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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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All subjects (including unvalidated):
subject book bibliographic info
artemis Augoustakis (2014) 332, 333
Bacchi (2022) 87, 139
Bianchetti et al (2015) 66, 76
Bloch (2022) 210
Borg (2008) 16, 19, 34, 38, 39, 343
Bortolani et al (2019) 7, 46, 57, 288, 295
Braund and Most (2004) 195, 196, 197
Bremmer (2008) 26, 218, 226, 320, 327
Bricault and Bonnet (2013) 33, 34, 38, 122, 124, 164, 183, 184, 185
Bricault et al. (2007) 473
Brule (2003) 10, 60
Castagnoli and Ceccarelli (2019) 14, 15, 116, 261, 265, 300
Clay and Vergados (2022) 340, 343, 344, 345, 347, 352, 354, 355
Del Lucchese (2019) 24
Demoen and Praet (2009) 241, 252, 253, 254, 255, 291, 292, 294, 296, 303
Dignas Parker and Stroumsa (2013) 76, 145
Dillon and Timotin (2015) 180
Edmonds (2019) 66, 131, 132, 158, 179, 194
Eisenfeld (2022) 79, 80, 132, 137, 138, 147, 211, 215
Ekroth (2013) 46, 48, 96, 146, 156, 157, 194, 201, 202, 217, 223, 225, 236, 292
Fabian Meinel (2015) 44
Faraone (1999) 47
Gagné (2020) 11, 13, 18, 117, 119, 140, 164, 166, 179, 191, 209, 341, 360, 378
Gaifman (2012) 70, 210, 288
Gazis and Hooper (2021) 51, 62, 65, 66
Geljon and Vos (2020) 72
Giusti (2018) 121
Goodman (2006) 61
Henderson (2020) 147, 151, 153, 154, 175, 234
Hitch (2017) 49, 51, 52, 53, 54, 58
Humphreys (2018) 407, 541, 694, 801
Huttner (2013) 46, 55, 57, 331, 342, 350, 351, 352
Jouanna (2012) 62
Jouanna (2018) 571, 586, 587
Kalinowski (2021) 66
Kessler (2004) 101
Kirichenko (2022) 81, 173
Konig (2022) 48, 54, 55, 153
Lalone (2019) 13, 136, 169, 257
Lampe (2003) 427
Levison (2009) 345
Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020) 111, 139
Mcclellan (2019) 180, 182, 183, 184, 185, 201
Meister (2019) 45, 78, 163, 164, 165, 168
Mikalson (2003) 127, 133, 172, 174, 180, 181, 224, 234
Mikalson (2010) 118, 220, 221, 230
Mikalson (2016) 152, 211, 247, 267, 268, 269, 270
Miller and Clay (2019) 52, 57, 67, 127, 151, 274
Mitchell and Pilhofer (2019) 206, 207, 209
Naiden (2013) 48, 49, 50, 95, 96, 97, 98, 101, 105, 121, 143, 145, 147, 148, 162, 204, 222, 338
Nuno et al (2021) 170, 273
Pachoumi (2017) 63, 82, 103, 126, 130, 131, 132, 133, 135, 136, 137, 142, 157, 167, 178, 179, 186
Papazarkadas (2011) 25, 142, 143
Peels (2016) 239, 240, 241
Petrovic and Petrovic (2016) 136, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 191, 192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 200, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 215, 241, 266
Pinheiro Bierl and Beck (2013) 9, 21, 37, 213
Pinheiro et al (2012a) 19, 53, 61, 70, 118, 132, 135, 148
Pinheiro et al (2018) 19, 101, 128
Pucci (2016) 54, 156, 165, 178
Repath and Whitmarsh (2022) 37, 81, 82
Russell and Nesselrath (2014) 159
Rutledge (2012) 49, 66, 109
Seaford (2018) 251
Segev (2017) 51, 54, 69, 142
Simon (2021) 165, 166, 168, 169, 170, 171, 173, 174, 175, 177, 178, 179, 180, 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 190, 193, 194, 197, 198
Stanton (2021) 123
Stavrianopoulou (2006) 286
Stavrianopoulou (2013) 333
Steiner (2001) 81, 86, 87, 103
Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020) 317, 335, 341, 343, 345, 354
Trapp et al (2016) 68, 81, 82, 83, 85, 94, 104, 105
Trott (2019) 131
Verhagen (2022) 332, 333
Versnel (2011) 23, 41
Williamson (2021) 279
de Jáuregui et al. (2011) 123, 124, 125, 313, 321
artemis, a. at ephesus Dignas Parker and Stroumsa (2013) 3, 142
artemis, a. ephesia Bremmer (2008) 253, 287, 289, 353, 354
artemis, a. lygodesma Bremmer (2008) 187
artemis, a. patmia Bremmer (2008) 253
artemis, a. phos-phoros of byzantium Dignas Parker and Stroumsa (2013) 146
artemis, acropolis Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020) 108, 113, 118, 119, 124, 128, 129, 131, 134, 135
artemis, aetiologies, specific, apollo and, delos Kowalzig (2007) 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67
artemis, agrotera Kowalzig (2007) 294
Lupu(2005) 334
Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020) 291
Mikalson (2016) 60, 125, 144, 192, 195, 219
Papazarkadas (2011) 23, 29, 80, 307, 308, 309, 314
Simon (2021) 168, 175, 182
artemis, agrotera at aegeira, cult of Simon (2021) 174, 175
artemis, agrotera at taras Kowalzig (2007) 294
artemis, agrotera of athens Mikalson (2003) 29, 30, 35, 76, 127, 129, 220
artemis, agrotera of athens, festivals, of Mikalson (2003) 29, 30, 76, 127, 220
artemis, agrotera of sparta Mikalson (2003) 127
artemis, agrotera procession for Parker (2005) 400, 461, 462
artemis, agrotera, athens, sanctuary of Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 33
artemis, agrotera, basileia Kowalzig (2007) 122
artemis, agrotera, brauronia Kowalzig (2007) 283
artemis, agrotera, divinities, greek and roman Renberg (2017) 344
artemis, agrotera, procession and sacrifice Henderson (2020) 147, 234, 235, 246, 249, 293
artemis, altar of Dignas Parker and Stroumsa (2013) 148
artemis, amarynthia, artemis Bernabe et al (2013) 221
artemis, amarysia Humphreys (2018) 541, 1037
artemis, and actaeon Rutledge (2012) 60
artemis, and apollo, strabo, on birth of Kalinowski (2021) 94, 95
artemis, and apollonian triad, apollo, leto Simon (2021) 143, 154, 155, 173, 184, 370
artemis, and artemis, apollonian triad, apollo, leto Simon (2021) 143, 154, 155, 173, 184, 370
artemis, and birth Parker (2005) 242, 428, 431
artemis, and childbirth Jim (2022) 106, 107, 154
artemis, and communications in the peloponnese Kowalzig (2007) 151, 286, 287, 288, 289, 290
artemis, and dionysos Seaford (2018) 21
artemis, and dionysus at calydon, cults of Simon (2021) 186
artemis, and dionysus at corinth, cults of Simon (2021) 186, 190
artemis, and hecate, close association with Jim (2022) 57, 58
artemis, and hippolytus Sommerstein and Torrance (2014) 247, 289, 291, 294
artemis, and human sacrifice Fabian Meinel (2015) 151, 158
artemis, and iphigeneia Seaford (2018) 10
artemis, and leto, apollonian triad, apollo, leto Simon (2021) 143, 154, 155, 173, 184, 370
artemis, and leto, parthenon, east pediment, aphrodite Simon (2021) 232, 278, 280
artemis, and leto, selinus, metope with apollo Simon (2021) 155
artemis, and marriage Brule (2003) 129, 144, 145, 147, 148
artemis, and moon Griffiths (1975) 117
artemis, and moon, and actaeon Griffiths (1975) 152
artemis, and moon, and clitophon Griffiths (1975) 301
artemis, and moon, and isis Griffiths (1975) 213
artemis, and moon, at ephesus Griffiths (1975) 117
artemis, and moon, in crete Griffiths (1975) 150
artemis, and nymphs Brule (2003) 57
artemis, and plague Jim (2022) 67
artemis, and the polis Kowalzig (2007) 283, 284, 285, 286
artemis, and warfare Parker (2005) 400, 401
artemis, and, aphrodite Simon (2021) 123, 165, 197, 198, 253, 272, 276, 278, 280
artemis, and, apollo Simon (2021) 137, 143, 154, 155, 157, 165, 171, 173, 174, 179, 180, 184, 194
artemis, and, ares Simon (2021) 165, 166, 180, 181, 182, 183, 292
artemis, and, athena Simon (2021) 165
artemis, and, bears Simon (2021) 179
artemis, and, charites, graces Simon (2021) 6, 178, 179, 197, 374
artemis, and, dionysus Simon (2021) 165, 166, 180, 184, 185, 186, 187, 327
artemis, and, eagles Simon (2021) 175
artemis, and, hera Simon (2021) 165, 181
artemis, and, hermes Simon (2021) 185, 186, 327
artemis, and, hestia Simon (2021) 131
artemis, and, leto Simon (2021) 165, 173, 180, 184
artemis, and, lions Simon (2021) 177, 178, 193, 194
artemis, and, magna graecia, southern italy, and sicily Simon (2021) 193, 194, 376
artemis, and, masks Simon (2021) 186
artemis, and, minoan-mycenaean religion and art Simon (2021) 170, 171, 174, 180, 187, 373
artemis, and, perfumes and ointments Simon (2021) 184, 190
artemis, and, rhea Simon (2021) 187
artemis, and, sea and seafarers Simon (2021) 184
artemis, and, theater and tragedy Simon (2021) 185, 186, 187
artemis, and, thrace Simon (2021) 166
artemis, and, vegetation deities Simon (2021) 180
artemis, and, zeus Simon (2021) 12, 165, 166, 173, 179, 180, 181
artemis, animals, association with Simon (2021) 165, 166, 168, 169, 170, 174, 175, 177, 190, 327
artemis, ano mazaraki Kowalzig (2007) 286, 287, 288
artemis, ano mazaraki, at communication routes Kowalzig (2007) 288, 289
artemis, aphrodite and Simon (2021) 123, 165, 197, 198, 253, 272, 276, 278, 280
artemis, apollo and Simon (2021) 137, 143, 154, 155, 157, 165, 171, 173, 174, 179, 180, 184, 194
artemis, apollo delios/dalios, delos, inseparable from earlier Kowalzig (2007) 60, 61, 62, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124
artemis, apparition of Pinheiro et al (2012a) 116
artemis, ares and Simon (2021) 165, 166, 180, 181, 182, 183, 292
artemis, arethusa Simon (2021) 193, 194, 376
artemis, arethusa from, syracuse, coin with head of Simon (2021) 193, 342
artemis, aristoboule Humphreys (2018) 669, 795, 1037, 1039
Mikalson (2016) 194
Simon (2021) 197
artemis, aristoboule of athens Mikalson (2003) 103, 127
artemis, aristoboule, athens, sanctuary of Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 33
artemis, aristoboule, temple, of Gygax (2016) 143, 166, 213, 233, 249
artemis, artemis, goddess, eleuthera, temple of Hahn Emmel and Gotter (2008) 130
artemis, artemis-hecate, Lupu(2005) 306
artemis, as a bee-goddess Pinheiro Bierl and Beck (2013) 257, 269
artemis, as bendis Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020) 34, 354
artemis, as birth goddess, birth of dionysus Simon (2021) 180, 384
artemis, as birth/vegetation deity Simon (2021) 180, 374
artemis, as civic goddess, pausanias, on Simon (2021) 173
artemis, as festivals Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 260
artemis, as gymnasiarchs Kalinowski (2021) 325
artemis, as prytaneis Kalinowski (2021) 112, 122, 123
artemis, as “mistress of animals, beasts, ” Simon (2021) 165, 166, 168, 169, 170, 174, 175, 177, 190, 327
artemis, as, arktoi, she-bears, young girls serving Simon (2021) 168, 169, 175, 184, 185, 190, 197
artemis, as, artemis, arktoi, she-bears, young girls serving Simon (2021) 168, 169, 175, 184, 185, 190, 197
artemis, as, bears, arktoi, she-bears, young girls serving Simon (2021) 168, 169, 175, 184, 185, 190, 197
artemis, as, prytanis, priestesses of Kalinowski (2021) 122, 123
artemis, ascent, imagery of Konig (2022) 79, 86, 88, 147, 148
artemis, associated with, bulls Simon (2021) 166, 169, 184, 375
artemis, associated with, death sentences and suicides Simon (2021) 190
artemis, associated with, deer Simon (2021) 169, 170, 177, 179
artemis, associated with, justice and political life, death sentences and suicides Simon (2021) 190
artemis, associated with, migration/movement of peoples Simon (2021) 174, 175, 193, 197
artemis, associated with, purification rituals Simon (2021) 177, 178, 179
artemis, associated with, sacrifice/sacrificial rituals, purification rituals related to Simon (2021) 177, 178, 179
artemis, associated with, suicides and death sentences Simon (2021) 190
artemis, associated with, the dead, death sentences and suicides Simon (2021) 190
artemis, association with, disoterion Jim (2022) 10, 106
artemis, at athens, thiasotai of Gabrielsen and Paganini (2021) 43
artemis, at aulis, cult of Simon (2021) 166, 184
artemis, at brauron Kapparis (2021) 82, 83
artemis, at brauron, athens, sanctuary of Renberg (2017) 104
artemis, at brauron, cult of Simon (2021) 168, 169, 184
artemis, at brauron, sanctuary, of Gygax (2016) 100
artemis, at cape zoster, cult of Simon (2021) 184
artemis, at claros Sweeney (2013) 110
artemis, at eleutherna Lupu(2005) 333
artemis, at elis, temple of Jenkyns (2013) 28, 249
artemis, at ephesus Lupu(2005) 95, 96, 108
Sweeney (2013) 26, 138, 140, 142, 145, 148, 149
artemis, at ephesus, breasts of Griffiths (1975) 117
artemis, at ephesus, temple of Jenkyns (2013) 52, 300, 314
artemis, at lousoi/metapontion, aetiologies, specific Kowalzig (2007) 268, 269, 270, 271, 272, 273, 274, 275, 276, 277, 278, 279, 280, 281, 282, 283
artemis, at magnesia Sweeney (2013) 138
artemis, at magnesia on the maeander Lupu(2005) 107, 108
artemis, at miletus, chithone Sweeney (2013) 52
artemis, at piraeus, cult of Simon (2021) 184
artemis, at saguntum Rojas(2019) 192
artemis, at sardis Rojas(2019) 41
Sweeney (2013) 148
artemis, at zoster, cape, cult of Simon (2021) 184
artemis, athena and Simon (2021) 165
artemis, bargylia Stavrianopoulou (2006) 115, 231
artemis, bell-shaped figurines of boeotia Simon (2021) 190
artemis, birth Huttner (2013) 46, 57
artemis, birth, of Lupu(2005) 315
artemis, births of birth scenes and stories, apollo and Simon (2021) 180, 358
artemis, boulaia Jim (2022) 178
Mikalson (2016) 62, 63, 65, 113, 170, 171, 197, 205
Simon (2021) 174
artemis, boule and demos, decree on worship of Kalinowski (2021) 102, 103
artemis, boulephoros Simon (2021) 174
artemis, brauron Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020) 108, 109, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135, 136, 139
Stavrianopoulou (2006) 49, 99
artemis, brauronia Humphreys (2018) 387, 551, 649
Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020) 108, 111, 120, 129, 131, 136
Mikalson (2016) 134, 135, 161, 205, 261
Papazarkadas (2011) 23, 28, 29, 71, 88, 89, 240, 301, 307, 316
Simon (2021) 194
artemis, brauronia of athens Mikalson (2003) 74, 174
artemis, brauronia, athens, sanctuary of Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 100, 101
artemis, brauronia, dedications, to Mikalson (2016) 34, 134, 161, 261
artemis, brauronia, divinities, greek and roman Renberg (2017) 104
artemis, brauronia, festivals Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 33, 100, 101, 184, 188, 189, 274, 492, 493, 494, 495, 496, 525, 532, 533
artemis, brauronia, sacred precint on the acropolis of Gygax (2016) 100
artemis, brauronia, statues, of Mikalson (2016) 134
artemis, brauronia, temples, of Mikalson (2016) 134
artemis, buildings in the shrine of Papazarkadas (2011) 27, 28, 29, 88, 89
artemis, by fl. damianus, dining hall in artemision, hestiaterion, gift to Kalinowski (2021) 149, 151, 152, 155, 156, 391
artemis, by vedius iv Kalinowski (2021) 91
artemis, callimachus, hymn to Kalinowski (2021) 98
artemis, callimachus/callimachos/kallimachos, hymn to Miller and Clay (2019) 343
artemis, callimachus’s hymn to Kalinowski (2021) 98
artemis, cave of Dignas Parker and Stroumsa (2013) 142
artemis, charicleia as priestess of Repath and Whitmarsh (2022) 113, 195
artemis, charicleia’s affinity with/likened to Repath and Whitmarsh (2022) 35, 37, 130, 136, 143
artemis, charites/graces and Simon (2021) 6, 178, 179, 197, 374
artemis, chastity as aspect of Kalinowski (2021) 98
artemis, children, as nurturer of Simon (2021) 175, 374
artemis, chitone Simon (2021) 174
artemis, chitone at miletus, temple of Gabrielsen and Paganini (2021) 94
artemis, claudia procula, priestess of Kalinowski (2021) 65, 379
artemis, clothing and worship of Kalinowski (2021) 257
artemis, coins, with head of arethusa, from syracuse Simon (2021) 193, 194
artemis, cruel death, providing vengeance against Simon (2021) 169, 170, 171, 175
artemis, cult and rites Simon (2021) 173, 174, 175, 177, 178, 179, 180, 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 194, 197, 198
artemis, cult of Bruun and Edmondson (2015) 616
Kalinowski (2021) 96, 98, 138, 170
artemis, cult of acropolis, athens Simon (2021) 178, 179, 194
artemis, cult of agora, athens Simon (2021) 174, 197
artemis, cult of athens Simon (2021) 174, 197, 373
artemis, cult of delos Simon (2021) 171, 180, 182, 190
artemis, cult of euboea Simon (2021) 182, 183, 197
artemis, cult of pylos Simon (2021) 174
artemis, cult, megabyxoi, in Kalinowski (2021) 123
artemis, cult, of Borg (2008) 19, 38
artemis, cult, rogers, g. m., on waning of Kalinowski (2021) 138
artemis, cults, artemis, ano mazaraki, and network of Kowalzig (2007) 288
artemis, cynthia Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020) 34, 142
artemis, dedications, to Mikalson (2016) 211
artemis, delia, delos Kowalzig (2007) 72, 118, 119, 120
artemis, delia, older deity on delos Kowalzig (2007) 118, 119, 120
artemis, delia, paros Kowalzig (2007) 73, 120
artemis, demosyne Humphreys (2018) 1094
artemis, diana Nasrallah (2019) 117, 137
Radicke (2022) 201, 293, 303, 304, 477, 496, 527
artemis, diana, gods Nasrallah (2019) 117, 137
artemis, diana, see also Gorain (2019) 125, 126, 195, 227
artemis, dionysos, and Seaford (2018) 21
artemis, dionysus and Simon (2021) 165, 166, 180, 184, 185, 186, 187, 327
artemis, divinities, greek and roman Renberg (2017) 222, 223, 250, 251, 541, 654, 687
artemis, dressed in lionskin of heracles Simon (2021) 194
artemis, duties of Kalinowski (2021) 109, 110, 112
artemis, eileithyia Simon (2021) 374
artemis, eileithyia, artemis Bernabe et al (2013) 440, 567
artemis, elaphebolos Hitch (2017) 51
Simon (2021) 170, 177
artemis, enodia Simon (2021) 175
artemis, enoikia Jim (2022) 108
artemis, entering dionysiac karneia painter, volute-krater with circle, from tarentum Simon (2021) 187
artemis, entering dionysiac tarentum, volute-krater by karneia painter with circle, from Simon (2021) 187
artemis, ephesia Dignas (2002) 9, 11, 84, 141, 142, 143, 144, 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 170, 172, 173, 175, 176, 189, 190, 226, 238, 268
Hallmannsecker (2022) 74, 91, 100, 101, 133, 143
Hitch (2017) 53
Papazarkadas (2011) 8, 77, 238
Simon (2021) 183, 184, 375
Versnel (2011) 76, 106, 107, 131
artemis, ephesia, ephesos Kowalzig (2007) 103, 104
artemis, ephesia, ephesus, artemisium, and Simon (2021) 183, 184, 193, 375
artemis, ephesia, paros Kowalzig (2007) 73
artemis, ephesia, xenophon, consecrates estate to Papazarkadas (2011) 8, 77, 238
artemis, ephesian cup of Simon (2021) 183
artemis, ephesos Stavrianopoulou (2006) 15, 158, 285, 290, 292
artemis, ephesos as sacred to Kalinowski (2021) 25, 59
artemis, ephesos, dedicated to cult of Kalinowski (2021) 91
artemis, ephesos, temple of Steiner (2001) 178
artemis, ephesus, temple of Jenkyns (2013) 52, 300, 314
artemis, epiphany, of Lupu(2005) 107
artemis, epipyrgidia Simon (2021) 178, 179
artemis, eukleia Clark (2007) 33
Simon (2021) 173, 197, 198, 292
artemis, eukleia of plataea Mikalson (2003) 100, 205
artemis, euphranor, latona, apollo, and Rutledge (2012) 268
artemis, euripides, and Jouanna (2018) 366
artemis, exekias, calyx-krater with apollo kitharoidos and Simon (2021) 157
artemis, festivals in Kalinowski (2021) 94, 95, 96, 98, 99, 100, 102, 103, 104, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111
artemis, festivals, and Mikalson (2010) 87
artemis, financial assets of Kalinowski (2021) 99, 100
artemis, flavius aristion iulianus, t., leaves inheritance to Kalinowski (2021) 160, 161
artemis, flavius vedius apellas, t., son of t. fl. vedius antoninus and fl. pasinice, and Kalinowski (2021) 170
artemis, flowing water, connection to Simon (2021) 179
artemis, from dreros, sphyrelata statuettes of apollo between leto and Simon (2021) 143
artemis, from hera at birth, kourêtes, protect Kalinowski (2021) 59, 95, 107, 108, 115, 117
artemis, from massalia, coins, with head of Simon (2021) 193, 194
artemis, from, dreros, crete, sphyrelata statuettes of apollo between leto and Simon (2021) 143, 173
artemis, from, massalia, coins with head of Simon (2021) 193, 194
artemis, goddess Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer (2022) 192, 209, 210, 218
Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 33, 100, 101, 184, 188, 189, 251, 260, 274, 524, 525, 532, 533, 546, 547
Hahn Emmel and Gotter (2008) 122, 243, 244
Riess (2012) 205, 343
artemis, goddess, laphria festival Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 14, 15
artemis, goddess, mounychia shrine Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 233, 532
artemis, goddess, sanctuary at athens Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 100, 101, 233, 234
artemis, goddess, sanctuary at brauron Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 274, 492, 493, 494, 495, 496, 525, 532
artemis, goddess, sanctuary at delos Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 236, 278, 280, 281
artemis, goddess, sanctuary at kalapodi Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 15
artemis, goddess, sanctuary at magnesia-on-the-maeander Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 544, 546, 547
artemis, goddess, sanctuary at pantikapaion Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 594
artemis, gods Thonemann (2020) 41, 117, 118, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 183
artemis, gods, egyptian, greek, and roman Edelmann-Singer et al (2020) 154
artemis, hadrian, honored for gifts to Kalinowski (2021) 159
artemis, hagnos, as epithet of Petrovic and Petrovic (2016) 185
artemis, hecate Griffiths (1975) 147
Simon (2021) 169, 170, 173, 175, 177, 178
artemis, hecate phosphoros, soteira, close association with Jim (2022) 57, 58
artemis, hegemone Jim (2022) 5
Simon (2021) 174, 175, 178, 179
artemis, hegemone and apollo carneius, sparta, sanctuary of Simon (2021) 174
artemis, hekate Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020) 64
artemis, hekate and Hitch (2017) 91
artemis, hekate, and Hitch (2017) 91
artemis, helps in childbirth Griffiths (1975) 2, 117
artemis, hemera Bianchetti et al (2015) 366
artemis, hemera, lousoi Kowalzig (2007) 271, 272, 273, 274
artemis, hemera, lousoi, aetiology jumbled with that of hera argeia Kowalzig (2007) 268, 269, 270, 271, 275, 279, 280, 281, 283, 325
artemis, hemera, lousoi, and aitolians Kowalzig (2007) 289, 290
artemis, hemera, lousoi, archaeology of Kowalzig (2007) 271, 272, 273, 274
artemis, hemera, lousoi, as agrotera Kowalzig (2007) 269, 290
artemis, hemera, lousoi, fluid worshipping group Kowalzig (2007) 286, 287, 288, 289, 290
artemis, hemera, lousoi, marriage rituals Kowalzig (2007) 274
artemis, hemera, lousoi, misleading bucolic imagery Kowalzig (2007) 271, 272, 273, 274
artemis, hemera, lousoi, myth-ritual nexus Kowalzig (2007) 274, 275, 276, 277, 278, 279, 280, 281, 282, 283
artemis, hemera, lousoi, role of in regional context Kowalzig (2007) 283, 284, 285, 286, 287, 288, 289, 290
artemis, hemera, lousoi, sacred herd, symbolised in womens khoroi Kowalzig (2007) 271, 281, 282, 283
artemis, hera and Simon (2021) 165, 181
artemis, hera, assault on Braund and Most (2004) 195
artemis, hermes and Simon (2021) 185, 186, 327
artemis, hestia and Simon (2021) 131
artemis, hestiaterion, dining hall, in temenos Kalinowski (2021) 149, 151, 152, 155, 156
artemis, holding, geese, alabastron from delos with Simon (2021) 190
artemis, homer, on Simon (2021) 165, 166
artemis, homeric hymn Sweeney (2013) 110
artemis, hunting and butchering, association with Simon (2021) 165, 168, 169, 170, 171, 175, 177, 179, 180, 181
artemis, hymn to Albrecht (2014) 53
artemis, hymnia Brule (2003) 18, 19
Pinheiro Bierl and Beck (2013) 257
artemis, iconography of Kalinowski (2021) 96
artemis, images and iconography Simon (2021) 143, 169, 170, 177, 187, 190, 193, 194, 197, 198
artemis, in calasiris’ dream, apollo, with Repath and Whitmarsh (2022) 81, 82, 83, 85
artemis, in delphi Jim (2022) 56
artemis, in ephesos, temple, of Hallmannsecker (2022) 103, 130, 191
artemis, in euboian gulf Kowalzig (2007) 24
artemis, in hippolytus, euripides Jouanna (2018) 366
artemis, in lionskin by, lydos, dinos with Simon (2021) 194
artemis, in procession, statues, of Kalinowski (2021) 94
artemis, in sicyon, cult statue of Simon (2021) 187
artemis, in statue of goddess from, wet-nurse festival for Simon (2021) 175
artemis, in temple of apollo palatinus Rutledge (2012) 238, 239, 240, 242
artemis, in the sanctuary at brauron, temple, of Gygax (2016) 100
artemis, in triple-bodied form Simon (2021) 177, 178, 374
artemis, in ‘structuralist’ interpretation Jim (2022) 59, 109
artemis, iphigenia, sacrifice of Simon (2021) 166, 170
artemis, isis, and Griffiths (1975) 213
artemis, kalliste Simon (2021) 165, 175
artemis, khitone Hitch (2017) 74
artemis, killing actaeon, pan painter, bell-krater with pan chasing daphnis and Simon (2021) 194, 337
artemis, killing niobids, niobid painter, calyx-krater with apollo and Simon (2021) 194
artemis, kindyas Jim (2022) 6
artemis, kindyas, bargylia Lupu(2005) 99, 100, 107
artemis, kolainis Humphreys (2018) 607, 647, 908, 980
artemis, kourêtes as attendants at Kalinowski (2021) 108
artemis, krateriskoi dedicated to Simon (2021) 184, 185, 190, 197
artemis, krateriskoi, from sanctuaries of Parker (2005) 234
artemis, kuria of termessus Mikalson (2016) 285
artemis, kynthia, paros Kowalzig (2007) 73
artemis, kynthia, paros, limnatis Kowalzig (2007) 39, 336
artemis, kynthia, paros, lykia, troizen Kowalzig (2007) 151
artemis, kynthia, paros, mounikhia Kowalzig (2007) 283
artemis, kynthia, paros, oupis, ephesos Kowalzig (2007) 124
artemis, laphria Hitch (2017) 53, 54, 92
Jim (2022) 113
artemis, laphria, artemis Bernabe et al (2013) 402, 403
artemis, larcia theogenis iuliane, as prytanis, gymnasiarch, and priestess of Kalinowski (2021) 325
artemis, leucophryene Huttner (2013) 179
artemis, leukophruene Versnel (2011) 76, 91
artemis, leukophryene Marek (2019) 123, 473, 474
Stavrianopoulou (2013) 185, 329, 357
artemis, leukophryene, festivals Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 546, 547
artemis, leukophryene, temple Marek (2019) 123
artemis, leukophyrene Brooten (1982) 232
artemis, limnatis λιμνάτις, artemis Bernabe et al (2013) 402
artemis, limneatis Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020) 142
artemis, loans, festivals of Lupu(2005) 107, 108
artemis, lochaia, gambreion Lupu(2005) 76
artemis, lyaia Csapo (2022) 65
artemis, meander Mikalson (2016) 294, 295
artemis, men and Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020) 131, 132, 133, 135
artemis, migration/movement of peoples, association with Simon (2021) 174, 175, 193, 197
artemis, miletos Stavrianopoulou (2006) 136, 146
artemis, miletus, boulephoros, cult of Simon (2021) 173, 174
artemis, moon, emerging from sea, and Griffiths (1975) 117
artemis, mounichia Humphreys (2018) 681, 992, 1100, 1102, 1103, 1104
Lupu(2005) 143
Papazarkadas (2011) 29
artemis, mounichia of athens Mikalson (2003) 76, 77, 127, 129, 134
artemis, mounychia Mikalson (2016) 75, 225
Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020) 142
artemis, mysteries of Kalinowski (2021) 107, 108, 109, 110, 111
artemis, named in inscriptions Kalinowski (2021) 31
artemis, naxos, cylinder seal of warrior at altar of ? Simon (2021) 180, 181
artemis, nicomachus, his apollo and Rutledge (2012) 275
artemis, nilsson, martin on Simon (2021) 169, 173, 190
artemis, niobids and Simon (2021) 33, 194
artemis, nocturnal intervention Jim (2022) 59
artemis, nymphe, bride, offerings to Brule (2003) 129, 144, 145
artemis, oaths invoking Sommerstein and Torrance (2014) 13, 28, 29, 76, 178, 318, 321, 346
artemis, oaths sworn by Sommerstein and Torrance (2014) 158, 198
artemis, of amyzon Marek (2019) 162
artemis, of amyzon, temple Marek (2019) 35
artemis, of aulis Simon (2021) 166, 169
artemis, of brauron, altars, of Mikalson (2016) 134
artemis, of brauron, temple of Radicke (2022) 81, 109, 391
artemis, of c. vibius salutaris Kalinowski (2021) 270
artemis, of delos Mikalson (2003) 26, 127
Mikalson (2016) 93
artemis, of ephesos Huttner (2013) 55, 57, 185, 372
artemis, of ephesos, artemis Steiner (2001) 107
artemis, of ephesos, temple Marek (2019) 114, 123
artemis, of ephesus Mikalson (2003) 127
Rutledge (2012) 98, 102, 109, 110, 118
Taylor (2012) 57
artemis, of ephesus, ephesia Pinheiro Bierl and Beck (2013) 251, 253, 254, 257
artemis, of euboea Simon (2021) 182, 183
artemis, of hierakome Marek (2019) 237
artemis, of hierakome, temple Marek (2019) 237
artemis, of inheritance Kalinowski (2021) 156, 159, 160, 161, 163
artemis, of lousoi and, artemis, s. biagio at metapontion Kowalzig (2007) 291, 296, 297
artemis, of lousoi, proitids, and aetiology for Kowalzig (2007) 268, 269, 274, 275, 276, 277, 278, 279, 280, 281, 282, 283, 306, 307, 308, 395
artemis, of lousoi, statuette artemis, hemera, lousoi, type Kowalzig (2007) 272, 273
artemis, of lusi Simon (2021) 179
artemis, of magnesia Mikalson (2010) 87
artemis, of oinoe Mikalson (2016) 232
artemis, of oinoe, priests and priestesses, of Mikalson (2016) 232
artemis, of samos Mikalson (2003) 100, 101, 127
artemis, of samos, festivals, of Mikalson (2003) 100, 101
artemis, of sardeis Marek (2019) 197
artemis, of xanthos Marek (2019) 125, 513
artemis, olympia Stavrianopoulou (2006) 107
artemis, on delos, leto, giving birth to apollo and Kowalzig (2007) 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 78, 79, 97, 98, 99, 119
artemis, on delos, mycenae, mycenaeans, bronze age Kowalzig (2007) 119, 120
artemis, on, corfu, corcyra, temple of Simon (2021) 29, 193
artemis, on, delos, sanctuary of Simon (2021) 143
artemis, on, ikaria, wooden representation of Simon (2021) 187
artemis, on, ortygia, cult of Simon (2021) 174, 193
artemis, on, parthenon, east frieze Simon (2021) 198, 280, 292
artemis, on, rhodes Simon (2021) 190
artemis, oracles, animal oracles and Simon (2021) 174
artemis, origins and development Simon (2021) 165, 166, 168, 169, 170, 171, 179, 180
artemis, ortheia, artemis Steiner (2001) 86
artemis, orthia Simon (2021) 184, 185, 186, 190
Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020) 142
artemis, orthia, orthosia Gaifman (2012) 153, 208
artemis, orthia, sparta, comb with judgment of paris scene, sanctuary of Simon (2021) 268
artemis, orthia, sparta, sanctuary/cult of Simon (2021) 184, 185, 186, 187, 190, 268, 374
artemis, orthosia Eisenfeld (2022) 132
Humphreys (2018) 602, 654
Jim (2022) 88
artemis, oulia Humphreys (2018) 585, 668, 673
artemis, palm tree, sacred to apollo and Simon (2021) 180
artemis, pan and Simon (2021) 194
artemis, panegyris, strabo, describes Kalinowski (2021) 155
artemis, parthenos Brule (2003) 7, 56, 57
artemis, parthenos in the crimean chersonesus, identification with Jim (2022) 60
artemis, patrae Stavrianopoulou (2006) 121, 122, 123, 126
artemis, patroa Gaifman (2012) 70, 210
Simon (2021) 187
artemis, patroa, inscribed Gaifman (2012) 153, 157, 217, 219, 309
artemis, pausanias, on amazons and Kalinowski (2021) 96
artemis, pelagia Griffiths (1975) 32
artemis, peldekeitis Versnel (2011) 76
artemis, penelope, pelagia, see isis and Griffiths (1975) 246
artemis, perasia Marek (2019) 110, 125, 435
Nuno et al (2021) 77, 78
artemis, perasia of hierapolis-kastabala, temple Marek (2019) 514
artemis, perasia, priest, ess, /priesthood, of Marek (2019) 110, 514
artemis, pergaia Dignas (2002) 11
Jim (2022) 143
Marek (2019) 126, 478, 513
Simon (2021) 190
artemis, pergaia, coins, with cult statue of Simon (2021) 190
artemis, pergaia, halicarnassus Lupu(2005) 51, 52
artemis, persian Marek (2019) 162, 265, 516
artemis, persica Versnel (2011) 106
artemis, persik􀄓, sanctuary, of Borg (2008) 19
artemis, phakelitis Eidinow (2007) 299
artemis, phakelitis, artemis Steiner (2001) 111
artemis, phosphoros Jim (2022) 59, 85
Mikalson (2016) 63, 113, 171
Simon (2021) 373
artemis, phylake Hitch (2017) 70, 75
artemis, pillar/column, worshipped in form of Simon (2021) 137, 187
artemis, political assemblies and civic life, association with Simon (2021) 173, 174, 190
artemis, polymorphism of Simon (2021) 165
artemis, potnia theron Hitch (2017) 91
artemis, pottery, cult vessels dedicated to, krateriskoi Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 532
artemis, premarital offerings to Parker (2005) 242, 440, 441
artemis, prestige of Kalinowski (2021) 122, 123
artemis, priest/priesthood, of Edelmann-Singer et al (2020) 154
artemis, priestesses of Dignas Parker and Stroumsa (2013) 154
artemis, priestesses of as builders Kalinowski (2021) 147
artemis, priestly elites, at the temple of Keddie (2019) 157, 158
artemis, priests of Dignas Parker and Stroumsa (2013) 117, 145, 148
artemis, priests/priestesses, of Breytenbach and Tzavella (2022) 116, 271, 274
artemis, propylaea Simon (2021) 179
artemis, propylaea and, eleusis Simon (2021) 179
artemis, propylaia Jim (2022) 5, 108
Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020) 51
artemis, propylaia, temple of Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020) 51
artemis, proseoa of artemisium, Mikalson (2003) 63, 110, 127, 129, 134
artemis, prostaterios Jim (2022) 51
artemis, prothyraia, artemis Trapp et al (2016) 94
artemis, prothyraia, divinities, greek and roman Renberg (2017) 195, 250
artemis, providing vengeance against cruel death, the dead Simon (2021) 169, 170, 171, 175
artemis, purification rituals, associated with Simon (2021) 177, 178, 179
artemis, pythiē Hallmannsecker (2022) 76, 191, 192
artemis, quail, sacred to Simon (2021) 174
artemis, s. biagio at metapontion Kowalzig (2007) 291, 292, 293, 294, 295, 296, 297, 308, 309, 310
artemis, s. biagio at metapontion, alternative aetiological myths Kowalzig (2007) 30, 268, 269, 270, 271, 308, 309, 310, 318, 319, 320
artemis, s. biagio at metapontion, and akhaian identity Kowalzig (2007) 306, 307, 308, 309, 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317, 318, 319
artemis, s. biagio at metapontion, archaeology of Kowalzig (2007) 291, 292, 293, 294, 295, 296, 297
artemis, s. biagio at metapontion, at routes of communication Kowalzig (2007) 296
artemis, s. biagio at metapontion, bestial and hunting imagery Kowalzig (2007) 295, 296, 297, 309, 310, 395
artemis, s. biagio at metapontion, between aiolian and akhaian traditions Kowalzig (2007) 306, 307, 308, 309, 310, 319
artemis, s. biagio at metapontion, fluid worshipping group Kowalzig (2007) 291, 294, 295, 296, 297
artemis, s. biagio at metapontion, misleading bucolic imagery Kowalzig (2007) 291, 296
artemis, s. biagio at metapontion, myth-ritual nexus Kowalzig (2007) 281, 282, 283, 308, 309, 310
artemis, s. biagio at metapontion, pre-colonial worshippers of Kowalzig (2007) 294, 295, 296, 314
artemis, sacrifice/sacrificial rituals for Simon (2021) 166, 168, 169, 170, 173, 174, 177, 179, 180, 181, 182, 184, 194, 197, 198
artemis, sacrifice/sacrificial rituals, for Simon (2021) 166, 168, 169, 170, 173, 174, 177, 179, 180, 181, 182, 184, 194, 197, 198
artemis, sanctuaries and temples Simon (2021) 143, 165, 166, 174, 180, 182, 183, 184, 193, 197, 268
artemis, sanctuaries and temples, of Simon (2021) 143, 165, 166, 174, 180, 182, 183, 184, 193, 197, 268
artemis, sanctuary at sardis Lupu(2005) 21
artemis, sanctuary of Rojas(2019) 41
artemis, sardeis Stavrianopoulou (2006) 212
artemis, sarpedonia, divinities, greek and roman Renberg (2017) 531
artemis, sea, and aphrodite Griffiths (1975) 32
artemis, serve memory, of vedius iv commemorating gift to Kalinowski (2021) 91, 156, 159, 160, 161, 163
artemis, service of vedii to Kalinowski (2021) 111
artemis, skiris Lupu(2005) 81
artemis, soteira Benefiel and Keegan (2016) 53, 58, 164, 171
Simon (2021) 174
artemis, soteira at boeae, cult of Simon (2021) 174
artemis, soteira of megara Mikalson (2003) 90, 127, 129, 134
artemis, soteira, and household protection Jim (2022) 7, 108, 109
artemis, soteira, and seafaring Jim (2022) 7, 21, 87
artemis, soteira, and warfare Jim (2022) 7, 57, 58, 59, 145
artemis, soteira, artemis Bernabe et al (2013) 407
artemis, soteira, as the most popular soteira Jim (2022) 126, 145, 147
artemis, soteira, in boeae Jim (2022) 145
artemis, soteira, in megalopolis Jim (2022) 7
artemis, soteira, in megara Jim (2022) 37, 57, 126
artemis, soteira, in megiste Jim (2022) 10
artemis, soteira, in pagae Jim (2022) 57
artemis, soteira, in pellene Jim (2022) 58
artemis, soteira, in rhodes Jim (2022) 8
artemis, soteira, in tegea Jim (2022) 108
artemis, soteira, in thera Jim (2022) 108
artemis, soteira, multiple functions of Jim (2022) 7, 10, 145, 147
artemis, soteira, on amorgos Jim (2022) 10
artemis, soteira, on delos Jim (2022) 108
artemis, soteira, on icaros, in the persina gulf Jim (2022) 87, 153
artemis, soteira, with two torches Jim (2022) 57, 59, 67, 108
artemis, soteria, artemis Steiner (2001) 85, 107, 178
artemis, sparta Stavrianopoulou (2006) 123
artemis, strabo, on mysteries related to Kalinowski (2021) 107, 108, 115, 118
artemis, syme, apollo dalios, dalia, leto Kowalzig (2007) 77
artemis, tauropolis Humphreys (2018) 880, 916
artemis, tauropolos Hitch (2017) 52
Simon (2021) 166
Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020) 142
artemis, tauropolos, amphipolis, temple of Simon (2021) 166
artemis, temple of Greensmith (2021) 166
Levine (2005) 315
Pinheiro Bierl and Beck (2013) 258
Pinheiro et al (2012a) 37, 62, 67, 111, 139
Schwartz (2008) 148, 355
artemis, temple of ephesos Keddie (2019) 156, 157, 160, 165, 167
artemis, temple, koresos, legendary co-founder of Kalinowski (2021) 282
artemis, temples of Jenkyns (2013) 52, 300, 314
Sommerstein and Torrance (2014) 152, 160, 164
artemis, temples of apollo and Dignas Parker and Stroumsa (2013) 120
artemis, testimony of devotion to, nt Kalinowski (2021) 98, 99
artemis, theater and tragedy, connection to Simon (2021) 185, 186, 187
artemis, themistokles, and Humphreys (2018) 1037
artemis, thiasoi and thiasotai, of Mikalson (2016) 102, 152, 153, 247
artemis, titles of aristoboule Parker (2005) 54, 400
artemis, titles of delphinia Parker (2005) 436, 466
artemis, titles of hekate Parker (2005) 414, 431
artemis, titles of lochia Parker (2005) 430, 431
artemis, titles of phosphoros Parker (2005) 400, 404
artemis, to, leto, births of apollo and Simon (2021) 180, 358
artemis, torch associated with Simon (2021) 178, 187
artemis, triklaria Brule (2003) 18
artemis, triklaria, artemis Bernabe et al (2013) 402, 404, 406, 408, 409, 411, 412
artemis, triple-bodied form of Simon (2021) 177, 178, 374
artemis, vedia marcia, as priestess of Kalinowski (2021) 60, 61, 111, 112, 122, 170
artemis, vedii, generosity to Kalinowski (2021) 121, 127, 129, 170
artemis, vedius papianus antoninus iv, p., vedius iv, ‘erblasser’, gift/bequest to Kalinowski (2021) 89, 156, 159, 160, 161, 163, 165, 166, 168, 169, 170, 275, 282, 369, 387, 388, 397
artemis, virginity of Simon (2021) 169
artemis, virginity, and Petrovic and Petrovic (2016) 185, 199
artemis, virginity, of Simon (2021) 169
artemis, wife Riess (2012) 190
artemis, with apollo, in calasiris’ dream Repath and Whitmarsh (2022) 81, 82, 83, 85
artemis, with political assemblies and civic life, justice and political life, association of Simon (2021) 173, 174, 190
artemis, with, butchering and hunting, association of Simon (2021) 165, 168, 169, 170, 171, 175, 177, 179, 180, 181
artemis, with, hunting and butchering, association of Simon (2021) 165, 168, 169, 170, 171, 175, 177, 179, 180, 181
artemis, worship of artawazd king of armenia Liapis and Petrides (2019) 256
artemis, worshipped in form of pillars/columns Simon (2021) 137, 187
artemis, xenophon and Lupu(2005) 83
artemis, zeus and Simon (2021) 12, 165, 166, 173, 179, 180, 181
artemis/, artemision, ephesos Marek (2019) 115, 123, 162, 197, 257, 273, 298, 356, 435, 473
artemis/artamis, see also diana Gorain (2019) 122
artemis/diana Bednarek (2021) 68, 85
artemis/hunting, goddesses and, goats Simon (2021) 170, 171, 174, 175, 180, 182, 194
artemis/hunting, goddesses associated with, pastoralism Simon (2021) 168, 173, 185, 186
diana/artemis Panoussi(2019) 42, 153, 155, 206, 208, 211, 215, 216, 250, 262

