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subject book bibliographic info
circe Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 114, 117
Bacchi (2022), Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics, 89, 118, 133, 134, 135
Bianchetti et al. (2015), Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition, 29
Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 115, 353
Bremmer (2008), Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East, 119, 318, 324
Del Lucchese (2019), Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture, 162
Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 22, 29, 112, 135, 222
Fielding (2017), Transformations of Ovid in Late Antiquity. 69
Fletcher (2023), The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature, 18, 19, 28, 29, 48, 67, 72
Gazis and Hooper (2021), Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature, 40, 99, 157
Graverini (2012), Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius. 25, 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 153
Hawes (2014), Rationalizing Myth in Antiquity, 112, 113
Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 73, 74, 300
Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 41
Johnston and Struck (2005), Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination, 289
Joosse (2021), Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher, 62, 74, 234
Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 9, 189
Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 82, 131, 132, 137, 138
Ker and Wessels (2020), The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn, 196, 197, 200, 203
Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 42
Kneebone (2020), Orthodoxy and the Courts in Late Antiquity, 115, 116, 117, 120, 121, 374
Konig and Wiater (2022), Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue, 206, 208
König and Wiater (2022), Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue, 206, 208
Legaspi (2018), Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition, 40, 41
Luck (2006), Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts, 93, 94, 95, 96, 211, 223
Mackay (2022), Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica, 63, 64, 208, 209, 211
Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 46
Miller and Clay (2019), Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury, 69, 70, 71, 72, 128, 129, 181, 215
Morrison (2020), Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography, 91, 143, 171, 172, 206
Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 140, 157
Panoussi(2019), Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature, 80, 232, 235
Pinheiro Bierl and Beck (2013), Anton Bierl? and Roger Beck?, Intende, Lector - Echoes of Myth, Religion and Ritual in the Ancient Novel, 290
Putnam et al. (2023), The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae, 37, 39, 173
Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 85, 86, 172, 176, 177
Schaaf (2019), Animal Kingdom of Heaven: Anthropozoological Aspects in the Late Antique World. 61
Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 61, 64, 203
Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020), Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity, 335, 408
Tite (2009), Valentinian Ethics and Paraenetic Discourse: Determining the Social Function of Moral Exhortation in Valentinian Christianity, 140
Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 114, 117
de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 112, 483, 718
circe, allegoresis in antisthenes, on Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 374
circe, and elegy Folit-Weinberg (2022), Homer, Parmenides, and the Road to Demonstration, 83
circe, and hermes Miller and Clay (2019), Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury, 71
circe, and hodos in od. Folit-Weinberg (2022), Homer, Parmenides, and the Road to Demonstration, 12, 138, 141, 142, 146, 147, 148
circe, and medea Bremmer (2008), Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East, 324
circe, and odysseus Bremmer (2008), Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East, 324
Miller and Clay (2019), Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury, 72
circe, and parmenides’ goddess Folit-Weinberg (2022), Homer, Parmenides, and the Road to Demonstration, 102, 104, 105, 114, 196, 197, 198, 202, 203
circe, and sirens and thrinacia Folit-Weinberg (2022), Homer, Parmenides, and the Road to Demonstration, 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157
circe, as allegory of pleasure, ἡδονή‎ Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 374
circe, encolpius, and Cueva et al. (2018b), Re-Wiring the Ancient Novel. Volume 2: Roman Novels and Other Important Texts, 336
circe, first-person speech, use of Folit-Weinberg (2022), Homer, Parmenides, and the Road to Demonstration, 107, 108
circe, gr. kirkē Zawanowska and Wilk (2022), The Character of David in Judaism, Christianity and Islam: Warrior, Poet, Prophet and King, 366, 368, 370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 375, 376, 377, 381, 387
circe, homer, odyssey Toloni (2022), The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis, 31, 49, 51, 58, 60, 209
circe, medea, and Bremmer (2008), Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East, 324
circe, odysseus, delayed by calypso and Braund and Most (2004), Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen, 177
circe, of lesbos Pinheiro et al. (2012a), Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel, 215, 217
circe, parallel with gilgamesh Feldman (2006), Judaism and Hellenism Reconsidered, 47
circe, parmenides’ goddess, and Folit-Weinberg (2022), Homer, Parmenides, and the Road to Demonstration, 102, 104, 105, 107, 108, 114, 196, 197, 198, 202, 203
circe, polypharmakos Toloni (2022), The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis, 31, 58
circe/kirke Blum and Biggs (2019), The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature, 17, 52, 56, 57, 131, 177
Skempis and Ziogas (2014), Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic 67, 73, 80, 81, 83, 162, 173, 194, 291, 295, 306, 307, 308, 309, 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317, 318, 319, 320, 321, 331, 353

List of validated texts:
18 validated results for "circe"
1. Hesiod, Theogony, 956-961, 1011-1016 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Circe

 Found in books: Bianchetti et al. (2015), Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition, 29; Bremmer (2008), Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East, 318; Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 137, 138; Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 140

sup>
956 ἠελίῳ δʼ ἀκάμαντι τέκεν κλυτὸς Ὠκεανίνη 957 Περσηὶς Κίρκην τε καὶ Αἰήτην βασιλῆα. 958 Αἰήτης δʼ υἱὸς φαεσιμβρότου Ἠελίοιο 959 κούρην Ὠκεανοῖο τελήεντος ποταμοῖο 960 γῆμε θεῶν βουλῇσιν Ἰδυῖαν καλλιπάρῃον. 961 ἣ δέ οἱ Μήδειαν ἐύσφυρον ἐν φιλότητι
1011
Κίρκη δʼ, Ἠελίου θυγάτηρ Ὑπεριονίδαο,'1012 γείνατʼ Ὀδυσσῆος ταλασίφρονος ἐν φιλότητι 1013 Ἄγριον ἠδὲ Λατῖνον ἀμύμονά τε κρατερόν τε· 1014 Τηλέγονον δʼ ἄρʼ ἔτικτε διὰ χρυσέην Ἀφροδίτην. 1015 οἳ δή τοι μάλα τῆλε μυχῷ νήσων ἱεράων 1016 πᾶσιν Τυρσηνοῖσιν ἀγακλειτοῖσιν ἄνασσον. ' None
sup>
956 Are everywhere. At the cessation 957 of the gods’ Titan wars, when they emerged 958 Successful with their dignity, they urged 959 All-seeing Zeus to wield his sovereignty 960 Over them, at Earth’s suggestion, and so he 961 Divided among the gods their dignities.
1011
She brought into the world a glorious son,'1012 Hephaestus, who transcended everyone 1013 In Heaven in handiwork. But Zeus then lay 1014 With Ocean’s and Tethys’ fair child, away 1015 From Hera … He duped Metis, although she 1016 Was splendidly intelligent. Then he ' None
2. Homer, Iliad, 2.284-2.288, 2.303-2.319, 18.59-18.60, 18.478-18.607, 23.69-23.92 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Circe • Circe, • Circe/Kirke

 Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 222; Edmunds (2021), Greek Myth, 38; Johnston and Struck (2005), Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination, 289; Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 42; Legaspi (2018), Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition, 41; Skempis and Ziogas (2014), Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic 83, 194; Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 61

