth

 Found in books: Edmunds (2021) 167; Hesk (2000) 13, 146, 147, 177, 183


27. ἴδμεν ψεύδεα πολλὰ λέγειν ἐτύμοισιν ὁμοῖα,'28. ἴδμεν δʼ, εὖτʼ ἐθέλωμεν, ἀληθέα γηρύσασθαι. '. None
27. Those daughters of Lord Zeus proclaimed to me:'28. “You who tend sheep, full of iniquity, '. None
7. Homer, Iliad, 14.153-14.255, 14.260-14.351, 19.133 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Judith, deceives and lies • Pericles, on deceit • Zeus, Deception of Zeus • deception • deception, opposed to hoplitism • ethical qualities, craftiness, deceit, deception, disguise, feigning, guile, sleight of hand, trickery (dolus, dolos)

 Found in books: Braund and Most (2004) 154; Farrell (2021) 54, 62, 145, 147; Gera (2014) 329; Hesk (2000) 36; Hunter (2018) 154, 155, 156, 157; Jouanna (2018) 671; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti (2022) 33, 90, 230


14.153. Ἥρη δʼ εἰσεῖδε χρυσόθρονος ὀφθαλμοῖσι 14.154. στᾶσʼ ἐξ Οὐλύμποιο ἀπὸ ῥίου· αὐτίκα δʼ ἔγνω 14.155. τὸν μὲν ποιπνύοντα μάχην ἀνὰ κυδιάνειραν 14.156. αὐτοκασίγνητον καὶ δαέρα, χαῖρε δὲ θυμῷ· 14.157. Ζῆνα δʼ ἐπʼ ἀκροτάτης κορυφῆς πολυπίδακος Ἴδης 14.158. ἥμενον εἰσεῖδε, στυγερὸς δέ οἱ ἔπλετο θυμῷ. 14.159. μερμήριξε δʼ ἔπειτα βοῶπις πότνια Ἥρη 14.160. ὅππως ἐξαπάφοιτο Διὸς νόον αἰγιόχοιο· 14.161. ἥδε δέ οἱ κατὰ θυμὸν ἀρίστη φαίνετο βουλὴ 14.162. ἐλθεῖν εἰς Ἴδην εὖ ἐντύνασαν ἓ αὐτήν, 14.163. εἴ πως ἱμείραιτο παραδραθέειν φιλότητι 14.164. ᾗ χροιῇ, τῷ δʼ ὕπνον ἀπήμονά τε λιαρόν τε 14.165. χεύῃ ἐπὶ βλεφάροισιν ἰδὲ φρεσὶ πευκαλίμῃσι. 14.166. βῆ δʼ ἴμεν ἐς θάλαμον, τόν οἱ φίλος υἱὸς ἔτευξεν 14.167. Ἥφαιστος, πυκινὰς δὲ θύρας σταθμοῖσιν ἐπῆρσε 14.168. κληῗδι κρυπτῇ, τὴν δʼ οὐ θεὸς ἄλλος ἀνῷγεν· 14.169. ἔνθʼ ἥ γʼ εἰσελθοῦσα θύρας ἐπέθηκε φαεινάς. 14.170. ἀμβροσίῃ μὲν πρῶτον ἀπὸ χροὸς ἱμερόεντος 14.171. λύματα πάντα κάθηρεν, ἀλείψατο δὲ λίπʼ ἐλαίῳ 14.172. ἀμβροσίῳ ἑδανῷ, τό ῥά οἱ τεθυωμένον ἦεν· 14.173. τοῦ καὶ κινυμένοιο Διὸς κατὰ χαλκοβατὲς δῶ 14.174. ἔμπης ἐς γαῖάν τε καὶ οὐρανὸν ἵκετʼ ἀϋτμή. 14.175. τῷ ῥʼ ἥ γε χρόα καλὸν ἀλειψαμένη ἰδὲ χαίτας 14.176. πεξαμένη χερσὶ πλοκάμους ἔπλεξε φαεινοὺς 14.177. καλοὺς ἀμβροσίους ἐκ κράατος ἀθανάτοιο. 14.178. ἀμφὶ δʼ ἄρʼ ἀμβρόσιον ἑανὸν ἕσαθʼ, ὅν οἱ Ἀθήνη 14.179. ἔξυσʼ ἀσκήσασα, τίθει δʼ ἐνὶ δαίδαλα πολλά· 14.180. χρυσείῃς δʼ ἐνετῇσι κατὰ στῆθος περονᾶτο. 14.181. ζώσατο δὲ ζώνῃ ἑκατὸν θυσάνοις ἀραρυίῃ, 14.182. ἐν δʼ ἄρα ἕρματα ἧκεν ἐϋτρήτοισι λοβοῖσι 14.183. τρίγληνα μορόεντα· χάρις δʼ ἀπελάμπετο πολλή. 14.184. κρηδέμνῳ δʼ ἐφύπερθε καλύψατο δῖα θεάων 14.185. καλῷ νηγατέῳ· λευκὸν δʼ ἦν ἠέλιος ὥς· 14.186. ποσσὶ δʼ ὑπὸ λιπαροῖσιν ἐδήσατο καλὰ πέδιλα. 14.187. αὐτὰρ ἐπεὶ δὴ πάντα περὶ χροῒ θήκατο κόσμον 14.188. βῆ ῥʼ ἴμεν ἐκ θαλάμοιο, καλεσσαμένη δʼ Ἀφροδίτην 14.189. τῶν ἄλλων ἀπάνευθε θεῶν πρὸς μῦθον ἔειπε· 14.190. ἦ ῥά νύ μοί τι πίθοιο φίλον τέκος ὅττί κεν εἴπω, 14.191. ἦέ κεν ἀρνήσαιο κοτεσσαμένη τό γε θυμῷ, 14.192. οὕνεκʼ ἐγὼ Δαναοῖσι, σὺ δὲ Τρώεσσιν ἀρήγεις; 14.193. τὴν δʼ ἠμείβετʼ ἔπειτα Διὸς θυγάτηρ Ἀφροδίτη· 14.194. Ἥρη πρέσβα θεὰ θύγατερ μεγάλοιο Κρόνοιο 14.195. αὔδα ὅ τι φρονέεις· τελέσαι δέ με θυμὸς ἄνωγεν, 14.196. εἰ δύναμαι τελέσαι γε καὶ εἰ τετελεσμένον ἐστίν. 14.197. τὴν δὲ δολοφρονέουσα προσηύδα πότνια Ἥρη· 14.198. δὸς νῦν μοι φιλότητα καὶ ἵμερον, ᾧ τε σὺ πάντας 14.199. δαμνᾷ ἀθανάτους ἠδὲ θνητοὺς ἀνθρώπους. 14.200. εἶμι γὰρ ὀψομένη πολυφόρβου πείρατα γαίης, 14.201. Ὠκεανόν τε θεῶν γένεσιν καὶ μητέρα Τηθύν, 14.202. οἵ μʼ ἐν σφοῖσι δόμοισιν ἐῢ τρέφον ἠδʼ ἀτίταλλον 14.203. δεξάμενοι Ῥείας, ὅτε τε Κρόνον εὐρύοπα Ζεὺς 14.204. γαίης νέρθε καθεῖσε καὶ ἀτρυγέτοιο θαλάσσης· 14.205. τοὺς εἶμʼ ὀψομένη, καί σφʼ ἄκριτα νείκεα λύσω· 14.206. ἤδη γὰρ δηρὸν χρόνον ἀλλήλων ἀπέχονται 14.207. εὐνῆς καὶ φιλότητος, ἐπεὶ χόλος ἔμπεσε θυμῷ. 14.208. εἰ κείνω ἐπέεσσι παραιπεπιθοῦσα φίλον κῆρ 14.209. εἰς εὐνὴν ἀνέσαιμι ὁμωθῆναι φιλότητι, 14.210. αἰεί κέ σφι φίλη τε καὶ αἰδοίη καλεοίμην. 14.211. τὴν δʼ αὖτε προσέειπε φιλομειδὴς Ἀφροδίτη· 14.212. οὐκ ἔστʼ οὐδὲ ἔοικε τεὸν ἔπος ἀρνήσασθαι· 14.213. Ζηνὸς γὰρ τοῦ ἀρίστου ἐν ἀγκοίνῃσιν ἰαύεις. 14.214. ἦ, καὶ ἀπὸ στήθεσφιν ἐλύσατο κεστὸν ἱμάντα 14.215. ποικίλον, ἔνθα δέ οἱ θελκτήρια πάντα τέτυκτο· 14.216. ἔνθʼ ἔνι μὲν φιλότης, ἐν δʼ ἵμερος, ἐν δʼ ὀαριστὺς 14.217. πάρφασις, ἥ τʼ ἔκλεψε νόον πύκα περ φρονεόντων. 14.218. τόν ῥά οἱ ἔμβαλε χερσὶν ἔπος τʼ ἔφατʼ ἔκ τʼ ὀνόμαζε· 14.219. τῆ νῦν τοῦτον ἱμάντα τεῷ ἐγκάτθεο κόλπῳ 14.220. ποικίλον, ᾧ ἔνι πάντα τετεύχαται· οὐδέ σέ φημι 14.221. ἄπρηκτόν γε νέεσθαι, ὅ τι φρεσὶ σῇσι μενοινᾷς. 14.222. ὣς φάτο, μείδησεν δὲ βοῶπις πότνια Ἥρη, 14.223. μειδήσασα δʼ ἔπειτα ἑῷ ἐγκάτθετο κόλπῳ. 14.224. ἣ μὲν ἔβη πρὸς δῶμα Διὸς θυγάτηρ Ἀφροδίτη, 14.225. Ἥρη δʼ ἀΐξασα λίπεν ῥίον Οὐλύμποιο, 14.226. Πιερίην δʼ ἐπιβᾶσα καὶ Ἠμαθίην ἐρατεινὴν 14.227. σεύατʼ ἐφʼ ἱπποπόλων Θρῃκῶν ὄρεα νιφόεντα 14.228. ἀκροτάτας κορυφάς· οὐδὲ χθόνα μάρπτε ποδοῖιν· 14.229. ἐξ Ἀθόω δʼ ἐπὶ πόντον ἐβήσετο κυμαίνοντα, 14.230. Λῆμνον δʼ εἰσαφίκανε πόλιν θείοιο Θόαντος. 14.231. ἔνθʼ Ὕπνῳ ξύμβλητο κασιγνήτῳ Θανάτοιο, 14.232. ἔν τʼ ἄρα οἱ φῦ χειρὶ ἔπος τʼ ἔφατʼ ἔκ τʼ ὀνόμαζεν· 14.233. Ὕπνε ἄναξ πάντων τε θεῶν πάντων τʼ ἀνθρώπων, 14.234. ἠμὲν δή ποτʼ ἐμὸν ἔπος ἔκλυες, ἠδʼ ἔτι καὶ νῦν 14.235. πείθευ· ἐγὼ δέ κέ τοι ἰδέω χάριν ἤματα πάντα. 14.236. κοίμησόν μοι Ζηνὸς ὑπʼ ὀφρύσιν ὄσσε φαεινὼ 14.237. αὐτίκʼ ἐπεί κεν ἐγὼ παραλέξομαι ἐν φιλότητι. 14.238. δῶρα δέ τοι δώσω καλὸν θρόνον ἄφθιτον αἰεὶ 14.239. χρύσεον· Ἥφαιστος δέ κʼ ἐμὸς πάϊς ἀμφιγυήεις 14.240. τεύξειʼ ἀσκήσας, ὑπὸ δὲ θρῆνυν ποσὶν ἥσει, 14.241. τῷ κεν ἐπισχοίης λιπαροὺς πόδας εἰλαπινάζων. 14.242. τὴν δʼ ἀπαμειβόμενος προσεφώνεε νήδυμος Ὕπνος· 14.244. ἄλλον μέν κεν ἔγωγε θεῶν αἰειγενετάων 14.245. ῥεῖα κατευνήσαιμι, καὶ ἂν ποταμοῖο ῥέεθρα 14.246. Ὠκεανοῦ, ὅς περ γένεσις πάντεσσι τέτυκται· 14.247. Ζηνὸς δʼ οὐκ ἂν ἔγωγε Κρονίονος ἆσσον ἱκοίμην 14.248. οὐδὲ κατευνήσαιμʼ, ὅτε μὴ αὐτός γε κελεύοι. 14.249. ἤδη γάρ με καὶ ἄλλο τεὴ ἐπίνυσσεν ἐφετμὴ 14.250. ἤματι τῷ ὅτε κεῖνος ὑπέρθυμος Διὸς υἱὸς 14.251. ἔπλεεν Ἰλιόθεν Τρώων πόλιν ἐξαλαπάξας. 14.252. ἤτοι ἐγὼ μὲν ἔλεξα Διὸς νόον αἰγιόχοιο 14.253. νήδυμος ἀμφιχυθείς· σὺ δέ οἱ κακὰ μήσαο θυμῷ 14.254. ὄρσασʼ ἀργαλέων ἀνέμων ἐπὶ πόντον ἀήτας,