List of validated texts:
94 validated results for "artemis"
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 287-292 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis, ascent, imagery of

 Found in books: Clay and Vergados (2022) 345; Konig (2022) 147


287. τὴν μέν τοι κακότητα καὶ ἰλαδὸν ἔστιν ἑλέσθαι'288. ῥηιδίως· λείη μὲν ὁδός, μάλα δʼ ἐγγύθι ναίει· 289. τῆς δʼ ἀρετῆς ἱδρῶτα θεοὶ προπάροιθεν ἔθηκαν 290. ἀθάνατοι· μακρὸς δὲ καὶ ὄρθιος οἶμος ἐς αὐτὴν 291. καὶ τρηχὺς τὸ πρῶτον· ἐπὴν δʼ εἰς ἄκρον ἵκηται, 292. ῥηιδίη δὴ ἔπειτα πέλει, χαλεπή περ ἐοῦσα. '. None
287. Perses, remember this, serve righteousne'288. And wholly sidestep the iniquity 289. of force. The son of Cronus made this act 290. For men - that fish, wild beasts and birds should eat 291. Each other, being lawless, but the pact 292. He made with humankind is very meet – '. None
2. Hesiod, Theogony, 411-452, 922 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Apollo, Artemis and • Apollonian triad (Apollo, Artemis, and Leto) • Artemis • Artemis Eukleia • Artemis Hecate • Artemis Orthia • Artemis Soteira, as the most popular Soteira • Artemis Soteira, multiple functions of • Artemis of Aulis • Artemis, Apollo and • Artemis, Apollonian triad (Apollo, Artemis, and Leto) • Artemis, Dionysus and • Artemis, Hermes and • Artemis, Zeus and • Artemis, animals, association with • Artemis, arktoi (she-bears), young girls serving Artemis as • Artemis, cruel death, providing vengeance against • Artemis, cult and rites • Artemis, hunting and butchering, association with • Artemis, images and iconography • Artemis, origins and development • Artemis, political assemblies and civic life, association with • Artemis, sacrifice/sacrificial rituals for • Artemis, theater and tragedy, connection to • Artemis, virginity of • Brauron, cult of Artemis at • Calydon, cults of Artemis and Dionysus at • Corinth, cults of Artemis and Dionysus at • Dionysus, Artemis and • Dreros (Crete), sphyrelata statuettes of Apollo between Leto and Artemis from • Hermes, Artemis and • Leto, Apollonian triad (Apollo, Artemis, and Leto) • Leto, Artemis and • Miletus, Artemis Boulephoros, cult of • Nilsson, Martin, on Artemis • Pausanias, on Artemis as civic goddess • Sparta, sanctuary/cult of Artemis Orthia • Zeus, Artemis and • animals, Artemis as “Mistress of Beasts,” • arktoi (she-bears), young girls serving Artemis as • bears, arktoi (she-bears), young girls serving Artemis as • bulls, Artemis associated with • butchering and hunting, association of Artemis with • deer, Artemis associated with • hunting and butchering, association of Artemis with • justice and political life, association of Artemis with political assemblies and civic life • masks, Artemis and • pastoralism, Artemis/hunting goddesses associated with • sacrifice/sacrificial rituals, for Artemis • the dead, Artemis providing vengeance against cruel death • theater and tragedy, Artemis and • virginity, of Artemis

 Found in books: Bortolani et al (2019) 7; Gagné (2020) 119; Jim (2022) 147; Mcclellan (2019) 184; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti (2022) 33, 242; Simon (2021) 169, 173, 186; Trapp et al (2016) 83


411. ἢ δʼ ὑποκυσαμένη Ἑκάτην τέκε, τὴν περὶ πάντων'412. Ζεὺς Κρονίδης τίμησε· πόρεν δέ οἱ ἀγλαὰ δῶρα, 413. μοῖραν ἔχειν γαίης τε καὶ ἀτρυγέτοιο θαλάσσης. 414. ἣ δὲ καὶ ἀστερόεντος ἀπʼ οὐρανοῦ ἔμμορε τιμῆς 415. ἀθανάτοις τε θεοῖσι τετιμένη ἐστὶ μάλιστα. 416. καὶ γὰρ νῦν, ὅτε πού τις ἐπιχθονίων ἀνθρώπων 417. ἔρδων ἱερὰ καλὰ κατὰ νόμον ἱλάσκηται, 418. κικλῄσκει Ἑκάτην. πολλή τέ οἱ ἕσπετο τιμὴ 419. ῥεῖα μάλʼ, ᾧ πρόφρων γε θεὰ ὑποδέξεται εὐχάς, 420. καί τέ οἱ ὄλβον ὀπάζει, ἐπεὶ δύναμίς γε πάρεστιν. 421. ὅσσοι γὰρ Γαίης τε καὶ Οὐρανοῦ ἐξεγένοντο 422. καὶ τιμὴν ἔλαχον, τούτων ἔχει αἶσαν ἁπάντων. 423. οὐδέ τί μιν Κρονίδης ἐβιήσατο οὐδέ τʼ ἀπηύρα, 424. ὅσσʼ ἔλαχεν Τιτῆσι μετὰ προτέροισι θεοῖσιν, 425. ἀλλʼ ἔχει, ὡς τὸ πρῶτον ἀπʼ ἀρχῆς ἔπλετο δασμός, 426. οὐδʼ, ὅτι μουνογενής, ἧσσον θεὰ ἔμμορε τιμῆς, 427. καὶ γέρας ἐν γαίῃ τε καὶ οὐρανῷ ἠδὲ θαλάσσῃ· 428. ἀλλʼ ἔτι καὶ πολὺ μᾶλλον, ἐπεὶ Ζεὺς τίεται αὐτήν. 429. ᾧ δʼ ἐθέλει, μεγάλως παραγίγνεται ἠδʼ ὀνίνησιν· 430. ἔν τʼ ἀγορῇ λαοῖσι μεταπρέπει, ὅν κʼ ἐθέλῃσιν· 431. ἠδʼ ὁπότʼ ἐς πόλεμον φθεισήνορα θωρήσσωνται 432. ἀνέρες, ἔνθα θεὰ παραγίγνεται, οἷς κʼ ἐθέλῃσι 433. νίκην προφρονέως ὀπάσαι καὶ κῦδος ὀρέξαι. 434. ἔν τε δίκῃ βασιλεῦσι παρʼ αἰδοίοισι καθίζει, 435. ἐσθλὴ δʼ αὖθʼ ὁπότʼ ἄνδρες ἀεθλεύωσιν ἀγῶνι, 436. ἔνθα θεὰ καὶ τοῖς παραγίγνεται ἠδʼ ὀνίνησιν· 437. νικήσας δὲ βίῃ καὶ κάρτεϊ καλὸν ἄεθλον 438. ῥεῖα φέρει χαίρων τε, τοκεῦσι δὲ κῦδος ὀπάζει. 439. ἐσθλὴ δʼ ἱππήεσσι παρεστάμεν, οἷς κʼ ἐθέλῃσιν. 440. καὶ τοῖς, οἳ γλαυκὴν δυσπέμφελον ἐργάζονται, 441. εὔχονται δʼ Ἑκάτῃ καὶ ἐρικτύπῳ Ἐννοσιγαίῳ, 442. ῥηιδίως ἄγρην κυδρὴ θεὸς ὤπασε πολλήν, 443. ῥεῖα δʼ ἀφείλετο φαινομένην, ἐθέλουσά γε θυμῷ. 444. ἐσθλὴ δʼ ἐν σταθμοῖσι σὺν Ἑρμῇ ληίδʼ ἀέξειν· 445. βουκολίας δʼ ἀγέλας τε καὶ αἰπόλια πλατέʼ αἰγῶν 446. ποίμνας τʼ εἰροπόκων ὀίων, θυμῷ γʼ ἐθέλουσα, 447. ἐξ ὀλίγων βριάει κἀκ πολλῶν μείονα θῆκεν. 448. οὕτω τοι καὶ μουνογενὴς ἐκ μητρὸς ἐοῦσα 449. πᾶσι μετʼ ἀθανάτοισι τετίμηται γεράεσσιν. 450. θῆκε δέ μιν Κρονίδης κουροτρόφον, οἳ μετʼ ἐκείνην 451. ὀφθαλμοῖσιν ἴδοντο φάος πολυδερκέος Ἠοῦς. 452. οὕτως ἐξ ἀρχῆς κουροτρόφος, αἳ δέ τε τιμαί.
922. ἣ δʼ Ἥβην καὶ Ἄρηα καὶ Εἰλείθυιαν ἔτικτε '. None
411. In fact three thousand of them, every one'412. Neat-ankled, spread through his dominion, 413. Serving alike the earth and mighty seas, 414. And all of them renowned divinities. 415. They have as many brothers, thundering 416. As on they flow, begotten by the king 417. of seas on Tethys. Though it’s hard to tell 418. Their names, yet they are known from where they dwell. 419. Hyperion lay with Theia, and she thu 420. Bore clear Selene and great Heliu 421. And Eos shining on all things on earth 422. And on the gods who dwell in the wide berth 423. of heaven. Eurybia bore great Astraeu 424. And Pallas, having mingled with Crius; 425. The bright goddess to Perses, too, gave birth, 426. Who was the wisest man on all the earth; 427. Eos bore the strong winds to Astraeus, 428. And Boreas, too, and brightening Zephyru 429. And Notus, born of two divinities. 430. The star Eosphorus came after these, 431. Birthed by Eugeneia, ‘Early-Born’, 432. Who came to be the harbinger of Dawn, 433. And heaven’s gleaming stars far up above. 434. And Ocean’s daughter Styx was joined in love 435. To Pelias – thus trim-ankled Victory 436. And Zeal first saw the light of day; and she 437. Bore Strength and Force, both glorious children: they 438. Dwell in the house of Zeus; they’ve no pathway 439. Or dwelling that’s without a god as guide, 440. And ever they continue to reside 441. With Zeus the Thunderer; thus Styx had planned 442. That day when Lightning Zeus sent a command 443. That all the gods to broad Olympus go 444. And said that, if they helped him overthrow 445. The Titans, then he vowed not to bereave 446. Them of their rights but they would still receive 447. The rights they’d had before, and, he explained, 448. To those who under Cronus had maintained 449. No rights or office he would then entrust 450. Those very privileges, as is just. 451. So deathless Styx, with all her progeny, 452. Was first to go, through the sagacity
922. And Hades, who has sovereignty over those '. None
3. Homer, Iliad, 2.485-2.486, 2.489-2.492, 5.385, 6.303, 6.428, 9.584, 14.326, 16.181-16.186, 19.119, 21.470-21.471, 21.483, 23.74, 24.603-24.606, 24.609 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Apollo, Artemis and • Apollonian triad (Apollo, Artemis, and Leto) • Artemis • Artemis Agrotera • Artemis Eukleia • Artemis Hecate • Artemis Limnatis, • Artemis, • Artemis, Apollo and • Artemis, Apollonian triad (Apollo, Artemis, and Leto) • Artemis, Artemis Laphria • Artemis, Artemis Limnatis Λιμνάτις • Artemis, Artemis Triklaria • Artemis, Eileithyia • Artemis, S. Biagio at Metapontion • Artemis, S. Biagio at Metapontion, archaeology of • Artemis, S. Biagio at Metapontion, fluid worshipping group • Artemis, S. Biagio at Metapontion, pre-colonial worshippers of • Artemis, Zeus and • Artemis, and childbirth • Artemis, animals, association with • Artemis, arktoi (she-bears), young girls serving Artemis as • Artemis, cult and rites • Artemis, hunting and butchering, association with • Artemis, origins and development • Artemis, political assemblies and civic life, association with • Artemis, sacrifice/sacrificial rituals for • Brauron, cult of Artemis at • Diana, see also Artemis • Diana/Artemis • Dreros (Crete), sphyrelata statuettes of Apollo between Leto and Artemis from • Hekate-Selene-Artemis • Leto, Apollonian triad (Apollo, Artemis, and Leto) • Leto, Artemis and • Miletus, Artemis Boulephoros, cult of • Nilsson, Martin, on Artemis • Pausanias, on Artemis as civic goddess • Taras, Artemis agrotera at • Zeus, Artemis and • animals, Artemis as “Mistress of Beasts,” • arktoi (she-bears), young girls serving Artemis as • bears, arktoi (she-bears), young girls serving Artemis as • butchering and hunting, association of Artemis with • hunting and butchering, association of Artemis with • justice and political life, association of Artemis with political assemblies and civic life • pastoralism, Artemis/hunting goddesses associated with • sacrifice/sacrificial rituals, for Artemis

 Found in books: Bernabe et al (2013) 402, 403; Bowie (2021) 541; Bremmer (2008) 327; Castagnoli and Ceccarelli (2019) 265; Eisenfeld (2022) 138; Gagné (2020) 119; Gorain (2019) 126; Jim (2022) 107, 154; Jouanna (2018) 586; Kowalzig (2007) 294; Lipka (2021) 208; Lyons (1997) 98, 136; Maciver (2012) 34; Mawford and Ntanou (2021) 254; Miller and Clay (2019) 67, 127; Pachoumi (2017) 137; Panoussi(2019) 211; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti (2022) 15, 33, 54; Simon (2021) 168, 173; de Jáuregui et al. (2011) 123


2.485. ὑμεῖς γὰρ θεαί ἐστε πάρεστέ τε ἴστέ τε πάντα, 2.486. ἡμεῖς δὲ κλέος οἶον ἀκούομεν οὐδέ τι ἴδμεν·
2.489. οὐδʼ εἴ μοι δέκα μὲν γλῶσσαι, δέκα δὲ στόματʼ εἶεν, 2.490. φωνὴ δʼ ἄρρηκτος, χάλκεον δέ μοι ἦτορ ἐνείη, 2.491. εἰ μὴ Ὀλυμπιάδες Μοῦσαι Διὸς αἰγιόχοιο 2.492. θυγατέρες μνησαίαθʼ ὅσοι ὑπὸ Ἴλιον ἦλθον·
5.385. τλῆ μὲν Ἄρης ὅτε μιν Ὦτος κρατερός τʼ Ἐφιάλτης
6.303. θῆκεν Ἀθηναίης ἐπὶ γούνασιν ἠϋκόμοιο,
6.428. πατρὸς δʼ ἐν μεγάροισι βάλʼ Ἄρτεμις ἰοχέαιρα.
9.584. πολλὰ δὲ τόν γε κασίγνηται καὶ πότνια μήτηρ
14.326. οὐδʼ ὅτε Δήμητρος καλλιπλοκάμοιο ἀνάσσης,
16.181. Φύλαντος θυγάτηρ· τῆς δὲ κρατὺς ἀργεϊφόντης 16.182. ἠράσατʼ, ὀφθαλμοῖσιν ἰδὼν μετὰ μελπομένῃσιν 16.183. ἐν χορῷ Ἀρτέμιδος χρυσηλακάτου κελαδεινῆς. 16.184. αὐτίκα δʼ εἰς ὑπερῷʼ ἀναβὰς παρελέξατο λάθρῃ 16.185. Ἑρμείας ἀκάκητα, πόρεν δέ οἱ ἀγλαὸν υἱὸν 16.186. Εὔδωρον πέρι μὲν θείειν ταχὺν ἠδὲ μαχητήν.
19.119. Ἀλκμήνης δʼ ἀπέπαυσε τόκον, σχέθε δʼ Εἰλειθυίας.
21.470. τὸν δὲ κασιγνήτη μάλα νείκεσε πότνια θηρῶν 21.471. Ἄρτεμις ἀγροτέρη, καὶ ὀνείδειον φάτο μῦθον·
21.483. τοξοφόρῳ περ ἐούσῃ, ἐπεὶ σὲ λέοντα γυναιξὶ
23.74. ἀλλʼ αὔτως ἀλάλημαι ἀνʼ εὐρυπυλὲς Ἄϊδος δῶ.
24.603. τῇ περ δώδεκα παῖδες ἐνὶ μεγάροισιν ὄλοντο 24.604. ἓξ μὲν θυγατέρες, ἓξ δʼ υἱέες ἡβώοντες. 24.605. τοὺς μὲν Ἀπόλλων πέφνεν ἀπʼ ἀργυρέοιο βιοῖο 24.606. χωόμενος Νιόβῃ, τὰς δʼ Ἄρτεμις ἰοχέαιρα,
24.609. τὼ δʼ ἄρα καὶ δοιώ περ ἐόντʼ ἀπὸ πάντας ὄλεσσαν.''. None
2.485. for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.490. and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains,
5.385. So suffered Ares, when Otus and mighty Ephialtes, the sons of Aloeus, bound him in cruel bonds, and in a brazen jar he lay bound for thirteen months; and then would Ares, insatiate of war, have perished, had not the stepmother of the sons of Aloeus, the beauteous Eëriboea,
6.303. for her had the Trojans made priestess of Athene. Then with sacred cries they all lifted up their hands to Athene; and fair-cheeked Theano took the robe and laid it upon the knees of fair-haired Athene, and with vows made prayer to the daughter of great Zeus: ' "
6.428. And my mother, that was queen beneath wooded Placus, her brought he hither with the rest of the spoil, but thereafter set her free, when he had taken ransom past counting; and in her father's halls Artemis the archer slew her. Nay, Hector, thou art to me father and queenly mother, " '
9.584. and the half clear plough-land, to be cut from out the plain. And earnestly the old horseman Oeneus besought him, standing upon the threshold of his high-roofed chamber, and shaking the jointed doors, in prayer to his son, and earnestly too did his sisters and his honoured mother beseech him
14.326. and Semele bare Dionysus, the joy of mortals; nor of Demeter, the fair-tressed queen; nor of glorious Leto; nay, nor yet of thine own self, as now I love thee, and sweet desire layeth hold of me. Then with crafty mind the queenly Hera spake unto him:
16.181. the son of a girl unwed, and him did Polymele, fair in the dance, daughter of Phylas, bear. of her the strong Argeiphontes became enamoured, when his eyes had sight of her amid the singing maidens, in the dancing-floor of Artemis, huntress of the golden arrows and the echoing chase. Forthwith then he went up into her upper chamber, and lay with her secretly, 16.185. even Hermes the helper, and she gave him a goodly son, Eudorus, pre-eminent in speed of foot and as a warrior. But when at length Eileithyia, goddess of child-birth, had brought him to the light, and he saw the rays of the sun, then her did the stalwart and mighty Echecles, son of Actor, 16.186. even Hermes the helper, and she gave him a goodly son, Eudorus, pre-eminent in speed of foot and as a warrior. But when at length Eileithyia, goddess of child-birth, had brought him to the light, and he saw the rays of the sun, then her did the stalwart and mighty Echecles, son of Actor, ' "
19.119. and swiftly came to Achaean Argos, where she knew was the stately wife of Sthenelus, son of Perseus, that bare a son in her womb, and lo, the seventh month was come. This child Hera brought forth to the light even before the full tale of the months, but stayed Alcmene's bearing, and held back the Eileithyiae. " '
21.470. But his sister railed at him hotly, even the queen of the wild beasts, Artemis of the wild wood, and spake a word of reviling:Lo, thou fleest, thou god that workest afar, and to Poseidon hast thou utterly yielded the victory, and given him glory for naught! Fool, why bearest thou a bow thus worthless as wind?
21.483. How now art thou fain, thou bold and shameless thing, to stand forth against me? No easy foe I tell thee, am I, that thou shouldst vie with me in might, albeit thou bearest the bow, since it was against women that Zeus made thee a lion, and granted thee to slay whomsoever of them thou wilt.
23.74. Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades.
24.603. and lieth upon a bier; and at break of day thou shalt thyself behold him, as thou bearest him hence; but for this present let us bethink us of supper. For even the fair-haired Niobe bethought her of meat, albeit twelve children perished in her halls, six daughters and six lusty sons. 24.605. The sons Apollo slew with shafts from his silver bow, being wroth against Niobe, and the daughters the archer Artemis, for that Niobe had matched her with fair-cheeked Leto, saying that the goddess had borne but twain, while herself was mother to many; wherefore they, for all they were but twain, destroyed them all.
24.609. The sons Apollo slew with shafts from his silver bow, being wroth against Niobe, and the daughters the archer Artemis, for that Niobe had matched her with fair-cheeked Leto, saying that the goddess had borne but twain, while herself was mother to many; wherefore they, for all they were but twain, destroyed them all. ''. None
4. Homeric Hymns, To Aphrodite, 20, 26-28, 108-127, 198-199, 209 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Aphrodite, Artemis and • Apollo, Artemis and • Apollonian triad (Apollo, Artemis, and Leto) • Artemis • Artemis Eukleia • Artemis Hecate • Artemis Orthia, • Artemis, A. Ephesia • Artemis, A. Patmia • Artemis, Aphrodite and • Artemis, Apollo and • Artemis, Apollonian triad (Apollo, Artemis, and Leto) • Artemis, Zeus and • Artemis, cult and rites • Artemis, oaths sworn by • Artemis, political assemblies and civic life, association with • Artemis, sacrifice/sacrificial rituals for • Artemis, sanctuaries and temples • Dreros (Crete), sphyrelata statuettes of Apollo between Leto and Artemis from • Leto, Apollonian triad (Apollo, Artemis, and Leto) • Leto, Artemis and • Miletus, Artemis Boulephoros, cult of • Nilsson, Martin, on Artemis • Pausanias, on Artemis as civic goddess • Sparta, comb with Judgment of Paris scene, sanctuary of Artemis Orthia • Sparta, sanctuary/cult of Artemis Orthia • Zeus, Artemis and • justice and political life, association of Artemis with political assemblies and civic life • pastoralism, Artemis/hunting goddesses associated with • sacrifice/sacrificial rituals, for Artemis • sanctuaries and temples, of Artemis

 Found in books: Bowie (2021) 540; Bremmer (2008) 253; Farrell (2021) 104; Lipka (2021) 58; Miller and Clay (2019) 127; Simon (2021) 123, 173, 253, 268; Sommerstein and Torrance (2014) 158, 198


20. Istia is the third to have no taste
26. She swore a great oath, which would come to be 27. Fulfilled, by touching Father Zeus’s head. 28. She’d be a virgin evermore, she said.
108. The child of Zeus addressed him and said: “I'109. Am no goddess, Anchises, most sublime 110. of earth-born ones. Why do you think that I’m 111. Immortal? No, a mortal gave me birth. 112. My father’s Otreus, very well known on earth, 113. If you have heard of him. He holds command 114. In well-walled Phrygia. I understand 115. Your language well. At home have I been bred 116. By a Trojan nurse who, in my mother’s stead, 117. Nurtured me from a child, and that is why 118. I know your tongue as well. However, I 119. Was seized by Hermes, who took me away 1
20. From Artemis’s dance. A great array 121. of marriageable maids were we as we 122. Frolicked together. A great company 123. Surrounded us. Thence Hermes snatched me, then 124. Guided me over many fields of men, 125. Much land that was not harrowed nor possessed, 1
26. Where beasts of prey roamed the dark vales. I guessed 127. I’d never touch the earth again. He said
198. Are the most godlike, being fair of face 199. And tall. Zeus seized golden-haired Ganymede

209. High-stepping horses such as carry men. '. None
5. Homeric Hymns, To Hermes, 567-568 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis, Dionysus and • Artemis, Hermes and • Artemis, animals, association with • Dionysus, Artemis and • Hermes, Artemis and • animals, Artemis as “Mistress of Beasts,”

 Found in books: Miller and Clay (2019) 52; Simon (2021) 327


567. About. I give you them. If you enquire'568. Strictly of them, you’ll gain your heart’s desire. '. None
6. None, None, nan (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Amphipolis, temple of Artemis Tauropolos • Aphrodite, Artemis and • Apollo Delios/Dalios (Delos), inseparable from earlier Artemis • Apollo, Artemis and • Ares, Artemis and • Artemis • Artemis (goddess) • Artemis (goddess), Laphria festival • Artemis (goddess), sanctuary at Delos • Artemis Delia, Delos • Artemis Delia, older deity on Delos • Artemis Elaphebolos • Artemis Hecate • Artemis Kalliste • Artemis Tauropolos • Artemis of Aulis • Artemis, • Artemis, A. Ephesia • Artemis, A. Patmia • Artemis, Aphrodite and • Artemis, Apollo and • Artemis, Ares and • Artemis, Athena and • Artemis, Dionysus and • Artemis, Hera and • Artemis, Homeric Hymn • Artemis, Iphigenia, sacrifice of • Artemis, S. Biagio at Metapontion, alternative aetiological myths • Artemis, S. Biagio at Metapontion, and Akhaian identity • Artemis, Zeus and • Artemis, and childbirth • Artemis, and moon • Artemis, and moon, at Ephesus • Artemis, animals, association with • Artemis, as birth/vegetation deity • Artemis, at Claros • Artemis, cruel death, providing vengeance against • Artemis, cult and rites • Artemis, hunting and butchering, association with • Artemis, images and iconography • Artemis, oaths invoking • Artemis, origins and development • Artemis, parthenos • Artemis, polymorphism of • Artemis, sacrifice/sacrificial rituals for • Artemis, sanctuaries and temples • Artemis/Artamis, see also Diana • Athena, Artemis and • Aulis, cult of Artemis at • Birth of Dionysus, Artemis as birth goddess • Breasts of Artemis at Ephesus • Childbirth, Artemis helps in • Delos, Artemis, cult of • Diana / Artemis • Dionysus, Artemis and • Hera, Artemis and • Homer, on Artemis • Leto, Artemis and • Leto, births of Apollo and Artemis to • Leto, giving birth to Apollo and Artemis on Delos • Minoan-Mycenaean religion and art, Artemis and • Moon, emerging from sea, and Artemis • Mycenae, Mycenaeans (Bronze Age), Artemis on Delos • Naxos, cylinder seal of warrior at altar of Artemis (?) • Thrace, Artemis and • Zeus, Artemis and • animals, Artemis as “Mistress of Beasts,” • birth scenes and stories, Apollo and Artemis, births of • bulls, Artemis associated with • butchering and hunting, association of Artemis with • deer, Artemis associated with • goats, Artemis/hunting goddesses and • hunting and butchering, association of Artemis with • palm tree, sacred to Apollo and Artemis • sacrifice/sacrificial rituals, for Artemis • sanctuaries and temples, of Artemis • the dead, Artemis providing vengeance against cruel death • vegetation deities, Artemis and

 Found in books: Bowie (2021) 545, 546, 547; Bremmer (2008) 26, 253; Brule (2003) 56; Castagnoli and Ceccarelli (2019) 261; Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 14, 278, 524; Farrell (2021) 107; Gazis and Hooper (2021) 51, 62; Giusti (2018) 121; Gorain (2019) 122; Griffiths (1975) 117; Hitch (2017) 49; Jim (2022) 107, 154; Jouanna (2018) 586; Kowalzig (2007) 119, 311, 318; Lyons (1997) 98, 125; Maciver (2012) 136; Mayor (2017) 177, 181; Naiden (2013) 145; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti (2022) 15, 28; Simon (2021) 165, 166, 170, 180; Sommerstein and Torrance (2014) 178; Sweeney (2013) 110; Waldner et al (2016) 22, 42, 43


7. None, None, nan (8th cent. BCE - 8th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Apollo Delios/Dalios (Delos), inseparable from earlier Artemis • Apollo, Artemis and • Apollonian triad (Apollo, Artemis, and Leto) • Artemis • Artemis Ephesia, Ephesos • Artemis, Amarysia • Artemis, Apollo and • Artemis, Apollonian triad (Apollo, Artemis, and Leto) • Artemis, Homeric Hymn • Artemis, at Claros • Artemis, cruel death, providing vengeance against • Artemis, hunting and butchering, association with • Artemis, origins and development • Delos, Artemis, cult of • Exekias, calyx-krater with Apollo Kitharoidos and Artemis • Leto, Apollonian triad (Apollo, Artemis, and Leto) • Leto, giving birth to Apollo and Artemis on Delos • Minoan-Mycenaean religion and art, Artemis and • Selinus, metope with Apollo, Artemis, and Leto • aetiologies, specific, Apollo and Artemis (Delos) • butchering and hunting, association of Artemis with • goats, Artemis/hunting goddesses and • hunting and butchering, association of Artemis with • the dead, Artemis providing vengeance against cruel death

 Found in books: Humphreys (2018) 541; Kowalzig (2007) 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 78, 103; Lipka (2021) 52; Simon (2021) 154, 155, 157, 171; Sweeney (2013) 110; de Jáuregui et al. (2011) 123


8. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 134-138, 140-143, 218-229 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Aegeira, cult of Artemis Agrotera at • Amphipolis, temple of Artemis Tauropolos • Ares, Artemis and • Artemis • Artemis (goddess) • Artemis (goddess), sanctuary at Brauron • Artemis Agrotera • Artemis Enodia • Artemis Hecate • Artemis Hegemone • Artemis Kalliste • Artemis Tauropolos • Artemis and birth • Artemis of Aulis • Artemis premarital offerings to • Artemis, Ares and • Artemis, Dionysus and • Artemis, Iphigenia, sacrifice of • Artemis, Tauropolos • Artemis, Zeus and • Artemis, animals, association with • Artemis, arktoi (she-bears), young girls serving Artemis as • Artemis, children, as nurturer of • Artemis, cruel death, providing vengeance against • Artemis, cult and rites • Artemis, hunting and butchering, association with • Artemis, migration/movement of peoples, association with • Artemis, origins and development • Artemis, sacrifice/sacrificial rituals for • Artemis, sanctuaries and temples • Aulis, cult of Artemis at • Dionysus, Artemis and • Homer, on Artemis • Thrace, Artemis and • Zeus, Artemis and • animals, Artemis as “Mistress of Beasts,” • arktoi (she-bears), young girls serving Artemis as • bears, arktoi (she-bears), young girls serving Artemis as • bulls, Artemis associated with • butchering and hunting, association of Artemis with • eagles, Artemis and • festivals, Artemis Brauronia • goats, Artemis/hunting goddesses and • hunting and butchering, association of Artemis with • migration/movement of peoples, Artemis associated with • sacrifice/sacrificial rituals, for Artemis • sanctuaries and temples, of Artemis • statue of goddess from, wet-nurse festival for Artemis in • the dead, Artemis providing vengeance against cruel death

 Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 525; Hitch (2017) 52; Parker (2005) 428, 441; Petrovic and Petrovic (2016) 136; Simon (2021) 166, 175


135. 140. τόσον περ εὔφρων, καλά,
218. ἐπεὶ δʼ ἀνάγκας ἔδυ λέπαδνον 219. φρενὸς πνέων δυσσεβῆ τροπαίαν 220. ἄναγνον ἀνίερον, τόθεν 221. τὸ παντότολμον φρονεῖν μετέγνω. 222. βροτοὺς θρασύνει γὰρ αἰσχρόμητις 223. τάλαινα παρακοπὰ πρωτοπήμων. ἔτλα δʼ οὖν' '225. θυτὴρ γενέσθαι θυγατρός, 226. γυναικοποίνων πολέμων ἀρωγὰν 227. καὶ προτέλεια ναῶν. Χορός 228. λιτὰς δὲ καὶ κληδόνας πατρῴους 229. παρʼ οὐδὲν αἰῶ τε παρθένειον''. None
134.
9. None, None, nan (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis premarital offerings to • Artemis, and human sacrifice • Hekate-Selene-Artemis

 Found in books: Fabian Meinel (2015) 151; Meister (2019) 45; Pachoumi (2017) 133; Parker (2005) 441


10. None, None, nan (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis Hemera (Lousoi), aetiology jumbled with that of Hera Argeia • Artemis Hemera (Lousoi), myth-ritual nexus • Artemis Hemera (Lousoi), sacred herd, symbolised in womens khoroi • Artemis, Artemis-Hecate • Artemis, Hekate and • Artemis, Potnia Theron • Artemis, S. Biagio at Metapontion, myth-ritual nexus • Hekate, and Artemis • Proitids, and aetiology for Artemis of Lousoi • aetiologies, specific, Artemis at Lousoi/Metapontion

 Found in books: Edmunds (2021) 22; Hitch (2017) 91; Kowalzig (2007) 275, 280, 281; Lupu(2005) 306; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti (2022) 237; Waldner et al (2016) 43


11. None, None, nan (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Apollo Delios/Dalios (Delos), inseparable from earlier Artemis • Artemis • Artemis Orthosia • Artemis, S. Biagio at Metapontion, alternative aetiological myths

 Found in books: Eisenfeld (2022) 132, 137, 138, 147; Gagné (2020) 11, 13; Kowalzig (2007) 30, 121; Meister (2019) 78


12. Euripides, Bacchae, 73-75, 107-108, 113-114, 139 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis, Artemis Soteria • Diana/Artemis

 Found in books: Pachoumi (2017) 135; Panoussi(2019) 215; Peels (2016) 239; Pucci (2016) 156; Steiner (2001) 85