sup>
2.284 Ἀτρεΐδη νῦν δή σε ἄναξ ἐθέλουσιν Ἀχαιοὶ 2.285 πᾶσιν ἐλέγχιστον θέμεναι μερόπεσσι βροτοῖσιν, 2.286 οὐδέ τοι ἐκτελέουσιν ὑπόσχεσιν ἥν περ ὑπέσταν 2.287 ἐνθάδʼ ἔτι στείχοντες ἀπʼ Ἄργεος ἱπποβότοιο 2.288 Ἴλιον ἐκπέρσαντʼ εὐτείχεον ἀπονέεσθαι.
2.303
χθιζά τε καὶ πρωΐζʼ ὅτʼ ἐς Αὐλίδα νῆες Ἀχαιῶν 2.304 ἠγερέθοντο κακὰ Πριάμῳ καὶ Τρωσὶ φέρουσαι, 2.305 ἡμεῖς δʼ ἀμφὶ περὶ κρήνην ἱεροὺς κατὰ βωμοὺς 2.306 ἕρδομεν ἀθανάτοισι τεληέσσας ἑκατόμβας 2.307 καλῇ ὑπὸ πλατανίστῳ ὅθεν ῥέεν ἀγλαὸν ὕδωρ· 2.308 ἔνθʼ ἐφάνη μέγα σῆμα· δράκων ἐπὶ νῶτα δαφοινὸς 2.309 σμερδαλέος, τόν ῥʼ αὐτὸς Ὀλύμπιος ἧκε φόως δέ, 2.310 βωμοῦ ὑπαΐξας πρός ῥα πλατάνιστον ὄρουσεν. 2.311 ἔνθα δʼ ἔσαν στρουθοῖο νεοσσοί, νήπια τέκνα, 2.312 ὄζῳ ἐπʼ ἀκροτάτῳ πετάλοις ὑποπεπτηῶτες 2.313 ὀκτώ, ἀτὰρ μήτηρ ἐνάτη ἦν ἣ τέκε τέκνα· 2.314 ἔνθʼ ὅ γε τοὺς ἐλεεινὰ κατήσθιε τετριγῶτας· 2.315 μήτηρ δʼ ἀμφεποτᾶτο ὀδυρομένη φίλα τέκνα· 2.316 τὴν δʼ ἐλελιξάμενος πτέρυγος λάβεν ἀμφιαχυῖαν. 2.317 αὐτὰρ ἐπεὶ κατὰ τέκνα φάγε στρουθοῖο καὶ αὐτήν, 2.318 τὸν μὲν ἀρίζηλον θῆκεν θεὸς ὅς περ ἔφηνε· 2.319 λᾶαν γάρ μιν ἔθηκε Κρόνου πάϊς ἀγκυλομήτεω·
18.59
Τρωσὶ μαχησόμενον· τὸν δʼ οὐχ ὑποδέξομαι αὖτις 18.60 οἴκαδε νοστήσαντα δόμον Πηλήϊον εἴσω.
18.478
ποίει δὲ πρώτιστα σάκος μέγα τε στιβαρόν τε 18.479 πάντοσε δαιδάλλων, περὶ δʼ ἄντυγα βάλλε φαεινὴν 18.480 τρίπλακα μαρμαρέην, ἐκ δʼ ἀργύρεον τελαμῶνα. 18.481 πέντε δʼ ἄρʼ αὐτοῦ ἔσαν σάκεος πτύχες· αὐτὰρ ἐν αὐτῷ 18.482 ποίει δαίδαλα πολλὰ ἰδυίῃσι πραπίδεσσιν. 18.483 ἐν μὲν γαῖαν ἔτευξʼ, ἐν δʼ οὐρανόν, ἐν δὲ θάλασσαν, 18.484 ἠέλιόν τʼ ἀκάμαντα σελήνην τε πλήθουσαν, 18.485 ἐν δὲ τὰ τείρεα πάντα, τά τʼ οὐρανὸς ἐστεφάνωται, 18.486 Πληϊάδας θʼ Ὑάδας τε τό τε σθένος Ὠρίωνος 18.487 Ἄρκτόν θʼ, ἣν καὶ Ἄμαξαν ἐπίκλησιν καλέουσιν, 18.488 ἥ τʼ αὐτοῦ στρέφεται καί τʼ Ὠρίωνα δοκεύει, 18.489 οἴη δʼ ἄμμορός ἐστι λοετρῶν Ὠκεανοῖο. 18.490 ἐν δὲ δύω ποίησε πόλεις μερόπων ἀνθρώπων 18.491 καλάς. ἐν τῇ μέν ῥα γάμοι τʼ ἔσαν εἰλαπίναι τε, 18.492 νύμφας δʼ ἐκ θαλάμων δαΐδων ὕπο λαμπομενάων 18.493 ἠγίνεον ἀνὰ ἄστυ, πολὺς δʼ ὑμέναιος ὀρώρει· 18.494 κοῦροι δʼ ὀρχηστῆρες ἐδίνεον, ἐν δʼ ἄρα τοῖσιν 18.495 αὐλοὶ φόρμιγγές τε βοὴν ἔχον· αἳ δὲ γυναῖκες 18.496 ἱστάμεναι θαύμαζον ἐπὶ προθύροισιν ἑκάστη. 18.497 λαοὶ δʼ εἰν ἀγορῇ ἔσαν ἀθρόοι· ἔνθα δὲ νεῖκος 18.498 ὠρώρει, δύο δʼ ἄνδρες ἐνείκεον εἵνεκα ποινῆς 18.499 ἀνδρὸς ἀποφθιμένου· ὃ μὲν εὔχετο πάντʼ ἀποδοῦναι 18.500 δήμῳ πιφαύσκων, ὃ δʼ ἀναίνετο μηδὲν ἑλέσθαι· 18.501 ἄμφω δʼ ἱέσθην ἐπὶ ἴστορι πεῖραρ ἑλέσθαι. 18.502 λαοὶ δʼ ἀμφοτέροισιν ἐπήπυον ἀμφὶς ἀρωγοί· 18.503 κήρυκες δʼ ἄρα λαὸν ἐρήτυον· οἳ δὲ γέροντες 18.504 εἵατʼ ἐπὶ ξεστοῖσι λίθοις ἱερῷ ἐνὶ κύκλῳ, 18.505 σκῆπτρα δὲ κηρύκων ἐν χέρσʼ ἔχον ἠεροφώνων· 18.506 τοῖσιν ἔπειτʼ ἤϊσσον, ἀμοιβηδὶς δὲ δίκαζον. 18.507 κεῖτο δʼ ἄρʼ ἐν μέσσοισι δύω χρυσοῖο τάλαντα, 18.508 τῷ δόμεν ὃς μετὰ τοῖσι δίκην ἰθύντατα εἴποι. 18.509 τὴν δʼ ἑτέρην πόλιν ἀμφὶ δύω στρατοὶ ἥατο λαῶν 18.510 τεύχεσι λαμπόμενοι· δίχα δέ σφισιν ἥνδανε βουλή, 18.511 ἠὲ διαπραθέειν ἢ ἄνδιχα πάντα δάσασθαι 18.512 κτῆσιν ὅσην πτολίεθρον ἐπήρατον ἐντὸς ἔεργεν· 18.513 οἳ δʼ οὔ πω πείθοντο, λόχῳ δʼ ὑπεθωρήσσοντο. 18.514 τεῖχος μέν ῥʼ ἄλοχοί τε φίλαι καὶ νήπια τέκνα 18.515 ῥύατʼ ἐφεσταότες, μετὰ δʼ ἀνέρες οὓς ἔχε γῆρας· 18.516 οἳ δʼ ἴσαν· ἦρχε δʼ ἄρά σφιν Ἄρης καὶ Παλλὰς Ἀθήνη 18.517 ἄμφω χρυσείω, χρύσεια δὲ εἵματα ἕσθην, 18.518 καλὼ καὶ μεγάλω σὺν τεύχεσιν, ὥς τε θεώ περ 18.519 ἀμφὶς ἀριζήλω· λαοὶ δʼ ὑπολίζονες ἦσαν. 18.520 οἳ δʼ ὅτε δή ῥʼ ἵκανον ὅθι σφίσιν εἶκε λοχῆσαι 18.521 ἐν ποταμῷ, ὅθι τʼ ἀρδμὸς ἔην πάντεσσι βοτοῖσιν, 18.522 ἔνθʼ ἄρα τοί γʼ ἵζοντʼ εἰλυμένοι αἴθοπι χαλκῷ. 18.523 τοῖσι δʼ ἔπειτʼ ἀπάνευθε δύω σκοποὶ εἵατο λαῶν 18.524 δέγμενοι ὁππότε μῆλα ἰδοίατο καὶ ἕλικας βοῦς. 18.525 οἳ δὲ τάχα προγένοντο, δύω δʼ ἅμʼ ἕποντο νομῆες 18.526 τερπόμενοι σύριγξι· δόλον δʼ οὔ τι προνόησαν. 18.527 οἳ μὲν τὰ προϊδόντες ἐπέδραμον, ὦκα δʼ ἔπειτα 18.528 τάμνοντʼ ἀμφὶ βοῶν ἀγέλας καὶ πώεα καλὰ 18.529 ἀργεννέων οἰῶν, κτεῖνον δʼ ἐπὶ μηλοβοτῆρας. 18.530 οἳ δʼ ὡς οὖν ἐπύθοντο πολὺν κέλαδον παρὰ βουσὶν 18.531 εἰράων προπάροιθε καθήμενοι, αὐτίκʼ ἐφʼ ἵππων 18.532 βάντες ἀερσιπόδων μετεκίαθον, αἶψα δʼ ἵκοντο. 18.533 στησάμενοι δʼ ἐμάχοντο μάχην ποταμοῖο παρʼ ὄχθας, 18.534 βάλλον δʼ ἀλλήλους χαλκήρεσιν ἐγχείῃσιν. 18.535 ἐν δʼ Ἔρις ἐν δὲ Κυδοιμὸς ὁμίλεον, ἐν δʼ ὀλοὴ Κήρ, 18.536 ἄλλον ζωὸν ἔχουσα νεούτατον, ἄλλον ἄουτον, 18.537 ἄλλον τεθνηῶτα κατὰ μόθον ἕλκε ποδοῖιν· 18.538 εἷμα δʼ ἔχʼ ἀμφʼ ὤμοισι δαφοινεὸν αἵματι φωτῶν. 18.539 ὡμίλευν δʼ ὥς τε ζωοὶ βροτοὶ ἠδʼ ἐμάχοντο, 18.540 νεκρούς τʼ ἀλλήλων ἔρυον κατατεθνηῶτας. 18.541 ἐν δʼ ἐτίθει νειὸν μαλακὴν πίειραν ἄρουραν 18.542 εὐρεῖαν τρίπολον· πολλοὶ δʼ ἀροτῆρες ἐν αὐτῇ 18.543 ζεύγεα δινεύοντες ἐλάστρεον ἔνθα καὶ ἔνθα. 18.544 οἳ δʼ ὁπότε στρέψαντες ἱκοίατο τέλσον ἀρούρης, 18.545 τοῖσι δʼ ἔπειτʼ ἐν χερσὶ δέπας μελιηδέος οἴνου 18.546 δόσκεν ἀνὴρ ἐπιών· τοὶ δὲ στρέψασκον ἀνʼ ὄγμους, 18.547 ἱέμενοι νειοῖο βαθείης τέλσον ἱκέσθαι. 18.548 ἣ δὲ μελαίνετʼ ὄπισθεν, ἀρηρομένῃ δὲ ἐῴκει, 18.549 χρυσείη περ ἐοῦσα· τὸ δὴ περὶ θαῦμα τέτυκτο. 18.550 ἐν δʼ ἐτίθει τέμενος βασιλήϊον· ἔνθα δʼ ἔριθοι 18.551 ἤμων ὀξείας δρεπάνας ἐν χερσὶν ἔχοντες. 18.552 δράγματα δʼ ἄλλα μετʼ ὄγμον ἐπήτριμα πῖπτον ἔραζε, 18.553 ἄλλα δʼ ἀμαλλοδετῆρες ἐν ἐλλεδανοῖσι δέοντο. 18.554 τρεῖς δʼ ἄρʼ ἀμαλλοδετῆρες ἐφέστασαν· αὐτὰρ ὄπισθε 18.555 παῖδες δραγμεύοντες ἐν ἀγκαλίδεσσι φέροντες 18.556 ἀσπερχὲς πάρεχον· βασιλεὺς δʼ ἐν τοῖσι σιωπῇ 18.557 σκῆπτρον ἔχων ἑστήκει ἐπʼ ὄγμου γηθόσυνος κῆρ. 18.558 κήρυκες δʼ ἀπάνευθεν ὑπὸ δρυῒ δαῖτα πένοντο, 18.559 βοῦν δʼ ἱερεύσαντες μέγαν ἄμφεπον· αἳ δὲ γυναῖκες 18.560 δεῖπνον ἐρίθοισιν λεύκʼ ἄλφιτα πολλὰ πάλυνον. 18.561 ἐν δʼ ἐτίθει σταφυλῇσι μέγα βρίθουσαν ἀλωὴν 18.562 καλὴν χρυσείην· μέλανες δʼ ἀνὰ βότρυες ἦσαν, 18.563 ἑστήκει δὲ κάμαξι διαμπερὲς ἀργυρέῃσιν. 18.564 ἀμφὶ δὲ κυανέην κάπετον, περὶ δʼ ἕρκος ἔλασσε 18.565 κασσιτέρου· μία δʼ οἴη ἀταρπιτὸς ἦεν ἐπʼ αὐτήν, 18.566 τῇ νίσοντο φορῆες ὅτε τρυγόῳεν ἀλωήν. 18.567 παρθενικαὶ δὲ καὶ ἠΐθεοι ἀταλὰ φρονέοντες 18.568 πλεκτοῖς ἐν ταλάροισι φέρον μελιηδέα καρπόν. 18.569 τοῖσιν δʼ ἐν μέσσοισι πάϊς φόρμιγγι λιγείῃ 18.570 ἱμερόεν κιθάριζε, λίνον δʼ ὑπὸ καλὸν ἄειδε 18.571 λεπταλέῃ φωνῇ· τοὶ δὲ ῥήσσοντες ἁμαρτῇ 18.572 μολπῇ τʼ ἰυγμῷ τε ποσὶ σκαίροντες ἕποντο. 18.573 ἐν δʼ ἀγέλην ποίησε βοῶν ὀρθοκραιράων· 18.574 αἳ δὲ βόες χρυσοῖο τετεύχατο κασσιτέρου τε, 18.575 μυκηθμῷ δʼ ἀπὸ κόπρου ἐπεσσεύοντο νομὸν δὲ 18.576 πὰρ ποταμὸν κελάδοντα, παρὰ ῥοδανὸν δονακῆα. 18.577 χρύσειοι δὲ νομῆες ἅμʼ ἐστιχόωντο βόεσσι 18.578 τέσσαρες, ἐννέα δέ σφι κύνες πόδας ἀργοὶ ἕποντο. 18.579 σμερδαλέω δὲ λέοντε δύʼ ἐν πρώτῃσι βόεσσι 18.580 ταῦρον ἐρύγμηλον ἐχέτην· ὃ δὲ μακρὰ μεμυκὼς 18.581 ἕλκετο· τὸν δὲ κύνες μετεκίαθον ἠδʼ αἰζηοί. 18.582 τὼ μὲν ἀναρρήξαντε βοὸς μεγάλοιο βοείην 18.583 ἔγκατα καὶ μέλαν αἷμα λαφύσσετον· οἳ δὲ νομῆες 18.584 αὔτως ἐνδίεσαν ταχέας κύνας ὀτρύνοντες. 18.585 οἳ δʼ ἤτοι δακέειν μὲν ἀπετρωπῶντο λεόντων, 18.586 ἱστάμενοι δὲ μάλʼ ἐγγὺς ὑλάκτεον ἔκ τʼ ἀλέοντο. 18.587 ἐν δὲ νομὸν ποίησε περικλυτὸς ἀμφιγυήεις 18.588 ἐν καλῇ βήσσῃ μέγαν οἰῶν ἀργεννάων, 18.589 σταθμούς τε κλισίας τε κατηρεφέας ἰδὲ σηκούς.
18.590
ἐν δὲ χορὸν ποίκιλλε περικλυτὸς ἀμφιγυήεις,
18.591
τῷ ἴκελον οἷόν ποτʼ ἐνὶ Κνωσῷ εὐρείῃ
18.592
Δαίδαλος ἤσκησεν καλλιπλοκάμῳ Ἀριάδνῃ.
18.593
ἔνθα μὲν ἠΐθεοι καὶ παρθένοι ἀλφεσίβοιαι
18.594
ὀρχεῦντʼ ἀλλήλων ἐπὶ καρπῷ χεῖρας ἔχοντες.
18.595
τῶν δʼ αἳ μὲν λεπτὰς ὀθόνας ἔχον, οἳ δὲ χιτῶνας
18.596
εἵατʼ ἐϋννήτους, ἦκα στίλβοντας ἐλαίῳ·
18.597
καί ῥʼ αἳ μὲν καλὰς στεφάνας ἔχον, οἳ δὲ μαχαίρας
18.598
εἶχον χρυσείας ἐξ ἀργυρέων τελαμώνων.
18.599
οἳ δʼ ὁτὲ μὲν θρέξασκον ἐπισταμένοισι πόδεσσι 18.600 ῥεῖα μάλʼ, ὡς ὅτε τις τροχὸν ἄρμενον ἐν παλάμῃσιν 18.601 ἑζόμενος κεραμεὺς πειρήσεται, αἴ κε θέῃσιν· 18.602 ἄλλοτε δʼ αὖ θρέξασκον ἐπὶ στίχας ἀλλήλοισι. 18.603 πολλὸς δʼ ἱμερόεντα χορὸν περιίσταθʼ ὅμιλος 18.604 τερπόμενοι· δοιὼ δὲ κυβιστητῆρε κατʼ αὐτοὺς 18.605 μολπῆς ἐξάρχοντες ἐδίνευον κατὰ μέσσους. 18.606 ἐν δʼ ἐτίθει ποταμοῖο μέγα σθένος Ὠκεανοῖο 18.607 ἄντυγα πὰρ πυμάτην σάκεος πύκα ποιητοῖο.
23.69