14.260. τὴν ἱκόμην φεύγων, ὃ δʼ ἐπαύσατο χωόμενός περ. 14.261. ἅζετο γὰρ μὴ Νυκτὶ θοῇ ἀποθύμια ἕρδοι. 14.262. νῦν αὖ τοῦτό μʼ ἄνωγας ἀμήχανον ἄλλο τελέσσαι. 14.263. τὸν δʼ αὖτε προσέειπε βοῶπις πότνια Ἥρη· 14.264. Ὕπνε τί ἢ δὲ σὺ ταῦτα μετὰ φρεσὶ σῇσι μενοινᾷς; 14.265. ἦ φῂς ὣς Τρώεσσιν ἀρηξέμεν εὐρύοπα Ζῆν 14.266. ὡς Ἡρακλῆος περιχώσατο παῖδος ἑοῖο; 14.267. ἀλλʼ ἴθʼ, ἐγὼ δέ κέ τοι Χαρίτων μίαν ὁπλοτεράων 14.268. δώσω ὀπυιέμεναι καὶ σὴν κεκλῆσθαι ἄκοιτιν.' '14.270. ὣς φάτο, χήρατο δʼ Ὕπνος, ἀμειβόμενος δὲ προσηύδα· 14.271. ἄγρει νῦν μοι ὄμοσσον ἀάατον Στυγὸς ὕδωρ, 14.272. χειρὶ δὲ τῇ ἑτέρῃ μὲν ἕλε χθόνα πουλυβότειραν, 14.273. τῇ δʼ ἑτέρῃ ἅλα μαρμαρέην, ἵνα νῶϊν ἅπαντες 14.274. μάρτυροι ὦσʼ οἳ ἔνερθε θεοὶ Κρόνον ἀμφὶς ἐόντες, 14.275. ἦ μὲν ἐμοὶ δώσειν Χαρίτων μίαν ὁπλοτεράων 14.276. Πασιθέην, ἧς τʼ αὐτὸς ἐέλδομαι ἤματα πάντα. 14.277. ὣς ἔφατʼ, οὐδʼ ἀπίθησε θεὰ λευκώλενος Ἥρη, 14.278. ὄμνυε δʼ ὡς ἐκέλευε, θεοὺς δʼ ὀνόμηνεν ἅπαντας 14.279. τοὺς ὑποταρταρίους οἳ Τιτῆνες καλέονται. 14.280. αὐτὰρ ἐπεί ῥʼ ὄμοσέν τε τελεύτησέν τε τὸν ὅρκον, 14.281. τὼ βήτην Λήμνου τε καὶ Ἴμβρου ἄστυ λιπόντε 14.282. ἠέρα ἑσσαμένω ῥίμφα πρήσσοντε κέλευθον. 14.283. Ἴδην δʼ ἱκέσθην πολυπίδακα μητέρα θηρῶν 14.284. Λεκτόν, ὅθι πρῶτον λιπέτην ἅλα· τὼ δʼ ἐπὶ χέρσου 14.285. βήτην, ἀκροτάτη δὲ ποδῶν ὕπο σείετο ὕλη. 14.286. ἔνθʼ Ὕπνος μὲν ἔμεινε πάρος Διὸς ὄσσε ἰδέσθαι 14.287. εἰς ἐλάτην ἀναβὰς περιμήκετον, ἣ τότʼ ἐν Ἴδῃ 14.288. μακροτάτη πεφυυῖα διʼ ἠέρος αἰθέρʼ ἵκανεν· 14.289. ἔνθʼ ἧστʼ ὄζοισιν πεπυκασμένος εἰλατίνοισιν 14.290. ὄρνιθι λιγυρῇ ἐναλίγκιος, ἥν τʼ ἐν ὄρεσσι 14.291. χαλκίδα κικλήσκουσι θεοί, ἄνδρες δὲ κύμινδιν. 14.292. Ἥρη δὲ κραιπνῶς προσεβήσετο Γάργαρον ἄκρον 14.293. Ἴδης ὑψηλῆς· ἴδε δὲ νεφεληγερέτα Ζεύς. 14.294. ὡς δʼ ἴδεν, ὥς μιν ἔρως πυκινὰς φρένας ἀμφεκάλυψεν, 14.295. οἷον ὅτε πρῶτόν περ ἐμισγέσθην φιλότητι 14.296. εἰς εὐνὴν φοιτῶντε, φίλους λήθοντε τοκῆας. 14.297. στῆ δʼ αὐτῆς προπάροιθεν ἔπος τʼ ἔφατʼ ἔκ τʼ ὀνόμαζεν· 14.298. Ἥρη πῇ μεμαυῖα κατʼ Οὐλύμπου τόδʼ ἱκάνεις; 14.299. ἵπποι δʼ οὐ παρέασι καὶ ἅρματα τῶν κʼ ἐπιβαίης. 14.300. τὸν δὲ δολοφρονέουσα προσηύδα πότνια Ἥρη· 14.301. ἔρχομαι ὀψομένη πολυφόρβου πείρατα γαίης, 14.303. οἵ με σφοῖσι δόμοισιν ἐῢ τρέφον ἠδʼ ἀτίταλλον· 14.307. ἵπποι δʼ ἐν πρυμνωρείῃ πολυπίδακος Ἴδης 14.308. ἑστᾶσʼ, οἵ μʼ οἴσουσιν ἐπὶ τραφερήν τε καὶ ὑγρήν. 14.309. νῦν δὲ σεῦ εἵνεκα δεῦρο κατʼ Οὐλύμπου τόδʼ ἱκάνω, 14.310. μή πώς μοι μετέπειτα χολώσεαι, αἴ κε σιωπῇ 14.311. οἴχωμαι πρὸς δῶμα βαθυρρόου Ὠκεανοῖο. 14.312. τὴν δʼ ἀπαμειβόμενος προσέφη νεφεληγερέτα Ζεύς· 14.313. Ἥρη κεῖσε μὲν ἔστι καὶ ὕστερον ὁρμηθῆναι, 14.314. νῶϊ δʼ ἄγʼ ἐν φιλότητι τραπείομεν εὐνηθέντε. 14.315. οὐ γάρ πώ ποτέ μʼ ὧδε θεᾶς ἔρος οὐδὲ γυναικὸς 14.316. θυμὸν ἐνὶ στήθεσσι περιπροχυθεὶς ἐδάμασσεν, 14.317. οὐδʼ ὁπότʼ ἠρασάμην Ἰξιονίης ἀλόχοιο, 14.318. ἣ τέκε Πειρίθοον θεόφιν μήστωρʼ ἀτάλαντον· 14.319. οὐδʼ ὅτε περ Δανάης καλλισφύρου Ἀκρισιώνης, 14.320. ἣ τέκε Περσῆα πάντων ἀριδείκετον ἀνδρῶν· 14.321. οὐδʼ ὅτε Φοίνικος κούρης τηλεκλειτοῖο, 14.322. ἣ τέκε μοι Μίνων τε καὶ ἀντίθεον Ῥαδάμανθυν· 14.323. οὐδʼ ὅτε περ Σεμέλης οὐδʼ Ἀλκμήνης ἐνὶ Θήβῃ, 14.324. ἥ ῥʼ Ἡρακλῆα κρατερόφρονα γείνατο παῖδα· 14.325. ἣ δὲ Διώνυσον Σεμέλη τέκε χάρμα βροτοῖσιν· 14.326. οὐδʼ ὅτε Δήμητρος καλλιπλοκάμοιο ἀνάσσης, 14.327. οὐδʼ ὁπότε Λητοῦς ἐρικυδέος, οὐδὲ σεῦ αὐτῆς, 14.328. ὡς σέο νῦν ἔραμαι καί με γλυκὺς ἵμερος αἱρεῖ. 14.330. αἰνότατε Κρονίδη ποῖον τὸν μῦθον ἔειπες. 14.331. εἰ νῦν ἐν φιλότητι λιλαίεαι εὐνηθῆναι 14.332. Ἴδης ἐν κορυφῇσι, τὰ δὲ προπέφανται ἅπαντα· 14.333. πῶς κʼ ἔοι εἴ τις νῶϊ θεῶν αἰειγενετάων 14.334. εὕδοντʼ ἀθρήσειε, θεοῖσι δὲ πᾶσι μετελθὼν 14.335. πεφράδοι; οὐκ ἂν ἔγωγε τεὸν πρὸς δῶμα νεοίμην 14.336. ἐξ εὐνῆς ἀνστᾶσα, νεμεσσητὸν δέ κεν εἴη. 14.337. ἀλλʼ εἰ δή ῥʼ ἐθέλεις καί τοι φίλον ἔπλετο θυμῷ, 14.338. ἔστιν τοι θάλαμος, τόν τοι φίλος υἱὸς ἔτευξεν 14.339. Ἥφαιστος, πυκινὰς δὲ θύρας σταθμοῖσιν ἐπῆρσεν· 14.340. ἔνθʼ ἴομεν κείοντες, ἐπεί νύ τοι εὔαδεν εὐνή. 14.341. τὴν δʼ ἀπαμειβόμενος προσέφη νεφεληγερέτα Ζεύς· 14.342. Ἥρη μήτε θεῶν τό γε δείδιθι μήτέ τινʼ ἀνδρῶν 14.343. ὄψεσθαι· τοῖόν τοι ἐγὼ νέφος ἀμφικαλύψω 14.344. χρύσεον· οὐδʼ ἂν νῶϊ διαδράκοι Ἠέλιός περ, 14.345. οὗ τε καὶ ὀξύτατον πέλεται φάος εἰσοράασθαι. 14.346. ἦ ῥα καὶ ἀγκὰς ἔμαρπτε Κρόνου παῖς ἣν παράκοιτιν· 14.347. τοῖσι δʼ ὑπὸ χθὼν δῖα φύεν νεοθηλέα ποίην, 14.348. λωτόν θʼ ἑρσήεντα ἰδὲ κρόκον ἠδʼ ὑάκινθον 14.349. πυκνὸν καὶ μαλακόν, ὃς ἀπὸ χθονὸς ὑψόσʼ ἔεργε. 14.350. τῷ ἔνι λεξάσθην, ἐπὶ δὲ νεφέλην ἕσσαντο 14.351. καλὴν χρυσείην· στιλπναὶ δʼ ἀπέπιπτον ἔερσαι.
19.133. ἔργον ἀεικὲς ἔχοντα ὑπʼ Εὐρυσθῆος ἀέθλων.''. None