73. μάκαρ, ὅστις εὐδαίμων
73. ὦ 74. βιοτὰν ἁγιστεύει καὶ 74. τελετὰς θεῶν εἰδὼς 75. θιασεύεται ψυχὰν
107. βρύετε βρύετε χλοήρει'108. μίλακι καλλικάρπῳ
113. μαλλοῖς· ἀμφὶ δὲ νάρθηκας ὑβριστὰς 114. ὁσιοῦσθʼ· αὐτίκα γᾶ πᾶσα χορεύσει—
139. αἷμα τραγοκτόνον, ὠμοφάγον χάριν, ἱέμενος 113. or pine. Adorn your garments of spotted fawn-skin with fleeces of white sheep, and sport in holy games with insolent thyrsoi The thyrsos is a staff that is crowned with ivy and that is sacred to Dionysus and an emblem of his worship. . At once all the earth will dance—
139. He is sweet in the mountains cf. Dodds, ad loc. , whenever after the running dance he falls on the ground, wearing the sacred garment of fawn skin, hunting the blood of the slain goat, a raw-eaten delight, rushing to the '. None
13. Euripides, Hippolytus, 1, 7, 10-22, 25, 29-33, 35, 47, 58-60, 82-86, 104, 141-147, 236-238, 317, 443-450, 611-612, 657, 1060-1063, 1277-1280, 1286-1289, 1298-1299, 1301-1302, 1305-1324, 1328-1334, 1339-1340, 1390-1391, 1400, 1402, 1409, 1416-1430, 1437-1439 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis, Brauronia • Artemis, Tauropolus • Artemis, and Hippolytus • Artemis, oaths invoking • Artemis/Diana • Euripides, and Artemis • Hippolytus (Euripides), Artemis in • hagnos, as epithet of Artemis • virginity, and Artemis

 Found in books: Bednarek (2021) 85; Ekroth (2013) 201; Fabian Meinel (2015) 44; Faraone (1999) 47; Jouanna (2018) 366; Lipka (2021) 83, 94, 109; Lyons (1997) 44, 100; Meister (2019) 45, 164, 165; Naiden (2013) 121, 148; Petrovic and Petrovic (2016) 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 191, 192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 200, 202, 203, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, 210, 212, 213, 214, 241; Pucci (2016) 54, 156, 165; Sommerstein and Torrance (2014) 28, 247, 289, 291, 294; Álvarez (2019) 145


1. Πολλὴ μὲν ἐν βροτοῖσι κοὐκ ἀνώνυμος'
7. ἔνεστι γὰρ δὴ κἀν θεῶν γένει τόδε:' "

10. ὁ γάρ με Θησέως παῖς, ̓Αμαζόνος τόκος,
1
1. ̔Ιππόλυτος, ἁγνοῦ Πιτθέως παιδεύματα,
12. μόνος πολιτῶν τῆσδε γῆς Τροζηνίας
13. λέγει κακίστην δαιμόνων πεφυκέναι:
14. ἀναίνεται δὲ λέκτρα κοὐ ψαύει γάμων,' "
15. Φοίβου δ' ἀδελφὴν ̓́Αρτεμιν, Διὸς κόρην," '
16. τιμᾷ, μεγίστην δαιμόνων ἡγούμενος,' "
1
7. χλωρὰν δ' ἀν' ὕλην παρθένῳ ξυνὼν ἀεὶ" '
18. κυσὶν ταχείαις θῆρας ἐξαιρεῖ χθονός,
19. μείζω βροτείας προσπεσὼν ὁμιλίας. 20. τούτοισι μέν νυν οὐ φθονῶ: τί γάρ με δεῖ;' "2
1. ἃ δ' εἰς ἔμ' ἡμάρτηκε τιμωρήσομαι" "22. ̔Ιππόλυτον ἐν τῇδ' ἡμέρᾳ: τὰ πολλὰ δὲ" '
25. σεμνῶν ἐς ὄψιν καὶ τέλη μυστηρίων
29. καὶ πρὶν μὲν ἐλθεῖν τήνδε γῆν Τροζηνίαν,' "30. πέτραν παρ' αὐτὴν Παλλάδος, κατόψιον" '3
1. γῆς τῆσδε ναὸν Κύπριδος ἐγκαθίσατο,' "32. ἐρῶς' ἔρωτ' ἔκδημον, ̔Ιππολύτῳ δ' ἔπι" '33. τὸ λοιπὸν ὀνομάσουσιν ἱδρῦσθαι θεάν.
35. μίασμα φεύγων αἵματος Παλλαντιδῶν 4
7. ἡ δ' εὐκλεὴς μὲν ἀλλ' ὅμως ἀπόλλυται" "
58. ἕπεσθ' ᾄδοντες ἕπεσθε" '59. τὰν Διὸς οὐρανίαν 60. ̓́Αρτεμιν, ᾇ μελόμεσθα.
82. ἀλλ', ὦ φίλη δέσποινα, χρυσέας κόμης" '83. ἀνάδημα δέξαι χειρὸς εὐσεβοῦς ἄπο.' "84. μόνῳ γάρ ἐστι τοῦτ' ἐμοὶ γέρας βροτῶν:" '85. σοὶ καὶ ξύνειμι καὶ λόγοις ἀμείβομαι,' "86. κλύων μὲν αὐδῆς, ὄμμα δ' οὐχ ὁρῶν τὸ σόν." '


104. ἄλλοισιν ἄλλος θεῶν τε κἀνθρώπων μέλει.
14
1. †σύ γὰρ† ἔνθεος, ὦ κούρα,
142. εἴτ' ἐκ Πανὸς εἴθ' ̔Εκάτας" '
143. ἢ σεμνῶν Κορυβάντων φοι-
144. τᾷς ἢ ματρὸς ὀρείας;' "
145. †σὺ δ'† ἀμφὶ τὰν πολύθη-" '
146. ρον Δίκτυνναν ἀμπλακίαις
14
7. ἀνίερος ἀθύτων πελάνων τρύχῃ;' "
236. τάδε μαντείας ἄξια πολλῆς, 23
7. ὅστις σε θεῶν ἀνασειράζει 238. καὶ παρακόπτει φρένας, ὦ παῖ. 3
1
7. χεῖρες μὲν ἁγναί, φρὴν δ' ἔχει μίασμά τι." "
443. Κύπρις γὰρ οὐ φορητὸν ἢν πολλὴ ῥυῇ,' "444. ἣ τὸν μὲν εἴκονθ' ἡσυχῇ μετέρχεται," "445. ὃν δ' ἂν περισσὸν καὶ φρονοῦνθ' εὕρῃ μέγα," '446. τοῦτον λαβοῦσα πῶς δοκεῖς καθύβρισεν.' "44
7. φοιτᾷ δ' ἀν' αἰθέρ', ἔστι δ' ἐν θαλασσίῳ" "448. κλύδωνι Κύπρις, πάντα δ' ἐκ ταύτης ἔφυ:" "449. ἥδ' ἐστὶν ἡ σπείρουσα καὶ διδοῦς' ἔρον," "450. οὗ πάντες ἐσμὲν οἱ κατὰ χθόν' ἔκγονοι." "6
1
1. ὦ τέκνον, ὅρκους μηδαμῶς ἀτιμάσῃς.' "6
12. ἡ γλῶσς' ὀμώμοχ', ἡ δὲ φρὴν ἀνώμοτος." '65
7. εἰ μὴ γὰρ ὅρκοις θεῶν ἄφαρκτος ᾑρέθην,


1060. ὦ θεοί, τί δῆτα τοὐμὸν οὐ λύω στόμα,' "

106
1. ὅστις γ' ὑφ' ὑμῶν, οὓς σέβω, διόλλυμαι;" "

1062. οὐ δῆτα: πάντως οὐ πίθοιμ' ἂν οὕς με δεῖ," "

1063. μάτην δ' ἂν ὅρκους συγχέαιμ' οὓς ὤμοσα." '
12
7
7. ὅσα τε γᾶ τρέφει' "
12
78. τά τ' αἰθόμενος ἅλιος δέρκεται," '
1280. ἄνδρας τε: συμπάντων βασιληίδα τι-

1286. Θησεῦ, τί τάλας τοῖσδε συνήδῃ,' "
128
7. παῖδ' οὐχ ὁσίως σὸν ἀποκτείνας" '
1288. ψευδέσι μύθοις ἀλόχου πεισθεὶς' "
1289. ἀφανῆ; φανερὰν δ' ἔσχεθες ἄτην." "
1
298. ἀλλ' ἐς τόδ' ἦλθον, παιδὸς ἐκδεῖξαι φρένα" "
1
299. τοῦ σοῦ δικαίαν, ὡς ὑπ' εὐκλείας θάνῃ," '
130
1. γενναιότητα: τῆς γὰρ ἐχθίστης θεῶν
1302. ἡμῖν ὅσοισι παρθένειος ἡδονὴ' "

1305. τροφοῦ διώλετ' οὐχ ἑκοῦσα μηχαναῖς," "
1306. ἣ σῷ δι' ὅρκων παιδὶ σημαίνει νόσον." "
130
7. ὁ δ', ὥσπερ ὢν δίκαιος, οὐκ ἐφέσπετο" "
1308. λόγοισιν, οὐδ' αὖ πρὸς σέθεν κακούμενος" '
1309. ὅρκων ἀφεῖλε πίστιν, εὐσεβὴς γεγώς.' "
13

10. ἡ δ' εἰς ἔλεγχον μὴ πέσῃ φοβουμένη" '
13
1
1. ψευδεῖς γραφὰς ἔγραψε καὶ διώλεσεν' "
13
12. δόλοισι σὸν παῖδ', ἀλλ' ὅμως ἔπεισέ σε." '
13
13. οἴμοι.' "
13
14. δάκνει σε, Θησεῦ, μῦθος; ἀλλ' ἔχ' ἥσυχος," "
13
15. ἆρ' οἶσθα πατρὸς τρεῖς ἀρὰς ἔχων σαφεῖς;" '
13
15. τοὐνθένδ' ἀκούσας ὡς ἂν οἰμώξῃς πλέον." "
13
16. ὧν τὴν μίαν παρεῖλες, ὦ κάκιστε σύ,
13
1
7. ἐς παῖδα τὸν σόν, ἐξὸν εἰς ἐχθρόν τινα.
13
18. πατὴρ μὲν οὖν σοι πόντιος φρονῶν καλῶς' "
13
19. ἔδωχ' ὅσονπερ χρῆν, ἐπείπερ ᾔνεσεν:" "
1320. σὺ δ' ἔν τ' ἐκείνῳ κἀν ἐμοὶ φαίνῃ κακός," '
132
1. ὃς οὔτε πίστιν οὔτε μάντεων ὄπα
1322. ἔμεινας, οὐκ ἤλεγξας, οὐ χρόνῳ μακρῷ' "
1323. σκέψιν παρέσχες, ἀλλὰ θᾶσσον ἤ ς' ἐχρῆν" '
1324. ἀρὰς ἀφῆκας παιδὶ καὶ κατέκτανες.' "

1328. Κύπρις γὰρ ἤθελ' ὥστε γίγνεσθαι τάδε," "
13
29. πληροῦσα θυμόν. θεοῖσι δ' ὧδ' ἔχει νόμος:" '
1330. οὐδεὶς ἀπαντᾶν βούλεται προθυμίᾳ' "
1330. τῇ τοῦ θέλοντος, ἀλλ' ἀφιστάμεσθ' ἀεί." "
133
1. ἐπεί, σάφ' ἴσθι, Ζῆνα μὴ φοβουμένη" "
1332. οὐκ ἄν ποτ' ἦλθον ἐς τόδ' αἰσχύνης ἐγὼ" "
1333. ὥστ' ἄνδρα πάντων φίλτατον βροτῶν ἐμοὶ" '
1334. θανεῖν ἐᾶσαι. τὴν δὲ σὴν ἁμαρτίαν

1339. λύπη δὲ κἀμοί: τοὺς γὰρ εὐσεβεῖς θεοὶ
1340. θνῄσκοντας οὐ χαίρουσι: τούς γε μὴν κακοὺς' "

1390. τὸ δ' εὐγενές σε τῶν φρενῶν ἀπώλεσεν." '
139
1. ἔα:

1400. Κύπρις γὰρ ἡ πανοῦργος ὧδ' ἐμήσατο." "

1402. τιμῆς ἐμέμφθη, σωφρονοῦντι δ' ἤχθετο." "

1409. στένω σὲ μᾶλλον ἢ 'μὲ τῆς ἁμαρτίας." '
14
16. ἔασον: οὐ γὰρ οὐδὲ γῆς ὑπὸ ζόφον
14
1
7. θεᾶς ἄτιμοι Κύπριδος ἐκ προθυμίας
14
18. ὀργαὶ κατασκήψουσιν ἐς τὸ σὸν δέμας,
14
19. σῆς εὐσεβείας κἀγαθῆς φρενὸς χάριν:' "
1420. ἐγὼ γὰρ αὐτῆς ἄλλον ἐξ ἐμῆς χερὸς
142
1. ὃς ἂν μάλιστα φίλτατος κυρῇ βροτῶν
1422. τόξοις ἀφύκτοις τοῖσδε τιμωρήσομαι.' "
1423. σοὶ δ', ὦ ταλαίπωρ', ἀντὶ τῶνδε τῶν κακῶν" '
1424. τιμὰς μεγίστας ἐν πόλει Τροζηνίᾳ
14
25. δώσω: κόραι γὰρ ἄζυγες γάμων πάρος' "
1426. κόμας κεροῦνταί σοι, δι' αἰῶνος μακροῦ" '
142
7. πένθη μέγιστα δακρύων καρπουμένῳ.
1428. ἀεὶ δὲ μουσοποιὸς ἐς σὲ παρθένων
14
29. ἔσται μέριμνα, κοὐκ ἀνώνυμος πεσὼν
1430. ἔρως ὁ Φαίδρας ἐς σὲ σιγηθήσεται.' "
143
7. καὶ χαῖρ': ἐμοὶ γὰρ οὐ θέμις φθιτοὺς ὁρᾶν" "
1438. οὐδ' ὄμμα χραίνειν θανασίμοισιν ἐκπνοαῖς:" "
1439. ὁρῶ δέ ς' ἤδη τοῦδε πλησίον κακοῦ." ''. None
1. Wide o’er man my realm extends, and proud the name that I, the goddess Cypris, bear, both in heaven’s courts and ’mongst all those who dwell within the limits of the sea i.e. the Euxine. and the bounds of Atlas, beholding the sun-god’s light;'
7. those that respect my power I advance to honour, but bring to ruin all who vaunt themselves at me. For even in the race of gods this feeling finds a home, even pleasure at the honour men pay them.

10. for that son of Theseus, born of the Amazon, Hippolytus, whom holy Pittheus taught, alone of all the dwellers in this land of Troezen, calls me vilest of the deities. Love he scorns, and, as for marriage, will none of it;
15. but Artemis, daughter of Zeus, sister of Phoebus, he doth honour, counting her the chief of goddesses, and ever through the greenwood, attendant on his virgin goddess, he dears the earth of wild beasts with his fleet hounds, enjoying the comradeship of one too high for mortal ken. 20. ’Tis not this I grudge him, no! why should I? But for his sins against me, I will this very day take vengeance on Hippolytus; for long ago I cleared the ground of many obstacles, so it needs but trifling toil.
25. to witness the solemn mystic rites and be initiated therein in Pandion’s land, i.e. Attica. Phaedra, his father’s noble wife, caught sight of him, and by my designs she found her heart was seized with wild desire. 30. a temple did she rear to Cypris hard by the rock of Pallas where it o’erlooks this country, for love of the youth in another land; and to win his love in days to come she called after his name the temple she had founded for the goddess.
35. flying the pollution of the blood of Pallas’ Descendants of Pandion, king of Cecropia, slain by Theseus to obtain the kingdom. sons, and with his wife sailed to this shore, content to suffer exile for a year, then began the wretched wife to pine away in silence, moaning ’neath love’s cruel scourge, 4
7. for the lord Poseidon granted this boon to Theseus; three wishes of the god to ask, nor ever ask in vain. So Phaedra is to die, an honoured death ’tis true, but still to die; for I will not let her suffering outweigh the payment of such forfeit by my foe
58. Come follow, friends, singing to Artemis, daughter of Zeus, throned in the sky, 60. whose votaries we are. Attendants of Hippolytu
82. elf-control, made perfect, hath a home, these may pluck the flowers, but not the wicked world. Accept, I pray, dear mistress, mine this chaplet from my holy hand to crown thy locks of gold; for I, and none other of mortals, have this high guerdon, 85. to be with thee, with thee converse, hearing thy voice, though not thy face beholding. So be it mine to end my life as I began. Attendant


104. ’Mongst gods as well as men we have our several preferences. Attendant
14
1. Maiden, thou must be possessed, by Pan made frantic or by Hecate, or by the Corybantes dread, and Cybele the mountain mother.
145. Or maybe thou hast sinned against Dictynna, huntress-queen, and art wasting for thy guilt in sacrifice unoffered. For she doth range o’er lakes’ expanse and past the bounds of earth
236. thy yearning is to drive the steed over the waveless sands. This needs a cunning seer to say what god it is that reins thee from the course, distracting thy senses, child. Phaedra 3
1
7. My hands are pure, but on my soul there rests a stain. Nurse
443. Wilt thou, because thou lov’st, destroy thyself? ’Tis little gain, I trow, for those who love or yet may love their fellows, if death must be their end; for though the Love-Queen’s onset in her might is more than man can bear, yet doth she gently visit yielding hearts, 445. and only when she finds a proud unnatural spirit, doth she take and mock it past belief. Her path is in the sky, and mid the ocean’s surge she rides; from her all nature springs; she sows the seeds of love, inspires the warm desire 450. to which we sons of earth all owe our being. They who have aught to do with books of ancient scribes, or themselves engage in studious pursuits, know how Zeus of Semele was enamoured, 6
1
1. Never dishonour thy oath, thy son. Hippolytu 6
12. My tongue an oath did take, but not my heart. Nurse 65
7. when by the very mention of it I feel myself polluted? Be well assured, woman, ’tis only my religious scruple saves thee. For had not I unawares been caught by an oath, ’fore heaven! I would not have refrained from telling all unto my father. But now I will from the house away, so long a


1060. (aside). Great gods! why do I not unlock my lips, seeing that I am ruined by you, the objects of my reverence? No, I will not; I should nowise persuade those whom I ought to, and in vain should break the oath I swore. Theseu
12
7
7. maddening the heart and beguiling the senses of all whom he attacks, savage whelps on mountains bred, ocean’s monsters, creatures of this sun-warmed earth,
1280. and man; thine, O Cypris, thine alone the sovereign power to rule them all. Artemi

1286. lo! ’tis I Latona’s child, that speak, I, Artemis. Why, Theseus, to thy sorrow dost thou rejoice at these tidings, seeing that thou hast slain thy son most impiously, listening to a charge not clearly proved, but falsely sworn to by thy wife? though clearly has the curse therefrom upon thee fallen.
1
298. now no share in life.
1
299. now no share in life.
130
1. as well the frenzy, and, in a sense, the nobleness of thy wife; for she was cruelly stung with a passion for thy son by that goddess whom all we, that joy in virgin purity, detest. And though she strove to conquer love by resolution,

1305. yet by no fault of hers she fell, thanks to her nurse’s strategy, who did reveal her malady unto thy son under oath. But he would none of her counsels, as indeed was right, nor yet, when thou didst revile him, would he break the oath he swore, from piety.
13

10. She meantime, fearful of being found out, wrote a lying letter, destroying by guile thy son, but yet persuading thee. Theseu
13
13. Woe is me! Artemi
13
14. Woe is me! Artemi
13
15. Dost remember those three prayers thy father granted thee, fraught with certain issue? ’Tis one of these thou hast misused, unnatural wretch, against thy son, instead of aiming it at an enemy. Thy sea-god sire, ’tis true, for all his kind intent, hath granted that boon he was compelled, by reason of his promise, to grant.
1320. But thou alike in his eyes and in mine hast shewn thy evil heart, in that thou hast forestalled all proof or voice prophetic, hast made no inquiry, nor taken time for consideration, but with undue haste cursed thy son even to the death. Theseu

1328. Perdition seize me! Queen revered! Artemi
1330. his neighbour’s will, but ever we stand aloof. For be well assured, did I not fear Zeus, never would I have incurred the bitter shame of handing over to death a man of all his kind to me most dear. As for thy sin,

1339. first thy ignorance absolves thee from its villainy, next thy wife, who is dead, was lavish in her use of convincing arguments to influence thy mind.
1340. albeit we try to destroy the wicked, house and home. Choru

1390. Thy noble soul hath been thy ruin. Hippolytu
139
1. Ah! the fragrance from my goddess wafted! Even in my agony I feel thee near and find relief; she is here in this very place, my goddess Artemis. Artemi

1400. Twas Cypris, mistress of iniquity, devised this evil. Hippolytu

1402. She was jealous of her slighted honour, vexed at thy chaste life. Hippolytu

1409. For this mistake I mourn thee rather than myself. Theseu
14
16. Enough! for though thou pass to gloom beneath the earth, the wrath of Cypris shall not, at her will, fall on thee unrequited, because thou hadst a noble righteous soul. Nauck encloses this line in brackets.
1420. For I with mine own hand will with these unerring shafts avenge me on another, Adonis. who is her votary, dearest to her of all the sons of men. And to thee, poor sufferer, for thy anguish now will I grant high honours in the city of Troezen;
14
25. for thee shall maids unwed before their marriage cut off their hair, thy harvest through the long roll of time of countless bitter tears. Yea, and for ever shall the virgin choir hymn thy sad memory,
1430. nor shall Phaedra’s love for thee fall into oblivion and pass away unnoticed.
143
7. And thee Hippolytus, I admonish; hate not thy sire, for in this death thou dost but meet thy destined fate. '. None
14. Euripides, Iphigenia At Aulis, 718, 911-916, 1587-1595 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Apollo Delios/Dalios (Delos), inseparable from earlier Artemis • Artemis • Artemis premarital offerings to • Artemis, Ephesia • Artemis, Laphria • Artemis, oaths invoking • Leto, giving birth to Apollo and Artemis on Delos • aetiologies, specific, Apollo and Artemis (Delos)

 Found in books: Hitch (2017) 53; Kowalzig (2007) 62; Meister (2019) 168; Naiden (2013) 145; Parker (2005) 441; Petrovic and Petrovic (2016) 200; Sommerstein and Torrance (2014) 29


718. Have you already offered the goddess a sacrifice to usher in the maiden’s marriage? Agamemnon
911. for your name it was that worked my ruin, and you are bound to stand by that. Except your knees I have no altar to fly to; and not a friend stands Reading πέλας with Markland for MSS. γελᾷ , a conjecture adopted by Hermann and Monk. at my side. You have heard the cruel abandoned scheme of Agamemnon; and I, a woman, have come, as you see, to a camp of lawless sailor-folk, bold in evil’s cause, 915. though useful when they wish; Now if you boldly stretch forth your arm in my behalf, our safety is assured; but if not, we are lost. Chorus Leader
1587. at the sight of a marvel all unlooked for, due to some god’s agency, and passing all belief, although it was seen; for there upon the ground lay a deer of immense size, magnificent to see, gasping out her life, with whose blood the altar of the goddess was thoroughly bedewed.'1588. at the sight of a marvel all unlooked for, due to some god’s agency, and passing all belief, although it was seen; for there upon the ground lay a deer of immense size, magnificent to see, gasping out her life, with whose blood the altar of the goddess was thoroughly bedewed. 1590. Then spoke Calchas thus—his joy you can imagine— You captains of this leagued Achaean army, do you see this victim, which the goddess has set before her altar, a mountain-roaming deer? This is more welcome to her by far than the maid, 1595. that she may not defile her altar by shedding noble blood. Gladly she has accepted it, and is granting us a prosperous voyage for Reading Ἰλίου πρὸς for Ἰλίου τ᾽ with Hermann. our attack on Ilium . Therefore take heart, sailors, each man of you, and away to your ships, for today '. None
15. Euripides, Medea, 161-162, 1334 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis Arethusa • Artemis, oaths invoking • Magna Graecia (southern Italy) and Sicily, Artemis and

 Found in books: Mcclellan (2019) 185; Pucci (2016) 178; Simon (2021) 376; Sommerstein and Torrance (2014) 28


161. λεύσσεθ' ἃ πάσχω, μεγάλοις ὅρκοις" '162. ἐνδησαμένα τὸν κατάρατον
1334. κτανοῦσα γὰρ δὴ σὸν κάσιν παρέστιον'". None
161. (within). Great Themis, and husband καὶ πότνι’ Ἄρτεμι , corrupt and pointless. The reading here adopted by the translator is καὶ πόσις, ἄρτι με , suggested by Munro (Journal of Philology, No. 22, p. 275) πόσις = Zeus. of Themis, behold what I am suffering now, though I did bind that accursed one, my husband, by strong oaths to me? O, to see him and his bride some day brought to utter destruction, they and their house with them,
1334. in the day I brought thee, fraught with doom, from thy home in a barbarian land to dwell in Hellas, traitress to thy sire and to the land that nurtured thee. On me the gods have hurled the curse that dogged thy steps, for thou didst slay thy brother at his hearth''. None
16. Herodotus, Histories, 1.31, 1.92, 1.94, 1.105, 1.131, 1.146, 1.159, 1.199, 2.50, 2.159, 3.48, 4.33-4.35, 4.35.4, 4.103, 4.181, 5.83, 5.92, 6.21, 6.75, 6.97, 6.105-6.107, 7.94, 7.189, 7.191-7.192, 8.36-8.37, 8.39, 8.55, 8.64 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Acropolis, Athens, Artemis, cult of • Aegeira, cult of Artemis Agrotera at • Agora, Athens, Artemis, cult of • Aphrodite, Artemis and • Apollo Delios/Dalios (Delos), inseparable from earlier Artemis • Apollo, Artemis and • Ares, Artemis and • Artemis • Artemis (goddess), sanctuary at Brauron • Artemis (goddess), sanctuary at Delos • Artemis Agrotera, Basileia • Artemis Arethusa • Artemis Aristoboule • Artemis Boulaia • Artemis Boulephoros • Artemis Brauronia • Artemis Chitone • Artemis Ephesia • Artemis Epipyrgidia • Artemis Eukleia • Artemis Hecate • Artemis Hegemone • Artemis Kynthia (Paros), Lykia (Troizen) • Artemis Orthia (Orthosia) • Artemis Patroa, inscribed • Artemis Soteira • Artemis Soteira, as the most popular Soteira • Artemis Soteira, in Megara • Artemis Soteira, in Rhodes • Artemis of Euboea • Artemis, Agrotera of Athens • Artemis, Agrotera of Sparta • Artemis, Aphrodite and • Artemis, Apollo and • Artemis, Ares and • Artemis, Aristoboule of Athens • Artemis, Artemis Laphria • Artemis, Artemis Limnatis Λιμνάτις • Artemis, Artemis Triklaria • Artemis, Brauronia of Athens • Artemis, Charites/Graces and • Artemis, Ephesia • Artemis, Eukleia of Plataea • Artemis, Kuria of Termessus • Artemis, Leukophryene • Artemis, Mounichia of Athens • Artemis, Niobids and • Artemis, Orthosia • Artemis, Pan and • Artemis, Proseoa of Artemisium • Artemis, S. Biagio at Metapontion • Artemis, S. Biagio at Metapontion, alternative aetiological myths • Artemis, S. Biagio at Metapontion, and Akhaian identity • Artemis, S. Biagio at Metapontion, between Aiolian and Akhaian traditions • Artemis, S. Biagio at Metapontion, myth-ritual nexus • Artemis, Soteira of Megara • Artemis, and childbirth • Artemis, and communications in the Peloponnese • Artemis, animals, association with • Artemis, arktoi (she-bears), young girls serving Artemis as • Artemis, at Ephesus • Artemis, at Saguntum • Artemis, cult and rites • Artemis, images and iconography • Artemis, in triple-bodied form • Artemis, migration/movement of peoples, association with • Artemis, of Delos • Artemis, of Ephesus • Artemis, of Samos • Artemis, political assemblies and civic life, association with • Artemis, purification rituals, associated with • Artemis, sacrifice/sacrificial rituals for • Artemis, sanctuaries and temples • Artemis, torch associated with • Athens, Artemis, cult of • Boeae, cult of Artemis Soteira at • Charites (Graces), Artemis and • Ephesian cup of Artemis • Ephesos, Artemis/ Artemision • Ephesus, Artemisium and Artemis Ephesia • Euboea, Artemis, cult of • Festivals, of Artemis Agrotera of Athens • Festivals, of Artemis of Samos • Hekate-Selene-Artemis • Heracles, Artemis dressed in lionskin of • Lydos, dinos with Artemis in lionskin by • Magna Graecia (southern Italy) and Sicily, Artemis and • Massalia, coins with head of Artemis from • Miletus, Artemis Boulephoros, cult of • Minoan-Mycenaean religion and art, Artemis and • Niobid Painter, calyx-krater with Apollo and Artemis killing Niobids • Ortygia, cult of Artemis on • Pan Painter, bell-krater with Pan chasing Daphnis and Artemis killing Actaeon • Parthenos in the Crimean Chersonesus, identification with Artemis • Proitids, and aetiology for Artemis of Lousoi • Pylos, Artemis, cult of • Sparta, sanctuary of Artemis Hegemone and Apollo Carneius • Xenophon, consecrates estate to Artemis Ephesia • animals, Artemis as “Mistress of Beasts,” • arktoi (she-bears), young girls serving Artemis as • bears, arktoi (she-bears), young girls serving Artemis as • bulls, Artemis associated with • coins, with head of Artemis Arethusa, from Syracuse • coins, with head of Artemis, from Massalia • cult, of Artemis • festivals, Artemis Brauronia • goats, Artemis/hunting goddesses and • gods, Artemis • justice and political life, association of Artemis with political assemblies and civic life • krateriskoi dedicated to Artemis • lions, Artemis and • migration/movement of peoples, Artemis associated with • oracles, animal oracles and Artemis • purification rituals, Artemis associated with • quail, sacred to Artemis • sacrifice/sacrificial rituals, for Artemis • sacrifice/sacrificial rituals, purification rituals related to, Artemis associated with • sanctuaries and temples, of Artemis • temple, Artemis Leukophryene • temple, Artemis of Ephesos • triple-bodied form of Artemis

 Found in books: Bernabe et al (2013) 402; Borg (2008) 38; Edmunds (2021) 92; Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 280, 495; Ekroth (2013) 201, 202; Gagné (2020) 117, 119, 191; Gaifman (2012) 153; Jim (2022) 8, 37, 60, 88, 107, 126; Kowalzig (2007) 121, 122, 123, 151, 306, 308, 312; Lipka (2021) 159, 168; Marek (2019) 114, 123; Mcclellan (2019) 201; Meister (2019) 168; Mikalson (2003) 26, 29, 63, 74, 77, 100, 101, 127, 133, 134, 172, 180, 181, 234; Mikalson (2016) 285; Naiden (2013) 49, 162; Pachoumi (2017) 157; Papazarkadas (2011) 8; Pinheiro et al (2012a) 70; Rojas(2019) 192; Simon (2021) 6, 174, 178, 183, 194, 197, 272, 375; Sweeney (2013) 145, 149; Thonemann (2020) 117; Álvarez (2019) 145