εὕδεις, αὐτὰρ ἐμεῖο λελασμένος ἔπλευ Ἀχιλλεῦ. 23.70 οὐ μέν μευ ζώοντος ἀκήδεις, ἀλλὰ θανόντος· 23.71 θάπτέ με ὅττι τάχιστα πύλας Ἀΐδαο περήσω. 23.72 τῆλέ με εἴργουσι ψυχαὶ εἴδωλα καμόντων, 23.73 οὐδέ μέ πω μίσγεσθαι ὑπὲρ ποταμοῖο ἐῶσιν, 23.74 ἀλλʼ αὔτως ἀλάλημαι ἀνʼ εὐρυπυλὲς Ἄϊδος δῶ. 23.75 καί μοι δὸς τὴν χεῖρʼ· ὀλοφύρομαι, οὐ γὰρ ἔτʼ αὖτις 23.76 νίσομαι ἐξ Ἀΐδαο, ἐπήν με πυρὸς λελάχητε. 23.77 οὐ μὲν γὰρ ζωοί γε φίλων ἀπάνευθεν ἑταίρων 23.78 βουλὰς ἑζόμενοι βουλεύσομεν, ἀλλʼ ἐμὲ μὲν κὴρ 23.79 ἀμφέχανε στυγερή, ἥ περ λάχε γιγνόμενόν περ· 23.80 καὶ δὲ σοὶ αὐτῷ μοῖρα, θεοῖς ἐπιείκελʼ Ἀχιλλεῦ, 23.81 τείχει ὕπο Τρώων εὐηφενέων ἀπολέσθαι. 23.82 ἄλλο δέ τοι ἐρέω καὶ ἐφήσομαι αἴ κε πίθηαι· 23.83 μὴ ἐμὰ σῶν ἀπάνευθε τιθήμεναι ὀστέʼ Ἀχιλλεῦ, 23.84 ἀλλʼ ὁμοῦ ὡς ἐτράφημεν ἐν ὑμετέροισι δόμοισιν, 23.85 εὖτέ με τυτθὸν ἐόντα Μενοίτιος ἐξ Ὀπόεντος 23.86 ἤγαγεν ὑμέτερόνδʼ ἀνδροκτασίης ὕπο λυγρῆς, 23.87 ἤματι τῷ ὅτε παῖδα κατέκτανον Ἀμφιδάμαντος 23.88 νήπιος οὐκ ἐθέλων ἀμφʼ ἀστραγάλοισι χολωθείς· 23.89 ἔνθά με δεξάμενος ἐν δώμασιν ἱππότα Πηλεὺς 23.90 ἔτραφέ τʼ ἐνδυκέως καὶ σὸν θεράποντʼ ὀνόμηνεν· 23.91 ὣς δὲ καὶ ὀστέα νῶϊν ὁμὴ σορὸς ἀμφικαλύπτοι 23.92 χρύσεος ἀμφιφορεύς, τόν τοι πόρε πότνια μήτηρ.'' None
sup>
2.284 in the likeness of a herald, bade the host keep silence, that the sons of the Achaeans, both the nearest and the farthest, might hear his words, and lay to heart his counsel. He with good intent addressed their gathering and spake among them:Son of Atreus, now verily are the Achaeans minded to make thee, O king, 2.285 the most despised among all mortal men, nor will they fulfill the promise that they made to thee, while faring hitherward from Argos, the pasture-land of horses, that not until thou hadst sacked well-walled Ilios shouldest thou get thee home. For like little children or widow women
2.303
whether the prophecies of Calchas be true, or no. 2.304 whether the prophecies of Calchas be true, or no. For this in truth do we know well in our hearts, and ye are all witnesses thereto, even as many as the fates of death have not borne away. It was but as yesterday or the day before, when the ships of the Achaeans were gathering in Aulis, laden with woes for Priam and the Trojans; 2.305 and we round about a spring were offering to the immortals upon the holy altars hecatombs that bring fulfillment, beneath a fair plane-tree from whence flowed the bright water; then appeared a great portent: a serpent, blood-red on the back, terrible, whom the Olympian himself had sent forth to the light, 2.310 glided from beneath the altar and darted to the plane-tree. Now upon this were the younglings of a sparrow, tender little ones, on the topmost bough, cowering beneath the leaves, eight in all, and the mother that bare them was the ninth, Then the serpent devoured them as they twittered piteously, 2.314 glided from beneath the altar and darted to the plane-tree. Now upon this were the younglings of a sparrow, tender little ones, on the topmost bough, cowering beneath the leaves, eight in all, and the mother that bare them was the ninth, Then the serpent devoured them as they twittered piteously, ' "2.315 and the mother fluttered around them, wailing for her dear little ones; howbeit he coiled himself and caught her by the wing as she screamed about him. But when he had devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them, the god, who had brought him to the light, made him to be unseen; for the son of crooked-counselling Cronos turned him to stone; " "2.319 and the mother fluttered around them, wailing for her dear little ones; howbeit he coiled himself and caught her by the wing as she screamed about him. But when he had devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them, the god, who had brought him to the light, made him to be unseen; for the son of crooked-counselling Cronos turned him to stone; " 18.59 for after I had borne a son peerless and stalwart, pre-eminent among warriors, and he shot up like a sapling; then when I had reared him as a tree in a rich orchard plot, I sent him forth in the beaked ships to Ilios to war with the Trojans; but never again shall I welcome him 18.60 back to his home, to the house of Peleus. And while yet he liveth, and beholdeth the light of the sun, he hath sorrow, neither can I anywise help him, though I go to him. Howbeit go I will, that I may behold my dear child, and hear what grief has come upon him while yet he abideth aloof from the war.
18.478
and precious gold and silver; and thereafter he set on the anvil-block a great anvil, and took in one hand a massive hammer, and in the other took he the tongs.First fashioned he a shield, great and sturdy, adorning it cunningly in every part, and round about it set a bright rim, 18.480 threefold and glittering, and therefrom made fast a silver baldric. Five were the layers of the shield itself; and on it he wrought many curious devices with cunning skill.Therein he wrought the earth, therein the heavens therein the sea, and the unwearied sun, and the moon at the full, 18.485 and therein all the constellations wherewith heaven is crowned—the Pleiades, and the Hyades and the mighty Orion, and the Bear, that men call also the Wain, that circleth ever in her place, and watcheth Orion, and alone hath no part in the baths of Ocean. 18.490 Therein fashioned he also two cities of mortal men exceeding fair. In the one there were marriages and feastings, and by the light of the blazing torches they were leading the brides from their bowers through the city, and loud rose the bridal song. And young men were whirling in the dance, and in their midst 18.495 flutes and lyres sounded continually; and there the women stood each before her door and marvelled. But the folk were gathered in the place of assembly; for there a strife had arisen, and two men were striving about the blood-price of a man slain; the one avowed that he had paid all, 18.500 declaring his cause to the people, but the other refused to accept aught; and each was fain to win the issue on the word of a daysman. Moreover, the folk were cheering both, shewing favour to this side and to that. And heralds held back the folk, and the elders were sitting upon polished stones in the sacred circle, 18.505 holding in their hands the staves of the loud-voiced heralds. Therewith then would they spring up and give judgment, each in turn. And in the midst lay two talents of gold, to be given to him whoso among them should utter the most righteous judgment.But around the other city lay in leaguer two hosts of warriors 18.510 gleaming in armour. And twofold plans found favour with them, either to lay waste the town or to divide in portions twain all the substance that the lovely city contained within. Howbeit the besieged would nowise hearken thereto, but were arming to meet the foe in an ambush. The wall were their dear wives and little children guarding, 18.515 as they stood thereon, and therewithal the men that were holden of old age; but the rest were faring forth, led of Ares and Pallas Athene, both fashioned in gold, and of gold was the raiment wherewith they were clad. Goodly were they and tall in their harness, as beseemeth gods, clear to view amid the rest, and the folk at their feet were smaller. 18.520 But when they were come to the place where it seemed good unto them to set their ambush, in a river-bed where was a watering-place for all herds alike, there they sate them down, clothed about with flaming bronze. Thereafter were two scouts set by them apart from the host, waiting till they should have sight of the sheep and sleek cattle. 18.525 And these came presently, and two herdsmen followed with them playing upon pipes; and of the guile wist they not at all. 18.529 And these came presently, and two herdsmen followed with them playing upon pipes; and of the guile wist they not at all. But the liers-in-wait, when they saw these coming on, rushed forth against them and speedily cut off the herds of cattle and fair flocks of white-fleeced sheep, and slew the herdsmen withal. 