14.153. even so mighty a shout did the lord, the Shaker of Earth, send forth from his breast. and in the heart of each man of the Achaeans he put great strength, to war and fight unceasingly. 14.154. even so mighty a shout did the lord, the Shaker of Earth, send forth from his breast. and in the heart of each man of the Achaeans he put great strength, to war and fight unceasingly. Now Hera of the golden throne, standing on a peak of Olympus, therefrom had sight of him, and forthwith knew him ' "14.155. as he went busily about in the battle where men win glory, her own brother and her lord's withal; and she was glad at heart. And Zeus she marked seated on the topmost peak of many-fountained Ida, and hateful was he to her heart. Then she took thought, the ox-eyed, queenly Hera, " "14.159. as he went busily about in the battle where men win glory, her own brother and her lord's withal; and she was glad at heart. And Zeus she marked seated on the topmost peak of many-fountained Ida, and hateful was he to her heart. Then she took thought, the ox-eyed, queenly Hera, " '14.160. how she might beguile the mind of Zeus that beareth the aegis. And this plan seemed to her mind the best—to go to Ida, when she had beauteously adorned her person, if so be he might desire to lie by her side and embrace her body in love, and she might shed a warm and gentle sleep 14.165. upon his eyelids and his cunning mind. So she went her way to her chamber, that her dear son Hephaestus had fashioned for her, and had fitted strong doors to the door-posts with a secret bolt, that no other god might open. Therein she entered, and closed the bright doors. 14.170. With ambrosia first did she cleanse from her lovely body every stain, and anointed her richly with oil, ambrosial, soft, and of rich fragrance; were this but shaken in the palace of Zeus with threshold of bronze, even so would the savour thereof reach unto earth and heaven. 14.175. Therewith she annointed her lovely body, and she combed her hair, and with her hands pIaited the bright tresses, fair and ambrosial, that streamed from her immortal head. Then she clothed her about in a robe ambrosial, which Athene had wrought for her with cunning skill, and had set thereon broideries full many; 14.180. and she pinned it upon her breast with brooches of gold, and she girt about her a girdle set with an hundred tassels, and in her pierced ears she put ear-rings with three clustering drops; and abundant grace shone therefrom. And with a veil over all did the bright goddess 14.185. veil herself, a fair veil, all glistering, and white was it as the sun; and beneath her shining feet she bound her fair sandals. But when she had decked her body with all adornment, she went forth from her chamber, and calling to her Aphrodite, apart from the other gods, she spake to her, saying: 14.190. Wilt thou now hearken to me, dear child, in what I shall say? or wilt thou refuse me, being angered at heart for that I give aid to the Danaans and thou to the Trojans? 14.194. Wilt thou now hearken to me, dear child, in what I shall say? or wilt thou refuse me, being angered at heart for that I give aid to the Danaans and thou to the Trojans? Then made answer to her Aphrodite, daughter of Zeus:Hera, queenly goddess, daughter of great Cronos, 14.195. peak what is in thy mind; my heart bids me fulfill it, if fulfill it I can, and it is a thing that hath fulfillment. Then with crafty thought spake to her queenly Hera:Give me now love and desire, wherewith thou art wont to subdue all immortals and mortal men. 14.200. For I am faring to visit the limits of the all-nurturing earth, and Oceanus, from whom the gods are sprung, and mother Tethys, even them that lovingly nursed and cherished me in their halls, when they had taken me from Rhea, what time Zeus, whose voice is borne afar, thrust Cronos down to dwell beneath earth and the unresting sea. 14.204. For I am faring to visit the limits of the all-nurturing earth, and Oceanus, from whom the gods are sprung, and mother Tethys, even them that lovingly nursed and cherished me in their halls, when they had taken me from Rhea, what time Zeus, whose voice is borne afar, thrust Cronos down to dwell beneath earth and the unresting sea. ' "14.205. Them am I faring to visit, and will loose for them their endless strife, since now for a long time's space they hold aloof one from the other from the marriage-bed and from love, for that wrath hath come upon their hearts. If by words I might but persuade the hearts of these twain, and bring them back to be joined together in love, " "14.209. Them am I faring to visit, and will loose for them their endless strife, since now for a long time's space they hold aloof one from the other from the marriage-bed and from love, for that wrath hath come upon their hearts. If by words I might but persuade the hearts of these twain, and bring them back to be joined together in love, " '14.210. ever should I be called dear by them and worthy of reverence. To her again spake in answer laughter-loving Aphrodite:It may not be that I should say thee nay, nor were it seemly; for thou sleepest in the arms of mightiest Zeus. She spake, and loosed from her bosom the broidered zone, 14.215. curiously-wrought, wherein are fashioned all manner of allurements; therein is love, therein desire, therein dalliance—beguilement that steals the wits even of the wise. This she laid in her hands, and