1.31. ὣς δὲ τὰ κατὰ τὸν Τέλλον προετρέψατο ὁ Σόλων τὸν Κροῖσον εἴπας πολλά τε καὶ ὀλβία, ἐπειρώτα τίνα δεύτερον μετʼ ἐκεῖνον ἴδοι, δοκέων πάγχυ δευτερεῖα γῶν οἴσεσθαι. ὃ δʼ εἶπε “Κλέοβίν τε καὶ Βίτωνα. τούτοισι γὰρ ἐοῦσι γένος Ἀργείοισι βίος τε ἀρκέων ὑπῆν, καὶ πρὸς τούτῳ ῥώμη σώματος τοιήδε· ἀεθλοφόροι τε ἀμφότεροι ὁμοίως ἦσαν, καὶ δὴ καὶ λέγεται ὅδε ὁ λόγος. ἐούσης ὁρτῆς τῇ Ἥρῃ τοῖσι Ἀργείοισι ἔδεε πάντως τὴν μητέρα αὐτῶν ζεύγεϊ κομισθῆναι ἐς τὸ ἱρόν, οἱ δέ σφι βόες ἐκ τοῦ ἀγροῦ οὐ παρεγίνοντο ἐν ὥρῃ· ἐκκληιόμενοι δὲ τῇ ὥρῃ οἱ νεηνίαι ὑποδύντες αὐτοὶ ὑπὸ τὴν ζεύγλην εἷλκον τὴν ἅμαξαν, ἐπὶ τῆς ἁμάξης δέ σφι ὠχέετο ἡ μήτηρ· σταδίους δὲ πέντε καὶ τεσσεράκοντα διακομίσαντες ἀπίκοντο ἐς τὸ ἱρόν. ταῦτα δέ σφι ποιήσασι καὶ ὀφθεῖσι ὑπὸ τῆς πανηγύριος τελευτὴ τοῦ βίου ἀρίστη ἐπεγένετο, διέδεξέ τε ἐν τούτοισι ὁ θεὸς ὡς ἄμεινον εἴη ἀνθρώπῳ τεθνάναι μᾶλλον ἢ ζώειν. Ἀργεῖοι μὲν γὰρ περιστάντες ἐμακάριζον τῶν νεηνιέων τὴν ῥώμην, αἱ δὲ Ἀργεῖαι τὴν μητέρα αὐτῶν, οἵων τέκνων ἐκύρησε· ἡ δὲ μήτηρ περιχαρής ἐοῦσα τῷ τε ἔργῳ καὶ τῇ φήμῃ, στᾶσα ἀντίον τοῦ ἀγάλματος εὔχετο Κλεόβι τε καὶ Βίτωνι τοῖσι ἑωυτῆς τέκνοισι, οἵ μιν ἐτίμησαν μεγάλως, τὴν θεὸν δοῦναι τὸ ἀνθρώπῳ τυχεῖν ἄριστον ἐστί. μετὰ ταύτην δὲ τὴν εὐχὴν ὡς ἔθυσάν τε καὶ εὐωχήθησαν, κατακοιμηθέντες ἐν αὐτῷ τῷ ἱρῷ οἱ νεηνίαι οὐκέτι ἀνέστησαν ἀλλʼ ἐν τέλεϊ τούτῳ ἔσχοντο. Ἀργεῖοι δὲ σφέων εἰκόνας ποιησάμενοι ἀνέθεσαν ἐς Δελφοὺς ὡς ἀριστῶν γενομένων.”
1.92. Κροίσῳ δὲ ἐστὶ ἄλλα ἀναθήματα ἐν τῇ Ἑλλάδι πολλὰ καὶ οὐ τὰ εἰρημένα μοῦνα. ἐν μὲν γὰρ Θήβῃσι τῇσι Βοιωτῶν τρίπους χρύσεος, τὸν ἀνέθηκέ τῷ Ἀπόλλωνι τῷ Ἰσμηνίῳ, ἐν δὲ Ἐφέσῳ αἵ τε βόες αἱ χρύσεαι καὶ τῶν κιόνων αἱ πολλαί, ἐν δὲ Προνηίης τῆς ἐν Δελφοῖσι ἀσπὶς χρυσέη μεγάλη. ταῦτα μὲν καὶ ἔτι ἐς ἐμὲ ἦν περιεόντα, τὰ δʼ ἐξαπόλωλε τῶν ἀναθημάτων· τὰ δʼ ἐν Βραγχίδῃσι τῇσι Μιλησίων ἀναθήματα Κροίσῳ, ὡς ἐγὼ πυνθάνομαι, ἴσα τε σταθμὸν καὶ ὅμοια τοῖσι ἐν Δελφοῖσι 1 τὰ μέν νυν ἔς τε Δελφοὺς καὶ ἐς τοῦ Ἀμφιάρεω ἀνέθηκε οἰκήιά τε ἐόντα καὶ τῶν πατρωίων χρημάτων ἀπαρχήν· τὰ δὲ ἄλλα ἀναθήματα ἐξ ἀνδρὸς ἐγένετο οὐσίης ἐχθροῦ, ὅς οἱ πρὶν ἢ βασιλεῦσαι ἀντιστασιώτης κατεστήκεε, συσπεύδων Πανταλέοντι γενέσθαι τὴν Λυδῶν ἀρχήν. ὁ δὲ Πανταλέων ἦν Ἀλυάττεω μὲν παῖς, Κροίσου δὲ ἀδελφεὸς οὐκ ὁμομήτριος· Κροῖσος μὲν γὰρ ἐκ Καείρης ἦν γυναικὸς Ἀλυάττῃ, Πανταλέων δὲ ἐξ Ἰάδος. ἐπείτε δὲ δόντος τοῦ πατρὸς ἐκράτησε τῆς ἀρχῆς ὁ Κροῖσος, τὸν ἄνθρωπον τὸν ἀντιπρήσσοντα ἐπὶ κνάφου ἕλκων διέφθειρε, τὴν δὲ οὐσίην αὐτοῦ ἔτι πρότερον κατιρώσας τότε τρόπῳ τῷ εἰρημένῳ ἀνέθηκε ἐς τὰ εἴρηται. καὶ περὶ μὲν ἀναθημάτων τοσαῦτα εἰρήσθω.
1.94. Λυδοὶ δὲ νόμοισι μὲν παραπλησίοισι χρέωνται καὶ Ἕλληνές, χωρὶς ἢ ὅτι τὰ θήλεα τέκνα καταπορνεύουσι, πρῶτοι δὲ ἀνθρώπων τῶν ἡμεῖς ἴδμεν νόμισμα χρυσοῦ καὶ ἀργύρου κοψάμενοι ἐχρήσαντο, πρῶτοι δὲ καὶ κάπηλοι ἐγένοντο. φασὶ δὲ αὐτοὶ Λυδοὶ καὶ τὰς παιγνίας τὰς νῦν σφίσι τε καὶ Ἕλλησι κατεστεώσας ἑωυτῶν ἐξεύρημα γενέσθαι· ἅμα δὲ ταύτας τε ἐξευρεθῆναι παρὰ σφίσι λέγουσι καὶ Τυρσηνίην ἀποικίσαι, ὧδε περὶ αὐτῶν λέγοντες. ἐπὶ Ἄτυος τοῦ Μάνεω βασιλέος σιτοδείην ἰσχυρὴν ἀνὰ τὴν Λυδίην πᾶσαν γενέσθαι, καὶ τοὺς Λυδοὺς τέως μὲν διάγειν λιπαρέοντας, μετὰ δὲ ὡς οὐ παύεσθαι, ἄκεα δίζησθαι, ἄλλον δὲ ἄλλο ἐπιμηχανᾶσθαι αὐτῶν. ἐξευρεθῆναι δὴ ὦν τότε καὶ τῶν κύβων καὶ τῶν ἀστραγάλων καὶ τῆς σφαίρης καὶ τῶν ἀλλέων πασέων παιγνιέων τὰ εἴδεα, πλὴν πεσσῶν τούτων γὰρ ὦν τὴν ἐξεύρεσιν οὐκ οἰκηιοῦνται Λυδοί. ποιέειν δὲ ὧδε πρὸς τὸν λιμὸν ἐξευρόντας, τὴν μὲν ἑτέρην τῶν ἡμερέων παίζειν πᾶσαν, ἵνα δὴ μὴ ζητέοιεν σιτία, τὴν δὲ ἑτέρην σιτέεσθαι παυομένους τῶν παιγνιέων. τοιούτῳ τρόπῳ διάγειν ἐπʼ ἔτεα δυῶν δέοντα εἴκοσι. ἐπείτε δὲ οὐκ ἀνιέναι τὸ κακὸν ἀλλʼ ἔτι ἐπὶ μᾶλλον βιάζεσθαι οὕτω δὴ τὸν βασιλέα αὐτῶν δύο μοίρας διελόντα Λυδῶν πάντων κληρῶσαι τὴν μὲν ἐπὶ μόνῃ τὴν δὲ ἐπὶ ἐξόδῳ ἐκ τῆς χώρης, καὶ ἐπὶ μὲν τῇ μένειν αὐτοῦ λαγχανούσῃ τῶν μοιρέων ἑωυτὸν τὸν βασιλέα προστάσσειν, ἐπὶ δὲ τῇ ἀπαλλασσομένῃ τὸν ἑωυτοῦ παῖδα, τῷ οὔνομα εἶναι Τυρσηνόν. λαχόντας δὲ αὐτῶν τοὺς ἑτέρους ἐξιέναι ἐκ τῆς χώρης καταβῆναι ἐς Σμύρνην καὶ μηχανήσασθαι πλοῖα, ἐς τὰ ἐσθεμένους τὰ πάντα ὅσα σφι ἦν χρηστὰ ἐπίπλοα, ἀποπλέειν κατὰ βίου τε καὶ γῆς ζήτησιν, ἐς ὃ ἔθνεα πολλὰ παραμειψαμένους ἀπικέσθαι ἐς Ὀμβρικούς, ἔνθα σφέας ἐνιδρύσασθαι πόλιας καὶ οἰκέειν τὸ μέχρι τοῦδε. ἀντὶ δὲ Λυδῶν μετονομασθῆναι αὐτοὺς ἐπὶ τοῦ βασιλέος τοῦ παιδός, ὅς σφεας ἀνήγαγε, ἐπὶ τούτου τὴν ἐπωνυμίην ποιευμένους ὀνομασθῆναι Τυρσηνούς. Λυδοὶ μὲν δὴ ὑπὸ Πέρσῃσι ἐδεδούλωντο.
1.105. ἐνθεῦτεν δὲ ἤισαν ἐπʼ Αἴγυπτον. καὶ ἐπείτε ἐγένοντο ἐν τῇ Παλαιστίνῃ Συρίῃ, Ψαμμήτιχος σφέας Αἰγύπτου βασιλεὺς ἀντιάσας δώροισί τε καὶ λιτῇσι ἀποτράπει τὸ προσωτέρω μὴ πορεύεσθαι. οἳ δὲ ἐπείτε ἀναχωρέοντες ὀπίσω ἐγένοντο τῆς Συρίης ἐν Ἀσκάλωνι πόλι, τῶν πλεόνων Σκυθέων παρεξελθόντων ἀσινέων, ὀλίγοι τινὲς αὐτῶν ὑπολειφθέντες ἐσύλησαν τῆς οὐρανίης Ἀφροδίτης τὸ ἱρόν. ἔστι δὲ τοῦτο τὸ ἱρόν, ὡς ἐγὼ πυνθανόμενος εὑρίσκω, πάντων ἀρχαιότατον ἱρῶν ὅσα ταύτης τῆς θεοῦ· καὶ γὰρ τὸ ἐν Κύπρῳ ἱρὸν ἐνθεῦτεν ἐγένετο, ὡς αὐτοὶ Κύπριοι λέγουσι, καὶ τὸ ἐν Κυθήροισι Φοίνικές εἰσὶ οἱ ἱδρυσάμενοι ἐκ ταύτης τῆς Συρίης ἐόντες. τοῖσι δὲ τῶν Σκυθέων συλήσασι τὸ ἱρὸν τὸ ἐν Ἀσκάλωνι καὶ τοῖσι τούτων αἰεὶ ἐκγόνοισι ἐνέσκηψε ὁ θεὸς θήλεαν νοῦσον· ὥστε ἅμα λέγουσί τε οἱ Σκύθαι διὰ τοῦτο σφέας νοσέειν, καὶ ὁρᾶν παρʼ ἑωυτοῖσι τοὺς ἀπικνεομένους ἐς τὴν Σκυθικὴν χώρην ὡς διακέαται τοὺς καλέουσι Ἐνάρεας οἱ Σκύθαι.
1.131. Πέρσας δὲ οἶδα νόμοισι τοιοῖσιδε χρεωμένους, ἀγάλματα μὲν καὶ νηοὺς καὶ βωμοὺς οὐκ ἐν νόμῳ ποιευμένους ἱδρύεσθαι, ἀλλὰ καὶ τοῖσι ποιεῦσι μωρίην ἐπιφέρουσι, ὡς μὲν ἐμοὶ δοκέειν, ὅτι οὐκ ἀνθρωποφυέας ἐνόμισαν τοὺς θεοὺς κατά περ οἱ Ἕλληνες εἶναι· οἳ δὲ νομίζουσι Διὶ μὲν ἐπὶ τὰ ὑψηλότατα τῶν ὀρέων ἀναβαίνοντες θυσίας ἔρδειν, τὸν κύκλον πάντα τοῦ οὐρανοῦ Δία καλέοντες· θύουσι δὲ ἡλίῳ τε καὶ σελήνῃ καὶ γῇ καὶ πυρὶ καὶ ὕδατι καὶ ἀνέμοισι. τούτοισι μὲν δὴ θύουσι μούνοισι ἀρχῆθεν, ἐπιμεμαθήκασι δὲ καὶ τῇ Οὐρανίῃ θύειν, παρά τε Ἀσσυρίων μαθόντες καὶ Ἀραβίων. καλέουσι δὲ Ἀσσύριοι τὴν Ἀφροδίτην Μύλιττα, Ἀράβιοι δὲ Ἀλιλάτ, Πέρσαι δὲ Μίτραν.
1.146. τούτων δὴ εἵνεκα καὶ οἱ Ἴωνες δυώδεκα πόλιας ἐποιήσαντο· ἐπεὶ ὥς γέ τι μᾶλλον οὗτοι Ἴωνες εἰσὶ τῶν ἄλλων Ἰώνων ἢ κάλλιόν τι γεγόνασι, μωρίη πολλὴ λέγειν· τῶν Ἄβαντες μὲν ἐξ Εὐβοίες εἰσὶ οὐκ ἐλαχίστη μοῖρα, τοῖσι Ἰωνίης μέτα οὐδὲ τοῦ οὐνόματος οὐδέν, Μινύαι δὲ Ὀρχομένιοί σφι ἀναμεμίχαται καὶ Καδμεῖοι καὶ Δρύοπες καὶ Φωκέες ἀποδάσμιοι καὶ Μολοσσοὶ καὶ Ἀρκάδες Πελασγοὶ καὶ Δωριέες Ἐπιδαύριοι, ἄλλα τε ἔθνεα πολλὰ ἀναμεμίχαται· οἱ δὲ αὐτῶν ἀπὸ τοῦ πρυτανηίου τοῦ Ἀθηναίων ὁρμηθέντες καὶ νομίζοντες γενναιότατοι εἶναι Ἰώνων, οὗτοι δὲ οὐ γυναῖκας ἠγάγοντο ἐς τὴν ἀποικίην ἀλλὰ Καείρας ἔσχον, τῶν ἐφόνευσαν τοὺς γονέας. διὰ τοῦτὸν δὲ τὸν φόνον αἱ γυναῖκες αὗται νόμον θέμεναι σφίσι αὐτῇσι ὅρκους ἐπήλασαν καὶ παρέδοσαν τῇσι θυγατράσι, μή κοτε ὁμοσιτῆσαι τοῖσι ἀνδράσι μηδὲ οὐνόματι βῶσαι τὸν ἑωυτῆς ἄνδρα, τοῦδε εἵνεκα ὅτι ἐφόνευσαν σφέων τοὺς πατέρας καὶ ἄνδρας καὶ παῖδας καὶ ἔπειτα ταῦτα ποιήσαντες αὐτῇσι συνοίκεον.
1.159. ἀπικομένων δὲ ἐς Βραγχίδας ἐχρηστηριάζετο ἐκ πάντων Ἀριστόδικος ἐπειρωτῶν τάδε. “ὦναξ, ἦλθε παρʼ ἡμέας ἱκέτης Πακτύης ὁ Λυδός, φεύγων θάνατον βίαιον πρὸς Περσέων· οἳ δέ μιν ἐξαιτέονται, προεῖναι Κυμαίους κελεύοντες. ἡμεῖς δὲ δειμαίνοντες τὴν Περσέων δύναμιν τὸν ἱκέτην ἐς τόδε οὐ τετολμήκαμεν ἐκδιδόναι, πρὶν ἂν τὸ ἀπὸ σεῦ ἡμῖν δηλωθῇ ἀτρεκέως ὁκότερα ποιέωμεν.” ὃ μὲν ταῦτα ἐπειρώτα, ὃ δʼ αὖτις τὸν αὐτόν σφι χρησμὸν ἔφαινε, κελεύων ἐκδιδόναι Πακτύην Πέρσῃσι. πρὸς ταῦτα ὁ Ἀριστόδικος ἐκ προνοίης ἐποίεε τάδε· περιιὼν τὸν νηὸν κύκλῳ ἐξαίρεε τοὺς στρουθοὺς καὶ ἄλλα ὅσα ἦν νενοσσευμένα ὀρνίθων γένεα ἐν τῷ νηῷ. ποιέοντος δὲ αὐτοῦ ταῦτα λέγεται φωνὴν ἐκ τοῦ ἀδύτου γενέσθαι φέρουσαν μὲν πρὸς τὸν Ἀριστόδικον, λέγουσαν δὲ τάδε “ἀνοσιώτατε ἀνθρώπων, τί τάδε τολμᾷς ποιέειν; τοὺς ἱκέτας μου ἐκ τοῦ νηοῦ κεραΐζεις;” Ἀριστόδικον δὲ οὐκ ἀπορήσαντα πρὸς ταῦτα εἰπεῖν “ὦναξ, αὐτὸς μὲν οὕτω τοῖσι ἱκέτῃσι βοηθέεις, Κυμαίους δὲ κελεύεις τὸν ἱκέτην ἐκδιδόναι;” τὸν δὲ αὖτις ἀμείψασθαι τοῖσιδε “ναὶ κελεύω, ἵνα γε ἀσεβήσαντες θᾶσσον ἀπόλησθε, ὡς μὴ τὸ λοιπὸν περὶ ἱκετέων ἐκδόσιος ἔλθητε ἐπὶ τὸ χρηστήριον.”
1.199. 1 ὁ δὲ δὴ αἴσχιστος τῶν νόμων ἐστὶ τοῖσι Βαβυλωνίοισι ὅδε· δεῖ πᾶσαν γυναῖκα ἐπιχωρίην ἱζομένην ἐς ἱρὸν Ἀφροδίτης ἅπαξ ἐν τῇ ζόῃ μιχθῆναι ἀνδρὶ ξείνῳ. πολλαὶ δὲ καὶ οὐκ ἀξιούμεναι ἀναμίσγεσθαι τῇσι ἄλλῃσι, οἷα πλούτῳ ὑπερφρονέουσαι, ἐπὶ ζευγέων ἐν καμάρῃσι ἐλάσασαι πρὸς τὸ ἱρὸν ἑστᾶσι· θεραπηίη δέ σφι ὄπισθε ἕπεται πολλή. αἱ δὲ πλεῦνες ποιεῦσι ὧδε· ἐν τεμένεϊ Ἀφροδίτης κατέαται στέφανον περὶ τῇσι κεφαλῇσι ἔχουσαι θώμιγγος πολλαὶ γυναῖκες· αἳ μὲν γὰρ προσέρχονται, αἳ δὲ ἀπέρχονται. σχοινοτενέες δὲ διέξοδοι πάντα τρόπον ὁδῶν ἔχουσι διὰ τῶν γυναικῶν, διʼ ὧν οἱ ξεῖνοι διεξιόντες ἐκλέγονται· ἔνθα ἐπεὰν ἵζηται γυνή, οὐ πρότερον ἀπαλλάσσεται ἐς τὰ οἰκία ἤ τίς οἱ ξείνων ἀργύριον ἐμβαλὼν ἐς τὰ γούνατα μιχθῇ ἔξω τοῦ ἱροῦ· ἐμβαλόντα δὲ δεῖ εἰπεῖν τοσόνδε· “ἐπικαλέω τοι τὴν θεὸν Μύλιττα.” Μύλιττα δὲ καλέουσι τὴν Ἀφροδίτην Ἀσσύριοι. τὸ δὲ ἀργύριον μέγαθος ἐστὶ ὅσον ὦν· οὐ γὰρ μὴ ἀπώσηται· οὐ γάρ οἱ θέμις ἐστί· γίνεται γὰρ ἱρὸν τοῦτο τὸ ἀργύριον. τῷ δὲ πρώτῳ ἐμβαλόντι ἕπεται οὐδὲ ἀποδοκιμᾷ οὐδένα. ἐπεὰν δὲ μιχθῇ, ἀποσιωσαμένη τῇ θεῷ ἀπαλλάσσεται ἐς τὰ οἰκία, καὶ τὠπὸ τούτου οὐκ οὕτω μέγα τί οἱ δώσεις ὥς μιν λάμψεαι. ὅσσαι μέν νυν εἴδεός τε ἐπαμμέναι εἰσὶ καὶ μεγάθεος, ταχὺ ἀπαλλάσσονται, ὅσαι δὲ ἄμορφοι αὐτέων εἰσί, χρόνον πολλὸν προσμένουσι οὐ δυνάμεναι τὸν νόμον ἐκπλῆσαι· καὶ γὰρ τριέτεα καὶ τετραέτεα μετεξέτεραι χρόνον μένουσι. ἐνιαχῇ δὲ καὶ τῆς Κύπρου ἐστὶ παραπλήσιος τούτῳ νόμος.
2.50. σχεδὸν δὲ καὶ πάντων τὰ οὐνόματα τῶν θεῶν ἐξ Αἰγύπτου ἐλήλυθε ἐς τὴν Ἑλλάδα. διότι μὲν γὰρ ἐκ τῶν βαρβάρων ἥκει, πυνθανόμενος οὕτω εὑρίσκω ἐόν· δοκέω δʼ ὦν μάλιστα ἀπʼ Αἰγύπτου ἀπῖχθαι. ὅτι γὰρ δὴ μὴ Ποσειδέωνος καὶ Διοσκούρων, ὡς καὶ πρότερόν μοι ταῦτα εἴρηται, καὶ Ἥρης καὶ Ἱστίης καὶ Θέμιος καὶ Χαρίτων καὶ Νηρηίδων, τῶν ἄλλων θεῶν Αἰγυπτίοισι αἰεί κοτε τὰ οὐνόματα ἐστὶ ἐν τῇ χώρῃ. λέγω δὲ τὰ λέγουσι αὐτοὶ Αἰγύπτιοι. τῶν δὲ οὔ φασι θεῶν γινώσκειν τὰ οὐνόματα, οὗτοι δέ μοι δοκέουσι ὑπὸ Πελασγῶν ὀνομασθῆναι, πλὴν Ποσειδέωνος· τοῦτον δὲ τὸν θεὸν παρὰ Λιβύων ἐπύθοντο· οὐδαμοὶ γὰρ ἀπʼ ἀρχῆς Ποσειδέωνος οὔνομα ἔκτηνται εἰ μὴ Λίβυες καὶ τιμῶσι τὸν θεὸν τοῦτον αἰεί. νομίζουσι δʼ ὦν Αἰγύπτιοι οὐδʼ ἥρωσι οὐδέν.
2.159. παυσάμενος δὲ τῆς διώρυχος ὁ Νεκῶς ἐτράπετο πρὸς στρατηίας, καὶ τριήρεες αἳ μὲν ἐπὶ τῇ βορηίῃ θαλάσσῃ ἐποιήθησαν, αἳ δʼ ἐν τῷ Ἀραβίῳ κόλπῳ ἐπὶ τῇ Ἐρυθρῇ θαλάσσῃ, τῶν ἔτι οἱ ὁλκοὶ ἐπίδηλοι. καὶ ταύτῃσί τε ἐχρᾶτο ἐν τῷ δέοντι καὶ Σύροισι πεζῇ ὁ Νεκῶς συμβαλὼν ἐν Μαγδώλῳ ἐνίκησε, μετὰ δὲ τὴν μάχην Κάδυτιν πόλιν τῆς Συρίης ἐοῦσαν μεγάλην εἷλε. ἐν τῇ δὲ ἐσθῆτι ἔτυχε ταῦτα κατεργασάμενος, ἀνέθηκε τῷ Ἀπόλλωνι πέμψας ἐς Βραγχίδας τὰς Μιλησίων. μετὰ δέ, ἑκκαίδεκα ἔτεα τὰ πάντα ἄρξας, τελευτᾷ, τῷ παιδὶ Ψάμμι παραδοὺς τὴν ἀρχήν.
3.48. συνεπελάβοντο δὲ τοῦ στρατεύματος τοῦ ἐπὶ Σάμον ὥστε γενέσθαι καὶ Κορίνθιοι προθύμως· ὕβρισμα γὰρ καὶ ἐς τούτους εἶχε ἐκ τῶν Σαμίων γενόμενον γενεῇ πρότερον τοῦ στρατεύματος τούτου, κατὰ δὲ τὸν αὐτὸν χρόνον τοῦ κρητῆρος τῇ ἁρπαγῇ γεγονός. Κερκυραίων γὰρ παῖδας τριηκοσίους ἀνδρῶν τῶν πρώτων Περίανδρος ὁ Κυψέλου ἐς Σάρδις ἀπέπεμψε παρὰ Ἀλυάττεα ἐπʼ ἐκτομῇ· προσσχόντων δὲ ἐς τὴν Σάμον τῶν ἀγόντων τοὺς παῖδας Κορινθίων, πυθόμενοι οἱ Σάμιοι τὸν λόγον, ἐπʼ οἷσι ἀγοίατο ἐς Σάρδις, πρῶτα μὲν τοὺς παῖδας ἐδίδαξαν ἱροῦ ἅψασθαι Ἀρτέμιδος· μετὰ δὲ οὐ περιορῶντες ἀπέλκειν τοὺς ἱκέτας ἐκ τοῦ ἱροῦ, σιτίων δὲ τοὺς παῖδας ἐργόντων Κορινθίων, ἐποιήσαντο οἱ Σάμιοι ὁρτήν, τῇ καὶ νῦν ἔτι χρέωνται κατὰ ταὐτά. νυκτὸς γὰρ ἐπιγενομένης, ὅσον χρόνον ἱκέτευον οἱ παῖδες, ἵστασαν χοροὺς παρθένων τε καὶ ἠιθέων, ἱστάντες δὲ τοὺς χοροὺς τρωκτὰ σησάμου τε καὶ μέλιτος ἐποιήσαντο νόμον φέρεσθαι, ἵνα ἁρπάζοντες οἱ τῶν Κερκυραίων παῖδες ἔχοιεν τροφήν. ἐς τοῦτο δὲ τόδε ἐγίνετο, ἐς ὃ οἱ Κορίνθιοι τῶν παίδων οἱ φύλακοι οἴχοντο ἀπολιπόντες· τοὺς δὲ παῖδας ἀπήγαγον ἐς Κέρκυραν οἱ Σάμιοι.
4.33. πολλῷ δέ τι πλεῖστα περὶ αὐτῶν Δήλιοι λέγουσι, φάμενοι ἱρὰ ἐνδεδεμένα ἐν καλάμῃ πυρῶν ἐξ Ὑπερβορέων φερόμενα ἀπικνέεσθαι ἐς Σκύθας, ἀπὸ δὲ Σκυθέων ἤδη δεκομένους αἰεὶ τοὺς πλησιοχώρους ἑκάστους κομίζειν αὐτὰ τὸ πρὸς ἑσπέρης ἑκαστάτω ἐπὶ τὸν Ἀδρίην, ἐνθεῦτεν δὲ πρὸς μεσαμβρίην προπεμπόμενα πρώτους Δωδωναίους Ἑλλήνων δέκεσθαι, ἀπὸ δὲ τούτων καταβαίνειν ἐπὶ τὸν Μηλιέα κόλπον καὶ διαπορεύεσθαι ἐς Εὔβοιαν, πόλιν τε ἐς πόλιν πέμπειν μέχρι Καρύστου, τὸ δʼ ἀπὸ ταύτης ἐκλιπεῖν Ἄνδρον· Καρυστίους γὰρ εἶναι τοὺς κομίζοντας ἐς Τῆνον, Τηνίους δὲ ἐς Δῆλον. ἀπικνέεσθαι μέν νυν οὕτω ταῦτα τὰ ἱρὰ λέγουσι ἐς Δῆλον· πρῶτον δὲ τοὺς Ὑπερβορέους πέμψαι φερούσας τὰ ἱρὰ δὺο κόρας, τὰς ὀνομάζουσι Δήλιοι εἶναι Ὑπερόχην τε καὶ Λαοδίκην· ἅμα δὲ αὐτῇσι ἀσφαλείης εἵνεκεν πέμψαι τοὺς Ὑπερβορέους τῶν ἀστῶν ἄνδρας πέντε πομπούς, τούτους οἳ νῦν Περφερέες καλέονται τιμὰς μεγάλας ἐν Δήλῳ ἔχοντες. ἐπεὶ δὲ τοῖσι Ὑπερβορέοισι τοὺς ἀποπεμφθέντας ὀπίσω οὐκ ἀπονοστέειν, δεινὰ ποιευμένους εἰ σφέας αἰεὶ καταλάμψεται ἀποστέλλοντας μὴ ἀποδέκεσθαι, οὕτω δὴ φέροντας ἐς τοὺς οὔρους τὰ ἱρὰ ἐνδεδεμένα ἐν πυρῶν καλάμῃ τοὺς πλησιοχώρους ἐπισκήπτειν κελεύοντας προπέμπειν σφέα ἀπὸ ἑωυτῶν ἐς ἄλλο ἔθνος. καὶ ταῦτα μὲν οὕτω προπεμπόμενα ἀπικνέεσθαι λέγουσι ἐς Δῆλον. οἶδα δὲ αὐτὸς τούτοισι τοῖσι ἱροῖσι τόδε ποιεύμενον προσφερές, τὰς Θρηικίας καὶ τὰς Παιονίδας γυναῖκας, ἐπεὰν θύωσι τῇ Ἀρτέμιδι τῇ βασιλείῃ, οὐκ ἄνευ πυρῶν καλάμης ἐχούσας τὰ ἱρά. 4.34. καὶ ταῦτα μὲν δὴ ταύτας οἶδα ποιεύσας· τῇσι δὲ παρθένοισι ταύτῃσι τῇσι ἐξ Ὑπερβορέων τελευτησάσῃσι ἐν Δήλῳ κείρονται καὶ αἱ κόραι καὶ οἱ παῖδες οἱ Δηλίων· αἱ μὲν πρὸ γάμου πλόκαμον ἀποταμνόμεναι καὶ περὶ ἄτρακτον εἱλίξασαι ἐπὶ τὸ σῆμα τιθεῖσι ʽτὸ δὲ σῆμα ἐστὶ ἔσω ἐς τὸ Ἀρτεμίσιον ἐσιόντι ἀριστερῆς χειρός, ἐπιπέφυκε δέ οἱ ἐλαίἠ, ὅσοι δὲ παῖδες τῶν Δηλίων, περὶ χλόην τινὰ εἱλίξαντες τῶν τριχῶν τιθεῖσι καὶ οὗτοι ἐπὶ τὸ σῆμα. 4.35. αὗται μὲν δὴ ταύτην τιμὴν ἔχουσι πρὸς τῶν Δήλου οἰκητόρων. φασὶ δὲ οἱ αὐτοὶ οὗτοι καὶ τὴν Ἄργην τε καὶ τὴν Ὦπιν ἐούσας παρθένους ἐξ Ὑπερβορέων κατὰ τοὺς αὐτοὺς τούτους ἀνθρώπους πορευομένας ἀπικέσθαι ἐς Δῆλον ἔτι πρότερον Ὑπερόχης τε καὶ Λαοδίκης. ταύτας μέν νυν τῇ Εἰλειθυίῃ ἀποφερούσας ἀντὶ τοῦ ὠκυτόκου τὸν ἐτάξαντο φόρον ἀπικέσθαι, τὴν δὲ Ἄργην τε καὶ τὴν Ὦπιν ἅμα αὐτοῖσι θεοῖσι ἀπικέσθαι λέγουσι καὶ σφι τιμὰς ἄλλας δεδόσθαι πρὸς σφέων· καὶ γὰρ ἀγείρειν σφι τὰς γυναῖκας ἐπονομαζούσας τὰ οὐνόματα ἐν τῷ ὕμνῳ τόν σφι Ὠλὴν ἀνὴρ Λύκιος ἐποίησε, παρὰ δὲ σφέων μαθόντας νησιώτας τε καὶ Ἴωνας ὑμνέειν Ὦπίν τε καὶ Ἄργην ὀνομάζοντάς τε καὶ ἀγείροντας ʽοὗτος δὲ ὁ Ὠλὴν καὶ τοὺς ἄλλους τοὺς παλαιοὺς ὕμνους ἐποίησε ἐκ Λυκίης ἐλθὼν τοὺς ἀειδομένους ἐν Δήλᾠ, καὶ τῶν μηρίων καταγιζομένων ἐπὶ τῷ βωμῷ τὴν σποδὸν ταύτην ἐπὶ τὴν θήκην τῆς Ὤπιός τε καὶ Ἄργης ἀναισιμοῦσθαι ἐπιβαλλομένην. ἡ δὲ θήκη αὐτέων ἐστὶ ὄπισθε τοῦ Ἀρτεμισίου, πρὸς ἠῶ τετραμμένη, ἀγχοτάτω τοῦ Κηίων ἱστιητορίου.' '
4.103. τούτων Ταῦροι μὲν νόμοισι τοιοῖσιδε χρέωνται· θύουσι μὲν τῇ, Παρθένῳ τούς τε ναυηγοὺς καὶ τοὺς ἂν λάβωσι Ἑλλήνων ἐπαναχθέντες τρόπῳ τοιῷδε· καταρξάμενοι ῥοπάλῳ παίουσι τὴν κεφαλήν. οἳ μὲν δὴ λέγουσι ὡς τὸ σῶμα ἀπὸ τοῦ κρημνοῦ ὠθέουσι κάτω ʽἐπὶ γὰρ κρημνοῦ ἵδρυται τὸ ἱρόν̓, τὴν δὲ κεφαλὴν ἀνασταυροῦσι· οἳ δὲ κατὰ μὲν τὴν κεφαλὴν ὁμολογέουσι, τὸ μέντοι σῶμα οὐκ ὠθέεσθαι ἀπὸ τοῦ κρημνοῦ λέγουσι ἀλλὰ γῇ κρύπτεσθαι. τὴν δὲ δαίμονα ταύτην τῆ θύουσι λέγουσι αὐτοὶ Ταῦροι Ἰφιγένειαν τὴν Ἀγαμέμνονος εἶναι. πολεμίους δὲ ἄνδρας τοὺς ἂν χειρώσωνται ποιεῦσι τάδε· ἀποταμὼν ἕκαστος 1 κεφαλὴν ἀποφέρεται ἐς τὰ οἰκία, ἔπειτα ἐπὶ ξύλου μεγάλου ἀναπείρας ἱστᾷ ὑπὲρ τῆς οἰκίης ὑπερέχουσαν πολλόν, μάλιστα δὲ ὑπὲρ τῆς καπνοδόκης. φασὶ δὲ τούτους φυλάκους τῆς οἰκίης πάσης ὑπεραιωρέεσθαι. ζῶσι δὲ ἀπὸ ληίης τε καὶ πολέμου.
4.181. οὗτοι μὲν οἱ παραθαλάσσιοι τῶν νομάδων Λιβύων εἰρέαται, ὑπὲρ δὲ τούτων ἐς μεσόγαιαν ἡ θηριώδης ἐστὶ Λιβύη, ὑπὲρ δὲ τῆς θηριώδεος ὀφρύη ψάμμης κατήκει παρατείνουσα ἀπὸ Θηβέων τῶν Αἰγυπτιέων ἐπʼ Ἡρακλέας στήλας. ἐν δὲ τῇ ὀφρύῃ ταύτῃ μάλιστα διὰ δέκα ἡμερέων ὁδοῦ ἁλός ἐστι τρύφεα κατὰ χόνδρους μεγάλους ἐν κολωνοῖσι, καὶ ἐν κορυφῇσι ἑκάστου τοῦ κολωνοῦ ἀνακοντίζει ἐκ μέσου τοῦ ἁλὸς ὕδωρ ψυχρὸν καὶ γλυκύ, περὶ δὲ αὐτὸν ἄνθρωποι οἰκέουσι ἔσχατοι πρὸς τῆς ἐρήμου καὶ ὑπὲρ τῆς θηριώδεος, πρῶτοι μὲν ἀπὸ Θηβέων διὰ δέκα ἡμερέων ὁδοῦ Ἀμμώνιοι, ἔχοντες τὸ ἱρὸν ἀπὸ τοῦ Θηβαιέος Διός· καὶ γὰρ τὸ 1 ἐν Θήβῃσι, ὡς καὶ πρότερον εἴρηταί μοι, κριοπρόσωπον τοῦ Διὸς τὤγαλμα ἐστί. τυγχάνει δὲ καὶ ἄλλο σφι ὕδωρ κρηναῖον ἐὸν, τὸ τὸν μὲν ὄρθρον γίνεται χλιαρόν, ἀγορῆς δὲ πληθυούσης ψυχρότερον, μεσαμβρίη τε ἐστὶ καὶ τὸ κάρτα γίνεται ψυχρόν· τηνικαῦτα δὲ ἄρδουσι τοὺς κήπους· ἀποκλινομένης δὲ τῆς ἡμέρης ὑπίεται τοῦ ψυχροῦ, ἐς οὗ δύεταί τε ὁ ἥλιος καὶ τὸ ὕδωρ γίνεται χλιαρόν. ἐπὶ δὲ μᾶλλον ἰὸν ἐς τὸ θερμὸν ἐς μέσας νύκτας πελάζει, τηνικαῦτα δὲ ζέει ἀμβολάδην· παρέρχονται τε μέσαι νύκτες καὶ ψύχεται μέχρι ἐς ἠῶ. ἐπίκλησιν δὲ αὕτη ἡ κρήνη καλέεται ἡλίου.
5.83. τοῦτον δʼ ἔτι τὸν χρόνον καὶ πρὸ τοῦ Αἰγινῆται Ἐπιδαυρίων ἤκουον τά τε ἄλλα καὶ δίκας διαβαίνοντες ἐς Ἐπίδαυρον ἐδίδοσάν τε καὶ ἐλάμβανον παρʼ ἀλλήλων οἱ Αἰγινῆται· τὸ δὲ ἀπὸ τοῦδε νέας τε πηξάμενοι καὶ ἀγνωμοσύνῃ χρησάμενοι ἀπέστησαν ἀπὸ τῶν Ἐπιδαυρίων. ἅτε δὲ ἐόντες διάφοροι ἐδηλέοντο αὐτούς, ὥστε θαλασσοκράτορες ἐόντες, καὶ δὴ καὶ τὰ ἀγάλματα ταῦτα τῆς τε Δαμίης καὶ τῆς Αὐξησίης ὑπαιρέονται αὐτῶν, καί σφεα ἐκόμισάν τε καὶ ἱδρύσαντο τῆς σφετέρης χώρης ἐς τὴν μεσόγαιαν, τῇ Οἴη μὲν ἐστὶ οὔνομα, στάδια δὲ μάλιστά κῃ ἀπὸ τῆς πόλιος ὡς εἴκοσι ἀπέχει. ἱδρυσάμενοι δὲ ἐν τούτῳ τῷ χώρῳ θυσίῃσί τε σφέα καὶ χοροῖσι γυναικηίοισι κερτομίοισι ἱλάσκοντο, χορηγῶν ἀποδεικνυμένων ἑκατέρῃ τῶν δαιμόνων δέκα ἀνδρῶν· κακῶς δὲ ἠγόρευον οἱ χοροὶ ἄνδρα μὲν οὐδένα, τὰς δὲ ἐπιχωρίας γυναῖκας. ἦσαν δὲ καὶ τοῖσι Ἐπιδαυρίοισι αἱ αὐταὶ ἱροεργίαι· εἰσὶ δέ σφι καὶ ἄρρητοι ἱρουργίαι.
5.92. Ἠετίωνι δὲ μετὰ ταῦτα ὁ παῖς ηὐξάνετο, καί οἱ διαφυγόντι τοῦτον τὸν κίνδυνον ἀπὸ τῆς κυψέλης ἐπωνυμίην Κύψελος οὔνομα ἐτέθη. ἀνδρωθέντι δὲ καὶ μαντευομένῳ Κυψέλῳ ἐγένετο ἀμφιδέξιον χρηστήριον ἐν Δελφοῖσι, τῷ πίσυνος γενόμενος ἐπεχείρησέ τε καὶ ἔσχε Κόρινθον. ὁ δὲ χρησμὸς ὅδε ἦν. ὄλβιος οὗτος ἀνὴρ ὃς ἐμὸν δόμον ἐσκαταβαίνει, Κύψελος Ἠετίδης, βασιλεὺς κλειτοῖο Κορίνθου αὐτὸς καὶ παῖδες, παίδων γε μὲν οὐκέτι παῖδες. τὸ μὲν δὴ χρηστήριον τοῦτο ἦν, τυραννεύσας δὲ ὁ Κύψελος τοιοῦτος δή τις ἀνὴρ ἐγένετο· πολλοὺς μὲν Κορινθίων ἐδίωξε, πολλοὺς δὲ χρημάτων ἀπεστέρησε, πολλῷ δέ τι πλείστους τῆς ψυχῆς.
5.92. Κορινθίοισι γὰρ ἦν πόλιος κατάστασις τοιήδε· ἦν ὀλιγαρχίη, καὶ οὗτοι Βακχιάδαι καλεόμενοι ἔνεμον τὴν πόλιν, ἐδίδοσαν δὲ καὶ ἤγοντο ἐξ ἀλλήλων. Ἀμφίονι δὲ ἐόντι τούτων τῶν ἀνδρῶν γίνεται θυγάτηρ χωλή· οὔνομα δέ οἱ ἦν Λάβδα. ταύτην Βακχιαδέων γὰρ οὐδεὶς ἤθελε γῆμαι, ἴσχει Ἠετίων ὁ Ἐχεκράτεος, δήμου μὲν ἐὼν ἐκ Πέτρης, ἀτὰρ τὰ ἀνέκαθεν Λαπίθης τε καὶ Καινείδης. ἐκ δέ οἱ ταύτης τῆς γυναικὸς οὐδʼ ἐξ ἄλλης παῖδες ἐγίνοντο. ἐστάλη ὦν ἐς Δελφοὺς περὶ γόνου. ἐσιόντα δὲ αὐτὸν ἰθέως ἡ Πυθίη προσαγορεύει τοῖσιδε τοῖσι ἔπεσι. Ἠετίων, οὔτις σε τίει πολύτιτον ἐόντα. Λάβδα κύει, τέξει δʼ ὀλοοίτροχον· ἐν δὲ πεσεῖται ἀνδράσι μουνάρχοισι, δικαιώσει δὲ Κόρινθον. ταῦτα χρησθέντα τῷ Ἠετίωνι ἐξαγγέλλεταί κως τοῖσι Βακχιάδῃσι, τοῖσι τὸ μὲν πρότερον γενόμενον χρηστήριον ἐς Κόρινθον ἦν ἄσημον, φέρον τε ἐς τὠυτὸ καὶ τὸ τοῦ Ἠετίωνος καὶ λέγον ὧδε. αἰετὸς ἐν πέτρῃσι κύει, τέξει δὲ λέοντα καρτερὸν ὠμηστήν· πολλῶν δʼ ὑπὸ γούνατα λύσει. ταῦτά νυν εὖ φράζεσθε, Κορίνθιοι, οἳ περὶ καλήν Πειρήνην οἰκεῖτε καὶ ὀφρυόεντα Κόρινθον.
5.92. Περίανδρος δὲ συνιεὶς τὸ ποιηθὲν καὶ νόῳ ἴσχων ὥς οἱ ὑπετίθετο Θρασύβουλος τοὺς ὑπειρόχους τῶν ἀστῶν φονεύειν, ἐνθαῦτα δὴ πᾶσαν κακότητα ἐξέφαινε ἐς τοὺς πολιήτας. ὅσα γὰρ Κύψελος ἀπέλιπε κτείνων τε καὶ διώκων, Περίανδρος σφέα ἀπετέλεσε, μιῇ δὲ ἡμέρῃ ἀπέδυσε πάσας τὰς Κορινθίων γυναῖκας διὰ τὴν ἑωυτοῦ γυναῖκα Μέλισσαν. πέμψαντι γάρ οἱ ἐς Θεσπρωτοὺς ἐπʼ Ἀχέροντα ποταμὸν ἀγγέλους ἐπὶ τὸ νεκυομαντήιον παρακαταθήκης πέρι ξεινικῆς οὔτε σημανέειν ἔφη ἡ Μέλισσα ἐπιφανεῖσα οὔτε κατερέειν ἐν τῷ κέεται χώρῳ ἡ παρακαταθήκη· ῥιγοῦν τε γὰρ καὶ εἶναι γυμνή· τῶν γάρ οἱ συγκατέθαψε ἱματίων ὄφελος εἶναι οὐδὲν οὐ κατακαυθέντων· μαρτύριον δέ οἱ εἶναι ὡς ἀληθέα ταῦτα λέγει, ὅτι ἐπὶ ψυχρὸν τὸν ἰπνὸν Περίανδρος τοὺς ἄρτους ἐπέβαλε. ταῦτα δὲ ὡς ὀπίσω ἀπηγγέλθη τῷ Περιάνδρῳ, πιστὸν γάρ οἱ ἦν τὸ συμβόλαιον ὃς νεκρῷ ἐούσῃ Μελίσσῃ ἐμίγη, ἰθέως δὴ μετὰ τὴν ἀγγελίην κήρυγμα ἐποιήσατο ἐς τὸ Ἥραιον ἐξιέναι πάσας τὰς Κορινθίων γυναῖκας. αἳ μὲν δὴ ὡς ἐς ὁρτὴν ἤισαν κόσμῳ τῷ καλλίστῳ χρεώμεναι, ὃ δʼ ὑποστήσας τοὺς δορυφόρους ἀπέδυσε σφέας πάσας ὁμοίως, τάς τε ἐλευθέρας καὶ τὰς ἀμφιπόλους, συμφορήσας δὲ ἐς ὄρυγμα Μελίσσῃ ἐπευχόμενος κατέκαιε. ταῦτα δέ οἱ ποιήσαντι καὶ τὸ δεύτερον πέμψαντι ἔφρασε τὸ εἴδωλον τὸ Μελίσσης ἐς τὸν κατέθηκε χῶρον τοῦ ξείνου τὴν παρακαταθήκην. τοιοῦτο μὲν ὑμῖν ἐστὶ ἡ τυραννίς, ὦ Λακεδαιμόνιοι, καὶ τοιούτων ἔργων. ἡμέας δὲ τοὺς Κορινθίους τότε αὐτίκα θῶμα μέγα εἶχε ὅτε ὑμέας εἴδομεν μεταπεμπομένους Ἱππίην, νῦν τε δὴ καὶ μεζόνως θωμάζομεν λέγοντας ταῦτα, ἐπιμαρτυρόμεθά τε ἐπικαλεόμενοι ὑμῖν θεοὺς τοὺς Ἑλληνίους μὴ κατιστάναι τυραννίδας ἐς τὰς πόλις. οὔκων παύσεσθε ἀλλὰ πειρήσεσθε παρὰ τὸ δίκαιον κατάγοντες Ἱππίην· ἴστε ὑμῖν Κορινθίους γε οὐ συναινέοντας.”
5.92. ἄρξαντος δὲ τούτου ἐπὶ τριήκοντα ἔτεα καὶ διαπλέξαντος τὸν βίον εὖ, διάδοχός οἱ τῆς τυραννίδος ὁ παῖς Περίανδρος γίνεται. ὁ τοίνυν Περίανδρος κατʼ ἀρχὰς μὲν ἦν ἠπιώτερος τοῦ πατρός, ἐπείτε δὲ ὡμίλησε διʼ ἀγγέλων Θρασυβούλῳ τῷ Μιλήτου τυράννῳ, πολλῷ ἔτι ἐγένετο Κυψέλου μιαιφονώτερος. πέμψας γὰρ παρὰ Θρασύβουλον κήρυκα ἐπυνθάνετο ὅντινα ἂν τρόπον ἀσφαλέστατον καταστησάμενος τῶν πρηγμάτων κάλλιστα τὴν πόλιν ἐπιτροπεύοι. Θρασύβουλος δὲ τὸν ἐλθόντα παρὰ τοῦ Περιάνδρου ἐξῆγε ἔξω τοῦ ἄστεος, ἐσβὰς δὲ ἐς ἄρουραν ἐσπαρμένην ἅμα τε διεξήιε τὸ λήιον ἐπειρωτῶν τε καὶ ἀναποδίζων τὸν κήρυκα κατὰ τὴν ἀπὸ Κορίνθου ἄπιξιν, καὶ ἐκόλουε αἰεὶ ὅκως τινὰ ἴδοι τῶν ἀσταχύων ὑπερέχοντα, κολούων δὲ ἔρριπτε, ἐς ὃ τοῦ ληίου τὸ κάλλιστόν τε καὶ βαθύτατον διέφθειρε τρόπῳ τοιούτω· διεξελθὼν δὲ τὸ χωρίον καὶ ὑποθέμενος ἔπος οὐδὲν ἀποπέμπει τὸν κήρυκα. νοστήσαντος δὲ τοῦ κήρυκος ἐς τὴν Κόρινθον ἦν πρόθυμος πυνθάνεσθαι τὴν ὑποθήκην ὁ Περίανδρος· ὁ δὲ οὐδέν οἱ ἔφη Θρασύβουλον ὑποθέσθαι, θωμάζειν τε αὐτοῦ παρʼ οἷόν μιν ἄνδρα ἀποπέμψειε, ὡς παραπλῆγά τε καὶ τῶν ἑωυτοῦ σινάμωρον, ἀπηγεόμενος τά περ πρὸς Θρασυβούλου ὀπώπεε.
5.92. ἔδει δὲ ἐκ τοῦ Ἠετίωνος γόνου Κορίνθῳ κακὰ ἀναβλαστεῖν. ἡ Λάβδα γὰρ πάντα ταῦτα ἤκουε ἑστεῶσα πρὸς αὐτῇσι τῇσι θύρῃσι· δείσασα δὲ μή σφι μεταδόξῃ καὶ τὸ δεύτερον λαβόντες τὸ παιδίον ἀποκτείνωσι, φέρουσα κατακρύπτει ἐς τὸ ἀφραστότατόν οἱ ἐφαίνετο εἶναι, ἐς κυψέλην, ἐπισταμένη ὡς εἰ ὑποστρέψαντες ἐς ζήτησιν ἀπικνεοίατο πάντα ἐρευνήσειν μέλλοιεν· τὰ δὴ καὶ ἐγίνετο. ἐλθοῦσι δὲ καὶ διζημένοισι αὐτοῖσι ὡς οὐκ ἐφαίνετο, ἐδόκεε ἀπαλλάσσεσθαι καὶ λέγειν πρὸς τοὺς ἀποπέμψαντας ὡς πάντα ποιήσειαν τὰ ἐκεῖνοι ἐνετείλαντο. οἳ μὲν δὴ ἀπελθόντες ἔλεγον ταῦτα.
5.92. οἳ μὲν ταῦτα ἔλεγον, τῶν δὲ συμμάχων τὸ πλῆθος οὐκ ἐνεδέκετο τοὺς λόγους. οἱ μέν νυν ἄλλοι ἡσυχίην ἦγον, Κορίνθιος δὲ Σωκλέης ἔλεξε τάδε.
5.92. τοῦτο μὲν δὴ τοῖσι Βακχιάδῃσι πρότερον γενόμενον ἦν ἀτέκμαρτον· τότε δὲ τὸ Ἠετίωνι γενόμενον ὡς ἐπύθοντο, αὐτίκα καὶ τὸ πρότερον συνῆκαν ἐὸν συνῳδὸν τῷ Ἠετίωνος. συνέντες δὲ καὶ τοῦτο εἶχον ἐν ἡσυχίῃ, ἐθέλοντες τὸν μέλλοντα Ἠετίωνι γίνεσθαι γόνον διαφθεῖραι. ὡς δʼ ἔτεκε ἡ γυνὴ τάχιστα, πέμπουσι σφέων αὐτῶν δέκα ἐς τὸν δῆμον ἐν τῷ κατοίκητο ὁ Ἠετίων ἀποκτενέοντας τὸ παιδίον. ἀπικόμενοι δὲ οὗτοι ἐς τὴν Πέτρην καὶ παρελθόντες ἐς τὴν αὐλὴν τὴν Ἠετίωνος αἴτεον τὸ παιδίον· ἡ δὲ Λάβδα εἰδυῖά τε οὐδὲν τῶν εἵνεκα ἐκεῖνοι ἀπικοίατο, καὶ δοκέουσα σφέας φιλοφροσύνης τοῦ πατρὸς εἵνεκα αἰτέειν, φέρουσα ἐνεχείρισε αὐτῶν ἑνί. τοῖσι δὲ ἄρα ἐβεβούλευτο κατʼ ὁδὸν τὸν πρῶτον αὐτῶν λαβόντα τὸ παιδίον προσουδίσαι. ἐπεὶ ὦν ἔδωκε φέρουσα ἡ Λάβδα, τὸν λαβόντα τῶν ἀνδρῶν θείῃ τύχῃ προσεγέλασε τὸ παιδίον, καὶ τὸν φρασθέντα τοῦτο οἶκτός τις ἴσχει ἀποκτεῖναι, κατοικτείρας δὲ παραδιδοῖ τῷ δευτέρῳ, ὁ δὲ τῷ τρίτῳ. οὕτω δὴ διεξῆλθε διὰ πάντων τῶν δέκα παραδιδόμενον, οὐδενὸς βουλομένου διεργάσασθαι. ἀποδόντες ὦν ὀπίσω τῇ τεκούσῃ τὸ παιδίον καὶ ἐξελθόντες ἔξω, ἑστεῶτες ἐπὶ τῶν θυρέων ἀλλήλων ἅπτοντο καταιτιώμενοι, καὶ μάλιστα τοῦ πρώτου λαβόντος, ὅτι οὐκ ἐποίησε κατὰ τὰ δεδογμένα, ἐς ὃ δή σφι χρόνου ἐγγινομένου ἔδοξε αὖτις παρελθόντας πάντας τοῦ φόνου μετίσχειν.
5.92. ‘ἦ δὴ ὅ τε οὐρανὸς ἔνερθε ἔσται τῆς γῆς καὶ ἡ γῆ μετέωρος ὑπὲρ τοῦ οὐρανοῦ, καὶ ἄνθρωποι νομὸν ἐν θαλάσσῃ ἕξουσι καὶ ἰχθύες τὸν πρότερον ἄνθρωποι, ὅτε γε ὑμεῖς ὦ Λακεδαιμόνιοι ἰσοκρατίας καταλύοντες τυραννίδας ἐς τὰς πόλις κατάγειν παρασκευάζεσθε, τοῦ οὔτε ἀδικώτερον ἐστὶ οὐδὲν κατʼ ἀνθρώπους οὔτε μιαιφονώτερον. εἰ γὰρ δὴ τοῦτό γε δοκέει ὑμῖν εἶναι χρηστὸν ὥστε τυραννεύεσθαι τὰς πόλις, αὐτοὶ πρῶτοι τύραννον καταστησάμενοι παρὰ σφίσι αὐτοῖσι οὕτω καὶ τοῖσι ἄλλοισι δίζησθε κατιστάναι· νῦν δὲ αὐτοὶ τυράννων ἄπειροι ἐόντες, καὶ φυλάσσοντες τοῦτο δεινότατα ἐν τῇ Σπάρτῃ μὴ γενέσθαι, παραχρᾶσθε ἐς τοὺς συμμάχους. εἰ δὲ αὐτοῦ ἔμπειροι ἔατε κατά περ ἡμεῖς, εἴχετε ἂν περὶ αὐτοῦ γνώμας ἀμείνονας συμβαλέσθαι ἤ περ νῦν.
6.21. παθοῦσι δὲ ταῦτα Μιλησίοισι πρὸς Περσέων οὐκ ἀπέδοσαν τὴν ὁμοίην Συβαρῖται, οἳ Λᾶόν τε καὶ Σκίδρον οἴκεον τῆς πόλιος ἀπεστερημένοι. Συβάριος γὰρ ἁλούσης ὑπὸ Κροτωνιητέων Μιλήσιοι πάντες ἡβηδὸν ἀπεκείραντο τὰς κεφαλὰς καὶ πένθος μέγα προσεθήκαντο· πόλιες γὰρ αὗται μάλιστα δὴ τῶν ἡμεῖς ἴδμεν ἀλλήλῃσι ἐξεινώθησαν· οὐδὲν ὁμοίως καὶ Ἀθηναῖοι. Ἀθηναῖοι μὲν γὰρ δῆλον ἐποίησαν ὑπεραχθεσθέντες τῇ Μιλήτου ἁλώσι τῇ τε ἄλλῃ πολλαχῇ, καὶ δὴ καὶ ποιήσαντι Φρυνίχῳ δρᾶμα Μιλήτου ἅλωσιν καὶ διδάξαντι ἐς δάκρυά τε ἔπεσε τὸ θέητρον, καὶ ἐζημίωσάν μιν ὡς ἀναμνήσαντα οἰκήια κακὰ χιλίῃσι δραχμῇσι, καὶ ἐπέταξαν μηδένα χρᾶσθαι τούτῳ τῷ δράματι.
6.75. μαθόντες δὲ Κλεομένεα Λακεδαιμόνιοι ταῦτα πρήσσοντα, κατῆγον αὐτὸν δείσαντες ἐπὶ τοῖσι αὐτοῖσι ἐς Σπάρτην τοῖσι καὶ πρότερον ἦρχε. κατελθόντα δὲ αὐτὸν αὐτίκα ὑπέλαβε μανίη νοῦσος, ἐόντα καὶ πρότερον ὑπομαργότερον· ὅκως γὰρ τεῷ ἐντύχοι Σπαρτιητέων, ἐνέχραυε ἐς τὸ πρόσωπον τὸ σκῆπτρον. ποιέοντα δὲ αὐτὸν ταῦτα καὶ παραφρονήσαντα ἔδησαν οἱ προσήκοντες ἐν ξύλω· ὁ δὲ δεθεὶς τὸν φύλακον μουνωθέντα ἰδὼν τῶν ἄλλων αἰτέει μάχαιραν· οὐ βουλομένου δὲ τὰ πρῶτα τοῦ φυλάκου διδόναι ἀπείλεε τά μιν αὖτις ποιήσει, ἐς ὁ δείσας τὰς ἀπειλὰς ὁ φύλακος ʽἦν γὰρ τῶν τις εἱλωτέων’ διδοῖ οἱ μάχαιραν. Κλεομένης δὲ παραλαβὼν τὸν σίδηρον ἄρχετο ἐκ τῶν κνημέων ἑωυτὸν λωβώμενος· ἐπιτάμνων γὰρ κατὰ μῆκος τὰς σάρκας προέβαινε ἐκ τῶν κνημέων ἐς τοὺς μηρούς, ἐκ δὲ τῶν μηρῶν ἔς τε τὰ ἰσχία καὶ τὰς λαπάρας, ἐς ὃ ἐς τὴν γαστέρα ἀπίκετο, καὶ ταύτην καταχορδεύων ἀπέθανε τρόπῳ τοιούτῳ, ὡς μὲν οἱ πολλοὶ λέγουσι Ἐλλήνων, ὅτι τὴν Πυθίην ἀνέγνωσε τὰ περὶ Δημαρήτου λέγειν γενόμενα, ὡς δὲ Ἀθηναῖοι μοῦνοι λέγουσι, διότι ἐς Ἐλευσῖνα ἐσβαλὼν ἔκειρε τὸ τέμενος τῶν θεῶν, ὡς δὲ Ἀργεῖοι, ὅτι ἐξ ἱροῦ αὐτῶν τοῦ Ἄργου Ἀργείων τοὺς καταφυγόντας ἐκ τῆς μάχης καταγινέων κατέκοπτε καὶ αὐτὸ τὸ ἄλσος ἐν ἀλογίῃ ἔχων ἐνέπρησε.
6.97. ἐν ᾧ δὲ οὗτοι ταῦτα ἐποίευν, οἱ Δήλιοι ἐκλιπόντες καὶ αὐτοὶ τὴν Δῆλον οἴχοντο φεύγοντες ἐς Τῆνον. τῆς δὲ στρατιῆς καταπλεούσης ὁ Δᾶτις προπλώσας οὐκ ἔα τὰς νέας πρὸς τὴν Δῆλον προσορμίζεσθαι, ἀλλὰ πέρην ἐν τῇ Ῥηναίῃ· αὐτὸς δὲ πυθόμενος ἵνα ἦσαν οἱ Δήλιοι, πέμπων κήρυκα ἠγόρευέ σφι τάδε. “ἄνδρες ἱροί, τί φεύγοντες οἴχεσθε, οὐκ ἐπιτήδεα καταγνόντες κατʼ ἐμεῦ; ἐγὼ γὰρ καὶ αὐτὸς ἐπὶ τοσοῦτό γε φρονέω καὶ μοι ἐκ βασιλέος ὧδε ἐπέσταλται, ἐν τῇ χώρῃ οἱ δύο θεοὶ ἐγένοντο, ταύτην μηδὲν σίνεσθαι, μήτε αὐτὴν τὴν χώρην μήτε τοὺς οἰκήτορας αὐτῆς. νῦν ὦν καὶ ἄπιτε ἐπὶ τὰ ὑμέτερα αὐτῶν καὶ τὴν νῆσον νέμεσθε.” ταῦτα μὲν ἐπεκηρυκεύσατο τοῖσι Δηλίοισι, μετὰ δὲ λιβανωτοῦ τριηκόσια τάλαντα κατανήσας ἐπὶ τοῦ βωμοῦ ἐθυμίησε.
6.105. καὶ πρῶτα μὲν ἐόντες ἔτι ἐν τῷ ἄστεϊ οἱ στρατηγοὶ ἀποπέμπουσι ἐς Σπάρτην κήρυκα Φειδιππίδην Ἀθηναῖον μὲν ἄνδρα, ἄλλως δὲ ἡμεροδρόμην τε καὶ τοῦτο μελετῶντα· τῷ δή, ὡς αὐτός τε ἔλεγε Φειδιππίδης καὶ Ἀθηναίοισι ἀπήγγελλε, περὶ τὸ Παρθένιον ὄρος τὸ ὑπὲρ Τεγέης ὁ Πὰν περιπίπτει· βώσαντα δὲ τὸ οὔνομα τοῦ Φειδιππίδεω τὸν Πᾶνα Ἀθηναίοισι κελεῦσαι ἀπαγγεῖλαι, διʼ ὅ τι ἑωυτοῦ οὐδεμίαν ἐπιμελείην ποιεῦνται ἐόντος εὐνόου Ἀθηναίοισι καὶ πολλαχῇ γενομένου σφι ἤδη χρησίμου, τὰ δʼ ἔτι καὶ ἐσομένου. καὶ ταῦτα μὲν Ἀθηναῖοι, καταστάντων σφι εὖ ἤδη τῶν πρηγμάτων, πιστεύσαντες εἶναι ἀληθέα ἱδρύσαντο ὑπὸ τῇ ἀκροπόλι Πανὸς ἱρόν, καὶ αὐτὸν ἀπὸ ταύτης τῆς ἀγγελίης θυσίῃσι ἐπετείοισι καὶ λαμπάδι ἱλάσκονται. 6.106. τότε δὲ πεμφθεὶς ὑπὸ τῶν στρατηγῶν ὁ Φειδιππίδης οὗτος, ὅτε πέρ οἱ ἔφη καὶ τὸν Πᾶνα φανῆναι, δευτεραῖος ἐκ τοῦ Ἀθηναίων ἄστεος ἦν ἐν Σπάρτῃ, ἀπικόμενος δὲ ἐπὶ τοὺς ἄρχοντας ἔλεγε “ὦ Λακεδαιμόνιοι, Ἀθηναῖοι ὑμέων δέονται σφίσι βοηθῆσαι καὶ μὴ περιιδεῖν πόλιν ἀρχαιοτάτην ἐν τοῖσι Ἕλλησι δουλοσύνῃ περιπεσοῦσαν πρὸς ἀνδρῶν βαρβάρων· καὶ γὰρ νῦν Ἐρέτριά τε ἠνδραπόδισται καὶ πόλι λογίμῳ ἡ Ἑλλὰς γέγονε ἀσθενεστέρη.” ὃ μὲν δή σφι τὰ ἐντεταλμένα ἀπήγγελλε, τοῖσι δὲ ἕαδε μὲν βοηθέειν Ἀθηναίοισι, ἀδύνατα δέ σφι ἦν τὸ παραυτίκα ποιέειν ταῦτα, οὐ βουλομένοισι λύειν τὸν νόμον· ἦν γὰρ ἱσταμένου τοῦ μηνὸς εἰνάτη, εἰνάτῃ δὲ οὐκ ἐξελεύσεσθαι ἔφασαν μὴ οὐ πλήρεος ἐόντος τοῦ κύκλου. 6.107. οὗτοι μέν νυν τὴν πανσέληνον ἔμενον. τοῖσι δὲ βαρβάροισι κατηγέετο Ἱππίης ὁ Πεισιστράτου ἐς τὸν Μαραθῶνα, τῆς παροιχομένης νυκτὸς ὄψιν ἰδὼν τοιήνδε· ἐδόκεε ὁ Ἱππίης τῇ μητρὶ τῇ ἑωυτοῦ συνευνηθῆναι. συνεβάλετο ὦν ἐκ τοῦ ὀνείρου κατελθὼν ἐς τὰς Ἀθήνας καὶ ἀνασωσάμενος τὴν ἀρχὴν τελευτήσειν ἐν τῇ ἑωυτοῦ γηραιός. ἐκ μὲν δὴ τῆς ὄψιος συνεβάλετο ταῦτα, τότε δὲ κατηγεόμενος τοῦτο μὲν τὰ ἀνδράποδα τὰ ἐξ Ἐρετρίης ἀπέβησε ἐς τὴν νῆσον τὴν Στυρέων, καλεομένην δὲ Αἰγλείην, τοῦτο δὲ καταγομένας ἐς τὸν Μαραθῶνα τὰς νέας ὅρμιζε οὗτος, ἐκβάντας τε ἐς γῆν τοὺς βαρβάρους διέτασσε. καί οἱ ταῦτα διέποντι ἐπῆλθε πταρεῖν τε καὶ βῆξαι μεζόνως ἢ ὡς ἐώθεε· οἷα δέ οἱ πρεσβυτέρῳ ἐόντι τῶν ὀδόντων οἱ πλεῦνες ἐσείοντο· τούτων ὦν ἕνα τῶν ὀδόντων ἐκβάλλει ὑπὸ βίης βήξας· ἐκπεσόντος δὲ ἐς τὴν ψάμμον αὐτοῦ ἐποιέετο σπουδὴν πολλὴν ἐξευρεῖν. ὡς δὲ οὐκ ἐφαίνετό οἱ ὁ ὀδών, ἀναστενάξας εἶπε πρὸς τοὺς παραστάτας “ἡ γῆ ἥδε οὐκ ἡμετέρη ἐστί, οὐδέ μιν δυνησόμεθα ὑποχειρίην ποιήσασθαι· ὁκόσον δέ τι μοι μέρος μετῆν, ὁ ὀδὼν μετέχει.”
7.94. Ἴωνες δὲ ἑκατὸν νέας παρείχοντο ἐσκευασμένοι ὡς Ἕλληνες. Ἴωνες δὲ ὅσον μὲν χρόνον ἐν Πελοποννήσῳ οἴκεον τὴν νῦν καλεομένην Ἀχαιίην, καὶ πρὶν ἢ Δαναόν τε καὶ Ξοῦθον ἀπικέσθαι ἐς Πελοπόννησον, ὡς Ἕλληνες λέγουσι, ἐκαλέοντο Πελασγοὶ Αἰγιαλέες, ἐπὶ δὲ Ἴωνος τοῦ Ξούθου Ἴωνες.
7.189. λέγεται δὲ λόγος ὡς Ἀθηναῖοι τὸν Βορέην ἐκ θεοπροπίου ἐπεκαλέσαντο, ἐλθόντος σφι ἄλλου χρηστηρίου τὸν γαμβρὸν ἐπίκουρον καλέσασθαι. Βορέης δὲ κατὰ τὸν Ἑλλήνων λόγον ἔχει γυναῖκα Ἀττικήν, Ὠρειθυίην τὴν Ἐρεχθέος. κατὰ δὴ τὸ κῆδος τοῦτο οἱ Ἀθηναῖοι, ὡς φάτις ὅρμηται, συμβαλλόμενοι σφίσι τὸν Βορέην γαμβρὸν εἶναι, ναυλοχέοντες τῆς Εὐβοίης ἐν Χαλκίδι ὡς ἔμαθον αὐξόμενον τὸν χειμῶνα ἢ καὶ πρὸ τούτου, ἐθύοντό τε καὶ ἐπεκαλέοντο τόν τε Βορέην καὶ τὴν Ὠρειθυίην τιμωρῆσαι σφίσι καὶ διαφθεῖραι τῶν βαρβάρων τὰς νέας, ὡς καὶ πρότερον περὶ Ἄθων. εἰ μέν νυν διὰ ταῦτα τοῖσι βαρβάροισι ὁρμέουσι Βορέης ἐπέπεσε, οὐκ ἔχω εἰπεῖν· οἱ δʼ ὦν Ἀθηναῖοι σφίσι λέγουσι βοηθήσαντα τὸν Βορέην πρότερον καὶ τότε ἐκεῖνα κατεργάσασθαι, καὶ ἱρὸν ἀπελθόντες Βορέω ἱδρύσαντο παρὰ ποταμὸν Ἰλισσόν.
7.191. σιταγωγῶν δὲ ὁλκάδων καὶ τῶν ἄλλων πλοίων διαφθειρομένων οὐκ ἐπῆν ἀριθμός. ὥστε δείσαντες οἱ στρατηγοὶ τοῦ ναυτικοῦ στρατοῦ μή σφι κεκακωμένοισι ἐπιθέωνται οἱ Θεσσαλοί, ἕρκος ὑψηλὸν ἐκ τῶν ναυηγίων περιεβάλοντο· ἡμέρας γὰρ δὴ ἐχείμαζε τρεῖς. τέλος δὲ ἔντομά τε ποιεῦντες καὶ καταείδοντες γόησι οἱ Μάγοι τῷ ἀνέμῳ, πρός τε τούτοισι καὶ τῇ Θέτι καὶ τῇσι Νηρηίσι θύοντες, ἔπαυσαν τετάρτῃ ἡμέρῃ, ἢ ἄλλως κως αὐτὸς ἐθέλων ἐκόπασε. τῇ δὲ Θέτι ἔθυον πυθόμενοι παρὰ τῶν Ἰώνων τὸν λόγον. ὡς ἐκ τοῦ χώρου τούτου ἁρπασθείη ὑπὸ Πηλέος, εἴη τε ἅπασα ἡ ἀκτὴ ἡ Σηπιὰς ἐκείνης τε καὶ τῶν ἀλλέων Νηρηίδων. 7.192. ὃ μὲν δὴ τετάρτῃ ἡμέρῃ ἐπέπαυτο· τοῖσι δὲ Ἕλλησι οἱ ἡμεροσκόποι ἀπὸ τῶν ἄκρων τῶν Εὐβοϊκῶν καταδραμόντες δευτέρῃ ἡμέρῃ ἀπʼ ἧς ὁ χειμὼν ὁ πρῶτος ἐγένετο, ἐσήμαινον πάντα τὰ γενόμενα περὶ τὴν ναυηγίην. οἳ δὲ ὡς ἐπύθοντο, Ποσειδέωνι σωτῆρι εὐξάμενοι καὶ σπονδὰς προχέαντες τὴν ταχίστην ὀπίσω ἠπείγοντο ἐπὶ τὸ Ἀρτεμίσιον, ἐλπίσαντες ὀλίγας τινάς σφι ἀντιξόους ἔσεσθαι νέας.
8.36. οἱ Δελφοὶ δὲ πυνθανόμενοι ταῦτα ἐς πᾶσαν ἀρρωδίην ἀπίκατο, ἐν δείματι δὲ μεγάλῳ κατεστεῶτες ἐμαντεύοντο περὶ τῶν ἱρῶν χρημάτων, εἴτε σφέα κατὰ γῆς κατορύξωσι εἴτε ἐκκομίσωσι ἐς ἄλλην χώρην. ὁ δὲ θεός σφεας οὐκ ἔα κινέειν, φὰς αὐτὸς ἱκανὸς εἶναι τῶν ἑωυτοῦ προκατῆσθαι. Δελφοὶ δὲ ταῦτα ἀκούσαντες σφέων αὐτῶν πέρι ἐφρόντιζον. τέκνα μέν νυν καὶ γυναῖκας πέρην ἐς τὴν Ἀχαιίην διέπεμψαν, αὐτῶν δὲ οἱ μὲν πλεῖστοι ἀνέβησαν ἐς τοῦ Παρνησοῦ τὰς κορυφὰς καὶ ἐς τὸ Κωρύκιον ἄντρον ἀνηνείκαντο, οἳ δὲ ἐς Ἄμφισσαν τὴν Λοκρίδα ὑπεξῆλθον. πάντες δὲ ὦν οἱ Δελφοὶ ἐξέλιπον τὴν πόλιν, πλὴν ἑξήκοντα ἀνδρῶν καὶ τοῦ προφήτεω. 8.37. ἐπεὶ δὲ ἀγχοῦ ἦσαν οἱ βάρβαροι ἐπιόντες καὶ ἀπώρων τὸ ἱρόν, ἐν τούτῳ ὁ προφήτης, τῷ οὔνομα ἦν Ἀκήρατος, ὁρᾷ πρὸ τοῦ νηοῦ ὅπλα προκείμενα ἔσωθεν ἐκ τοῦ μεγάρου ἐξενηνειγμένα ἱρά, τῶν οὐκ ὅσιον ἦν ἅπτεσθαι ἀνθρώπων οὐδενί. ὃ μὲν δὴ ἤιε Δελφῶν τοῖσι παρεοῦσι σημανέων τὸ τέρας· οἱ δὲ βάρβαροι ἐπειδὴ ἐγίνοντο ἐπειγόμενοι κατὰ τὸ ἱρὸν τῆς Προναίης Ἀθηναίης, ἐπιγίνεταί σφι τέρεα ἔτι μέζονα τοῦ πρὶν γενομένου τέρεος. θῶμα μὲν γὰρ καὶ τοῦτο κάρτα ἐστί, ὅπλα ἀρήια αὐτόματα φανῆναι ἔξω προκείμενα τοῦ νηοῦ· τὰ δὲ δὴ ἐπὶ τούτῳ δεύτερα ἐπιγενόμενα καὶ διὰ πάντων φασμάτων ἄξια θωμάσαι μάλιστα. ἐπεὶ γὰρ δὴ ἦσαν ἐπιόντες οἱ βάρβαροι κατὰ τὸ ἱρὸν τῆς Προναίης Ἀθηναίης, ἐν τούτῳ ἐκ μὲν τοῦ οὐρανοῦ κεραυνοὶ αὐτοῖσι ἐνέπιπτον, ἀπὸ δὲ τοῦ Παρνησοῦ ἀπορραγεῖσαι δύο κορυφαὶ ἐφέροντο πολλῷ πατάγῳ ἐς αὐτοὺς καὶ κατέβαλον συχνούς σφεων, ἐκ δὲ τοῦ ἱροῦ τῆς Προναίης βοή τε καὶ ἀλαλαγμὸς ἐγίνετο.
8.39. τούτους δὲ τοὺς δύο Δελφοὶ λέγουσι εἶναι ἐπιχωρίους ἥρωας, Φύλακόν τε καὶ Αὐτόνοον, τῶν τὰ τεμένεα ἐστὶ περὶ τὸ ἱρόν, Φυλάκου μὲν παρʼ αὐτὴν τὴν ὁδὸν κατύπερθε τοῦ ἱροῦ τῆς Προναίης, Αὐτονόου δὲ πέλας τῆς Κασταλίης ὑπὸ τῇ Ὑαμπείῃ κορυφῇ. οἱ δὲ πεσόντες ἀπὸ τοῦ Παρνησοῦ λίθοι ἔτι καὶ ἐς ἡμέας ἦσαν σόοι, ἐν τῷ τεμένεϊ τῆς Προναίης Ἀθηναίης κείμενοι, ἐς τὸ ἐνέσκηψαν διὰ τῶν βαρβάρων φερόμενοι. τούτων μέν νυν τῶν ἀνδρῶν αὕτη ἀπὸ τοῦ ἱροῦ ἀπαλλαγὴ γίνεται.