18.530 But the besiegers, as they sat before the places of gathering and heard much tumult among the kine, mounted forthwith behind their high-stepping horses, and set out thitherward, and speedily came upon them. Then set they their battle in array and fought beside the river banks, and were ever smiting one another with bronze-tipped spears. 18.535 And amid them Strife and Tumult joined in the fray, and deadly Fate, grasping one man alive, fresh-wounded, another without a wound, and another she dragged dead through the mellay by the feet; and the raiment that she had about her shoulders was red with the blood of men. Even as living mortals joined they in the fray and fought; 18.539 And amid them Strife and Tumult joined in the fray, and deadly Fate, grasping one man alive, fresh-wounded, another without a wound, and another she dragged dead through the mellay by the feet; and the raiment that she had about her shoulders was red with the blood of men. Even as living mortals joined they in the fray and fought; ' "18.540 and they were haling away each the bodies of the others' slain.Therein he set also soft fallow-land, rich tilth and wide, that was three times ploughed; and ploughers full many therein were wheeling their yokes and driving them this way and that. And whensoever after turning they came to the headland of the field, " "18.544 and they were haling away each the bodies of the others' slain.Therein he set also soft fallow-land, rich tilth and wide, that was three times ploughed; and ploughers full many therein were wheeling their yokes and driving them this way and that. And whensoever after turning they came to the headland of the field, " '18.545 then would a man come forth to each and give into his hands a cup of honey-sweet wine; and the ploughmen would turn them in the furrows, eager to reach the headland of the deep tilth. And the field grew black behind and seemed verily as it had been ploughed, for all that it was of gold; herein was the great marvel of the work. 18.549 then would a man come forth to each and give into his hands a cup of honey-sweet wine; and the ploughmen would turn them in the furrows, eager to reach the headland of the deep tilth. And the field grew black behind and seemed verily as it had been ploughed, for all that it was of gold; herein was the great marvel of the work. ' "18.550 Therein he set also a king's demesne-land, wherein labourers were reaping, bearing sharp sickles in their hands. Some handfuls were falling in rows to the ground along the swathe, while others the binders of sheaves were binding with twisted ropes of straw. Three binders stood hard by them, while behind them " "18.554 Therein he set also a king's demesne-land, wherein labourers were reaping, bearing sharp sickles in their hands. Some handfuls were falling in rows to the ground along the swathe, while others the binders of sheaves were binding with twisted ropes of straw. Three binders stood hard by them, while behind them " '18.555 boys would gather the handfuls, and bearing them in their arms would busily give them to the binders; and among them the king, staff in hand, was standing in silence at the swathe, joying in his heart. And heralds apart beneath an oak were making ready a feast, and were dressing a great ox they had slain for sacrifice; and the women 18.559 boys would gather the handfuls, and bearing them in their arms would busily give them to the binders; and among them the king, staff in hand, was standing in silence at the swathe, joying in his heart. And heralds apart beneath an oak were making ready a feast, and were dressing a great ox they had slain for sacrifice; and the women ' "18.560 prinkled the flesh with white barley in abundance, for the workers' mid-day meal. " "18.564 prinkled the flesh with white barley in abundance, for the workers' mid-day meal. Therein he set also a vineyard heavily laden with clusters, a vineyard fair and wrought of gold; black were the grapes, and the vines were set up throughout on silver poles. And around it he drave a trench of cyanus, and about that a fence of tin; " '18.565 and one single path led thereto, whereby the vintagers went and came, whensoever they gathered the vintage. And maidens and youths in childish glee were bearing the honey-sweet fruit in wicker baskets. And in their midst a boy made pleasant music with a clear-toned lyre, 18.570 and thereto sang sweetly the Linos-song with his delicate voice; and his fellows beating the earth in unison therewith followed on with bounding feet mid dance and shoutings.And therein he wrought a herd of straight-horned kine: the kine were fashioned of gold and tin, 18.575 and with lowing hasted they forth from byre to pasture beside the sounding river, beside the waving reed. And golden were the herdsmen that walked beside the kine, four in number, and nine dogs swift of foot followed after them. But two dread lions amid the foremost kine 18.580 were holding a loud-lowing bull, and he, bellowing mightily, was haled of them, while after him pursued the dogs and young men. The lions twain had rent the hide of the great bull, and were devouring the inward parts and the black blood, while the herdsmen vainly sought to fright them, tarring on the swift hounds. 18.585 Howbeit these shrank from fastening on the lions, but stood hard by and barked and sprang aside.Therein also the famed god of the two strong arms wrought a pasture in a fair dell, a great pasture of white-fleeced sheep, and folds, and roofed huts, and pens.
18.590
Therein furthermore the famed god of the two strong arms cunningly wrought a dancing-floor like unto that which in wide Cnosus Daedalus fashioned of old for fair-tressed Ariadne. There were youths dancing and maidens of the price of many cattle, holding their hands upon the wrists one of the other.
18.595
of these the maidens were clad in fine linen, while the youths wore well-woven tunics faintly glistening with oil; and the maidens had fair chaplets, and the youths had daggers of gold hanging from silver baldrics. Now would they run round with cunning feet 18.600 exceeding lightly, as when a potter sitteth by his wheel that is fitted between his hands and maketh trial of it whether it will run; and now again would they run in rows toward each other. And a great company stood around the lovely dance, taking joy therein; 18.605 and two tumblers whirled up and down through the midst of them as leaders in the dance.Therein he set also the great might of the river Oceanus, around the uttermost rim of the strongly-wrought shield.But when he had wrought the shield, great and sturdy, 18.607 and two tumblers whirled up and down through the midst of them as leaders in the dance.Therein he set also the great might of the river Oceanus, around the uttermost rim of the strongly-wrought shield.But when he had wrought the shield, great and sturdy, ' "
23.69
then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. " '23.70 Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.75 And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.80 opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house, 23.84 opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house, ' "23.85 when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house " "23.89 when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house " '23.90 and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.92 and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. '' None
3. None, None, nan (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Circe • Circe (Gr. kirkē) • Circe, • Circe, and Hermes • Circe, and Medea • Circe, and Odysseus • Circe, and Parmenides’ goddess • Circe, and Sirens and Thrinacia • Circe, and elegy • Circe, and hodos in Od. • Circe, first-person speech, use of • Circe/Kirke • Homer, Odyssey, Circe • Medea, and Circe • Parmenides’ goddess, and Circe • polypharmakos, Circe