spake, and addressed her:Take now and lay in thy bosom this zone, 14.220. curiously-wrought, wherein all things are fashioned; I tell thee thou shalt not return with that unaccomplished, whatsoever in thy heart thou desirest. So spake she, and ox-eyed, queenly Hera smiled, and smiling laid the zone in her bosom.She then went to her house, the daughter of Zeus, Aphrodite, 14.225. but Hera darted down and left the peak of Olympus; on Pieria she stepped and lovely Emathia, and sped over the snowy mountains of the Thracian horsemen, even over their topmost peaks, nor grazed she the ground with her feet; and from Athos she stepped upon the billowy sea, 14.230. and so came to Lemnos, the city of godlike Thoas. There she met Sleep, the brother of Death; and she clasped him by the hand, and spake and addressed him:Sleep, lord of all gods and of all men, if ever thou didst hearken to word of mine, so do thou even now obey, 14.235. and I will owe thee thanks all my days. Lull me to sleep the bright eyes of Zeus beneath his brows, so soon as I shall have lain me by his side in love. And gifts will I give thee, a fair throne, ever imperishable, wrought of gold, that Hephaestus, mine own son, 14.240. the god of the two strong arms, shall fashion thee with skill, and beneath it shall he set a foot-stool for the feet, whereon thou mayest rest thy shining feet when thou quaffest thy wine. 14.244. the god of the two strong arms, shall fashion thee with skill, and beneath it shall he set a foot-stool for the feet, whereon thou mayest rest thy shining feet when thou quaffest thy wine. Then sweet Sleep made answer to her, saying:Hera, queenly goddess, daughter of great Cronos, another of the gods, that are for ever, might I lightly lull to sleep, aye, were it even the streams of the river 14.245. Oceanus, from whom they all are sprung; but to Zeus, son of Cronos, will I not draw nigh, neither lull him to slumber, unless of himself he bid me. For ere now in another matter did a behest of thine teach me a lesson, 14.250. on the day when the glorious son of Zeus, high of heart, sailed forth from Ilios, when he had laid waste the city of the Trojans. I, verily, beguiled the mind of Zeus, that beareth the aegis, being shed in sweetness round about him, and thou didst devise evil in thy heart against his son, when thou hadst roused the blasts of cruel winds over the face of the deep, and thereafter didst bear him away unto well-peopled Cos, far from all his kinsfolk. But Zeus, when he awakened, was wroth, and flung the gods hither and thither about his palace, and me above all he sought, and would have hurled me from heaven into the deep to be no more seen, had Night not saved me—Night that bends to her sway both gods and men.
14.260. To her I came in my flight, and besought her, and Zeus refrained him, albeit he was wroth, for he had awe lest he do aught displeasing to swift Night. And now again thou biddest me fulfill this other task, that may nowise be done. To him then spake again ox-eyed, queenly Hera:Sleep, wherefore ponderest thou of these things in thine heart? 14.265. Deemest thou that Zeus, whose voice is borne afar, will aid the Trojans, even as he waxed wroth for the sake of Heracles, his own son? Nay, come, I will give thee one of the youthful Graces to wed to be called thy wife, even Pasithea, for whom thou ever longest all thy days. 14.269. Deemest thou that Zeus, whose voice is borne afar, will aid the Trojans, even as he waxed wroth for the sake of Heracles, his own son? Nay, come, I will give thee one of the youthful Graces to wed to be called thy wife, even Pasithea, for whom thou ever longest all thy days. 14.270. So spake she, and Sleep waxed glad, and made answer saying:Come now, swear to me by the inviolable water of Styx, and with one hand lay thou hold of the bounteous earth, and with the other of the shimmering sea, that one and all they may be witnesses betwixt us twain, even the gods that are below with Cronos, 14.275. that verily thou wilt give me one of the youthful Graces, even Pasithea, that myself I long for all my days. So spake he, and the goddess, white-armed Hera, failed not to hearken, but sware as he bade, and invoked by name all the gods below Tartarus, that are called Titans. 14.280. But when she had sworn and made an end of the oath, the twain left the cities of Lemnos and Imbros, and clothed about in mist went forth, speeding swiftly on their way. To many-fountained Ida they came, the mother of wild creatures, even to Lectum, where first they left the sea; and the twain fared on over the dry land, 14.285. and the topmost forest quivered beneath their feet. There Sleep did halt, or ever the eyes of Zeus beheld him, and mounted up on a fir-tree exceeding tall, the highest that then grew in Ida; and it reached up through the mists into heaven. Thereon he perched, thick-hidden by the branches of the fir, 14.290. in the likeness of a clear-voiced mountain bird, that the gods call Chalcis, and men Cymindis.But Hera swiftly drew nigh to topmost Gargarus, the peak of lofty Ida, and Zeus, the cloud-gatherer, beheld her. And when he beheld her, then love encompassed his wise heart about, 14.295. even as when at the first they had gone to the couch and had dalliance together in love, their dear parents knowing naught thereof. And he stood before her, and spake, and addressed her:Hera, with what desire art thou thus come hither down from Olympus? Lo, thy horses are not at hand, neither thy chariot, whereon thou mightest mount. 