8.55. τοῦ δὲ εἵνεκεν τούτων ἐπεμνήσθην, φράσω. ἔστι ἐν τῇ ἀκροπόλι ταύτῃ Ἐρεχθέος τοῦ γηγενέος λεγομένου εἶναι νηός, ἐν τῷ ἐλαίη τε καὶ θάλασσα ἔνι, τὰ λόγος παρὰ Ἀθηναίων Ποσειδέωνά τε καὶ Ἀθηναίην ἐρίσαντας περὶ τῆς χώρης μαρτύρια θέσθαι. ταύτην ὦν τὴν ἐλαίην ἅμα τῷ ἄλλῳ ἱρῷ κατέλαβε ἐμπρησθῆναι ὑπὸ τῶν βαρβάρων· δευτέρῃ δὲ ἡμέρῃ ἀπὸ τῆς ἐμπρήσιος Ἀθηναίων οἱ θύειν ὑπὸ βασιλέος κελευόμενοι ὡς ἀνέβησαν ἐς τὸ ἱρόν, ὥρων βλαστὸν ἐκ τοῦ στελέχεος ὅσον τε πηχυαῖον ἀναδεδραμηκότα. οὗτοι μέν νυν ταῦτα ἔφρασαν.
8.64. οὕτω μὲν οἱ περὶ Σαλαμῖνα ἔπεσι ἀκροβολισάμενοι, ἐπείτε Εὐρυβιάδῃ ἔδοξε, αὐτοῦ παρεσκευάζοντο ὡς ναυμαχήσοντες. ἡμέρη τε ἐγίνετο καὶ ἅμα τῷ ἡλίῳ ἀνιόντι σεισμὸς ἐγένετο ἔν τε τῇ γῇ καὶ τῇ θαλάσσῃ. ἔδοξε δέ σφι εὔξασθαι τοῖσι θεοῖσι καὶ ἐπικαλέσασθαι τοὺς Αἰακίδας συμμάχους. ὡς δέ σφι ἔδοξε, καὶ ἐποίευν ταῦτα· εὐξάμενοι γὰρ πᾶσι τοῖσι θεοῖσι, αὐτόθεν μὲν ἐκ Σαλαμῖνος Αἴαντά τε καὶ Τελαμῶνα ἐπεκαλέοντο, ἐπὶ δὲ Αἰακὸν καὶ τοὺς ἄλλους Αἰακίδας νέα ἀπέστελλον ἐς Αἴγιναν.''. None
1.31. When Solon had provoked him by saying that the affairs of Tellus were so fortunate, Croesus asked who he thought was next, fully expecting to win second prize. Solon answered, “Cleobis and Biton. ,They were of Argive stock, had enough to live on, and on top of this had great bodily strength. Both had won prizes in the athletic contests, and this story is told about them: there was a festival of Hera in Argos, and their mother absolutely had to be conveyed to the temple by a team of oxen. But their oxen had not come back from the fields in time, so the youths took the yoke upon their own shoulders under constraint of time. They drew the wagon, with their mother riding atop it, traveling five miles until they arrived at the temple. ,When they had done this and had been seen by the entire gathering, their lives came to an excellent end, and in their case the god made clear that for human beings it is a better thing to die than to live. The Argive men stood around the youths and congratulated them on their strength; the Argive women congratulated their mother for having borne such children. ,She was overjoyed at the feat and at the praise, so she stood before the image and prayed that the goddess might grant the best thing for man to her children Cleobis and Biton, who had given great honor to the goddess. ,After this prayer they sacrificed and feasted. The youths then lay down in the temple and went to sleep and never rose again; death held them there. The Argives made and dedicated at Delphi statues of them as being the best of men.” ' "
1.92. There are many offerings of Croesus' in Hellas, and not only those of which I have spoken. There is a golden tripod at Thebes in Boeotia, which he dedicated to Apollo of Ismenus; at Ephesus there are the oxen of gold and the greater part of the pillars; and in the temple of Proneia at Delphi, a golden shield. All these survived to my lifetime; but other of the offerings were destroyed. ,And the offerings of Croesus at Branchidae of the Milesians, as I learn by inquiry, are equal in weight and like those at Delphi . Those which he dedicated at Delphi and the shrine of Amphiaraus were his own, the first-fruits of the wealth inherited from his father; the rest came from the estate of an enemy who had headed a faction against Croesus before he became king, and conspired to win the throne of Lydia for Pantaleon. ,This Pantaleon was a son of Alyattes, and half-brother of Croesus: Croesus was Alyattes' son by a Carian and Pantaleon by an Ionian mother. ,So when Croesus gained the sovereignty by his father's gift, he put the man who had conspired against him to death by drawing him across a carding-comb, and first confiscated his estate, then dedicated it as and where I have said. This is all that I shall say of Croesus' offerings. " "
1.94. The customs of the Lydians are like those of the Greeks, except that they make prostitutes of their female children. They were the first men whom we know who coined and used gold and silver currency; and they were the first to sell by retail. ,And, according to what they themselves say, the games now in use among them and the Greeks were invented by the Lydians: these, they say, were invented among them at the time when they colonized Tyrrhenia. This is their story: ,In the reign of Atys son of Manes there was great scarcity of food in all Lydia . For a while the Lydians bore this with what patience they could; presently, when the famine did not abate, they looked for remedies, and different plans were devised by different men. Then it was that they invented the games of dice and knuckle-bones and ball and all other forms of game except dice, which the Lydians do not claim to have discovered. ,Then, using their discovery to lighten the famine, every other day they would play for the whole day, so that they would not have to look for food, and the next day they quit their play and ate. This was their way of life for eighteen years. ,But the famine did not cease to trouble them, and instead afflicted them even more. At last their king divided the people into two groups, and made them draw lots, so that the one group should remain and the other leave the country; he himself was to be the head of those who drew the lot to remain there, and his son, whose name was Tyrrhenus, of those who departed. ,Then the one group, having drawn the lot, left the country and came down to Smyrna and built ships, in which they loaded all their goods that could be transported aboard ship, and sailed away to seek a livelihood and a country; until at last, after sojourning with one people after another, they came to the Ombrici, where they founded cities and have lived ever since. ,They no longer called themselves Lydians, but Tyrrhenians, after the name of the king's son who had led them there.The Lydians, then, were enslaved by the Persians. " '
1.105. From there they marched against Egypt : and when they were in the part of Syria called Palestine, Psammetichus king of Egypt met them and persuaded them with gifts and prayers to come no further. ,So they turned back, and when they came on their way to the city of Ascalon in Syria, most of the Scythians passed by and did no harm, but a few remained behind and plundered the temple of Heavenly Aphrodite. ,This temple, I discover from making inquiry, is the oldest of all the temples of the goddess, for the temple in Cyprus was founded from it, as the Cyprians themselves say; and the temple on Cythera was founded by Phoenicians from this same land of Syria . ,But the Scythians who pillaged the temple, and all their descendants after them, were afflicted by the goddess with the “female” sickness: and so the Scythians say that they are afflicted as a consequence of this and also that those who visit Scythian territory see among them the condition of those whom the Scythians call “Hermaphrodites”.
1.131. As to the customs of the Persians, I know them to be these. It is not their custom to make and set up statues and temples and altars, but those who do such things they think foolish, because, I suppose, they have never believed the gods to be like men, as the Greeks do; ,but they call the whole circuit of heaven Zeus, and to him they sacrifice on the highest peaks of the mountains; they sacrifice also to the sun and moon and earth and fire and water and winds. ,From the beginning, these are the only gods to whom they have ever sacrificed; they learned later to sacrifice to the “heavenly” Aphrodite from the Assyrians and Arabians. She is called by the Assyrians Mylitta, by the Arabians Alilat, by the Persians Mitra.
1.146. For this reason, and for no other, the Ionians too made twelve cities; for it would be foolishness to say that these are more truly Ionian or better born than the other Ionians; since not the least part of them are Abantes from Euboea, who are not Ionians even in name, and there are mingled with them Minyans of Orchomenus, Cadmeans, Dryopians, Phocian renegades from their nation, Molossians, Pelasgian Arcadians, Dorians of Epidaurus, and many other tribes; ,and as for those who came from the very town-hall of Athens and think they are the best born of the Ionians, these did not bring wives with them to their settlements, but married Carian women whose parents they had put to death. ,For this slaughter, these women made a custom and bound themselves by oath (and enjoined it on their daughters) that no one would sit at table with her husband or call him by his name, because the men had married them after slaying their fathers and husbands and sons. This happened at Miletus .
1.159. When they came to Branchidae, Aristodicus, speaking for all, put this question to the oracle: “Lord, Pactyes the Lydian has come to us a suppliant fleeing a violent death at the hands of the Persians; and they demand him of us, telling the men of Cyme to surrender him. ,But we, as much as we fear the Persian power, have not dared give up this suppliant of ours until it is clearly made known to us by you whether we are to do this or not.” Thus Aristodicus inquired; and the god again gave the same answer, that Pactyes should be surrendered to the Persians. ,With that Aristodicus did as he had already decided; he went around the temple, and took away the sparrows and all the families of nesting birds that were in it. But while he was doing so, a voice (they say) came out of the inner shrine calling to Aristodicus, and saying, “Vilest of men, how dare you do this? Will you rob my temple of those that take refuge with me?” ,Then Aristodicus had his answer ready: “Lord,” he said, “will you save your own suppliants, yet tell the men of Cyme to deliver up theirs?” But the god replied, “Yes, I do command them, so that you may perish all the sooner for your impiety, and never again come to inquire of my oracle about giving up those that seek refuge with you.”
1.199. The foulest Babylonian custom is that which compels every woman of the land to sit in the temple of Aphrodite and have intercourse with some stranger once in her life. Many women who are rich and proud and disdain to mingle with the rest, drive to the temple in covered carriages drawn by teams, and stand there with a great retinue of attendants. ,But most sit down in the sacred plot of Aphrodite, with crowns of cord on their heads; there is a great multitude of women coming and going; passages marked by line run every way through the crowd, by which the men pass and make their choice. ,Once a woman has taken her place there, she does not go away to her home before some stranger has cast money into her lap, and had intercourse with her outside the temple; but while he casts the money, he must say, “I invite you in the name of Mylitta” (that is the Assyrian name for Aphrodite). ,It does not matter what sum the money is; the woman will never refuse, for that would be a sin, the money being by this act made sacred. So she follows the first man who casts it and rejects no one. After their intercourse, having discharged her sacred duty to the goddess, she goes away to her home; and thereafter there is no bribe however great that will get her. ,So then the women that are fair and tall are soon free to depart, but the uncomely have long to wait because they cannot fulfill the law; for some of them remain for three years, or four. There is a custom like this in some parts of Cyprus .
2.50. In fact, the names of nearly all the gods came to Hellas from Egypt . For I am convinced by inquiry that they have come from foreign parts, and I believe that they came chiefly from Egypt . ,Except the names of Poseidon and the Dioscuri, as I have already said, and Hera, and Hestia, and Themis, and the Graces, and the Nereids, the names of all the gods have always existed in Egypt . I only say what the Egyptians themselves say. The gods whose names they say they do not know were, as I think, named by the Pelasgians, except Poseidon, the knowledge of whom they learned from the Libyans. ,Alone of all nations the Libyans have had among them the name of Poseidon from the beginning, and they have always honored this god. The Egyptians, however, are not accustomed to pay any honors to heroes.
2.159. Necos, then, stopped work on the canal and engaged in preparations for war; some of his ships of war were built on the northern sea, and some in the Arabian Gulf, by the Red Sea coast: the winches for landing these can still be seen. ,He used these ships when needed, and with his land army met and defeated the Syrians at Magdolus, taking the great Syrian city of Cadytis after the battle. ,He sent to Branchidae of Miletus and dedicated there to Apollo the garments in which he won these victories. Then he died after a reign of sixteen years, and his son Psammis reigned in his place.
3.48. The Corinthians also enthusiastically helped to further the expedition against Samos . For an outrage had been done them by the Samians a generation before this expedition, about the time of the robbery of the bowl. ,Periander son of Cypselus sent to Alyattes at Sardis three hundred boys, sons of notable men in Corcyra, to be made eunuchs. The Corinthians who brought the boys put in at Samos ; and when the Samians heard why the boys were brought, first they instructed them to take sanctuary in the temple of Artemis, ,then they would not allow the suppliants to be dragged from the temple; and when the Corinthians tried to starve the boys out, the Samians held a festival which they still celebrate in the same fashion; throughout the time that the boys were seeking asylum, they held nightly dances of young men and women to which it was made a custom to bring cakes of sesame and honey, so that the Corcyraean boys might snatch these and have food. ,This continued to be done until the Corinthian guards left their charge and departed; then the Samians took the boys back to Corcyra .
4.33. But the Delians say much more about them than any others do. They say that offerings wrapped in straw are brought from the Hyperboreans to Scythia; when these have passed Scythia, each nation in turn receives them from its neighbors until they are carried to the Adriatic sea, which is the most westerly limit of their journey; ,from there, they are brought on to the south, the people of Dodona being the first Greeks to receive them. From Dodona they come down to the Melian gulf, and are carried across to Euboea, and one city sends them on to another until they come to Carystus; after this, Andros is left out of their journey, for Carystians carry them to Tenos, and Tenians to Delos. ,Thus (they say) these offerings come to Delos. But on the first journey, the Hyperboreans sent two maidens bearing the offerings, to whom the Delians give the names Hyperoche and Laodice, and five men of their people with them as escort for safe conduct, those who are now called Perpherees and greatly honored at Delos. ,But when those whom they sent never returned, they took it amiss that they should be condemned always to be sending people and not getting them back, and so they carry the offerings, wrapped in straw, to their borders, and tell their neighbors to send them on from their own country to the next; ,and the offerings, it is said, come by this conveyance to Delos. I can say of my own knowledge that there is a custom like these offerings; namely, that when the Thracian and Paeonian women sacrifice to the Royal Artemis, they have straw with them while they sacrifice. 4.34. I know that they do this. The Delian girls and boys cut their hair in honor of these Hyperborean maidens, who died at Delos; the girls before their marriage cut off a tress and lay it on the tomb, wound around a spindle ,(this tomb is at the foot of an olive-tree, on the left hand of the entrance of the temple of Artemis); the Delian boys twine some of their hair around a green stalk, and lay it on the tomb likewise.
4.35.4. Furthermore, they say that when the thighbones are burnt in sacrifice on the altar, the ashes are all cast on the burial-place of Opis and Arge, behind the temple of Artemis, looking east, nearest the refectory of the people of Ceos. ' "4.35. In this way, then, these maidens are honored by the inhabitants of Delos. These same Delians relate that two virgins, Arge and Opis, came from the Hyperboreans by way of the aforesaid peoples to Delos earlier than Hyperoche and Laodice; ,these latter came to bring to Eileithyia the tribute which they had agreed to pay for easing child-bearing; but Arge and Opis, they say, came with the gods themselves, and received honors of their own from the Delians. ,For the women collected gifts for them, calling upon their names in the hymn made for them by Olen of Lycia; it was from Delos that the islanders and Ionians learned to sing hymns to Opis and Arge, calling upon their names and collecting gifts (this Olen, after coming from Lycia, also made the other and ancient hymns that are sung at Delos). ,Furthermore, they say that when the thighbones are burnt in sacrifice on the altar, the ashes are all cast on the burial-place of Opis and Arge, behind the temple of Artemis, looking east, nearest the refectory of the people of Ceos.
4.103. Among these, the Tauri have the following customs: all ship-wrecked men, and any Greeks whom they capture in their sea-raids, they sacrifice to the Virgin goddess as I will describe: after the first rites of sacrifice, they strike the victim on the head with a club; ,according to some, they then place the head on a pole and throw the body off the cliff on which their temple stands; others agree as to the head, but say that the body is buried, not thrown off the cliff. The Tauri themselves say that this deity to whom they sacrifice is Agamemnon's daughter Iphigenia. ,As for enemies whom they defeat, each cuts his enemy's head off and carries it away to his house, where he places it on a tall pole and stands it high above the dwelling, above the smoke-vent for the most part. These heads, they say, are set up to guard the whole house. The Tauri live by plundering and war. " "
4.181. I have now described all the nomadic Libyans who live on the coast. Farther inland than these is that Libyan country which is haunted by wild beasts, and beyond this wild beasts' haunt runs a ridge of sand that stretches from Thebes of Egypt to the Pillars of Heracles. ,At intervals of about ten days' journey along this ridge there are masses of great lumps of salt in hills; on the top of every hill, a fountain of cold sweet water shoots up from the midst of the salt; men live around it who are farthest away toward the desert and inland from the wild beasts' country. The first on the journey from Thebes, ten days distant from there, are the Ammonians, who follow the worship of the Zeus of Thebes ; for, as I have said before, the image of Zeus at Thebes has the head of a ram. ,They have another spring of water besides, which is warm at dawn, and colder at market-time, and very cold at noon; ,and it is then that they water their gardens; as the day declines, the coldness abates, until at sunset the water grows warm. It becomes ever hotter and hotter until midnight, and then it boils and bubbles; after midnight it becomes ever cooler until dawn. This spring is called the Spring of the Sun. " '
5.83. Now at this time, as before it, the Aeginetans were in all matters still subject to the Epidaurians and even crossed to Epidaurus for the hearing of their own private lawsuits. From this time, however, they began to build ships, and stubbornly revolted from the Epidaurians. ,In the course of this struggle, they did the Epidaurians much damage and stole their images of Damia and Auxesia. These they took away and set them up in the middle of their own country at a place called Oea, about twenty furlongs distant from their city. ,Having set them up in this place they sought their favor with sacrifices and female choruses in the satirical and abusive mode. Ten men were appointed providers of a chorus for each of the deities, and the choruses aimed their raillery not at any men but at the women of the country. The Epidaurians too had the same rites, and they have certain secret rites as well.
5.92. These were the words of the Lacedaemonians, but their words were ill-received by the greater part of their allies. The rest then keeping silence, Socles, a Corinthian, said, ,“In truth heaven will be beneath the earth and the earth aloft above the heaven, and men will dwell in the sea and fishes where men dwelt before, now that you, Lacedaemonians, are destroying the rule of equals and making ready to bring back tyranny into the cities, tyranny, a thing more unrighteous and bloodthirsty than anything else on this earth. ,If indeed it seems to you to be a good thing that the cities be ruled by tyrants, set up a tyrant among yourselves first and then seek to set up such for the rest. As it is, however, you, who have never made trial of tyrants and take the greatest precautions that none will arise at Sparta, deal wrongfully with your allies. If you had such experience of that thing as we have, you would be more prudent advisers concerning it than you are now.” ,The Corinthian state was ordered in such manner as I will show.There was an oligarchy, and this group of men, called the Bacchiadae, held sway in the city, marrying and giving in marriage among themselves. Now Amphion, one of these men, had a crippled daughter, whose name was Labda. Since none of the Bacchiadae would marry her, she was wedded to Eetion son of Echecrates, of the township of Petra, a Lapith by lineage and of the posterity of Caeneus. ,When no sons were born to him by this wife or any other, he set out to Delphi to enquire concerning the matter of acquiring offspring. As soon as he entered, the Pythian priestess spoke these verses to him: 6.21. Now when the Milesians suffered all this at the hands of the Persians, the Sybarites (who had lost their city and dwelt in Laus and Scidrus) did not give them equal return for what they had done. When Sybaris was taken by the Crotoniates, all the people of Miletus, young and old, shaved their heads and made great public lamentation; no cities which we know were ever so closely joined in friendship as these. ,The Athenians acted very differently. The Athenians made clear their deep grief for the taking of Miletus in many ways, but especially in this: when Phrynichus wrote a play entitled “The Fall of Miletus” and produced it, the whole theater fell to weeping; they fined Phrynichus a thousand drachmas for bringing to mind a calamity that affected them so personally, and forbade the performance of that play forever.
6.75. When the Lacedaemonians learned that Cleomenes was doing this, they took fright and brought him back to Sparta to rule on the same terms as before. Cleomenes had already been not entirely in his right mind, and on his return from exile a mad sickness fell upon him: any Spartan that he happened to meet he would hit in the face with his staff. ,For doing this, and because he was out of his mind, his relatives bound him in the stocks. When he was in the stocks and saw that his guard was left alone, he demanded a dagger; the guard at first refused to give it, but Cleomenes threatened what he would do to him when he was freed, until the guard, who was a helot, was frightened by the threats and gave him the dagger. ,Cleomenes took the weapon and set about slashing himself from his shins upwards; from the shin to the thigh he cut his flesh lengthways, then from the thigh to the hip and the sides, until he reached the belly, and cut it into strips; thus he died, as most of the Greeks say, because he persuaded the Pythian priestess to tell the tale of Demaratus. The Athenians alone say it was because he invaded Eleusis and laid waste the precinct of the gods. The Argives say it was because when Argives had taken refuge after the battle in their temple of Argus he brought them out and cut them down, then paid no heed to the sacred grove and set it on fire. ' "
6.97. While they did this, the Delians also left Delos and fled away to Tenos. As his expedition was sailing landwards, Datis went on ahead and bade his fleet anchor not off Delos, but across the water off Rhenaea. Learning where the Delians were, he sent a herald to them with this proclamation: ,“Holy men, why have you fled away, and so misjudged my intent? It is my own desire, and the king's command to me, to do no harm to the land where the two gods were born, neither to the land itself nor to its inhabitants. So return now to your homes and dwell on your island.” He made this proclamation to the Delians, and then piled up three hundred talents of frankincense on the altar and burnt it. " "
6.105. While still in the city, the generals first sent to Sparta the herald Philippides, an Athenian and a long-distance runner who made that his calling. As Philippides himself said when he brought the message to the Athenians, when he was in the Parthenian mountain above Tegea he encountered Pan. ,Pan called out Philippides' name and bade him ask the Athenians why they paid him no attention, though he was of goodwill to the Athenians, had often been of service to them, and would be in the future. ,The Athenians believed that these things were true, and when they became prosperous they established a sacred precinct of Pan beneath the Acropolis. Ever since that message they propitiate him with annual sacrifices and a torch-race. " "6.106. This Philippides was in Sparta on the day after leaving the city of Athens, that time when he was sent by the generals and said that Pan had appeared to him. He came to the magistrates and said, ,“Lacedaemonians, the Athenians ask you to come to their aid and not allow the most ancient city among the Hellenes to fall into slavery at the hands of the foreigners. Even now Eretria has been enslaved, and Hellas has become weaker by an important city.” ,He told them what he had been ordered to say, and they resolved to send help to the Athenians, but they could not do this immediately, for they were unwilling to break the law. It was the ninth day of the rising month, and they said that on the ninth they could not go out to war until the moon's circle was full." '6.107. So they waited for the full moon, while the foreigners were guided to Marathon by Hippias son of Pisistratus. The previous night Hippias had a dream in which he slept with his mother. ,He supposed from the dream that he would return from exile to Athens, recover his rule, and end his days an old man in his own country. Thus he reckoned from the dream. Then as guide he unloaded the slaves from Eretria onto the island of the Styrians called Aegilia, and brought to anchor the ships that had put ashore at Marathon, then marshalled the foreigners who had disembarked onto land. ,As he was tending to this, he happened to sneeze and cough more violently than usual. Since he was an elderly man, most of his teeth were loose, and he lost one of them by the force of his cough. It fell into the sand and he expended much effort in looking for it, but the tooth could not be found. ,He groaned aloud and said to those standing by him: “This land is not ours and we will not be able to subdue it. My tooth holds whatever share of it was mine.”
7.94. The Ionians furnished a hundred ships; their equipment was like the Greek. These Ionians, as long as they were in the Peloponnese, dwelt in what is now called Achaia, and before Danaus and Xuthus came to the Peloponnese, as the Greeks say, they were called Aegialian Pelasgians. They were named Ionians after Ion the son of Xuthus.
7.189. The story is told that because of an oracle the Athenians invoked Boreas, the north wind, to help them, since another oracle told them to summon their son-in-law as an ally. According to the Hellenic story, Boreas had an Attic wife, Orithyia, the daughter of Erechtheus, ancient king of Athens. ,Because of this connection, so the tale goes, the Athenians considered Boreas to be their son-in-law. They were stationed off Chalcis in Euboea, and when they saw the storm rising, they then, if they had not already, sacrificed to and called upon Boreas and Orithyia to help them by destroying the barbarian fleet, just as before at Athos. ,I cannot say whether this was the cause of Boreas falling upon the barbarians as they lay at anchor, but the Athenians say that he had come to their aid before and that he was the agent this time. When they went home, they founded a sacred precinct of Boreas beside the Ilissus river.
7.191. There was no counting how many grain-ships and other vessels were destroyed. The generals of the fleet were afraid that the Thessalians might attack them now that they had been defeated, so they built a high palisade out of the wreckage. ,The storm lasted three days. Finally the Magi made offerings and cast spells upon the wind, sacrificing also to Thetis and the Nereids. In this way they made the wind stop on the fourth day—or perhaps it died down on its own. They sacrificed to Thetis after hearing from the Ionians the story that it was from this place that Peleus had carried her off and that all the headland of Sepia belonged to her and to the other Nereids. 7.192. The storm, then, ceased on the fourth day. Now the scouts stationed on the headlands of Euboea ran down and told the Hellenes all about the shipwreck on the second day after the storm began. ,After hearing this they prayed to Poseidon as their savior and poured libations. Then they hurried to Artemisium hoping to find few ships opposing them. So they came to Artemisium a second time and made their station there. From that time on they call Poseidon their savior.
8.36. When the Delphians learned all this, they were very much afraid, and in their great fear they inquired of the oracle whether they should bury the sacred treasure in the ground or take it away to another country. The god told them to move nothing, saying that he was able to protect what belonged to him. ,Upon hearing that, the Delphians took thought for themselves. They sent their children and women overseas to Achaia. Most of the men went up to the peaks of Parnassus and carried their goods into the Corycian cave, but some escaped to Amphissa in Locris. In short, all the Delphians left the town save sixty men and the prophet. 8.37. Now when the barbarians drew near and could see the temple, the prophet, whose name was Aceratus, saw certain sacred arms, which no man might touch without sacrilege, brought out of the chamber within and laid before the shrine. ,So he went to tell the Delphians of this miracle, but when the barbarians came with all speed near to the temple of Athena Pronaea, they were visited by miracles yet greater than the aforesaid. Marvellous indeed it is, that weapons of war should of their own motion appear lying outside in front of the shrine, but the visitation which followed was more wondrous than anything else ever seen. ,When the barbarians were near to the temple of Athena Pronaea, they were struck by thunderbolts from the sky, and two peaks broken off from Parnassus came rushing among them with a mighty noise and overwhelmed many of them. In addition to this a shout and a cry of triumph were heard from the temple of Athena. ' "
8.39. These two, say the Delphians, were the native heroes Phylacus and Autonous, whose precincts are near the temple, Phylacus' by the road itself above the shrine of Athena Pronaea, and Autonous' near the Castalian spring, under the Hyarapean Peak. ,The rocks that fell from Parnassus were yet to be seen in my day, lying in the precinct of Athena Pronaea, from where their descent through the foreigners' ranks had hurled them. Such, then, was the manner of those men's departure from the temple. " "
8.55. I will tell why I have mentioned this. In that acropolis is a shrine of Erechtheus, called the “Earthborn,” and in the shrine are an olive tree and a pool of salt water. The story among the Athenians is that they were set there by Poseidon and Athena as tokens when they contended for the land. It happened that the olive tree was burnt by the barbarians with the rest of the sacred precinct, but on the day after its burning, when the Athenians ordered by the king to sacrifice went up to the sacred precinct, they saw a shoot of about a cubit's length sprung from the stump, and they reported this. " '
8.64. After this skirmish of words, since Eurybiades had so resolved, the men at Salamis prepared to fight where they were. At sunrise on the next day there was an earthquake on land and sea, ,and they resolved to pray to the gods and summon the sons of Aeacus as allies. When they had so resolved, they did as follows: they prayed to all the gods, called Ajax and Telamon to come straight from Salamis, and sent a ship to Aegina for Aeacus and his sons. ''. None
17. Plato, Theaetetus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis (goddess) • Artemis (goddess), sanctuary at Brauron • festivals, Artemis Brauronia

 Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 524, 525; Mikalson (2010) 118, 221, 230


149c. οὐκ ἔδωκε μαιεύεσθαι, ὅτι ἡ ἀνθρωπίνη φύσις ἀσθενεστέρα ἢ λαβεῖν τέχνην ὧν ἂν ᾖ ἄπειρος· ταῖς δὲ διʼ ἡλικίαν ἀτόκοις προσέταξε τιμῶσα τὴν αὑτῆς ὁμοιότητα. ΘΕΑΙ. εἰκός. ΣΩ. οὐκοῦν καὶ τόδε εἰκός τε καὶ ἀναγκαῖον, τὰς κυούσας καὶ μὴ γιγνώσκεσθαι μᾶλλον ὑπὸ τῶν μαιῶν ἢ τῶν ἄλλων; ΘΕΑΙ. πάνυ γε. ΣΩ. καὶ μὴν καὶ διδοῦσαί γε αἱ μαῖαι φαρμάκια καὶ''. None
149c. THEAET. Very likely. SOC. Is it not, then, also likely and even necessary, that midwives should know better than anyone else who are pregt and who are not? THEAET. Certainly. SOC. And furthermore, the midwives, by means of drug''. None
18. Plato, Timaeus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis

 Found in books: Mikalson (2010) 230; Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020) 345


24d. τε καὶ φιλόσοφος ἡ θεὸς οὖσα τὸν προσφερεστάτους αὐτῇ μέλλοντα οἴσειν τόπον ἄνδρας, τοῦτον ἐκλεξαμένη πρῶτον κατῴκισεν. ᾠκεῖτε δὴ οὖν νόμοις τε τοιούτοις χρώμενοι καὶ ἔτι μᾶλλον εὐνομούμενοι πάσῃ τε παρὰ πάντας ἀνθρώπους ὑπερβεβληκότες ἀρετῇ, καθάπερ εἰκὸς γεννήματα καὶ παιδεύματα θεῶν ὄντας. πολλὰ μὲν οὖν ὑμῶν καὶ μεγάλα ἔργα τῆς πόλεως τῇδε γεγραμμένα θαυμάζεται, πάντων μὴν''. None
24d. So it was that the Goddess, being herself both a lover of war and a lover of wisdom, chose the spot which was likely to bring forth men most like unto herself, and this first she established. Wherefore you lived under the rule of such laws as these,—yea, and laws still better,—and you surpassed all men in every virtue, as became those who were the offspring and nurslings of gods. Many, in truth, and great are the achievements of your State, which are a marvel to men as they are here recorded; but there is one which stands out above all''. None
19. Sophocles, Antigone, 992-993, 999-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis (goddess), Laphria festival • Artemis, Homeric Hymn • Artemis, at Claros

 Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 14; Naiden (2013) 145; Sweeney (2013) 110


992. I will tell you. You, obey the seer. 993. It was not my habit before, at any rate, to stand apart from your will.
999. You will understand, when you hear the signs revealed by my art. As I took my place on my old seat of augury 1000. where all birds regularly gather for me, I heard an unintelligible voice among them: they were screaming in dire frenzy that made their language foreign to me. I realized that they were ripping each other with their talons, murderously—the rush of their wings did not lack meaning.''. None
20. Sophocles, Electra, 1239-1242 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis, oaths invoking

 Found in books: Seaford (2018) 251; Sommerstein and Torrance (2014) 28


1239. No, by ever-virgin Artemis,'1240. I will never think it right to tremble before eternally house-bound women, that useless burden on the ground! Oreste '. None
21. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 2.13.5, 2.71.2, 3.104 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis (goddess) • Artemis (goddess), sanctuary at Delos • Artemis Ephesia • Artemis Ephesia, Ephesos • Artemis Soteira, in Megara • Artemis, Agrotera of Athens • Festivals, of Artemis Agrotera of Athens

 Found in books: Dignas (2002) 155; Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 278, 280, 524; Jim (2022) 37; Kowalzig (2007) 103; Lalone (2019) 169; Mikalson (2003) 220; Papazarkadas (2011) 143


2.13.5. ἔτι δὲ καὶ τὰ ἐκ τῶν ἄλλων ἱερῶν προσετίθει χρήματα οὐκ ὀλίγα, οἷς χρήσεσθαι αὐτούς, καὶ ἢν πάνυ ἐξείργωνται πάντων, καὶ αὐτῆς τῆς θεοῦ τοῖς περικειμένοις χρυσίοις: ἀπέφαινε δ’ ἔχον τὸ ἄγαλμα τεσσαράκοντα τάλαντα σταθμὸν χρυσίου ἀπέφθου, καὶ περιαιρετὸν εἶναι ἅπαν. χρησαμένους τε ἐπὶ σωτηρίᾳ ἔφη χρῆναι μὴ ἐλάσσω ἀντικαταστῆσαι πάλιν.
2.71.2. ‘Ἀρχίδαμε καὶ Λακεδαιμόνιοι, οὐ δίκαια ποιεῖτε οὐδ’ ἄξια οὔτε ὑμῶν οὔτε πατέρων ὧν ἐστέ, ἐς γῆν τὴν Πλαταιῶν στρατεύοντες. Παυσανίας γὰρ ὁ Κλεομβρότου Λακεδαιμόνιος ἐλευθερώσας τὴν Ἑλλάδα ἀπὸ τῶν Μήδων μετὰ Ἑλλήνων τῶν ἐθελησάντων ξυνάρασθαι τὸν κίνδυνον τῆς μάχης ἣ παρ’ ἡμῖν ἐγένετο, θύσας ἐν τῇ Πλαταιῶν ἀγορᾷ ἱερὰ Διὶ ἐλευθερίῳ καὶ ξυγκαλέσας πάντας τοὺς ξυμμάχους ἀπεδίδου Πλαταιεῦσι γῆν καὶ πόλιν τὴν σφετέραν ἔχοντας αὐτονόμους οἰκεῖν, στρατεῦσαί τε μηδένα ποτὲ ἀδίκως ἐπ’ αὐτοὺς μηδ’ ἐπὶ δουλείᾳ: εἰ δὲ μή, ἀμύνειν τοὺς παρόντας ξυμμάχους κατὰ δύναμιν.' '. None
2.13.5. To this he added the treasures of the other temples. These were by no means inconsiderable, and might fairly be used. Nay, if they were ever absolutely driven to it, they might take even the gold ornaments of Athena herself; for the statue contained forty talents of pure gold and it was all removable. This might be used for self-preservation, and must every penny of it be restored.
2.71.2. ‘Archidamus and Lacedaemonians, in invading the Plataean territory, you do what is wrong in itself, and worthy neither of yourselves nor of the fathers who begot you. Pausanias, son of Cleombrotus, your countryman, after freeing Hellas from the Medes with the help of those Hellenes who were willing to undertake the risk of the battle fought near our city, offered sacrifice to Zeus the Liberator in the market-place of Plataea, and calling all the allies together restored to the Plataeans their city and territory, and declared it independent and inviolate against aggression or conquest. Should any such be attempted, the allies present were to help according to their power. ' '. None
22. Xenophon, The Persian Expedition, 3.2.12, 5.3.4-5.3.13 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Ares, Artemis and • Artemis • Artemis Agrotera • Artemis Agrotera procession for • Artemis Agrotera, procession and sacrifice • Artemis Ephesia • Artemis and warfare • Artemis of Euboea • Artemis, A. Ephesia • Artemis, Agrotera • Artemis, Agrotera of Athens • Artemis, Agrotera of Sparta • Artemis, Ares and • Artemis, Aristoboule of Athens • Artemis, Ephesia • Artemis, Laphria • Artemis, Mounichia of Athens • Artemis, Proseoa of Artemisium • Artemis, Soteira of Megara • Artemis, Xenophon and • Artemis, cult and rites • Artemis, of Delos • Artemis, of Ephesus • Artemis, of Samos • Artemis, sacrifice/sacrificial rituals for • Artemis, sanctuaries and temples • Artemis, titles of Phosphoros • Artemis, titles of Aristoboule • Delos, Artemis, cult of • Euboea, Artemis, cult of • Festivals, of Artemis Agrotera of Athens • Xenophon, consecrates estate to Artemis Ephesia • goats, Artemis/hunting goddesses and • sacrifice/sacrificial rituals, for Artemis • sanctuaries and temples, of Artemis

 Found in books: Bremmer (2008) 287, 353; Dignas (2002) 84, 176, 189; Ekroth (2013) 292; Henderson (2020) 246; Hitch (2017) 53; Lupu(2005) 83; Mikalson (2003) 29, 30, 127; Mikalson (2016) 125, 195, 219; Naiden (2013) 95, 222; Papazarkadas (2011) 77; Parker (2005) 400; Simon (2021) 182


3.2.12. καὶ εὐξάμενοι τῇ Ἀρτέμιδι ὁπόσους κατακάνοιεν τῶν πολεμίων τοσαύτας χιμαίρας καταθύσειν τῇ θεῷ, ἐπεὶ οὐκ εἶχον ἱκανὰς εὑρεῖν, ἔδοξεν αὐτοῖς κατʼ ἐνιαυτὸν πεντακοσίας θύειν, καὶ ἔτι νῦν ἀποθύουσιν.
5.3.4. ἐνταῦθα καὶ διαλαμβάνουσι τὸ ἀπὸ τῶν αἰχμαλώτων ἀργύριον γενόμενον. καὶ τὴν δεκάτην, ἣν τῷ Ἀπόλλωνι ἐξεῖλον καὶ τῇ Ἐφεσίᾳ Ἀρτέμιδι, διέλαβον οἱ στρατηγοὶ τὸ μέρος ἕκαστος φυλάττειν τοῖς θεοῖς· ἀντὶ δὲ Χειρισόφου Νέων ὁ Ἀσιναῖος ἔλαβε. 5.3.5. Ξενοφῶν οὖν τὸ μὲν τοῦ Ἀπόλλωνος ἀνάθημα ποιησάμενος ἀνατίθησιν εἰς τὸν ἐν Δελφοῖς τῶν Ἀθηναίων θησαυρὸν καὶ ἐπέγραψε τό τε αὑτοῦ ὄνομα καὶ τὸ Προξένου, ὃς σὺν Κλεάρχῳ ἀπέθανεν· ξένος γὰρ ἦν αὐτοῦ. 5.3.6. τὸ δὲ τῆς Ἀρτέμιδος τῆς Ἐφεσίας, ὅτʼ ἀπῄει σὺν Ἀγησιλάῳ ἐκ τῆς Ἀσίας τὴν εἰς Βοιωτοὺς ὁδόν, καταλείπει παρὰ Μεγαβύζῳ τῷ τῆς Ἀρτέμιδος νεωκόρῳ, ὅτι αὐτὸς κινδυνεύσων ἐδόκει ἰέναι, καὶ ἐπέστειλεν, ἢν μὲν αὐτὸς σωθῇ, αὑτῷ ἀποδοῦναι· ἢν δέ τι πάθῃ, ἀναθεῖναι ποιησάμενον τῇ Ἀρτέμιδι ὅ τι οἴοιτο χαριεῖσθαι τῇ θεῷ. 5.3.7. ἐπειδὴ δʼ ἔφευγεν ὁ Ξενοφῶν, κατοικοῦντος ἤδη αὐτοῦ ἐν Σκιλλοῦντι ὑπὸ τῶν Λακεδαιμονίων οἰκισθέντος παρὰ τὴν Ὀλυμπίαν ἀφικνεῖται Μεγάβυζος εἰς Ὀλυμπίαν θεωρήσων καὶ ἀποδίδωσι τὴν παρακαταθήκην αὐτῷ. Ξενοφῶν δὲ λαβὼν χωρίον ὠνεῖται τῇ θεῷ ὅπου ἀνεῖλεν ὁ θεός. 5.3.8. ἔτυχε δὲ διαρρέων διὰ τοῦ χωρίου ποταμὸς Σελινοῦς. καὶ ἐν Ἐφέσῳ δὲ παρὰ τὸν τῆς Ἀρτέμιδος νεὼν Σελινοῦς ποταμὸς παραρρεῖ. καὶ ἰχθύες τε ἐν ἀμφοτέροις ἔνεισι καὶ κόγχαι· ἐν δὲ τῷ ἐν Σκιλλοῦντι χωρίῳ καὶ θῆραι πάντων ὁπόσα ἐστὶν ἀγρευόμενα θηρία. 5.3.9. ἐποίησε δὲ καὶ βωμὸν καὶ ναὸν ἀπὸ τοῦ ἱεροῦ ἀργυρίου, καὶ τὸ λοιπὸν δὲ ἀεὶ δεκατεύων τὰ ἐκ τοῦ ἀγροῦ ὡραῖα θυσίαν ἐποίει τῇ θεῷ, καὶ πάντες οἱ πολῖται καὶ οἱ πρόσχωροι ἄνδρες καὶ γυναῖκες μετεῖχον τῆς ἑορτῆς. παρεῖχε δὲ ἡ θεὸς τοῖς σκηνοῦσιν ἄλφιτα, ἄρτους, οἶνον, τραγήματα, καὶ τῶν θυομένων ἀπὸ τῆς ἱερᾶς νομῆς λάχος, καὶ τῶν θηρευομένων δέ. 5.3.10. καὶ γὰρ θήραν ἐποιοῦντο εἰς τὴν ἑορτὴν οἵ τε Ξενοφῶντος παῖδες καὶ οἱ τῶν ἄλλων πολιτῶν, οἱ δὲ βουλόμενοι καὶ ἄνδρες ξυνεθήρων· καὶ ἡλίσκετο τὰ μὲν ἐξ αὐτοῦ τοῦ ἱεροῦ χώρου, τὰ δὲ καὶ ἐκ τῆς Φολόης, σύες καὶ δορκάδες καὶ ἔλαφοι. 5.3.11. ἔστι δὲ ἡ χώρα ᾗ ἐκ Λακεδαίμονος εἰς Ὀλυμπίαν πορεύονται ὡς εἴκοσι στάδιοι ἀπὸ τοῦ ἐν Ὀλυμπίᾳ Διὸς ἱεροῦ. ἔνι δʼ ἐν τῷ ἱερῷ χώρῳ καὶ λειμὼν καὶ ὄρη δένδρων μεστά, ἱκανὰ σῦς καὶ αἶγας καὶ βοῦς τρέφειν καὶ ἵππους, ὥστε καὶ τὰ τῶν εἰς τὴν ἑορτὴν ἰόντων ὑποζύγια εὐωχεῖσθαι. 5.3.12. περὶ δὲ αὐτὸν τὸν ναὸν ἄλσος ἡμέρων δένδρων ἐφυτεύθη ὅσα ἐστὶ τρωκτὰ ὡραῖα. ὁ δὲ ναὸς ὡς μικρὸς μεγάλῳ τῷ ἐν Ἐφέσῳ εἴκασται, καὶ τὸ ξόανον ἔοικεν ὡς κυπαρίττινον χρυσῷ ὄντι τῷ ἐν Ἐφέσῳ. 5.3.13. καὶ στήλη ἕστηκε παρὰ τὸν ναὸν γράμματα ἔχουσα· ἱερὸς ὁ χῶρος τῆς Ἀρτέμιδος. τὸν ἔχοντα καὶ καρπούμενον τὴν μὲν δεκάτην καταθύειν ἑκάστου ἔτους. ἐκ δὲ τοῦ περιττοῦ τὸν ναὸν ἐπισκευάζειν. ἂν δὲ τις μὴ ποιῇ ταῦτα τῇ θεῷ μελήσει.''. None
3.2.12. And while they had vowed to Artemis that for every man they might slay of the enemy they would sacrifice a goat to the goddess, they were unable to find goats enough; According to Herodotus ( Hdt. 6.117 ) the Persian dead numbered 6,400. so they resolved to offer five hundred every year, and this sacrifice they are paying even to this day.
5.3.4. First I went to war with the Thracians, and for the sake of Greece I inflicted punishment upon them with your aid, driving them out of the Chersonese when they wanted to deprive the Greeks who dwelt there of their land. Then when Cyru s’ summons came, I took you with me and set out, in order that, if he had need of me, I might give him aid in return for the benefits I had received from him.
5.3.4. There, also, they divided the money received from the sale of the booty. And the tithe, which they set apart for Apollo and for Artemis of the Ephesians, was distributed among the generals, each taking his portion to keep safely for the gods; and the portion that fell to Cheirisophus was given to Neon the Asinaean. 5.3.5. But you now do not wish to continue the march with me; so it seems that I must either desert you and continue to enjoy Cyru s’ friendship, or prove false to him and remain with you. Whether I shall be doing what is right, I know not, but at any rate I shall choose you and with you shall suffer whatever I must. And never shall any man say that I, after leading Greeks into the land of the barbarians, betrayed the Greeks and chose the friendship of the barbarians; 5.3.5. As for Xenophon, he caused a votive offering to be made out of Apollo’s share of his portion and dedicated it in the treasury of the Athenians at Delphi, inscribing upon it his own name and that of Proxenus, who was killed with Clearchus; Xen. Anab. 2.5 . for Proxenus was his friend. Xen. Anab. 3.1.4-10 . 5.3.6. nay, since you do not care to obey me, I shall follow with you and suffer whatever I must. For I consider that you are to me both fatherland and friends and allies; with you I think I shall be honoured wherever I may be, bereft of you I do not think I shall be able either to aid a friend or to ward off a foe. Be sure, therefore, that wherever you go, I shall go also. 5.3.6. The share which belonged to Artemis of the Ephesians he left behind, at the time when he was returning from Asia with Agesilaus to take part in the campaign against Boeotia, In 394 B.C., ending in the hard-fought battle of Coronea, at which Xenophon was present. cp. Xen. Hell. 4.2.1-8, Xen. Hell. 4.3.1-21 . in charge of Megabyzus, the sacristan of Artemis, for the reason that his own journey seemed likely to be a dangerous one; and his instructions were that in case he should escape with his life, the money was to be returned to him, but in case any ill should befall him, Megabyzus was to cause to be made and dedicated to Artemis whatever offering he thought would please the goddess. 5.3.7. In the time of Xenophon’s exile Which was probably due to his taking part in the expedition of Cyrus . cp. Xen. Anab. 3.1.5 . and while he was living at Scillus, near Olympia, where he had been established as a colonist by the Lacedaemonians, Megabyzus came to Olympia to attend the games and returned to him his deposit. Upon receiving it Xenophon bought a plot of ground for the goddess in a place which Apollo’s oracle appointed. 5.3.7. Such were his words. And the soldiers—not only his own men, but the rest also—when they heard that he said he would not go on to the King’s capital, commended him; and more than two thousand of the troops under Xenias and Pasion took their arms and their baggage train and encamped with Clearchus. 5.3.8. As it chanced, there flowed through the plot a river named Selinus ; and at Ephesus likewise a Selinus river flows past the temple of Artemis. In both streams, moreover, there are fish and mussels, while in the plot at Scillus there is hunting of all manner of beasts of the chase. 5.3.8. But Cyrus, perplexed and distressed by this situation, sent repeatedly for Clearchus. Clearchus refused to go to him, but without the knowledge of the soldiers he sent a messenger and told him not to be discouraged, because, he said, this matter would be settled in the right way. He directed Cyrus, however, to keep on sending for him, though he himself, he said, would refuse to go. 5.3.9. After this Clearchus gathered together his own soldiers, those who had come over to him, and any others who wanted to be present, and spoke as follows: Fellow-soldiers, it is clear that the relation of Cyrus to us is precisely the same as ours to him; that is, we are no longer his soldiers, since we decline to follow him, and likewise he is no longer our paymaster. 5.3.9. Here Xenophon built an altar and a temple with the sacred money, and from that time forth he would every year take the tithe of the products of the land in their season and offer sacrifice to the goddess, all the citizens and the men and women of the neighbourhood taking part in the festival. And the goddess would provide for the banqueters barley meal and loaves of bread, wine and sweetmeats, and a portion of the sacrificial victims from the sacred herd as well as of the victims taken in the chase. 5.3.10. I know, however, that he considers himself wronged by us. Therefore, although he keeps sending for me, I decline to go, chiefly, it is true, from a feeling of shame, because I am conscious that I have proved utterly false to him, but, besides that, from fear that he may seize me and inflict punishment upon me for the wrongs he thinks he has suffered at my hands. 5.3.10. For Xenophon’s sons and the sons of the other citizens used to have a hunting expedition at the time of the festival, and any grown men who so wished would join them; and they captured their game partly from the sacred precinct itself and partly from Mount Pholoe—boars and gazelles and stags. 5.3.11. In my opinion, therefore, it is no time for us to be sleeping or unconcerned about ourselves; we should rather be considering what course we ought to follow under the present circumstances. And so long as we remain here we must consider, I think, how we can remain most safely; or, again, if we count it best to depart at once, how we are to depart most safely and how we shall secure provisions—for without provisions neither general nor private is of any use. 5.3.11. The place is situated on the road which leads from Lacedaemon to Olympia, and is about twenty stadia from the temple of Zeus at Olympia . Within the sacred precinct there is meadowland and treecovered hills, suited for the rearing of swine, goats, cattle and horses, so that even the draught animals which bring people to the festival have their feast also. 5.3.12. And remember that while this Cyrus is a valuable friend when he is your friend, he is a most dangerous foe when he is your enemy; furthermore, he has an armament—infantry and cavalry and fleet—which we all alike see and know about; for I take it that our camp is not very far away from him. It is time, then, to propose whatever plan any one of you deems best. With these words he ceased speaking. 5.3.12. Immediately surrounding the temple is a grove of cultivated trees, producing all sorts of dessert fruits in their season. The temple itself is like the one at Ephesus, although small as compared with great, and the image of the goddess, although cypress wood as compared with gold, is like the Ephesian image. 5.3.13. Thereupon various speakers arose, some of their own accord to express the opinions they held, but others at the instigation of Clearchus to make clear the difficulty of either remaining or departing without the consent of Cyrus . 5.3.13. Beside the temple stands a tablet with this inscription: The place is sacred to Artemis. He who holds it and enjoys its fruits must offer the tithe every year in sacrifice, and from the remainder must keep the temple in repair. If any one leaves these things undone, the goddess will look to it. ''. None
23. Xenophon, On Hunting, 5.14 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis and birth • Artemis, Tauropolos