 Found in books: Bacchi (2022), Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics, 134, 135; Blum and Biggs (2019), The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature, 17; Bremmer (2008), Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East, 119, 324; Edmunds (2021), Greek Myth, 20, 38; Farrell (2021), Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity, 83, 94, 95, 96, 97, 136, 241; Fletcher (2023), The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature, 18, 19, 72; Folit-Weinberg (2022), Homer, Parmenides, and the Road to Demonstration, 83, 102, 105, 107, 138, 141, 142, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157, 196, 197, 198, 202, 203; Gazis and Hooper (2021), Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature, 40; Graverini (2012), Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius. 150, 151, 153; Hunter (2018), The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad, 174, 207; Iribarren and Koning (2022), Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy, 300; Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 41; Johnston and Struck (2005), Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination, 289; Joosse (2021), Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher, 62, 234; Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 132, 137, 138; Ker and Wessels (2020), The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn, 203; Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 42; Kneebone (2020), Orthodoxy and the Courts in Late Antiquity, 115, 121; Legaspi (2018), Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition, 40, 41; Lipka (2021), Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus, 29; Luck (2006), Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts, 93, 94, 95, 96, 223; Miller and Clay (2019), Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury, 69, 70, 71, 128, 129, 181; Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 140; Pinheiro Bierl and Beck (2013), Anton Bierl? and Roger Beck?, Intende, Lector - Echoes of Myth, Religion and Ritual in the Ancient Novel, 290; Schaaf (2019), Animal Kingdom of Heaven: Anthropozoological Aspects in the Late Antique World. 61; Skempis and Ziogas (2014), Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic 73, 194, 306, 309, 310; Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 61, 64, 203; Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020), Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity, 408; Tite (2009), Valentinian Ethics and Paraenetic Discourse: Determining the Social Function of Moral Exhortation in Valentinian Christianity, 140; Toloni (2022), The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis, 31, 49, 58, 60; Zawanowska and Wilk (2022), The Character of David in Judaism, Christianity and Islam: Warrior, Poet, Prophet and King, 366, 370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 375, 376, 377, 387; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 112, 718