14.300. Then with crafty mind the queenly Hera spake unto him:I am faring to visit the limits of the all-nurturing earth, and Oceanus, from whom the gods are sprung, and mother Tethys, even them that lovingly nursed me and cherished me in their halls. Them am I faring to visit, and will loose for them their endless strife, 14.304. Then with crafty mind the queenly Hera spake unto him:I am faring to visit the limits of the all-nurturing earth, and Oceanus, from whom the gods are sprung, and mother Tethys, even them that lovingly nursed me and cherished me in their halls. Them am I faring to visit, and will loose for them their endless strife, ' "14.305. ince now for long time's apace they hold aloof one from the other from the marriage-bed and from love, for that wrath hath fallen upon their hearts. And my horses stand at the foot of many-fountained Ida, my horses that shall bear me both over the solid land and the waters of the sea. But now it is because of thee that I am come hither down from Olympus, " "14.309. ince now for long time's apace they hold aloof one from the other from the marriage-bed and from love, for that wrath hath fallen upon their hearts. And my horses stand at the foot of many-fountained Ida, my horses that shall bear me both over the solid land and the waters of the sea. But now it is because of thee that I am come hither down from Olympus, " '14.310. lest haply thou mightest wax wroth with me hereafter, if without a word I depart to the house of deep-flowing Oceanus. 14.314. lest haply thou mightest wax wroth with me hereafter, if without a word I depart to the house of deep-flowing Oceanus. Then in answer spake to her Zeus, the cloud-gatherer.Hera, thither mayest thou go even hereafter. But for us twain, come, let us take our joy couched together in love; 14.315. for never yet did desire for goddess or mortal woman so shed itself about me and overmaster the heart within my breast—nay, not when I was seized with love of the wife of Ixion, who bare Peirithous, the peer of the gods in counsel; nor of Danaë of the fair ankles, daughter of Acrisius, 14.320. who bare Perseus, pre-eminent above all warriors; nor of the daughter of far-famed Phoenix, that bare me Minos and godlike Rhadamanthys; nor of Semele, nor of Alcmene in Thebes, and she brought forth Heracles, her son stout of heart, 14.325. and Semele bare Dionysus, the joy of mortals; nor of Demeter, the fair-tressed queen; nor of glorious Leto; nay, nor yet of thine own self, as now I love thee, and sweet desire layeth hold of me. Then with crafty mind the queenly Hera spake unto him: 14.330. Most dread son of Cronos, what a word hast thou said. If now thou art fain to be couched in love on the peaks of Ida, where all is plain to view, what and if some one of the gods that are for ever should behold us twain as we sleep, and should go and tell it to all the gods? 14.334. Most dread son of Cronos, what a word hast thou said. If now thou art fain to be couched in love on the peaks of Ida, where all is plain to view, what and if some one of the gods that are for ever should behold us twain as we sleep, and should go and tell it to all the gods? ' "14.335. Then verily could not I arise from the couch and go again to thy house; that were a shameful thing. But if thou wilt, and it is thy heart's good pleasure, thou hast a chamber, that thy dear son Hephaestus fashioned for thee, and fitted strong doors upon the door-posts. " "14.339. Then verily could not I arise from the couch and go again to thy house; that were a shameful thing. But if thou wilt, and it is thy heart's good pleasure, thou hast a chamber, that thy dear son Hephaestus fashioned for thee, and fitted strong doors upon the door-posts. " '14.340. Thither let us go and lay us down, since the couch is thy desire. Then in answer to her spake Zeus, the cloud-gatherer:Hera, fear thou not that any god or man shall behold the thing, with such a cloud shall I enfold thee withal, a cloud of gold. Therethrough might not even Helios discern us twain, 14.345. albeit his sight is the keenest of all for beholding. Therewith the son of Cronos clasped his wife in his arms, and beneath them the divine earth made fresh-sprung grass to grow, and dewy lotus, and crocus, and hyacinth, thick and soft, that upbare them from the ground. 14.350. Therein lay the twain, and were clothed about with a cloud, fair and golden, wherefrom fell drops of glistering dew. 14.351. Therein lay the twain, and were clothed about with a cloud, fair and golden, wherefrom fell drops of glistering dew. ' "
19.133. So said he, and whirling her in his hand flung her from the starry heaven, and quickly she came to the tilled fields of men. At thought of her would he ever groan, whenso he beheld his dear son in unseemly travail beneath Eurystheus' tasks. Even so I also, what time great Hector of the flashing helm " '. None
8. Homeric Hymns, To Aphrodite, 58-63, 84-90 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Judith, deceives and lies • ethical qualities, craftiness, deceit, deception, disguise, feigning, guile, sleight of hand, trickery (dolus, dolos)