 Found in books: Hitch (2017) 52; Naiden (2013) 97; Parker (2005) 428


5.14. Sportsmen, however, leave the very young ones to the goddess. Artemis. Yearlings go very fast in the first run, but then flag, being agile, but weak.''. None
24. Xenophon, Hellenica, 4.2.20, 4.4.2-4.4.3 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis Kynthia (Paros), Limnatis • Artemis, Agrotera of Athens • Artemis, Agrotera of Sparta • Artemis, Aristoboule of Athens • Artemis, Kuria of Termessus • Artemis, Mounichia of Athens • Artemis, Proseoa of Artemisium • Artemis, Soteira of Megara • Artemis, of Delos • Artemis, of Ephesus • Artemis, of Samos • Festivals, of Artemis Agrotera of Athens

 Found in books: Kowalzig (2007) 39; Mikalson (2003) 127; Mikalson (2016) 285; Naiden (2013) 101


4.2.20. And when the armies were now not so much as a stadium apart, the Lacedaemonians sacrificed the goat to Artemis Agrotera Goddess of the chase. , as is their custom, and led the charge upon their adversaries, wheeling round their overlapping wing in order to surround them. When they had come to close encounter, all the allies of 394 B.C. the Lacedaemonians were overcome by their adversaries except the men of Pellene, who, being pitted against the Thespians, fought and fell in their places,—as did also many of the other side.
4.4.2. But the Argives, Athenians, Boeotians, and 392 B.C. those among the Corinthians who had received a share of the money from the King, as well as those who had made themselves chiefly responsible for the war, realizing that if they did not put out of the way the people who had turned toward peace, the state would be in danger of going over to the Lacedaemonians again, undertook, under these circumstances, to bring about a general massacre. And in the first place, they devised the most sacrilegious of all schemes; for other people, even if a man is condemned by process of law, do not put him to death during a religious festival; but these men chose the last day of the Euclea, The festival of Artemis Euclea. because they thought they would catch more people in the market-place, so as to kill them. 4.4.3. Then again, when the signal was given to those who had been told whom they were to 392 B.C. kill, they drew their swords and struck men down,—one while standing in a social group, another while sitting in his seat, still another in the theatre, and another even while he was sitting as judge in a dramatic contest. Now when the situation became known, the better classes immediately fled, in part to the statues of the gods in the market-place, in part to the altars; then the conspirators, utterly sacrilegious and without so much as a single thought for civilized usage, both those who gave the orders and those who obeyed, kept up the slaughter even at the holy places, so that some even among those who were not victims of the attack, being right-minded men, were dismayed in their hearts at beholding such impiety.''. None
25. Xenophon, The Education of Cyrus, 3.3.21 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis, Ephesia • Artemis, Persica

 Found in books: Ekroth (2013) 194; Versnel (2011) 106


3.3.21. ἐκ τούτου τοῖς μὲν στρατιώταις εἶπον συσκευάζεσθαι· ὁ δὲ Κῦρος ἔθυε πρῶτον μὲν Διὶ βασιλεῖ, ἔπειτα δὲ καὶ τοῖς ἄλλοις θεοῖς, οὓς ἡγεῖτο ἵλεως καὶ εὐμενεῖς ὄντας ἡγεμόνας ἂν γενέσθαι τῇ στρατιᾷ καὶ παραστάτας ἀγαθοὺς καὶ συμμάχους καὶ συμβούλους τῶν ἀγαθῶν. συμπαρεκάλει δὲ καὶ ἥρωας γῆς Μηδίας οἰκήτορας καὶ κηδεμόνας.''. None
3.3.21. Hereupon they gave the soldiers the word to make ready to break camp. And Cyrus proceeded to sacrifice first to Sovereign Zeus and then to the rest of the gods; and he besought them to lead his army with their grace and favour and to be their mighty defenders and helpers and counsellors for the common good. ''. None
26. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Pan Painter, bell-krater with Pan chasing Daphnis and Artemis killing Actaeon

 Found in books: Naiden (2013) 148; Simon (2021) 337


27. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis Hemera (Lousoi), aetiology jumbled with that of Hera Argeia • Artemis Hemera (Lousoi), myth-ritual nexus • Artemis Hemera (Lousoi), role of in regional context • Artemis Hemera (Lousoi), sacred herd, symbolised in womens khoroi • Artemis, S. Biagio at Metapontion, myth-ritual nexus • Artemis, and Iphigeneia • Artemis, and the polis • Artemis, cult of • Artemis, titles of Hekate • Iphigeneia, and Artemis • Proitids, and aetiology for Artemis of Lousoi • aetiologies, specific, Artemis at Lousoi/Metapontion • cult, of Artemis • krateriskoi, from sanctuaries of Artemis

 Found in books: Kowalzig (2007) 281, 284; Lyons (1997) 145, 146; Parker (2005) 234, 414


28. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis, Agrotera • Divinities (Greek and Roman), Artemis • Divinities (Greek and Roman), Artemis Prothyraia

 Found in books: Lupu(2005) 334; Renberg (2017) 250


29. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Apollo Delios/Dalios (Delos), inseparable from earlier Artemis • Artemis • Artemis, Ephesia • Artemis, Laphria • Leto, giving birth to Apollo and Artemis on Delos • aetiologies, specific, Apollo and Artemis (Delos)

 Found in books: Hitch (2017) 53; Kowalzig (2007) 62; Naiden (2013) 145


30. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Apollo Delios/Dalios (Delos), inseparable from earlier Artemis • Artemis • Artemis (goddess) • Artemis Delia, Delos • Artemis Delia, Paros • Artemis Delia, older deity on Delos • Artemis Hemera (Lousoi), aetiology jumbled with that of Hera Argeia • Artemis Hemera (Lousoi), myth-ritual nexus • Artemis and birth • Artemis premarital offerings to • Artemis, Brauronia • Artemis, Tauropolus • Artemis, and Iphigeneia • Artemis, and human sacrifice • Artemis, cult of • Iphigeneia, and Artemis • Mycenae, Mycenaeans (Bronze Age), Artemis on Delos • Proitids, and aetiology for Artemis of Lousoi • aetiologies, specific, Artemis at Lousoi/Metapontion • cult, of Artemis • festivals, Artemis Brauronia

 Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 188, 189, 533; Fabian Meinel (2015) 151; Gagné (2020) 18; Kowalzig (2007) 120, 275; Lipka (2021) 94; Lyons (1997) 44, 145; Pachoumi (2017) 135; Parker (2005) 242


31. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis and birth • Artemis, Eileithyia

 Found in books: Parker (2005) 428; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti (2022) 61


32. Aeschines, Letters, 3.121 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis, Agrotera • Artemis, Brauronia • Artemis, Mounichia • buildings in the shrine of Artemis

 Found in books: Naiden (2013) 105, 143, 145, 147, 148; Papazarkadas (2011) 29


3.121. Consider then with what voice, with what spirit, with what countece, possessed of what effrontery, you will make your supplications, if you let go unpunished these men, who stand under the ban of the curse. For not in riddles, but plainly is written the penalty to be suffered by those who have been guilty of impiety, and for those who have permitted it; and the curse closes with these words: ‘May they who fail to punish them never offer pure sacrifice unto Apollo, nor to Artemis, nor to Leto, nor to Athena Pronaea, and may the gods refuse to accept their offerings.’”''. None
33. None, None, nan (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis (goddess)

 Found in books: Petrovic and Petrovic (2016) 205; Riess (2012) 205


34. None, None, nan (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis Agrotera procession for • Artemis Agrotera, procession and sacrifice • Artemis and warfare • Artemis, Agrotera • Artemis, titles of Phosphoros • Artemis, titles of Aristoboule

 Found in books: Ekroth (2013) 96; Henderson (2020) 235, 246; Mikalson (2016) 60, 219; Papazarkadas (2011) 80; Parker (2005) 400


35. None, None, nan (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis (goddess) • Artemis (goddess), sanctuary at Brauron • Artemis Kynthia (Paros), Limnatis • Artemis, A. Ephesia • Artemis, A. Patmia • festivals, Artemis Brauronia

 Found in books: Bremmer (2008) 253; Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 525; Ekroth (2013) 46; Giusti (2018) 121; Kowalzig (2007) 39; Maciver (2012) 145; Mcclellan (2019) 184; de Jáuregui et al. (2011) 321


36. Polybius, Histories, 4.18.10 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis Hemera (Lousoi) • Artemis Hemera (Lousoi), aetiology jumbled with that of Hera Argeia • Artemis Hemera (Lousoi), and Aitolians • Artemis Hemera (Lousoi), archaeology of • Artemis Hemera (Lousoi), as agrotera • Artemis Hemera (Lousoi), fluid worshipping group • Artemis Hemera (Lousoi), misleading bucolic imagery • Artemis Hemera (Lousoi), role of in regional context • Artemis Hemera (Lousoi), sacred herd, symbolised in womens khoroi • Artemis, Ano Mazaraki, at communication routes • Artemis, S. Biagio at Metapontion, alternative aetiological myths • Artemis, Tauropolos • Artemis, and communications in the Peloponnese • aetiologies, specific, Artemis at Lousoi/Metapontion

 Found in books: Hitch (2017) 52; Kowalzig (2007) 271, 289, 290


4.18.10. καὶ παραγενόμενοι πρὸς τὸ τῆς Ἀρτέμιδος ἱερόν, ὃ κεῖται μὲν μεταξὺ Κλείτορος καὶ Κυναίθης, ἄσυλον δὲ νενόμισται παρὰ τοῖς Ἕλλησιν, ἀνετείνοντο διαρπάσειν τὰ θρέμματα τῆς θεοῦ καὶ τἄλλα τὰ περὶ τὸν ναόν.''. None
4.18.10. \xa0On arriving at the temple of Artemis which lies between Cleitor and Cynaetha, and is regarded as inviolable by the Greeks, they threatened to lift the cattle of the goddess and plunder the other property about the temple. <''. None
37. None, None, nan (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis, of Ephesus • Temple of, Artemis at Elis

 Found in books: Jenkyns (2013) 28; Rutledge (2012) 110


38. None, None, nan (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis, and Actaeon • Diana (Artemis)

 Found in books: Radicke (2022) 201, 303; Rosa and Santangelo (2020) 15, 59, 60, 61, 70; Rutledge (2012) 60


39. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 2.14, 4.22.3, 13.102.2, 15.49.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis (goddess) • Artemis (goddess), sanctuary at Brauron • Artemis Ephesia • Artemis Ephesia, Ephesos • Artemis, Agrotera • Artemis, Orthosia • Artemis, S. Biagio at Metapontion, alternative aetiological myths • Artemis, S. Biagio at Metapontion, and Akhaian identity • cult, of Artemis • festivals, Artemis Brauronia • sanctuary, of Artemis Persik􀄓

 Found in books: Borg (2008) 19; Dignas (2002) 155; Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 274; Jim (2022) 88; Kowalzig (2007) 103, 318; Mikalson (2016) 195; Naiden (2013) 98; Waldner et al (2016) 74


2.14. 1. \xa0After this she visited Persis and every other country over which she ruled throughout Asia. Everywhere she cut through the mountains and the precipitous cliffs and constructed expensive roads, while on the plains she made mounds, sometimes constructing them as tombs for those of her generals who died, and sometimes founding cities on their tops.,2. \xa0And it was also her custom, whenever she made camp, to build little mounds, upon which setting her tent she could look down upon all the encampment. As a consequence many of the works she built throughout Asia remain to this day and are called Works of Semiramis.,3. \xa0After this she visited all Egypt, and after subduing most of Libya she went also to the oracle of Ammon to inquire of the god regarding her own end. And the account runs that the answer was given her that she would disappear from among men and receive undying honour among some of the peoples of Asia, and that this would take place when her son Ninyas should conspire against her.,4. \xa0Then upon her return from these regions she visited most of Ethiopia, subduing it as she went and inspecting the wonders of the land. For in that country, they say, there is a lake, square in form, with a perimeter of some hundred and sixty feet, and its water is like cinnabar in colour and the odour of it is exceedingly sweet, not unlike that of old wine; moreover, it has a remarkable power; for whoever has drunk of it, they say, falls into a frenzy and accuses himself of every sin which he had formerly committed in secret. However, a man may not readily agree with those who tell such things.
4.22.3. \xa0These, then, are the deeds of Heracles in the regions mentioned above. And moving on from there he came to a certain rock in the country of the people of Poseidonia, where the myths relate that a peculiar and marvellous thing once took place. There was, that is, among the natives of the region a certain hunter, the fame of whom had gone abroad because of his brave exploits in hunting. On former occasions it had been his practice to dedicate to Artemis the heads and feet of the animals he secured and to nail them to the trees, but once, when he had overpowered a huge wild boar, he said, as though in contempt of the goddess, "The head of the beast I\xa0dedicate to myself," and bearing out this words he hung the head on a tree, and then, the atmosphere being very warm, at midday he fell asleep. And while he was thus asleep the thong broke, and the head fell down of itself upon the sleeper and killed him.
13.102.2. \xa0And when all became still, he said: "Men of Athens, may the action which has been taken regarding us turn out well for the state; but as for the vows which we made for the victory, inasmuch as Fortune has prevented our paying them, since it is well that you give thought to them, do you pay them to Zeus the Saviour and Apollo and the Holy Goddesses; for it was to these gods that we made vows before we overcame the enemy."
15.49.1. \xa0In Ionia nine cities were in the habit of holding sacrifices of great antiquity on a large scale to Poseidon in a lonely region near the place called Mycalê. Later, however, as a result of the outbreak of wars in this neighbourhood, since they were unable to hold the Panionia there, they shifted the festival gathering to a safe place near Ephesus. Having sent an embassy to Delphi, they received an oracle telling them to take copies of the ancient ancestral altars at Helicê, which was situated in what was then known as Ionia, but is now known as Achaïa.''. None
40. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 3.167, 10.536 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Diana (Artemis) • Diana/Artemis

 Found in books: Panoussi(2019) 208; Radicke (2022) 293, 304, 496; de Jáuregui et al. (2011) 321


10.536. fine genu vestem ritu succincta Dianae' '. None
10.536. I might be joined to him; but, as it stands,' '. None
41. None, None, nan (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Temple of Artemis (Ephesos) • Temple of, Artemis at Elis

 Found in books: Jenkyns (2013) 28, 249; Keddie (2019) 156


42. Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, 2.2.2, 2.6.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis Hemera (Lousoi), myth-ritual nexus • Artemis, Artemis Soteria • Ephesos, Temple of Artemis • Proitids, and aetiology for Artemis of Lousoi • aetiologies, specific, Artemis at Lousoi/Metapontion

 Found in books: Kowalzig (2007) 277, 278; Miller and Clay (2019) 57; Naiden (2013) 338; Steiner (2001) 178


2.2.2. καὶ γίνεται Ἀκρισίῳ μὲν ἐξ Εὐρυδίκης τῆς Λακεδαίμονος Δανάη, Προίτῳ δὲ ἐκ Σθενεβοίας Λυσίππη καὶ Ἰφινόη καὶ Ἰφιάνασσα. αὗται δὲ ὡς ἐτελειώθησαν, ἐμάνησαν, ὡς μὲν Ἡσίοδός φησιν, ὅτι τὰς Διονύσου τελετὰς οὐ κατεδέχοντο, ὡς δὲ Ἀκουσίλαος λέγει, διότι τὸ τῆς Ἥρας ξόανον ἐξηυτέλισαν. γενόμεναι δὲ ἐμμανεῖς ἐπλανῶντο ἀνὰ τὴν Ἀργείαν ἅπασαν, αὖθις δὲ τὴν Ἀρκαδίαν καὶ τὴν Πελοπόννησον 1 -- διελθοῦσαι μετʼ ἀκοσμίας ἁπάσης διὰ τῆς ἐρημίας ἐτρόχαζον. Μελάμπους δὲ ὁ Ἀμυθάονος καὶ Εἰδομένης τῆς Ἄβαντος, μάντις ὢν καὶ τὴν διὰ φαρμάκων καὶ καθαρμῶν θεραπείαν πρῶτος εὑρηκώς, ὑπισχνεῖται θεραπεύειν τὰς παρθένους, εἰ λάβοι τὸ τρίτον μέρος τῆς δυναστείας. οὐκ ἐπιτρέποντος δὲ Προίτου θεραπεύειν ἐπὶ μισθοῖς τηλικούτοις, ἔτι μᾶλλον ἐμαίνοντο αἱ παρθένοι καὶ προσέτι μετὰ τούτων αἱ λοιπαὶ γυναῖκες· καὶ γὰρ αὗται τὰς οἰκίας ἀπολιποῦσαι τοὺς ἰδίους ἀπώλλυον παῖδας καὶ εἰς τὴν ἐρημίαν ἐφοίτων. προβαινούσης δὲ ἐπὶ πλεῖστον τῆς συμφορᾶς, τοὺς αἰτηθέντας μισθοὺς ὁ Προῖτος ἐδίδου. ὁ δὲ ὑπέσχετο θεραπεύειν ὅταν ἕτερον τοσοῦτον τῆς γῆς ὁ ἀδελφὸς αὐτοῦ λάβῃ Βίας. Προῖτος δὲ εὐλαβηθεὶς μὴ βραδυνούσης τῆς θεραπείας αἰτηθείη καὶ πλεῖον, θεραπεύειν συνεχώρησεν ἐπὶ τούτοις. Μελάμπους δὲ παραλαβὼν τοὺς δυνατωτάτους τῶν νεανιῶν μετʼ ἀλαλαγμοῦ καί τινος ἐνθέου χορείας ἐκ τῶν ὀρῶν αὐτὰς εἰς Σικυῶνα συνεδίωξε. κατὰ δὲ τὸν διωγμὸν ἡ πρεσβυτάτη τῶν θυγατέρων Ἰφινόη μετήλλαξεν· ταῖς δὲ λοιπαῖς τυχούσαις καθαρμῶν σωφρονῆσαι συνέβη. καὶ ταύτας μὲν ἐξέδοτο Προῖτος Μελάμποδι καὶ Βίαντι, παῖδα δʼ ὕστερον ἐγέννησε Μεγαπένθην.
2.6.2. μετʼ οὐ πολὺ δὲ κλαπεισῶν ἐξ Εὐβοίας ὑπὸ Αὐτολύκου βοῶν, Εὔρυτος μὲν ἐνόμιζεν ὑφʼ Ἡρακλέους γεγονέναι τοῦτο, Ἴφιτος δὲ ἀπιστῶν ἀφικνεῖται πρὸς Ἡρακλέα, καὶ συντυχὼν ἥκοντι ἐκ Φερῶν 2 -- αὐτῷ, σεσωκότι τὴν ἀποθανοῦσαν Ἄλκηστιν Ἀδμήτῳ, παρακαλεῖ συζητῆσαι τὰς βόας. Ἡρακλῆς δὲ ὑπισχνεῖται· καὶ ξενίζει μὲν αὐτόν, μανεὶς δὲ αὖθις ἀπὸ τῶν Τιρυνθίων ἔρριψεν αὐτὸν τειχῶν. καθαρθῆναι δὲ θέλων τὸν φόνον ἀφικνεῖται πρὸς Νηλέα· Πυλίων ἦν οὗτος δυνάστης. ἀπωσαμένου δὲ Νηλέως αὐτὸν διὰ τὴν πρὸς Εὔρυτον φιλίαν, εἰς Ἀμύκλας παραγενόμενος ὑπὸ Δηιφόβου τοῦ Ἱππολύτου καθαίρεται. κατασχεθεὶς δὲ δεινῇ νόσῳ διὰ τὸν Ἰφίτου φόνον, εἰς Δελφοὺς παραγενόμενος ἀπαλλαγὴν ἐπυνθάνετο τῆς νόσου. μὴ χρησμῳδούσης δὲ αὐτῷ τῆς Πυθίας τόν τε ναὸν συλᾶν ἤθελε, καὶ τὸν τρίποδα βαστάσας κατασκευάζειν 1 -- μαντεῖον ἴδιον. μαχομένου δὲ αὐτῷ Ἀπόλλωνος, ὁ Ζεὺς ἵησι μέσον αὐτῶν κεραυνόν. καὶ τοῦτον διαλυθέντων τὸν τρόπον, λαμβάνει χρησμὸν Ἡρακλῆς, ὃς ἔλεγεν ἀπαλλαγὴν αὐτῷ τῆς νόσου ἔσεσθαι πραθέντι καὶ τρία ἔτη λατρεύσαντι καὶ δόντι ποινὴν τοῦ φόνου τὴν τιμὴν Εὐρύτῳ.''. None
2.2.2. And Acrisius had a daughter Danae by Eurydice, daughter of Lacedaemon, and Proetus had daughters, Lysippe, Iphinoe, and Iphianassa, by Stheneboea. When these damsels were grown up, they went mad, according to Hesiod, because they would not accept the rites of Dionysus, but according to Acusilaus, because they disparaged the wooden image of Hera. In their madness they roamed over the whole Argive land, and afterwards, passing through Arcadia and the Peloponnese, they ran through the desert in the most disorderly fashion. But Melampus, son of Amythaon by Idomene, daughter of Abas, being a seer and the first to devise the cure by means of drugs and purifications, promised to cure the maidens if he should receive the third part of the sovereignty. When Proetus refused to pay so high a fee for the cure, the maidens raved more than ever, and besides that, the other women raved with them; for they also abandoned their houses, destroyed their own children, and flocked to the desert. Not until the evil had reached a very high pitch did Proetus consent to pay the stipulated fee, and Melampus promised to effect a cure whenever his brother Bias should receive just so much land as himself. Fearing that, if the cure were delayed, yet more would be demanded of him, Proetus agreed to let the physician proceed on these terms. So Melampus, taking with him the most stalwart of the young men, chased the women in a bevy from the mountains to Sicyon with shouts and a sort of frenzied dance. In the pursuit Iphinoe, the eldest of the daughters, expired; but the others were lucky enough to be purified and so to recover their wits. Proetus gave them in marriage to Melampus and Bias, and afterwards begat a son, Megapenthes.
2.6.2. Not long after, some cattle were stolen from Euboea by Autolycus, and Eurytus supposed that it was done by Hercules; but Iphitus did not believe it and went to Hercules. And meeting him, as he came from Pherae after saving the dead Alcestis for Admetus, he invited him to seek the kine with him. Hercules promised to do so and entertained him; but going mad again he threw him from the walls of Tiryns . Wishing to be purified of the murder he repaired to Neleus, who was prince of the Pylians. And when Neleus rejected his request on the score of his friendship with Eurytus, he went to Amyclae and was purified by Deiphobus, son of Hippolytus. But being afflicted with a dire disease on account of the murder of Iphitus he went to Delphi and inquired how he might be rid of the disease. As the Pythian priestess answered him not by oracles, he was fain to plunder the temple, and, carrying off the tripod, to institute an oracle of his own. But Apollo fought him, and Zeus threw a thunderbolt between them. When they had thus been parted, Hercules received an oracle, which declared that the remedy for his disease was for him to be sold, and to serve for three years, and to pay compensation for the murder to Eurytus.''. None
43. Apollodorus, Epitome, 3.21 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis

 Found in books: Edmunds (2021) 92; Jouanna (2018) 571


3.21. ἀναχθέντων δὲ αὐτῶν ἀπʼ Ἄργους καὶ παραγενομένων τὸ δεύτερον εἰς Αὐλίδα, τὸν στόλον ἄπλοια κατεῖχε· 1 -- Κάλχας δὲ ἔφη οὐκ 2 -- ἄλλως δύνασθαι πλεῖν αὐτούς, εἰ μὴ τῶν Ἀγαμέμνονος θυγατέρων ἡ κρατιστεύουσα κάλλει σφάγιον Ἀρτέμιδι 3 -- παραστῇ, διὰ τὸ μηνίειν 4 -- τὴν θεὸν τῷ Ἀγαμέμνονι, ὅτι τε βαλὼν ἔλαφον εἶπεν· οὐδὲ ἡ Ἄρτεμις, καὶ ὅτι Ἀτρεὺς οὐκ ἔθυσεν αὐτῇ τὴν χρυσῆν ἄρνα.''. None
3.21. But when they had put to sea from Argos and arrived for the second time at Aulis, the fleet was windbound, and Calchas said that they could not sail unless the fairest of Agamemnon's daughters were presented as a sacrifice to Artemis; for the goddess was angry with Agamemnon, both because, on shooting a deer, he had said, “ Artemis herself could not ( do it better),” Compare Tzetzes, Scholiast on Lycophron 183 . The full expression is reported by the Scholiast on Hom. Il. 1.108, οὐδὲ ἡ Ἄρτεμις οὕτως ἂν ἐτόξευσε, “Not even Artemis could have shot like that.” The elliptical phrase is wrongly interpreted by the Sabbaitic scribe. See the Critical Note. and because Atreus had not sacrificed to her the golden lamb. "". None
44. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 31.54 (1st cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis Ephesia • Artemis Ephesia, copies of cult image • iconography, of Artemis Ephesia

 Found in books: Dignas (2002) 146, 147; Elsner (2007) 235


31.54. \xa0Well then, that there is nothing in the official list, or in the fact that these memorials stand on public property, which tends to show that they do not belong to those who have received them, has perhaps long been evident; but in order that nobody may even attempt to dispute it, let me mention this: You know about the Ephesians, of course, and that large sums of money are in their hands, some of it belonging to private citizens and deposited in the temple of Artemis, not alone money of the Ephesians but also of aliens and of persons from all parts of the world, and in some cases of commonwealths and kings, money which all deposit there in order that it may be safe, since no one has ever yet dared to violate that place, although countless wars have occurred in the past and the city has often been captured. Well, that the money is deposited on state property is indeed evident, but it also is evident, as the lists show, that it is the custom of the Ephesians to have these deposits officially recorded. <''. None
45. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 18.22 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis Perasia • Artemis of Ephesus

 Found in books: Nuno et al (2021) 78; Taylor (2012) 57


18.22. ἀξιῶ δέ σε μηδὲν ἀμνημονεῖν ὁμιλήσαντα αὐτῇ μήτ' εὐνοίας τῆς ἐμῆς, ὃς εἰς τοσόνδε ἀξιώματος καθίστημι μέγεθος,"
18.22. ἀποδέκτας δὲ τῶν προσόδων χειροτονοῦντες καὶ ὁπόσα ἡ γῆ φέροι ἄνδρας ἀγαθούς, ἱερεῖς δὲ ἐπὶ ποιήσει σίτου τε καὶ βρωμάτων. ζῶσι δὲ οὐδὲν παρηλλαγμένως, ἀλλ' ὅτι μάλιστα ἐμφέροντες Δακῶν τοῖς πλείστοις λεγομένοις." "". None
18.22. They also appoint certain stewards to receive the incomes of their revenues, and of the fruits of the ground; such as are good men and priests, who are to get their corn and their food ready for them. They none of them differ from others of the Essenes in their way of living, but do the most resemble those Dacae who are called Polistae dwellers in cities.
18.22. and I desire thee never to be unmindful when thou comest to it, either of my kindness to thee, who set thee in so high a dignity,''. None
46. New Testament, Acts, 19.23, 19.34-19.41 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis (goddess) • Temple of Artemis (Ephesos)

 Found in books: Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer (2022) 192; Demoen and Praet (2009) 252; Keddie (2019) 156; Stavrianopoulou (2013) 333


19.23. Ἐγένετο δὲ κατὰ τὸν καιρὸν ἐκεῖνον τάραχος οὐκ ὀλίγος περὶ τῆς ὁδοῦ.
19.34. ἐπιγνόντες δὲ ὅτι Ἰουδαῖός ἐστιν φωνὴ ἐγένετο μία ἐκ πάντων ὡσεὶ ἐπὶ ὥρας δύο κραζόντων Μεγάλη ἡ Ἄρτεμις Ἐφεσίων . 19.35. καταστείλας δὲ τὸν ὄχλον ὁ γραμματεύς φησιν Ἄνδρες Ἐφέσιοι, τίς γάρ ἐστιν ἀνθρώπων ὃς οὐ γινώσκει τὴν Ἐφεσίων πόλιν νεωκόρον οὖσαν τῆς μεγάλης Ἀρτέμιδος καὶ τοῦ διοπετοῦς; 19.36. ἀναντιρήτων οὖν ὄντων τούτων δέον ἐστὶν ὑμᾶς κατεσταλμένους ὑπάρχειν καὶ μηδὲν προπετὲς πράσσειν. 19.37. ἠγάγετε γὰρ τοὺς ἄνδρας τούτους οὔτε ἱεροσύλους οὔτε βλασφημοῦντας τὴν θεὸν ἡμῶν. 19.38. εἰ μὲν οὖν Δημήτριος καὶ οἱ σὺν αὐτῷ τεχνῖται ἔχουσιν πρός τινα λόγον, ἀγοραῖοι ἄγονται καὶ ἀνθύπατοί εἰσιν, ἐγκαλείτωσαν ἀλλήλοις. 19.39. εἰ δέ τι περαιτέρω ἐπιζητεῖτε, ἐν τῇ ἐννόμῳ ἐκκλησίᾳ ἐπιλυθήσεται. 19.40. καὶ γὰρ κινδυνεύομεν ἐγκαλεῖσθαι στάσεως περὶ τῆς σήμερον μηδενὸς αἰτίου ὑπάρχοντος, περὶ οὗ οὐ δυνησόμεθα ἀποδοῦναι λόγον περὶ τῆς συστροφῆς ταύτης. 19.41. καὶ ταῦτα εἰπὼν ἀπέλυσεν τὴν ἐκκλησίαν.''. None
19.23. About that time there arose no small stir concerning the Way.
19.34. But when they perceived that he was a Jew, all with one voice for a time of about two hours cried out, "Great is Artemis of the Ephesians!" 19.35. When the town clerk had quieted the multitude, he said, "You men of Ephesus, what man is there who doesn\'t know that the city of the Ephesians is temple-keeper of the great goddess Artemis, and of the image which fell down from Zeus? ' "19.36. Seeing then that these things can't be denied, you ought to be quiet, and to do nothing rash. " '19.37. For you have brought these men here, who are neither robbers of temples nor blasphemers of your goddess. 19.38. If therefore Demetrius and the craftsmen who are with him have a matter against anyone, the courts are open, and there are proconsuls. Let them press charges against one another. 19.39. But if you seek anything about other matters, it will be settled in the regular assembly. 19.40. For indeed we are in danger of being accused concerning this day\'s riot, there being no cause. Concerning it, we wouldn\'t be able to give an account of this commotion." 19.41. When he had thus spoken, he dismissed the assembly. ''. None
47. Plutarch, Mark Antony, 24.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis, in Temple of Apollo Palatinus

 Found in books: Rutledge (2012) 242; Trapp et al (2016) 81


24.4. ἦν γὰρ ἀμέλει τοιοῦτος ἐνίοις, τοῖς δὲ πολλοῖς ὠμηστὴς καὶ ἀγριώνιος. ἀφῃρεῖτο γὰρ εὐγενεῖς ἀνθρώπους τὰ ὄντα μαστιγίαις καὶ κόλαξι χαριζόμενος. πολλῶν δὲ καὶ ζώντων ὡς τεθνηκότων αἰτησάμενοί τινες οὐσίας ἔλαβον. ἀνδρὸς δὲ Μάγνητος οἶκον ἐδωρήσατο μαγείρῳ περὶ ἕν, ὡς λέγεται, δεῖπνον εὐδοκιμήσαντι.''. None
24.4. ''. None
48. Plutarch, Aratus, 32.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis, Artemis Soteria • Artemis, Artemis of Ephesos • Ephesos, Temple of Artemis

 Found in books: Lipka (2021) 159; Steiner (2001) 107, 178


32.2. ὡς ἔστη πρὸ τῶν θυρῶν τοῦ ἱεροῦ καὶ κατέβλεψεν εἰς τοὺς μαχομένους ἄνωθεν ἔχουσα τὴν τριλοφίαν, αὐτοῖς τε τοῖς πολίταις θέαμα σεμνότερον ἢ κατʼ ἄνθρωπον ἐφάνη, καὶ τοῖς πολεμίοις φάσμα θεῖον ὁρᾶν δοκοῦσι φρίκην ἐνέβαλε καὶ θάμβος, ὥστε μηδένα τρέπεσθαι πρὸς ἀλκήν. αὐτοὶ δὲ Πελληνεῖς λέγουσι τὸ βρέτας τῆς θεοῦ τὸν μὲν ἄλλον ἀποκεῖσθαι χρόνον ἄψαυστον, ὅταν δὲ κινηθὲν ὑπὸ τῆς ἱερείας ἐκφέρηται, μηδένα προσβλέπειν ἐναντίον, ἀλλʼ ἀποτρέπεσθαι πάντας οὐ γὰρ ἀνθρώποις μόνον ὅραμα φρικτὸν εἶναι καὶ χαλεπόν, ἀλλά καὶ δένδρα ποιεῖν ἄφορα καὶ καρποὺς ἀπαμβλίσκειν, διʼ ὧν ἂν κομίζηται.''. None
32.2. ''. None
49. Plutarch, Aristides, 20.4-20.5, 21.2-21.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis Soteira, in Megara • Artemis, Agrotera of Athens • Artemis, Eukleia of Plataea • Artemis, of Samos • Festivals, of Artemis Agrotera of Athens • Festivals, of Artemis of Samos

 Found in books: Ekroth (2013) 96; Jim (2022) 37; Mikalson (2003) 100, 205, 220


20.4. περὶ δὲ θυσίας ἐρομένοις αὐτοῖς ἀνεῖλεν ὁ Πύθιος Διὸς ἐλευθερίου βωμὸν ἱδρύσασθαι, θῦσαι δὲ μὴ πρότερον ἢ τὸ κατὰ τὴν χώραν πῦρ ἀποσβέσαντας ὡς ὑπὸ τῶν βαρβάρων μεμιασμένον ἐναύσασθαι καθαρὸν ἐκ Δελφῶν ἀπὸ τῆς κοινῆς ἑστίας. οἱ μὲν οὖν ἄρχοντες τῶν Ἑλλήνων περιιόντες εὐθὺς ἠνάγκαζον ἀποσβεννύναι τὰ πυρὰ πάντα τοὺς χρωμένους, ἐκ δὲ Πλαταιέων Εὐχίδας ὑποσχόμενος ὡς ἐνδέχεται τάχιστα κομιεῖν τὸ παρὰ τοῦ θεοῦ πῦρ ἧκεν εἰς Δελφούς. 20.5. ἁγνίσας δὲ τὸ σῶμα καὶ περιρρανάμενος ἐστεφανώσατο δάφνῃ· καὶ λαβὼν ἀπὸ τοῦ βωμοῦ τὸ πῦρ δρόμῳ πάλιν εἰς τὰς Πλαταιὰς ἐχώρει καὶ πρὸ ἡλίου δυσμῶν ἐπανῆλθε, τῆς αὐτῆς ἡμέρας χιλίους σταδίους κατανύσας. ἀσπασάμενος δὲ τοὺς πολίτας καὶ τὸ πῦρ παραδοὺς εὐθὺς ἔπεσε καὶ μετὰ μικρὸν ἐξέπνευσεν. ἀγάμενοι δʼ αὐτὸν οἱ Πλαταιεῖς ἔθαψαν ἐν τῷ ἱερῷ τῆς Εὐκλείας Ἀρτέμιδος, ἐπιγράψαντες τόδε τὸ τετράμετρον·
21.2. κυρωθέντων δὲ τούτων οἱ Πλαταιεῖς ὑπεδέξαντο τοῖς πεσοῦσι καὶ κειμένοις αὐτόθι τῶν Ἑλλήνων ἐναγίζειν καθʼ ἕκαστον ἐνιαυτόν. καὶ τοῦτο μέχρι νῦν δρῶσι τόνδε τόνδε Hercher and Blass with F a S: τοῦτον . τὸν τρόπον· τοῦ Μαιμακτηριῶνος μηνός, ὅς ἐστι παρὰ Βοιωτοῖς Ἀλαλκομένιος, τῇ ἕκτῃ ἐπὶ δέκα πέμπουσι πομπήν, ἧς προηγεῖται μὲν ἅμʼ ἡμέρᾳ σαλπιγκτὴς ἐγκελευόμενος τὸ πολεμικόν, ἕπονται δʼ ἅμαξαι μυρρίνης μεσταὶ καὶ στεφανωμάτων καὶ μέλας ταῦρος καὶ χοὰς οἴνου καὶ γάλακτος ἐν ἀμφορεῦσιν ἐλαίου τε καὶ μύρου κρωσσοὺς νεανίσκοι κομίζοντες ἐλεύθεροι· δούλῳ γὰρ οὐδενὸς ἔξεστι τῶν περὶ τὴν διακονίαν ἐκείνην προσάψασθαι διὰ τὸ τοὺς ἄνδρας ἀποθανεῖν ὑπὲρ ἐλευθερίας· 21.3. ἐπὶ πᾶσι δὲ τῶν Πλαταιέων ὁ ἄρχων, ᾧ τὸν ἄλλον χρόνον οὔτε σιδήρου θιγεῖν ἔξεστιν οὔθʼ ἑτέραν ἐσθῆτα πλὴν λευκῆς ἀναλαβεῖν, τότε χιτῶνα φοινικοῦν ἐνδεδυκὼς ἀράμενός τε ὑδρίαν ἀπὸ τοῦ γραμματοφυλακίου ξιφήρης ἐπὶ τοὺς τάφους προάγει διὰ μέσης τῆς πόλεως. 21.4. εἶτα λαβὼν ὕδωρ ἀπὸ τῆς κρήνης αὐτὸς ἀπολούει τε τὰς στήλας καὶ μύρῳ χρίει, καὶ τὸν ταῦρον εἰς τὴν πυρὰν σφάξας καὶ κατευξάμενος Διῒ καὶ Ἑρμῇ χθονίῳ παρακαλεῖ τοὺς ἀγαθοὺς ἄνδρας τοὺς ὑπὲρ τῆς Ἑλλάδος ἀποθανόντας ἐπὶ τὸ δεῖπνον καὶ τὴν αἱμοκουρίαν. ἔπειτα κρατῆρα κεράσας οἴνου καὶ χεάμενος ἐπιλέγει· προπίνω τοῖς ἀνδράσι τοῖς ὑπὲρ τῆς ἐλευθερίας τῶν Ἑλλήνων ἀποθανοῦσι. ταῦτα μὲν οὖν ἔτι καὶ νῦν διαφυλάττουσιν οἱ Πλαταεῖς.' '. None
20.4. 21.4. ' '. None
50. Plutarch, Demetrius, 30.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis Ephesia • Temple of Artemis (Ephesos)