4. Xenophon, Memoirs, 1.3.7 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Circe • allegoresis in Antisthenes, On Circe • pleasure (ἡδονή‎), Circe as allegory of

 Found in books: Edmunds (2021), Greek Myth, 20; Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 89; Graverini (2012), Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius. 149; Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 374

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1.3.7 οἴεσθαι δʼ ἔφη ἐπισκώπτων καὶ τὴν Κίρκην ὗς ποιεῖν τοιούτοις πολλοῖς δειπνίζουσαν· τὸν δὲ Ὀδυσσέα Ἑρμοῦ τε ὑποθημοσύνῃ καὶ αὐτὸν ἐγκρατῆ ὄντα καὶ ἀποσχόμενον τοῦ ὑπὲρ τὸν κόρον τῶν τοιούτων ἅπτεσθαι, διὰ ταῦτα οὐ γενέσθαι ὗν.'' None
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1.3.7 I believe, he said in jest, it was by providing a feast of such things that Circe made swine; and it was partly by the prompting of Hermes, In Odyssey, X. 281 f. partly through his own self-restraint and avoidance of excessive indulgence in such things, that Odysseus was not turned into a pig. '' None
5. None, None, nan (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Circe • Circe,

 Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 22; Ker and Wessels (2020), The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn, 196

6. None, None, nan (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Circe • Circe/Kirke

 Found in books: Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 114; Farrell (2021), Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity, 136; Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 137, 138; Lipka (2021), Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus, 37, 45; Morrison (2020), Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography, 91, 171, 172; Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 176, 177; Skempis and Ziogas (2014), Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic 173, 310, 311, 313; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 114; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 483

7. Anon., Sibylline Oracles, 3.809-3.829 (1st cent. BCE - 5th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Circe

 Found in books: Bacchi (2022), Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics, 89, 118, 133, 134; Konig and Wiater (2022), Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue, 206, 208; König and Wiater (2022), Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue, 206, 208

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3.809 And vultures and wild beasts of earth shall spoil 3.810 810 Their flesh; and when these things are brought to pass, 3.811 Vast earth shall waste the relics of the dead. 3.812 And all unsown shall it be and unplowed, 3.813 Proclaiming sad the filth of men defiled 3.814 Many lengths of time in the revolving years, 3.815 815 And shields and javelins and all sorts of arms; 3.816 Nor shall the forest wood be cut for fire. 3.817 And then shall God send from the East a king, 3.818 Who shall make all earth cease from evil war, 3.819 Killing some, others binding with strong oaths. 3.820 820 And he will not by his own counsels do 3.821 All these things, but obey the good decree 3.822 of God the mighty. And with goodly wealth, 3.823 With gold and silver and purple ornament, 3.824 The temple of the mighty God again 3.825 825 Shall be weighed down; and the full-bearing earth 3.826 And the sea shall be filled full of good things. 3.827 And kings against each other shall begin 3.828 To hold ill will, in heart abetting evils. 3.829 Envy is not a good to wretched men.'' None
8. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 4.41, 4.45 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Circe

 Found in books: Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 114, 117; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 114, 117

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4.41 1. \xa0First of all, in the vicinity of Mount Pelion he built a ship which far surpassed in its size and in its equipment in general any vessel known in those days, since the men of that time put to sea on rafts or in very small boats. Consequently those who saw the ship at the time were greatly astonished, and when the report was noised about throughout Greece both of the exploit of the enterprise of building the ship, no small number of the youths of prominence were eager to take part in the expedition.,2. \xa0Jason, then, after he had launched the ship and fitted it out in brilliant fashion with everything which would astonish the mind, picked out the most renowned chieftains from those who were eager to share his plan, with the result that the whole number of those in his company amounted to fifty-four. of these the most famous were Castor and Polydeuces, Heracles and Telamon, Orpheus and Atalantê the daughter of Schoeneus, and the sons of Thespius, and the leader himself who was setting out on the voyage to Colchis.,3. \xa0The vessel was called Argo after Argus, as some writers of myths record, who was the master-builder of the ship and went along on the voyage in order to repair the parts of the vessel as they were strained from time to time, but, as some say, after its exceeding great swiftness, since the ancients called what is swift Argos. Now after the chieftains had gathered together they chose Heracles to be their general, preferring him because of his courage.
4.45
1. \xa0Since it is the task of history to inquire into the reasons for this slaying of strangers, we must discuss these reasons briefly, especially since the digression on this subject will be appropriate in connection with the deeds of the Argonauts. We are told, that is, that Helius had two sons, Aeëtes and Perses, Aeëtes being king of Colchis and the other king of the Tauric Chersonese, and that both of them were exceedingly cruel.,2. \xa0And Perses had a daughter Hecatê, who surpassed her father in boldness and lawlessness; she was also fond of hunting, and with she had no luck she would turn her arrows upon human beings instead of the beasts.,3. \xa0Being likewise ingenious in the mixing of deadly poisons she discovered the drug called aconite and tried out the strength of each poison by mixing it in the food given to the strangers.,4. \xa0And since she possessed great experience in such matters she first of all poisoned her father and so succeeded to the throne, and then, founding a temple of Artemis and commanding that strangers who landed there should be sacrificed to the goddess, she became known far and wide for her cruelty.,5. \xa0After this she married Aeëtes and bore two daughters, Circê and Medea, and a son Aegialeus.,6. \xa0Although Circê also, it is said, devoted herself to the devising of all kinds of drugs and discovered roots of all manner of natures and potencies such as are difficult to credit, yet, notwithstanding that she was taught by her mother Hecatê about not a\xa0few drugs, she discovered by her own study a far greater number, so that she left to the other woman no superiority whatever in the matter of devising uses of drugs.,7. \xa0She was given in marriage to the king of the Sarmatians, whom some call Scythians, and first she poisoned her husband and after that, succeeding to the throne, she committed many cruel and violent acts against her subjects.,8. \xa0For this reason she was deposed from her throne and, according to some writers of myths, fled to the ocean, where she seized a desert island, and there established herself with the women who had fled with her, though according to some historians she left the Pontus and settled in Italy on a promontory which to this day bears after her the name Circaeum.'' None
9. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.671-1.672, 14.320 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Circe

 Found in books: Fletcher (2023), The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature, 19, 29; Miller and Clay (2019), Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury, 181; Putnam et al. (2023), The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae, 173

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1.671 Parva mora est alas pedibus virgamque potenti 1.672 somniferam sumpsisse manu tegimenque capillis.' ' None
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1.671 nor clown compelled to watch the sheep and goats; 1.672 and neither canst thou know from whom thy feet' ' None
10. None, None, nan (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Circe

 Found in books: Farrell (2021), Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity, 77, 83; Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 89; Graverini (2012), Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius. 149; Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 137

11. None, None, nan (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Circe

 Found in books: Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 114; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 114

12. Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, 1.9.1, 1.9.28 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Circe

 Found in books: Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 114; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 114