 Found in books: Farrell (2021) 103; Gera (2014) 329


58. To Paphos where her altar, sweet with scent,'59. And precinct were. She entered there, and tight 60. She shut the doors, those doors that shone so bright. 61. The Graces bathed her with the oil that’s seen 62. Upon the deathless gods with heavenly sheen, 63. Fragrant and sweet. Her rich clothes they arrayed
84. Had on a robe whose shining brilliancy 85. Capped fire, gorgeous, golden and enhanced 86. With many hues and, like a moon, it glanced 87. Over her delicate breasts, a wondrous sight, 88. And twisted brooches, earrings shining bright, 89. And lovely necklaces were set around 90. Her tender throat. Now Eros quickly found '. None
9. None, None, nan (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Pericles, on deceit • deception • deception, and misleading reports • deception, and naturalism • deception, opposed to hoplitism • ethical qualities, craftiness, deceit, deception, disguise, feigning, guile, sleight of hand, trickery (dolus, dolos) • naturalism, and deception

 Found in books: Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy (2019) 87; Elsner (2007) 126; Farrell (2021) 97; Hesk (2000) 36; Jouanna (2018) 282


10. Hebrew Bible, Ezekiel, 36.26-36.27 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Deceiver • blinding/deceptive

 Found in books: Avery Peck et al. (2014) 245; Roskovec and Hušek (2021) 83


36.26. וְנָתַתִּי לָכֶם לֵב חָדָשׁ וְרוּחַ חֲדָשָׁה אֶתֵּן בְּקִרְבְּכֶם וַהֲסִרֹתִי אֶת־לֵב הָאֶבֶן מִבְּשַׂרְכֶם וְנָתַתִּי לָכֶם לֵב בָּשָׂר׃ 36.27. וְאֶת־רוּחִי אֶתֵּן בְּקִרְבְּכֶם וְעָשִׂיתִי אֵת אֲשֶׁר־בְּחֻקַּי תֵּלֵכוּ וּמִשְׁפָּטַי תִּשְׁמְרוּ וַעֲשִׂיתֶם׃''. None
36.26. A new heart also will I give you, and a new spirit will I put within you; and I will take away the stony heart out of your flesh, and I will give you a heart of flesh. 36.27. And I will put My spirit within you, and cause you to walk in My statutes, and ye shall keep Mine ordices, and do them.''. None
11. None, None, nan (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Euripides, on doxa and deception • Parmenides, Doxa, as deceptive • deception, and tragedy • deception, association with rhetoric

 Found in books: Hesk (2000) 281; Tor (2017) 203


12. None, None, nan (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Zeus, deception of • deception

 Found in books: Edmunds (2021) 160; Lightfoot (2021) 119


13. Euripides, Trojan Women, 991 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Zeus, Deception of Zeus • deception, and tragedy • tragedy,and deception

 Found in books: Hesk (2000) 71; Hunter (2018) 78


991. ὃν εἰσιδοῦσα βαρβάροις ἐσθήμασι''. None
991. and rightly does her name It is almost impossible to reproduce the play on words in Ἀφροδίτη and ἀφροσύνη ; perhaps the nearest approach would be sensuality and senseless. begin the word for senselessness ; so when you caught sight of him in gorgeous foreign clothes, ablaze with gold, your senses utterly forsook you. Yes, for in Argos you had moved in simple state, but, once free of Sparta ,''. None
14. Herodotus, Histories, 1.75.2 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Croesus (in Herodotus), deceived by Apollo? • deception

 Found in books: Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy (2019) 61; Joho (2022) 219


1.75.2. Having this reason to quarrel with Cyrus, Croesus sent to ask the oracles if he should march against the Persians; and when a deceptive answer came he thought it to be favorable to him, and so led his army into the Persian territory. ''. None
15. Sophocles, Electra, 774 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • deception, and tragedy • deception, and tragic irony • deception, association with rhetoric

 Found in books: Hesk (2000) 285; Jouanna (2018) 413


774. No, not in vain; how can you say in vain when you have brought me sure proofs of his death?''. None
16. Sophocles, Philoctetes, 3-4, 6-10, 50-120, 610-613, 1337-1342, 1423-1424, 1441 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Andocides, on deceiving the demos • Euripides, on deceit and fear • Homer, and deceit • Sparta, and official deceit • deception, and Philoctetes • deception, and fear • deception, and sophistry • deception, and tragedy • deception, and tragic irony • deception, as unheroic • tragedy,and deception

 Found in books: Hesk (2000) 113, 171, 190, 191, 192, 193, 194, 195, 196; Jouanna (2018) 58, 134, 328, 329, 330, 374, 375, 413


3. This is the headland of sea-washed Lemnos , land untrodden by men and desolate. It was here, child bred of the man who was the noblest of the Greeks, Neoptolemus son of Achilles, that I exposed
6. long ago the native of Malis, Poeas’ son, on the express command of the two chieftains to do so, because his foot was all running with a gnawing disease. Neither libation nor burnt sacrifice could be attempted by us in peace, but with his wild, ill-omened crie 10. he filled the whole camp continually with shrieking, moaning. But what need is there to speak of that? The time is not ripe for too many words, lest he even learn that I am here, and I so waste the whole ruse whereby I think soon to take him.'
50. Son of Achilles, you must be loyal to the goals of your mission—and not with your body alone. Should you hear some new plan unknown to you till now, you must serve it, since it is to serve that you are here. Neoptolemu 55. told as you converse with him. When he asks you who and from where you are, say that you are the son of Achilles—it is not in that detail that you will cheat him. But tell him you are sailing homeward, and have left the fleet of the Achaean warriors, after coming to hate them with unbounded hatred.
60. Give him this reason: when, with no other hope of taking Ilium , they had summoned you by their prayers to come from home, they judged you not worthy of the arms of Achilles, not worthy to receive them—even though you had come and were claiming them by right—but instead handed them over to Odysseus. Say what you
65. will of me—even the vilest of vile insults. You will not harm me at all by that. But if you fail to do as I say, you will inflict pain on all the Argives, for if that man’s bow is not seized, you can never sack the realm of Dardanus. 70. And learn why your intercourse with him may be free from mistrust and danger, while mine cannot. You have sailed to Troy under no oath to any man, nor under any constraint. Neither did you have any part in the earlier expedition. I, however, can deny none of these things. Accordingly, if he 75. perceives me while he is still master of his bow, I am dead, and you, as my comrade, will share my doom. No, the thing for which we must devise a ruse is just this: how you may steal his invincible weapons. Well I know, my son, that by nature you are not apt 80. to utter or contrive such treachery. Yet knowing that victory is a sweet prize to gain, steel yourself to do it. Our honesty shall be displayed another time. Now, however, give yourself to me for one brief, shameless day, and then for the rest of time 85. may you be called the most righteous of all humankind. Neoptolemu 8
6. I abhor acting on advice, son of Laertes , which causes pain in the hearing. It is not in my nature to achieve anything by means of evil cunning, nor was it, as I hear, in my father’s. 90. But I am ready to take the man by force and without treachery, since with the use of one foot only, he will not overcome so many of us in a struggle. And yet I was sent to assist you and am reluctant to be called traitor. Still I prefer, my king, 95. to fail when doing what is honorable than to be victorious in a dishonorable manner. Odysseu 9
6. Son of a father so noble, I, too, in my youth once had a slow tongue and an active hand. But now that I have come forth to the test, I see that the tongue, not action, is what masters everything among men. Neoptolemu 100. What, then, are your orders—apart from my lying? Odysseu 101. I command you to take Philoctetes by deceit. Neoptolemu 102. And why by deceit rather than by persuasion? Odysseu 10
3. He will never listen; and by force you cannot take him. Neoptolemu 104. Has he strength so terrific to make him bold? Odysseu 105. Yes, shafts inevitable, escorts of death. Neoptolemu 10
6. Then one does not dare even approach him? Odysseu 107. No, unless he takes the man by deceit, as I prescribe. Neoptolemu 108. Then you think it brings no shame to speak what is false? Odysseu 109. No, not if the falsehood yields deliverance. Neoptolemu 110. And with what expression on his face will anyone dare mouth those lies? Odysseu 111. When what you do promises gain, it is wrong to shrink back. Neoptolemu 112. And what gain is it for me that he should come to Troy ? Odysseu 11
3. His arrows alone will capture Troy . Neoptolemu 114. Then I am not to be the conqueror, as you said? Odysseu 115. Neither will you be without them, nor they without you. Neoptolemu 11
6. It would seem, then, that we must track them down, if things stand as you say. Odysseu 117. Know that by doing this task, you win two rewards. Neoptolemu 118. What are they? If I knew, I would not refuse the deed. Odysseu 119. You will be celebrated in the same breath as clever and as noble. Neoptolemu 120. So be it! I will do it, and cast off all shame. Odysseu

610. Helenus then prophesied for them whatever matter they asked, and, pertaining to Troy , he foretold that they would never sack its towers, unless by winning words they should bring Philoctetes here from the island where he now dwells. And, as soon as he heard the seer prophecy this, Laertes ’ son 1
3
37. aid and mine, be hailed as the sacker of Troy ’s towers. How I know these things are so ordained, I will tell you. We have a Trojan prisoner, Helenus, foremost among seers, who says plainly that all this must come to pass, and further, 1
340. that this very summer must see the complete capture of Troy . Otherwise he willingly gives himself over for execution, if these prophecies of his prove false. Therefore, now that you understand everything, give way graciously. It is a glorious addition to your gain to be singled out 142
3. And for you, be sure, this fate is ordained, that through these toils of yours you will make your life far-famed. You shall go with this man to the Trojan city, where, first, you shall be healed of your cruel sickness,
1441. before my arrows. But of this be mindful, when you plunder the land—that you show reverence towards the gods. Do this because Father Zeus regards all else as of less account, and because Piety does not die along with mortals. Whether they are alive or dead, their piety does not perish. Philoctete '. None
17. Sophocles, Women of Trachis, 270-280 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Euripides, on deceit and fear • Homer, and deceit • Pericles, on deceit • deception, and Philoctetes • deception, and fear • deception, as unheroic • deception, opposed to hoplitism • tragedy,and deception

 Found in books: Hesk (2000) 29, 113; Jouanna (2018) 722


270. when afterward Iphitus came to the hill of Tiryns on the track of horses that had strayed, Heracles seized a moment when the man’s eyes were one place and his thoughts another, and hurled him from a towering summit. But in anger at that deed, the king, '271. when afterward Iphitus came to the hill of Tiryns on the track of horses that had strayed, Heracles seized a moment when the man’s eyes were one place and his thoughts another, and hurled him from a towering summit. But in anger at that deed, the king, 275. the father of all, Olympian Zeus, sent him away to be sold, and did not tolerate that this once, he killed a man by guile. Had he achieved his vengeance openly, Zeus would surely have pardoned him the righteous triumph. 280. For the gods do not love criminal behavior either. So those men, who gloried in bitter speech, are themselves residents of Hades, all of them, and their city is enslaved. And the women whom you see, fallen from happiness to misery, '. None
18. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Deception • Xenophon, on Cyrus education in deceit • Xenophon, on dangers of teaching deceit • Xenophon, on value of deceiving enemies • deception, and hunting images • deception, and pedagogy

 Found in books: Hesk (2000) 131, 132; Michalopoulos et al. (2021) 180


19. Anon., 1 Enoch, 98.15, 104.9-104.10 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Deception/Deceit • Foundation, of Sin and Deceit • deceit • deceit, justified • pseudepigraphy, vii-viii, as deceptive

 Found in books: Klawans (2019) 35; Stuckenbruck (2007) 194, 255, 280, 375, 419, 596