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1.9.1 τῶν δὲ Αἰόλου παίδων Ἀθάμας, Βοιωτίας δυναστεύων, ἐκ Νεφέλης τεκνοῖ παῖδα μὲν Φρίξον θυγατέρα δὲ Ἕλλην. αὖθις δὲ Ἰνὼ γαμεῖ, ἐξ ἧς αὐτῷ Λέαρχος καὶ Μελικέρτης ἐγένοντο. ἐπιβουλεύουσα δὲ Ἰνὼ τοῖς Νεφέλης τέκνοις ἔπεισε τὰς γυναῖκας τὸν πυρὸν φρύγειν. λαμβάνουσαι δὲ κρύφα τῶν ἀνδρῶν τοῦτο ἔπρασσον. γῆ δὲ πεφρυγμένους πυροὺς δεχομένη καρποὺς ἐτησίους οὐκ ἀνεδίδου. διὸ πέμπων ὁ Ἀθάμας εἰς Δελφοὺς ἀπαλλαγὴν ἐπυνθάνετο τῆς ἀφορίας. Ἰνὼ δὲ τοὺς πεμφθέντας ἀνέπεισε λέγειν ὡς εἴη κεχρησμένον παύσεσθαι 1 -- τὴν ἀκαρπίαν, ἐὰν σφαγῇ Διὶ ὁ Φρίξος. τοῦτο ἀκούσας Ἀθάμας, συναναγκαζόμενος ὑπὸ τῶν τὴν γῆν κατοικούντων, τῷ βωμῷ παρέστησε Φρίξον. Νεφέλη δὲ μετὰ τῆς θυγατρὸς αὐτὸν ἀνήρπασε, καὶ παρʼ Ἑρμοῦ λαβοῦσα χρυσόμαλλον κριὸν ἔδωκεν, ὑφʼ 2 -- οὗ φερόμενοι διʼ οὐρανοῦ γῆν ὑπερέβησαν καὶ θάλασσαν. ὡς δὲ ἐγένοντο κατὰ τὴν μεταξὺ κειμένην θάλασσαν Σιγείου καὶ Χερρονήσου, ὤλισθεν εἰς τὸν βυθὸν ἡ Ἕλλη, κἀκεῖ θανούσης αὐτῆς ἀπʼ ἐκείνης Ἑλλήσποντος ἐκλήθη τὸ πέλαγος. Φρίξος δὲ ἦλθεν εἰς Κόλχους, ὧν Αἰήτης ἐβασίλευε παῖς Ἡλίου καὶ Περσηίδος, ἀδελφὸς δὲ Κίρκης καὶ Πασιφάης, ἣν Μίνως ἔγημεν. οὗτος αὐτὸν ὑποδέχεται, καὶ μίαν τῶν θυγατέρων Χαλκιόπην δίδωσιν. ὁ δὲ τὸν χρυσόμαλλον κριὸν Διὶ θύει φυξίῳ, τὸ δὲ τούτου δέρας Αἰήτῃ δίδωσιν· ἐκεῖνος δὲ αὐτὸ περὶ δρῦν ἐν Ἄρεος ἄλσει καθήλωσεν. ἐγένοντο δὲ ἐκ Χαλκιόπης Φρίξῳ παῖδες Ἄργος Μέλας Φρόντις Κυτίσωρος.
1.9.28
οἱ δὲ ἧκον εἰς Κόρινθον, καὶ δέκα μὲν ἔτη διετέλουν εὐτυχοῦντες, αὖθις δὲ τοῦ τῆς Κορίνθου βασιλέως Κρέοντος τὴν θυγατέρα Γλαύκην Ἰάσονι ἐγγυῶντος, παραπεμψάμενος Ἰάσων Μήδειαν ἐγάμει. ἡ δέ, οὕς τε ὤμοσεν Ἰάσων θεοὺς ἐπικαλεσαμένη καὶ τὴν Ἰάσονος ἀχαριστίαν μεμψαμένη πολλάκις, τῇ μὲν γαμουμένῃ πέπλον μεμαγμένον 1 -- φαρμάκοις 2 -- ἔπεμψεν, ὃν ἀμφιεσαμένη μετὰ τοῦ βοηθοῦντος πατρὸς πυρὶ λάβρῳ κατεφλέχθη, 3 -- τοὺς δὲ παῖδας οὓς εἶχεν ἐξ Ἰάσονος, Μέρμερον καὶ Φέρητα, ἀπέκτεινε, καὶ λαβοῦσα παρὰ Ἡλίου ἅρμα πτηνῶν 4 -- δρακόντων ἐπὶ τούτου φεύγουσα ἦλθεν εἰς Ἀθήνας. λέγεται δὲ καὶ ὅτι φεύγουσα τοὺς παῖδας ἔτι νηπίους ὄντας κατέλιπεν, ἱκέτας καθίσασα ἐπὶ τὸν βωμὸν τῆς Ἥρας τῆς ἀκραίας· Κορίνθιοι δὲ αὐτοὺς ἀναστήσαντες κατετραυμάτισαν. Μήδεια δὲ ἧκεν εἰς Ἀθήνας, κἀκεῖ γαμηθεῖσα Αἰγεῖ παῖδα γεννᾷ Μῆδον. ἐπιβουλεύουσα δὲ ὕστερον Θησεῖ φυγὰς ἐξ Ἀθηνῶν μετὰ τοῦ παιδὸς ἐκβάλλεται. ἀλλʼ οὗτος μὲν πολλῶν κρατήσας βαρβάρων τὴν ὑφʼ ἑαυτὸν χώραν ἅπασαν Μηδίαν ἐκάλεσε, καὶ στρατευόμενος ἐπὶ Ἰνδοὺς ἀπέθανε· Μήδεια δὲ εἰς Κόλχους ἦλθεν ἄγνωστος, καὶ καταλαβοῦσα Αἰήτην ὑπὸ τοῦ ἀδελφοῦ Πέρσου τῆς βασιλείας ἐστερημένον, κτείνασα τοῦτον τῷ πατρὶ τὴν βασιλείαν ἀποκατέστησεν.'' None
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1.9.1 of the sons of Aeolus, Athamas ruled over Boeotia and begat a son Phrixus and a daughter Helle by Nephele. And he married a second wife, Ino, by whom he had Learchus and Melicertes. But Ino plotted against the children of Nephele and persuaded the women to parch the wheat; and having got the wheat they did so without the knowledge of the men. But the earth, being sown with parched wheat, did not yield its annual crops; so Athamas sent to Delphi to inquire how he might be delivered from the dearth. Now Ino persuaded the messengers to say it was foretold that the infertility would cease if Phrixus were sacrificed to Zeus. When Athamas heard that, he was forced by the inhabitants of the land to bring Phrixus to the altar. But Nephele caught him and her daughter up and gave them a ram with a golden fleece, which she had received from Hermes, and borne through the sky by the ram they crossed land and sea. But when they were over the sea which lies betwixt Sigeum and the Chersonese, Helle slipped into the deep and was drowned, and the sea was called Hellespont after her. But Phrixus came to the Colchians, whose king was Aeetes, son of the Sun and of Perseis, and brother of Circe and Pasiphae, whom Minos married. He received Phrixus and gave him one of his daughters, Chalciope. And Phrixus sacrificed the ram with the golden fleece to Zeus the god of Escape, and the fleece he gave to Aeetes, who nailed it to an oak in a grove of Ares. And Phrixus had children by Chalciope, to wit, Argus, Melas, Phrontis, and Cytisorus.
1.9.28
They went to Corinth, and lived there happily for ten years, till Creon, king of Corinth, betrothed his daughter Glauce to Jason, who married her and divorced Medea. But she invoked the gods by whom Jason had sworn, and after often upbraiding him with his ingratitude she sent the bride a robe steeped in poison, which when Glauce had put on, she was consumed with fierce fire along with her father, who went to her rescue. But Mermerus and Pheres, the children whom Medea had by Jason, she killed, and having got from the Sun a car drawn by winged dragons she fled on it to Athens . Another tradition is that on her flight she left behind her children, who were still infants, setting them as suppliants on the altar of Hera of the Height; but the Corinthians removed them and wounded them to death. Medea came to Athens, and being there married to Aegeus bore him a son Medus. Afterwards, however, plotting against Theseus, she was driven a fugitive from Athens with her son. But he conquered many barbarians and called the whole country under him Media, and marching against the Indians he met his death. And Medea came unknown to Colchis, and finding that Aeetes had been deposed by his brother Perses, she killed Perses and restored the kingdom to her father.'' None
13. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 8.20-8.25 (1st cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Circe • allegoresis in Antisthenes, On Circe • pleasure (ἡδονή‎), Circe as allegory of

 Found in books: Gale (2000), Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition, 89; Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 374

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8.20 \xa0"But there is another battle more terrible and a struggle not slight but much greater than this and fraught with greater danger, I\xa0mean the fight against pleasure. Nor is it like that battle which Homer speaks of when he says, Fiercely then around the ships The struggle was renewed. With halberds and with trenchant battle-axe They fought, with mighty sword and two-edged spear. < 8.21 \xa0No, it is no such battle, for pleasure uses no open force but deceives and casts a spell with baneful drugs, just as Homer says Circe drugged the comrades of Odysseus, and some forthwith became swine, some wolves, and some other kinds of beasts. Yes, such is this thing pleasure, that hatches no single plot but all kinds of plots, and aims to undo men through sight, sound, smell, taste, and touch, with food too, and drink and carnal lust, tempting the waking and the sleeping alike. < 8.22 \xa0For it is not possible to set guards and then lie down to sleep as in ordinary warfare, since it is just then of all times that she makes her attack, at one time weakening and enslaving the soul by means of sleep itself, at another, sending mischievous and insidious dreams that suggest her. < 8.23 \xa0"Now work is carried on by means of touch for the most part and proceeds in that way, but pleasure assails a man through each and every sense that he has; and while he must face and grapple with work, to pleasure he must give the widest berth possible and have none but unavoidable dealings with her. <' "8.24 \xa0And herein the strongest man is indeed strongest, one might almost say, who can keep the farthest away from pleasures; for it is impossible to dwell with pleasure or even to dally with her for any length of time without being completely enslaved. Hence when she gets the mastery and overpowers the soul by her charms, the rest of Circe's sorcery at once follows. With a stroke of her wand pleasure coolly drives her victim into a sort of sty and pens him up, <" '8.25 \xa0and now from that time forth the man goes on living as a pig or a wolf. Pleasure also brings divers and deadly vipers into being, and other crawling things that attend constantly upon her as they lie about her doors, and though yearning for pleasure and serving her, they yet suffer a\xa0thousand hardships all in vain. <'' None
14. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Circe

 Found in books: Miller and Clay (2019), Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury, 181; Panoussi(2019), Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature, 235

15. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Circe

 Found in books: Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 117; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 117

16. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.197-1.204, 4.223-4.237, 4.262-4.263, 7.1-7.4, 7.10-7.29, 7.37-7.40, 7.45-7.53, 7.64, 7.189-7.191, 8.113
 Tagged with subjects: • Circe • Circe, • Circe/Kirke • Dido, intertexutal identities, Circe

 Found in books: Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 117; Blum and Biggs (2019), The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature, 131; Del Lucchese (2019), Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture, 162; Farrell (2021), Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity, 94, 96, 241, 242; Fielding (2017), Transformations of Ovid in Late Antiquity. 69; Fletcher (2023), The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature, 19; Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 41; Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 131, 132, 137, 138; Miller and Clay (2019), Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury, 129, 181; Putnam et al. (2023), The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae, 173; Skempis and Ziogas (2014), Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic 291, 295, 306, 307, 313, 314, 315, 316, 320, 321; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 117

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1.197 dividit, et dictis maerentia pectora mulcet: 1.198 O socii—neque enim ignari sumus ante malorum— 1.199 O passi graviora, dabit deus his quoque finem. 1.200 Vos et Scyllaeam rabiem penitusque sotis 1.201 accestis scopulos, vos et Cyclopea saxa 1.202 experti: revocate animos, maestumque timorem 1.203 mittite: forsan et haec olim meminisse iuvabit. 1.204 Per varios casus, per tot discrimina rerum
4.223
Vade age, nate, voca Zephyros et labere pennis, 4.224 Dardaniumque ducem, Tyria Karthagine qui nunc 4.225 exspectat, fatisque datas non respicit urbes, 4.227 Non illum nobis genetrix pulcherrima talem 4.228 promisit, Graiumque ideo bis vindicat armis; 4.229 sed fore, qui gravidam imperiis belloque frementem 4.230 Italiam regeret, genus alto a sanguine Teucri 4.231 proderet, ac totum sub leges mitteret orbem. 4.232 Si nulla accendit tantarum gloria rerum, 4.233 nec super ipse sua molitur laude laborem, 4.234 Ascanione pater Romanas invidet arces? 4.235 Quid struit, aut qua spe inimica in gente moratur, 4.236 nec prolem Ausoniam et Lavinia respicit arva? 4.237 Naviget: haec summa est; hic nostri nuntius esto.
4.262
ensis erat, Tyrioque ardebat murice laena 4.263 demissa ex umeris, dives quae munera Dido
7.1
Tu quoque litoribus nostris, Aeneia nutrix, 7.2 aeternam moriens famam, Caieta, dedisti; 7.3 et nunc servat honos sedem tuus ossaque nomen 7.4 Hesperia in magna, siqua est ea gloria, signat.

7.10
Proxima Circaeae raduntur litora terrae,
7.11
dives inaccessos ubi Solis filia lucos
7.12
adsiduo resonat cantu tectisque superbis
7.13
urit odoratam nocturna in lumina cedrum,
7.14
arguto tenuis percurrens pectine telas.
7.15
Hinc exaudiri gemitus iraeque leonum
7.16
vincla recusantum et sera sub nocte rudentum,
7.17
saetigerique sues atque in praesaepibus ursi
7.18
saevire ac formae magnorum ululare luporum,
7.19
quos hominum ex facie dea saeva potentibus herbis 7.20 induerat Circe in voltus ac terga ferarum. 7.21 Quae ne monstra pii paterentur talia Troes 7.22 delati in portus neu litora dira subirent, 7.23 Neptunus ventis implevit vela secundis 7.24 atque fugam dedit et praeter vada fervida vexit. 7.25 Iamque rubescebat radiis mare et aethere ab alto 7.26 Aurora in roseis fulgebat lutea bigis: 7.27 cum venti posuere omnisque repente resedit 7.28 flatus et in lento luctantur marmore tonsae. 7.29 Atque hic Aeneas ingentem ex aequore lucum
7.37
Nunc age, qui reges, Erato, quae tempora rerum, 7.38 quis Latio antiquo fuerit status, advena classem 7.39 cum primum Ausoniis exercitus appulit oris, 7.40 expediam et primae revocabo exordia pugnae. 7.46 iam senior longa placidas in pace regebat. 7.47 Hunc Fauno et nympha genitum Laurente Marica 7.48 accipimus, Fauno Picus pater isque parentem 7.49 te, Saturne, refert, tu sanguinis ultimus auctor. 7.50 filius huic fato divom prolesque virilis 7.51 nulla fuit primaque oriens erepta iuventa est. 7.52 Sola domum et tantas servabat filia sedes, 7.53 iam matura viro, iam plenis nubilis annis.
7.64
Huius apes summum densae (mirabile dictu),

7.189
Picus, equum domitor; quem capta cupidine coniunx
7.190
aurea percussum virga versumque venenis
7.191
fecit avem Circe sparsitque coloribus alas.
8.113
ignotas temptare vias, quo tenditis? inquit.' ' None
sup>
1.197 out-ebbing far, he calms the whole wide sea, 1.198 and glides light-wheeled along the crested foam. 1.199 As when, with not unwonted tumult, roars 1.200 in some vast city a rebellious mob, 1.201 and base-born passions in its bosom burn, 1.202 till rocks and blazing torches fill the air 1.203 (rage never lacks for arms)—if haply then 1.204 ome wise man comes, whose reverend looks attest
4.223
his chase outspeeds; but in his heart he prays 4.224 among these tame things suddenly to see 4.225 a tusky boar, or, leaping from the hills, 4.227 Meanwhile low thunders in the distant sky 4.228 mutter confusedly; soon bursts in full 4.229 the storm-cloud and the hail. The Tyrian troop 4.230 is scattered wide; the chivalry of Troy, ' "4.231 with the young heir of Dardan's kingly line, " '4.232 of Venus sprung, seek shelter where they may, 4.233 with sudden terror; down the deep ravines 4.234 the swollen torrents roar. In that same hour 4.235 Queen Dido and her hero out of Troy 4.236 to the same cavern fly. Old Mother-Earth 4.237 and wedlock-keeping Juno gave the sign; ' "
4.262
At night she spreads midway 'twixt earth and heaven " '4.263 her pinions in the darkness, hissing loud,
7.1
One more immortal name thy death bequeathed, 7.2 Nurse of Aeneas, to Italian shores, 7.3 Caieta ; there thy honor hath a home; ' "7.4 Thy bones a name: and on Hesperia's breast "
7.10
Freshly the night-winds breathe; the cloudless moon
7.11
Outpours upon his path unstinted beam,
7.12
And with far-trembling glory smites the sea.
7.13
Close to the lands of Circe soon they fare, ' "
7.14
Where the Sun's golden daughter in far groves " 7.15 Sounds forth her ceaseless song; her lofty hall
7.16
Is fragrant every night with flaring brands
7.17
of cedar, giving light the while she weaves
7.18
With shrill-voiced shuttle at her linens fine.
7.19
From hence are heard the loud lament and wrath 7.20 of lions, rebels to their linked chains 7.21 And roaring all night long; great bristly boars 7.22 And herded bears, in pinfold closely kept, 7.23 Rage horribly, and monster-wolves make moan; 7.24 Whom the dread goddess with foul juices strong 7.25 From forms of men drove forth, and bade to wear ' "7.26 the mouths and maws of beasts in Circe's thrall. " '7.27 But lest the sacred Trojans should endure 7.28 uch prodigy of doom, or anchor there 7.29 on that destroying shore, kind Neptune filled
7.37
Then, gazing from the deep, Aeneas saw ' "7.38 a stretch of groves, whence Tiber 's smiling stream, " '7.39 its tumbling current rich with yellow sands, 7.40 burst seaward forth: around it and above 7.46 Hail, Erato! while olden kings and thrones 7.47 and all their sequent story I unfold! ' "7.48 How Latium 's honor stood, when alien ships " '7.49 brought war to Italy, and from what cause 7.50 the primal conflict sprang, O goddess, breathe 7.51 upon thy bard in song. Dread wars I tell, 7.52 array of battle, and high-hearted kings ' "7.53 thrust forth to perish, when Etruria's host " "
7.64
to King Latinus' body no heirs male: "
7.189
and fountain of Numicius; here they see
7.190
the river Tiber, where bold Latins dwell. ' "
7.191
Anchises' son chose out from his brave band " 8.113 white gleaming through the grove, with all her brood ' ' None
17. Vergil, Eclogues, 8.70
 Tagged with subjects: • Circe • Circe,

 Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 22; Fletcher (2023), The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature, 18

sup>
8.70 bloom with narcissus-flower, the tamarisk'' None
18. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Circe

 Found in books: Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 114, 117; Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 137, 138; Mackay (2022), Animal Encounters in Valerius Flaccus’ Argonautica, 63, 208, 209; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 114, 117




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