98.15. And now I swear unto you, to the wise and to the foolish, For ye shall have manifold experiences on the earth.,For ye men shall put on more adornments than a woman, And coloured garments more than a virgin: In royalty and in grandeur and in power, And in silver and in gold and in purple, And in splendour and in food they shall be poured out as water.,Therefore they shall be wanting in doctrine and wisdom, And they shall perish thereby together with their possessions; And with all their glory and their splendour, And in shame and in slaughter and in great destitution, Their spirits shall be cast into the furnace of fire.,I have sworn unto you, ye sinners, as a mountain has not become a slave, And a hill does not become the handmaid of a woman, Even so sin has not been sent upon the earth, But man of himself has created it, And under a great curse shall they fall who commit it.,And barrenness has not been given to the woman, But on account of the deeds of her own hands she dies without children.,I have sworn unto you, ye sinners, by the Holy Great One, That all your evil deeds are revealed in the heavens, And that none of your deeds of oppression are covered and hidden.,And do not think in your spirit nor say in your heart that ye do not know and that ye do not see",that every sin is every day recorded in heaven in the presence of the Most High. From henceforth ye know that all your oppression wherewith ye oppress is written down every day till the day of your judgement.",Woe to you, ye fools, for through your folly shall ye perish: and ye transgress against the wise,,and so good hap shall not be your portion. And now, know ye that ye are prepared for the day of destruction: wherefore do not hope to live, ye sinners, but ye shall depart and die; for ye know no ransom; for ye are prepared for the day of the great judgement, for the day of tribulation and great shame for your spirits.,Woe to you, ye obstinate of heart, who work wickedness and eat blood: Whence have ye good things to eat and to drink and to be filled From all the good things which the Lord the Most High has placed in abundance on the earth; therefore ye shall have no peace.,Woe to you who love the deeds of unrighteousness: wherefore do ye hope for good hap unto yourselves know that ye shall be delivered into the hands of the righteous, and they shall cut,off your necks and slay you, and have no mercy upon you. Woe to you who rejoice in the tribulation of the righteous; for no grave shall be dug for you. Woe to you who set at nought the words of,the righteous; for ye shall have no hope of life. Woe to you who write down lying and godless words; for they write down their lies that men may hear them and act godlessly towards (their)",neighbour. Therefore they shall have no peace but die a sudden death."
104.9. day and night, see all your sins. Be not godless in your hearts, and lie not and alter not the words of uprightness, nor charge with lying the words of the Holy Great One, nor take account of your 104.10. I swear unto you, that in heaven the angels remember you for good before the glory of the Great,One: and your names are written before the glory of the Great One. Be hopeful; for aforetime ye were put to shame through ill and affliction; but now ye shall shine as the lights of heaven,,ye shall shine and ye shall be seen, and the portals of heaven shall be opened to you. And in your cry, cry for judgement, and it shall appear to you; for all your tribulation shall be visited on the,rulers, and on all who helped those who plundered you. Be hopeful, and cast not away your hopes for ye shall have great joy as the angels of heaven. What shall ye be obliged to do Ye shall not have to hide on the day of the great judgement and ye shall not be found as sinners, and the eternal,judgement shall be far from you for all the generations of the world. And now fear not, ye righteous, when ye see the sinners growing strong and prospering in their ways: be not companions with them,,but keep afar from their violence; for ye shall become companions of the hosts of heaven. And, although ye sinners say: \' All our sins shall not be searched out and be written down, nevertheless",they shall write down all your sins every day. And now I show unto you that light and darkness,,day and night, see all your sins. Be not godless in your hearts, and lie not and alter not the words of uprightness, nor charge with lying the words of the Holy Great One, nor take account of your,idols; for all your lying and all your godlessness issue not in righteousness but in great sin. And now I know this mystery, that sinners will alter and pervert the words of righteousness in many ways, and will speak wicked words, and lie, and practice great deceits, and write books concerning,their words. But when they write down truthfully all my words in their languages, and do not change or minish ought from my words but write them all down truthfully -all that I first testified,concerning them. Then, I know another mystery, that books will be given to the righteous and the,wise to become a cause of joy and uprightness and much wisdom. And to them shall the books be given, and they shall believe in them and rejoice over them, and then shall all the righteous who have learnt therefrom all the paths of uprightness be recompensed.\'''. None
20. None, None, nan (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Sons, of deceit • Spirits, of Deceit • deceit • deceit, justified • pseudepigraphy, vii-viii, as deceptive

 Found in books: Klawans (2019) 34, 35; Levison (2009) 387, 388, 389; Tellbe Wasserman and Nyman (2019) 50


21. New Testament, Ephesians, 4.25 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • deceit • deceit, justified • pseudepigraphy, vii-viii, as deceptive

 Found in books: Klawans (2019) 35; deSilva (2022) 36, 234, 235, 236


4.25. Διὸ ἀποθέμενοι τὸ ψεῦδος λαλεῖτε ἀλήθειαν ἕκαστος μετὰ τοῦ πλησίον αὐτοῦ, ὅτι ἐσμὲν ἀλλήλων μέλη.''. None
4.25. Therefore, putting away falsehood, speak truth each one with his neighbor. For we are members one of another. ''. None
22. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 5.7-5.9 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • emotions, as deceptive • fear, as deceptive emotion • pessimism, as a consequence of deceived hopes

 Found in books: Agri (2022) 100, 102; Kazantzidis and Spatharas (2018) 200


5.7. But I wish to share with you to-day\'s profit also. I find in the writings of our2 Hecato that the limiting of desires helps also to cure fears: "Cease to hope," he says, "and you will cease to fear." "But how," you will reply, "can things so different go side by side?" In this way, my dear Lucilius: though they do seem at variance, yet they are really united. Just as the same chain fastens the prisoner and the soldier who guards him, so hope and fear, dissimilar as they are, keep step together; fear follows hope. 5.8. I am not surprised that they proceed in this way; each alike belongs to a mind that is in suspense, a mind that is fretted by looking forward to the future. But the chief cause of both these ills is that we do not adapt ourselves to the present, but send our thoughts a long way ahead. And so foresight, the noblest blessing of the human race, becomes perverted. 5.9. Beasts avoid the dangers which they see, and when they have escaped them are free from care; but we men torment ourselves over that which is to come as well as over that which is past. Many of our blessings bring bane to us; for memory recalls the tortures of fear, while foresight anticipates them. The present alone can make no man wretched. Farewell.''. None
23. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.257, 1.279-1.283, 2.402, 2.428, 6.893-6.898
 Tagged with subjects: • deception • deception, and naturalism • ethical qualities, craftiness, deceit, deception, disguise, feigning, guile, sleight of hand, trickery (dolus, dolos) • fear, as deceptive emotion • naturalism, and deception

 Found in books: Agri (2022) 100; Braund and Most (2004) 236; Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy (2019) 87; Elsner (2007) 126; Farrell (2021) 146, 204


1.257. Parce metu, Cytherea: manent immota tuorum
1.279. imperium sine fine dedi. Quin aspera Iuno, 1.280. quae mare nunc terrasque metu caelumque fatigat, 1.281. consilia in melius referet, mecumque fovebit 1.282. Romanos rerum dominos gentemque togatam: 1.283. sic placitum. Veniet lustris labentibus aetas,
2.402. Heu nihil invitis fas quemquam fidere divis!
2.428. dis aliter visum; pereunt Hypanisque Dymasque
6.893. Sunt geminae Somni portae, quarum altera fertur 6.894. cornea, qua veris facilis datur exitus umbris; 6.895. altera candenti perfecta nitens elephanto, 6.896. sed falsa ad caelum mittunt insomnia Manes. 6.897. His ubi tum natum Anchises unaque Sibyllam 6.898. prosequitur dictis, portaque emittit eburna,''. None
1.257. in panic through the leafy wood, nor ceased
1.279. Such was his word, but vexed with grief and care, 1.280. feigned hopes upon his forehead firm he wore, ' "1.281. and locked within his heart a hero's pain. " '1.282. Now round the welcome trophies of his chase 1.283. they gather for a feast. Some flay the ribs
2.402. of that wide realm, which, after wandering far,
2.428. defensive gather. Frenzy and vast rage
6.893. Thy kindred accent mingling with my own? 6.894. I cherished long this hope. My prophet-soul 6.895. Numbered the lapse of days, nor did my thought ' "6.896. Deceive. 0, o'er what lands and seas wast driven " '6.897. To this embrace! What perils manifold 6.898. Assailed thee, 0 my son, on every side! ''. None



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