 Found in books: Dignas (2002) 146; Keddie (2019) 156


30.1. οὕτω δὲ κριθείσης τῆς μάχης, οἱ μὲν νενικηκότες βασιλεῖς τὴν ὑπʼ Ἀντιγόνῳ καὶ Δημητρίῳ πᾶσαν ἀρχὴν ὥσπερ μέγα σῶμα κατακόπτοντες ἐλάμβανον μερίδας, καὶ προσδιενείμαντο τὰς ἐκείνων ἐπαρχίας αἷς εἶχον αὐτοὶ πρότερον. Δημήτριος δὲ μετὰ πεντακισχιλίων πεζῶν καὶ τετρακισχιλίων ἱππέων φεύγων καὶ συντόνως ἐλάσας εἰς Ἔφεσον, οἰομένων ἁπάντων ἀποροῦντα χρημάτων αὐτὸν οὐκ ἀφέξεσθαι τοῦ ἱεροῦ,''. None
30.1. ''. None
51. Plutarch, Virtues of Women, 16 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis, at Miletus (Chithone)

 Found in books: Sweeney (2013) 52; Thorsen et al. (2021) 8


16. Some of the lonians who came to Miletus, owing to lively disagreements with the sons of Neileus, went away to Myus and settled there, suffering many ills at the hands of the Milesians; for these made war upon them because of their defection. However, the war was not without truce or intercourse, but at certain festivals the women commonly went to Miletus from My us. There was among the people of Myus a prominent man named Pythes, who had a wife named Iapygia and a daughter Pieria. As there was a festival in honour of Artemis, and a sacrifice, which they call Neleis, Cf. Roscher, Lexikon der griech. und röm. Mythologie, i. p. 572, line 63. he sent his wife, and daughter, who had asked that they might participate in the festival. The most influential of Neileus’s sons, Phrygius by name, fell in love with Pieria, and tried to think what could be done on his part that would be most pleasing to her. And when she said, If only you could make it possible for me to come here often and many with me, Phrygius was quick to understand that she wanted friendship and peace for the citizens, and stopped the war. There was, consequently, in both cities repute and honour for Pieria, so that the women of Miletus pray even to this day that their husbands may love them as Phrygius loved Pieria.''. None
52. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Diana/Artemis

 Found in books: Panoussi(2019) 208, 262; Pinheiro et al (2012a) 135


53. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis Ephesia • ritual, of Artemis Ephesia

 Found in books: Elsner (2007) 233; Pinheiro et al (2012a) 70


54. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis Soteira, and seafaring • Artemis Soteira, on Icaros (in the Persina Gulf) • Artemis, Orthosia • Artemis, Tauropolos

 Found in books: Hitch (2017) 52; Jim (2022) 87, 88; Naiden (2013) 101


55. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis, of Ephesus • gods, Artemis

 Found in books: Rutledge (2012) 109; Thonemann (2020) 146, 147, 148, 149, 150


56. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis

 Found in books: Augoustakis (2014) 332, 333; Verhagen (2022) 332, 333


57. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis, Artemis Soteria • Artemis, in Temple of Apollo Palatinus • Ephesos, Temple of Artemis

 Found in books: Rutledge (2012) 238; Steiner (2001) 87, 178


58. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis (goddess), Mounychia shrine • Artemis (goddess), sanctuary at Athens • Artemis, Agrotera of Athens • Artemis, Agrotera of Sparta • Artemis, Aristoboule of Athens • Artemis, Mounichia • Artemis, Mounichia of Athens • Artemis, Proseoa of Artemisium • Artemis, Soteira of Megara • Artemis, of Delos • Artemis, of Ephesus • Artemis, of Samos • Festivals, of Artemis Agrotera of Athens

 Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 233; Lupu(2005) 143; Mikalson (2003) 76, 103, 127, 220


59. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis Phosphoros • Artemis, Agrotera of Athens • Artemis, Agrotera of Sparta • Artemis, Aristoboule of Athens • Artemis, Mounichia of Athens • Artemis, Proseoa of Artemisium • Artemis, Soteira of Megara • Artemis, of Delos • Artemis, of Ephesus • Artemis, of Samos • Artemis, titles of Aristoboule • Athens, Artemis, cult of • Festivals, of Artemis Agrotera of Athens • Minoan-Mycenaean religion and art, Artemis and

 Found in books: Lipka (2021) 159; Mikalson (2003) 77, 103, 127; Naiden (2013) 145; Parker (2005) 54; Simon (2021) 373


60. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Aphrodite, Artemis and • Apollo, Artemis and • Apollonian triad (Apollo, Artemis, and Leto) • Artemis • Artemis Agrotera, procession and sacrifice • Artemis Ephesia • Artemis Orthia • Artemis, Aphrodite and • Artemis, Apollo and • Artemis, Apollonian triad (Apollo, Artemis, and Leto) • Artemis, Dionysus and • Artemis, S. Biagio at Metapontion, bestial and hunting imagery • Artemis, arktoi (she-bears), young girls serving Artemis as • Artemis, cruel death, providing vengeance against • Artemis, cult and rites • Artemis, hunting and butchering, association with • Artemis, origins and development • Artemis, sacrifice/sacrificial rituals for • Artemis, sanctuaries and temples • Aulis, cult of Artemis at • Brauron, cult of Artemis at • Cape Zoster, cult of Artemis at • Delos, Artemis, cult of • Diana/Artemis • Dionysus, Artemis and • Ephesus, Artemisium and Artemis Ephesia • Leto, Apollonian triad (Apollo, Artemis, and Leto) • Leto, Artemis and • Minoan-Mycenaean religion and art, Artemis and • Piraeus, cult of Artemis at • Proitids, and aetiology for Artemis of Lousoi • Sparta, sanctuary/cult of Artemis Orthia • Zoster (cape), cult of Artemis at • arktoi (she-bears), young girls serving Artemis as • bears, arktoi (she-bears), young girls serving Artemis as • bulls, Artemis associated with • butchering and hunting, association of Artemis with • goats, Artemis/hunting goddesses and • hunting and butchering, association of Artemis with • krateriskoi dedicated to Artemis • perfumes and ointments, Artemis and • sacrifice/sacrificial rituals, for Artemis • sanctuaries and temples, of Artemis • sea and seafarers, Artemis and • the dead, Artemis providing vengeance against cruel death

 Found in books: Henderson (2020) 249; Kowalzig (2007) 395; Lipka (2021) 159; Naiden (2013) 49; Panoussi(2019) 262; Simon (2021) 171, 184, 276


61. Anon., The Acts of John, 42-44, 46 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis, altar of • Artemis, priests of • Temple of Artemis (Ephesus)

 Found in books: Dignas Parker and Stroumsa (2013) 148; Dijkstra (2020) 89; Geljon and Vos (2020) 72


42. And as John spake these things, immediately the altar of Artemis was parted into many pieces, and all the things that were dedicated in the temple fell, and MS. that which seemed good to him was rent asunder, and likewise of the images of the gods more than seven. And the half of the temple fell down, so that the priest was slain at one blow by the falling of the (?roof, ? beam). The multitude of the Ephesians therefore cried out: One is the God of John, one is the God that hath pity on us, for thou only art God: now are we turned to thee, beholding thy marvellous works! have mercy on us, O God, according to thy will, and save us from our great error! And some of them, lying on their faces, made supplication, and some kneeled and besought, and some rent their clothes and wept, and others tried to escape.'43. But John spread forth his hands, and being uplifted in soul, said unto the Lord: Glory be to thee, my Jesus, the only God of truth, for that thou dost gain (receive) thy servants by divers devices. And having so said, he said to the people: Rise up from the floor, ye men of Ephesus, and pray to my God, and recognize the invisible power that cometh to manifestation, and the wonderful works which are wrought before your eyes. Artemis ought to have succoured herself: her servant ought to have been helped of her and not to have died. Where is the power of the evil spirit? where are her sacrifices? where her birthdays? where her festivals? where are the garlands? where is all that sorcery and the poisoning (witchcraft) that is sister thereto? 44. But the people rising up from off the floor went hastily and cast down the rest of the idol temple, crying: The God of John only do we know, and him hereafter do we worship, since he hath had mercy upon us! And as John came down from thence, much people took hold of him, saying: Help us, O John! Assist us that do perish in vain! Thou seest our purpose: thou seest the multitude following thee and hanging upon thee in hope toward thy God. We have seen the way wherein we went astray when we lost him: we have seen our gods that were set up in vain: we have seen the great and shameful derision that is come to them: but suffer us, we pray thee, to come unto thine house and to be succoured without hindrance. Receive us that are in bewilderment.
46. John therefore continued with them, receiving them in the house of Andromeus. And one of them that were gathered laid down the dead body of the priest of Artemis before the door of the temple, for he was his kinsman, and came in quickly with the rest, saying nothing of it. John, therefore, after the discourse to the brethren, and the prayer and the thanksgiving (eucharist) and the laying of hands upon every one of the congregation, said by the spirit: There is one here who moved by faith in God hath laid down the priest of Artemis before the gate and is come in, and in the yearning of his soul, taking care first for himself, hath thought thus in himself: It is better for me to take thought for the living than for my kinsman that is dead: for I know that if I turn to the Lord and save mine own soul, John will not deny to raise up the dead also. And John arising from his place went to that into which that kinsman of the priest who had so thought was entered, and took him by the hand and said: Hadst thou this thought when thou camest unto me, my child? And he, taken with trembling and affright, said: Yes, lord, and cast himself at his feet. And John said: Our Lord is Jesus Christ, who will show his power in thy dead kinsman by raising him up. '. None
62. Anon., Acts of John, 42-44, 46 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis, altar of • Artemis, priests of • Temple of Artemis (Ephesus)

 Found in books: Dignas Parker and Stroumsa (2013) 148; Dijkstra (2020) 89; Geljon and Vos (2020) 72


42. And as John spake these things, immediately the altar of Artemis was parted into many pieces, and all the things that were dedicated in the temple fell, and MS. that which seemed good to him was rent asunder, and likewise of the images of the gods more than seven. And the half of the temple fell down, so that the priest was slain at one blow by the falling of the (?roof, ? beam). The multitude of the Ephesians therefore cried out: One is the God of John, one is the God that hath pity on us, for thou only art God: now are we turned to thee, beholding thy marvellous works! have mercy on us, O God, according to thy will, and save us from our great error! And some of them, lying on their faces, made supplication, and some kneeled and besought, and some rent their clothes and wept, and others tried to escape.'43. But John spread forth his hands, and being uplifted in soul, said unto the Lord: Glory be to thee, my Jesus, the only God of truth, for that thou dost gain (receive) thy servants by divers devices. And having so said, he said to the people: Rise up from the floor, ye men of Ephesus, and pray to my God, and recognize the invisible power that cometh to manifestation, and the wonderful works which are wrought before your eyes. Artemis ought to have succoured herself: her servant ought to have been helped of her and not to have died. Where is the power of the evil spirit? where are her sacrifices? where her birthdays? where her festivals? where are the garlands? where is all that sorcery and the poisoning (witchcraft) that is sister thereto? 44. But the people rising up from off the floor went hastily and cast down the rest of the idol temple, crying: The God of John only do we know, and him hereafter do we worship, since he hath had mercy upon us! And as John came down from thence, much people took hold of him, saying: Help us, O John! Assist us that do perish in vain! Thou seest our purpose: thou seest the multitude following thee and hanging upon thee in hope toward thy God. We have seen the way wherein we went astray when we lost him: we have seen our gods that were set up in vain: we have seen the great and shameful derision that is come to them: but suffer us, we pray thee, to come unto thine house and to be succoured without hindrance. Receive us that are in bewilderment.
46. John therefore continued with them, receiving them in the house of Andromeus. And one of them that were gathered laid down the dead body of the priest of Artemis before the door of the temple, for he was his kinsman, and came in quickly with the rest, saying nothing of it. John, therefore, after the discourse to the brethren, and the prayer and the thanksgiving (eucharist) and the laying of hands upon every one of the congregation, said by the spirit: There is one here who moved by faith in God hath laid down the priest of Artemis before the gate and is come in, and in the yearning of his soul, taking care first for himself, hath thought thus in himself: It is better for me to take thought for the living than for my kinsman that is dead: for I know that if I turn to the Lord and save mine own soul, John will not deny to raise up the dead also. And John arising from his place went to that into which that kinsman of the priest who had so thought was entered, and took him by the hand and said: Hadst thou this thought when thou camest unto me, my child? And he, taken with trembling and affright, said: Yes, lord, and cast himself at his feet. And John said: Our Lord is Jesus Christ, who will show his power in thy dead kinsman by raising him up. '. None
63. Lucian, The Sky-Man, 24 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis Ephesia • Temple of Artemis (Ephesos)

 Found in books: Dignas (2002) 143; Keddie (2019) 156


24. As he went, he put questions to me about earthly affairs, beginning with, What was wheat a quarter in Greece? had we suffered much from cold last winter? and did the vegetables want more rain? Then he wished to know whether any of Phidias’s kin were alive, why there had been no Diasia at Athens all these years, whether his Olympieum was ever going to be completed, and had the robbers of his temple at Dodona been caught? I answered all these questions, and he proceeded:—‘Tell me, Menippus, what are men’s feelings towards me?’ ‘What should they be, Lord, but those of absolute reverence, as to the King of all Gods?’ ‘Now, now, chaffing as usual,’ he said; ‘I know their fickleness very well, for all your dissimulation. There was a time when I was their prophet, their healer, and their all,And Zeus filled every street and gathering place.In those days Dodona and Pisa were glorious and far famed, and I could not get a view for the clouds of sacrificial steam. But now Apollo has set up his oracle at Delphi, Asclepius his temple of health at Pergamum, Bendis and Anubis and Artemis their shrines in Thrace, Egypt, Ephesus; and to these all run; theirs the festal gatherings and the hecatombs. As for me, I am superannuated; they think themselves very generous if they offer me a victim at Olympia at four year intervals. My altars are cold as Plato’s Laws or Chrysippus’s Syllogisms.’''. None
64. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.4.4-1.4.5, 1.14.5, 1.18.5, 1.19.6, 1.20.3, 1.22.3, 1.27.1, 1.28.4, 1.29.2, 1.31.4, 1.32.4, 1.38.8, 1.40.2-1.40.3, 1.41.3, 2.2.6, 2.9.6, 2.13.3, 3.16.3, 3.16.7-3.16.11, 3.22.12, 4.1.5, 4.1.7, 4.4.2-4.4.3, 4.31.7-4.31.8, 5.7.8, 5.27.5, 6.20.3-6.20.5, 6.25.1, 7.2.6-7.2.8, 7.4.4, 7.5.4, 7.18.11-7.18.13, 7.19.1-7.19.10, 7.21.7, 8.14.9-8.14.10, 8.18.7-8.18.8, 8.23.7, 8.32.4, 8.39.6, 8.48.6, 8.54.6, 9.2.5-9.2.6, 9.19.6, 9.27.2, 9.35.3, 10.13.7-10.13.8, 10.23.1-10.23.2, 10.23.7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Acropolis, Athens, Artemis, cult of • Aegeira, cult of Artemis Agrotera at • Agora, Athens, Artemis, cult of • Aphrodite, Artemis and • Apollo Delios/Dalios (Delos), inseparable from earlier Artemis • Apollo, Artemis and • Apollonian triad (Apollo, Artemis, and Leto) • Ares, Artemis and • Artemis • Artemis (goddess) • Artemis (goddess), Laphria festival • Artemis (goddess), sanctuary at Brauron • Artemis Agrotera • Artemis Agrotera, • Artemis Agrotera, procession and sacrifice • Artemis Boulaia • Artemis Boulephoros • Artemis Brauronia, sacred precint on the acropolis of • Artemis Chitone • Artemis Ephesia • Artemis Ephesia, Ephesos • Artemis Epipyrgidia • Artemis Eucleia, • Artemis Hegemone • Artemis Hemera (Lousoi) • Artemis Hemera (Lousoi), aetiology jumbled with that of Hera Argeia • Artemis Hemera (Lousoi), archaeology of • Artemis Hemera (Lousoi), misleading bucolic imagery • Artemis Hemera (Lousoi), myth-ritual nexus • Artemis Hemera (Lousoi), sacred herd, symbolised in womens khoroi • Artemis Kynthia (Paros), Limnatis • Artemis Limnatis, • Artemis Orthia • Artemis Orthia, sanctuary of (Sparta) • Artemis Patroa • Artemis Patroa, inscribed • Artemis Pergaia • Artemis Phosphoros • Artemis Propylaea • Artemis Soteira • Artemis Soteira, and warfare • Artemis Soteira, as the most popular Soteira • Artemis Soteira, in Boeae • Artemis Soteira, in Megara • Artemis Soteira, in Pagae • Artemis Soteira, in Rhodes • Artemis Soteira, multiple functions of • Artemis Soteira, on Icaros (in the Persina Gulf) • Artemis Soteira, with two torches • Artemis of Euboea • Artemis of Lusi • Artemis, • Artemis, A. Lygodesma • Artemis, Agrotera of Athens • Artemis, Agrotera of Sparta • Artemis, Aphrodite and • Artemis, Apollo and • Artemis, Apollonian triad (Apollo, Artemis, and Leto) • Artemis, Ares and • Artemis, Aristoboule of Athens • Artemis, Artemis Laphria • Artemis, Artemis Limnatis Λιμνάτις • Artemis, Artemis Ortheia • Artemis, Artemis Soteira • Artemis, Artemis Soteria • Artemis, Artemis Triklaria • Artemis, Bargylia • Artemis, Brauronia • Artemis, Charites/Graces and • Artemis, Dionysus and • Artemis, Eileithyia • Artemis, Ephesia • Artemis, Eukleia of Plataea • Artemis, Hermes and • Artemis, Kolainis • Artemis, Laphria • Artemis, Mounichia of Athens • Artemis, Orthia • Artemis, Patrae • Artemis, Phosphoros • Artemis, Proseoa of Artemisium • Artemis, S. Biagio at Metapontion, alternative aetiological myths • Artemis, Soteira • Artemis, Soteira of Megara • Artemis, Sparta • Artemis, Zeus and • Artemis, and Hecate, close association with • Artemis, and Iphigeneia • Artemis, animals, association with • Artemis, arktoi (she-bears), young girls serving Artemis as • Artemis, at Ephesus • Artemis, at Magnesia • Artemis, cult and rites • Artemis, flowing water, connection to • Artemis, hunting and butchering, association with • Artemis, images and iconography • Artemis, in Delphi • Artemis, in ‘structuralist’ interpretation • Artemis, migration/movement of peoples, association with • Artemis, nocturnal intervention • Artemis, of Delos • Artemis, of Ephesus • Artemis, of Samos • Artemis, origins and development • Artemis, pillar/column, worshipped in form of • Artemis, political assemblies and civic life, association with • Artemis, purification rituals, associated with • Artemis, sacrifice/sacrificial rituals for • Artemis, sanctuaries and temples • Artemis, theater and tragedy, connection to • Artemis, torch associated with • Athens, Artemis, cult of • Aulis, cult of Artemis at • Boeae, cult of Artemis Soteira at • Boeotia, Artemis, bell-shaped figurines of • Brauron, cult of Artemis at • Calydon, cults of Artemis and Dionysus at • Cape Zoster, cult of Artemis at • Charites (Graces), Artemis and • Corinth, cults of Artemis and Dionysus at • Delos, Artemis, cult of • Diana/Artemis • Dionysus, Artemis and • Eleusis, Artemis Propylaea and • Ephesian cup of Artemis • Ephesos, Temple of Artemis • Ephesus, Artemisium and Artemis Ephesia • Euboea, Artemis, cult of • Festivals, of Artemis Agrotera of Athens • Festivals, of Artemis of Samos • Hecate Phosphoros, Artemis Soteira, close association with • Hermes, Artemis and • Ikaria, wooden representation of Artemis on • Iphigeneia, and Artemis • Karneia Painter, volute-krater with Artemis entering Dionysiac circle, from Tarentum • Leto, Apollonian triad (Apollo, Artemis, and Leto) • Leto, Artemis and • Leto, giving birth to Apollo and Artemis on Delos • Miletus, Artemis Boulephoros, cult of • Minoan-Mycenaean religion and art, Artemis and • Nilsson, Martin, on Artemis • Ortygia, cult of Artemis on • Piraeus, cult of Artemis at • Proitids, and aetiology for Artemis of Lousoi • Pylos, Artemis, cult of • Rhea, Artemis and • Rhodes, Artemis on • Sicyon, cult statue of Artemis in • Sparta, sanctuary of Artemis Hegemone and Apollo Carneius • Sparta, sanctuary of Artemis Orthia • Sparta, sanctuary/cult of Artemis Orthia • Tarentum, volute-krater by Karneia Painter with Artemis entering Dionysiac circle, from • Temple of Artemis (Ephesos) • Zeus, Artemis and • Zoster (cape), cult of Artemis at • aetiologies, specific, Artemis at Lousoi/Metapontion • animals, Artemis as “Mistress of Beasts,” • arktoi (she-bears), young girls serving Artemis as • bears, Artemis and • bears, arktoi (she-bears), young girls serving Artemis as • buildings in the shrine of Artemis • bulls, Artemis associated with • butchering and hunting, association of Artemis with • coins, with cult statue of Artemis Pergaia • cult, of Artemis • death sentences and suicides, Artemis associated with • deer, Artemis associated with • festivals, Artemis Brauronia • geese, alabastron from Delos with Artemis holding • goats, Artemis/hunting goddesses and • gods, Artemis • hunting and butchering, association of Artemis with • justice and political life, association of Artemis with political assemblies and civic life • justice and political life, death sentences and suicides, Artemis associated with • krateriskoi dedicated to Artemis • masks, Artemis and • migration/movement of peoples, Artemis associated with • oracles, animal oracles and Artemis • pastoralism, Artemis/hunting goddesses associated with • perfumes and ointments, Artemis and • pillars/columns, Artemis worshipped in form of • purification rituals, Artemis associated with • quail, sacred to Artemis • ritual, of Artemis Ephesia • sacrifice/sacrificial rituals, for Artemis • sacrifice/sacrificial rituals, purification rituals related to, Artemis associated with • sanctuaries and temples, of Artemis • sanctuary, of Artemis at Brauron • sea and seafarers, Artemis and • suicides and death sentences, Artemis associated with • temple, of Artemis in the sanctuary at Brauron • the dead, death sentences and suicides, Artemis associated with • theater and tragedy, Artemis and

 Found in books: Bernabe et al (2013) 402, 403, 404, 406, 407, 409, 411; Borg (2008) 16, 38; Bowie (2021) 541, 626, 689; Bremmer (2008) 187; Dignas (2002) 170; Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 14, 251, 496; Ekroth (2013) 96; Elsner (2007) 39, 40, 41, 229; Gagné (2020) 11, 117, 119, 191; Gaifman (2012) 288, 309; Gygax (2016) 100; Henderson (2020) 249; Hitch (2017) 53, 92; Humphreys (2018) 607, 649, 908; Jim (2022) 8, 37, 56, 57, 59, 126, 145, 153; Jouanna (2018) 571; Keddie (2019) 156; Kowalzig (2007) 39, 98, 104, 123, 271, 275, 336; Lipka (2021) 143, 148, 159, 166, 168; Lyons (1997) 73, 164, 167; Mikalson (2003) 30, 90, 100, 103, 127, 133, 205, 224; Miller and Clay (2019) 57; Naiden (2013) 48, 49, 204, 338; Panoussi(2019) 153; Papazarkadas (2011) 88; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti (2022) 54, 60, 135, 175; Simon (2021) 174, 179, 182, 183, 184, 186, 187, 190, 276, 373; Stavrianopoulou (2006) 115, 121, 122, 123; Steiner (2001) 81, 85, 86, 87, 178; Sweeney (2013) 138; Thonemann (2020) 149, 150; Versnel (2011) 107; Álvarez (2019) 145


1.4.4. οὗτοι μὲν δὴ τοὺς Ἕλληνας τρόπον τὸν εἰρημένον ἔσωζον, οἱ δὲ Γαλάται Πυλῶν τε ἐντὸς ἦσαν καὶ τὰ πολίσματα ἑλεῖν ἐν οὐδενὶ τὰ λοιπὰ ποιησάμενοι Δελφοὺς καὶ τὰ χρήματα. τοῦ θεοῦ διαρπάσαι μάλιστα εἶχον σπουδήν. καί σφισιν αὐτοί τε Δελφοὶ καὶ Φωκέων ἀντετάχθησαν οἱ τὰς πόλεις περὶ τὸν Παρνασσὸν οἰκοῦντες, ἀφίκετο δὲ καὶ δύναμις Αἰτωλῶν· τὸ γὰρ Αἰτωλικὸν προεῖχεν ἀκμῇ νεότητος τὸν χρόνον τοῦτον. ὡς δὲ ἐς χεῖρας συνῄεσαν, ἐνταῦθα κεραυνοί τε ἐφέροντο ἐς τοὺς Γαλάτας καὶ ἀπορραγεῖσαι πέτραι τοῦ Παρνασσοῦ, δείματά τε ἄνδρες ἐφίσταντο ὁπλῖται τοῖς βαρβάροις· τούτων τοὺς μὲν ἐξ Ὑπερβορέων λέγουσιν ἐλθεῖν, Ὑπέροχον καὶ Ἀμάδοκον, τὸν δὲ τρίτον Πύρρον εἶναι τὸν Ἀχιλλέως· ἐναγίζουσι δὲ ἀπὸ ταύτης Δελφοὶ τῆς συμμαχίας Πύρρῳ, πρότερον ἔχοντες ἅτε ἀνδρὸς πολεμίου καὶ τὸ μνῆμα ἐν ἀτιμίᾳ. 1.4.5. Γαλατῶν δὲ οἱ πολλοὶ ναυσὶν ἐς τὴν Ἀσίαν διαβάντες τὰ παραθαλάσσια αὐτῆς ἐλεηλάτουν· χρόνῳ δὲ ὕστερον οἱ Πέργαμον ἔχοντες, πάλαι δὲ Τευθρανίαν καλουμένην, ἐς ταύτην Γαλάτας ἐλαύνουσιν ἀπὸ θαλάσσης. οὗτοι μὲν δὴ τὴν ἐκτὸς Σαγγαρίου χώραν ἔσχον Ἄγκυραν πόλιν ἑλόντες Φρυγῶν, ἣν Μίδας ὁ Γορδίου πρότερον ᾤκισεν—ἄγκυρα δέ, ἣν ὁ Μίδας ἀνεῦρεν, ἦν ἔτι καὶ ἐς ἐμὲ ἐν ἱερῷ Διὸς καὶ κρήνη Μίδου καλουμένη· ταύτην οἴνῳ κεράσαι Μίδαν φασὶν ἐπὶ τὴν θήραν τοῦ Σιληνοῦ—, ταύτην τε δὴ τὴν Ἄγκυραν εἷλον καὶ Πεσσινοῦντα τὴν ὑπὸ τὸ ὄρος τὴν Ἄγδιστιν, ἔνθα καὶ τὸν Ἄττην τεθάφθαι λέγουσι.
1.14.5. —ἔτι δὲ ἀπωτέρω ναὸς Εὐκλείας, ἀνάθημα καὶ τοῦτο ἀπὸ Μήδων, οἳ τῆς χώρας Μαραθῶνι ἔσχον. φρονῆσαι δὲ Ἀθηναίους ἐπὶ τῇ νίκῃ ταύτῃ μάλιστα εἰκάζω· καὶ δὴ καὶ Αἰσχύλος, ὥς οἱ τοῦ βίου προσεδοκᾶτο ἡ τελευτή, τῶν μὲν ἄλλων ἐμνημόνευσεν οὐδενός, δόξης ἐς τ ος οῦτο ἥκων ἐπὶ ποιήσει καὶ πρὸ Ἀρτεμισίου καὶ ἐν Σαλαμῖνι ναυμαχήσας· ὁ δὲ τό τε ὄνομα πατρόθεν καὶ τὴν πόλιν ἔγραψε καὶ ὡς τῆς ἀνδρίας μάρτυρας ἔχοι τὸ Μαραθῶνι ἄλσος καὶ Μήδων τοὺς ἐς αὐτὸ ἀποβάντας.
1.18.5. πλησίον δὲ ᾠκοδόμητο ναὸς Εἰλειθυίας, ἣν ἐλθοῦσαν ἐξ Ὑπερβορέων ἐς Δῆλον γενέσθαι βοηθὸν ταῖς Λητοῦς ὠδῖσι, τοὺς δὲ ἄλλους παρʼ αὐτῶν φασι τῆς Εἰλειθυίας μαθεῖν τὸ ὄνομα· καὶ θύουσί τε Εἰλειθυίᾳ Δήλιοι καὶ ὕμνον ᾄδουσιν Ὠλῆνος. Κρῆτες δὲ χώρας τῆς Κνωσσίας ἐν Ἀμνισῷ γενέσθαι νομίζουσιν Εἰλείθυιαν καὶ παῖδα Ἥρας εἶναι· μόνοις δὲ Ἀθηναίοις τῆς Εἰλειθυίας κεκάλυπται τὰ ξόανα ἐς ἄκρους τοὺς πόδας. τὰ μὲν δὴ δύο εἶναι Κρητικὰ καὶ Φαίδρας ἀναθήματα ἔλεγον αἱ γυναῖκες, τὸ δὲ ἀρχαιότατον Ἐρυσίχθονα ἐκ Δήλου κομίσαι.
1.19.6. διαβᾶσι δὲ τὸν Ἰλισὸν χωρίον Ἄγραι καλούμενον καὶ ναὸς Ἀγροτέρας ἐστὶν Ἀρτέμιδος· ἐνταῦθα Ἄρτεμιν πρῶτον θηρεῦσαι λέγουσιν ἐλθοῦσαν ἐκ Δήλου, καὶ τὸ ἄγαλμα διὰ τοῦτο ἔχει τόξον. τὸ δὲ ἀκούσασι μὲν οὐχ ὁμοίως ἐπαγωγόν, θαῦμα δʼ ἰδοῦσι, στάδιόν ἐστι λευκοῦ λίθου. μέγεθος δὲ αὐτοῦ τῇδε ἄν τις μάλιστα τεκμαίροιτο· ἄνωθεν ὄρος ὑπὲρ τὸν Ἰλισὸν ἀρχόμενον ἐκ μηνοειδοῦς καθήκει τοῦ ποταμοῦ πρὸς τὴν ὄχθην εὐθύ τε καὶ διπλοῦν. τοῦτο ἀνὴρ Ἀθηναῖος Ἡρώδης ᾠκοδόμησε, καί οἱ τὸ πολὺ τῆς λιθοτομίας τῆς Πεντελῆσιν ἐς τὴν οἰκοδομὴν ἀνηλώθη.
1.20.3. τοῦ Διονύσου δέ ἐστι πρὸς τῷ θεάτρῳ τὸ ἀρχαιότατον ἱερόν· δύο δέ εἰσιν ἐντὸς τοῦ περιβόλου ναοὶ καὶ Διόνυσοι, ὅ τε Ἐλευθερεὺς καὶ ὃν Ἀλκαμένης ἐποίησεν ἐλέφαντος καὶ χρυσοῦ. γραφαὶ δὲ αὐτόθι Διόνυσός ἐστιν ἀνάγων Ἥφαιστον ἐς οὐρανόν· λέγεται δὲ καὶ τάδε ὑπὸ Ἑλλήνων, ὡς Ἥρα ῥίψαι γενόμενον Ἥφαιστον, ὁ δέ οἱ μνησικακῶν πέμψαι δῶρον χρυσοῦν θρόνον ἀφανεῖς δεσμοὺς ἔχοντα, καὶ τὴν μὲν ἐπεί τε ἐκαθέζετο δεδέσθαι, θεῶν δὲ τῶν μὲν ἄλλων οὐδενὶ τὸν Ἥφαιστον ἐθέλειν πείθεσθαι, Διόνυσος δὲ— μάλιστα γὰρ ἐς τοῦτον πιστὰ ἦν Ἡφαίστῳ—μεθύσας αὐτὸν ἐς οὐρανὸν ἤγαγε· ταῦτά τε δὴ γεγραμμένα εἰσὶ καὶ Πενθεὺς καὶ Λυκοῦργος ὧν ἐς Διόνυσον ὕβρισαν διδόντες δίκας, Ἀριάδνη δὲ καθεύδουσα καὶ Θησεὺς ἀναγόμενος καὶ Διόνυσος ἥκων ἐς τῆς Ἀριάδνης τὴν ἁρπαγήν.
1.22.3. Ἀφροδίτην δὲ τὴν Πάνδημον, ἐπεί τε Ἀθηναίους Θησεὺς ἐς μίαν ἤγαγεν ἀπὸ τῶν δήμων πόλιν, αὐτήν τε σέβεσθαι καὶ Πειθὼ κατέστησε· τὰ μὲν δὴ παλαιὰ ἀγάλματα οὐκ ἦν ἐπʼ ἐμοῦ, τὰ δὲ ἐπʼ ἐμοῦ τεχνιτῶν ἦν οὐ τῶν ἀφανεστάτων. ἔστι δὲ καὶ Γῆς Κουροτρόφου καὶ Δήμητρος ἱερὸν Χλόης· τὰ δὲ ἐς τὰς ἐπωνυμίας ἔστιν αὐτῶν διδαχθῆναι τοῖς ἱερεῦσιν ἐλθόντα ἐς λόγους.
1.27.1. κεῖται δὲ ἐν τῷ ναῷ τῆς Πολιάδος Ἑρμῆς ξύλου, Κέκροπος εἶναι λεγόμενον ἀνάθημα, ὑπὸ κλάδων μυρσίνης οὐ σύνοπτον. ἀναθήματα δὲ ὁπόσα ἄξια λόγου, τῶν μὲν ἀρχαίων δίφρος ὀκλαδίας ἐστὶ Δαιδάλου ποίημα, λάφυρα δὲ ἀπὸ Μήδων Μασιστίου θώραξ, ὃς εἶχεν ἐν Πλαταιαῖς τὴν ἡγεμονίαν τῆς ἵππου, καὶ ἀκινάκης Μαρδονίου λεγόμενος εἶναι. Μασίστιον μὲν δὴ τελευτήσαντα ὑπὸ τῶν Ἀθηναίων οἶδα ἱππέων· Μαρδονίου δὲ μαχεσαμένου Λακεδαιμονίοις ἐναντία καὶ ὑπὸ ἀνδρὸς Σπαρτιάτου πεσόντος οὐδʼ ἂν ὑπεδέξαντο ἀρχὴν οὐδὲ ἴσως Ἀθηναίοις παρῆκαν φέρεσθαι Λακεδαιμόνιοι τὸν ἀκινάκην.
1.28.4. καταβᾶσι δὲ οὐκ ἐς τὴν κάτω πόλιν ἀλλʼ ὅσον ὑπὸ τὰ προπύλαια πηγή τε ὕδατός ἐστι καὶ πλησίον Ἀπόλλωνος ἱερὸν ἐν σπηλαίῳ· Κρεούσῃ δὲ θυγατρὶ Ἐρεχθέως Ἀπόλλωνα ἐνταῦθα συγγενέσθαι νομίζουσι. ὡς πεμφθείη Φιλιππίδης ἐς Λακεδαίμονα ἄγγελος ἀποβεβηκότων Μήδων ἐς τὴν γῆν, ἐπανήκων δὲ Λακεδαιμονίους ὑπερβαλέσθαι φαίη τὴν ἔξοδον, εἶναι γὰρ δὴ νόμον αὐτοῖς μὴ πρότερον μαχουμένους ἐξιέναι πρὶν ἢ πλήρη τὸν κύκλον τῆς σελήνης γενέσθαι· τὸν δὲ Πᾶνα ὁ Φιλιππίδης ἔλεγε περὶ τὸ ὄρος ἐντυχόντα οἱ τὸ Παρθένιον φάναι τε ὡς εὔνους Ἀθηναίοις εἴη καὶ ὅτι ἐς Μαραθῶνα ἥξει συμμαχήσων. οὗτος μὲν οὖν ὁ θεὸς ἐπὶ ταύτῃ τῇ ἀγγελίᾳ τετίμηται·
1.29.2. Ἀθηναίοις δὲ καὶ ἔξω πόλεως ἐν τοῖς δήμοις καὶ κατὰ τὰς ὁδοὺς θεῶν ἐστιν ἱερὰ καὶ ἡρώων καὶ ἀνδρῶν τάφοι· ἐγγυτάτω δὲ Ἀκαδημία, χωρίον ποτὲ ἀνδρὸς ἰδιώτου, γυμνάσιον δὲ ἐπʼ ἐμοῦ. κατιοῦσι δʼ ἐς αὐτὴν περίβολός ἐστιν Ἀρτέμιδος καὶ ξόανα Ἀρίστης καὶ Καλλίστης· ὡς μὲν ἐγὼ δοκῶ καὶ ὁμολογεῖ τὰ ἔπη τὰ Πάμφω, τῆς Ἀρτέμιδός εἰσιν ἐπικλήσεις αὗται, λεγόμενον δὲ καὶ ἄλλον ἐς αὐτὰς λόγον εἰδὼς ὑπερβήσομαι. καὶ ναὸς οὐ μέγας ἐστίν, ἐς ὃν τοῦ Διονύσου τοῦ Ἐλευθερέως τὸ ἄγαλμα ἀνὰ πᾶν ἔτος κομίζουσιν ἐν τεταγμέναις ἡμέραις.
1.31.4. ταῦτα μὲν δὴ οὕτω λέγεται, Φλυεῦσι δέ εἰσι καὶ Μυρρινουσίοις τοῖς μὲν Ἀπόλλωνος Διονυσοδότου καὶ Ἀρτέμιδος Σελασφόρου βωμοὶ Διονύσου τε Ἀνθίου καὶ νυμφῶν Ἰσμηνίδων καὶ Γῆς, ἣν Μεγάλην θεὸν ὀνομάζουσι· ναὸς δὲ ἕτερος ἔχει βωμοὺς Δήμητρος Ἀνησιδώρας καὶ Διὸς Κτησίου καὶ Τιθρωνῆς Ἀθηνᾶς καὶ Κόρης Πρωτογόνης καὶ Σεμνῶν ὀνομαζομένων θεῶν· τὸ δὲ ἐν Μυρρινοῦντι ξόανόν ἐστι Κολαινίδος. Ἀθμονεῖς δὲ τιμῶσιν Ἀμαρυσίαν Ἄρτεμιν·
1.32.4. καὶ ἀνδρός ἐστιν ἰδίᾳ μνῆμα Μιλτιάδου τοῦ Κίμωνος, συμβάσης ὕστερόν οἱ τῆς τελευτῆς Πάρου τε ἁμαρτόντι καὶ διʼ αὐτὸ ἐς κρίσιν Ἀθηναίοις καταστάντι. ἐνταῦθα ἀνὰ πᾶσαν νύκτα καὶ ἵππων χρεμετιζόντων καὶ ἀνδρῶν μαχομένων ἔστιν αἰσθέσθαι· καταστῆναι δὲ ἐς ἐναργῆ θέαν ἐπίτηδες μὲν οὐκ ἔστιν ὅτῳ συνήνεγκεν, ἀνηκόῳ δὲ ὄντι καὶ ἄλλως συμβὰν οὐκ ἔστιν ἐκ τῶν δαιμόνων ὀργή. σέβονται δὲ οἱ Μαραθώνιοι τούτους τε οἳ παρὰ τὴν μάχην ἀπέθανον ἥρωας ὀνομάζοντες καὶ Μαραθῶνα ἀφʼ οὗ τῷ δήμῳ τὸ ὄνομά ἐστι καὶ Ἡρακλέα, φάμενοι πρώτοις Ἑλλήνων σφίσιν Ἡρακλέα θεὸν νομισθῆναι.
1.38.8. ἐκ δὲ Ἐλευσῖνος τραπομένοις ἐπὶ Βοιωτῶν, ἐστὶν ὅμορος Ἀθηναίοις ἡ Πλαταιίς. πρότερον μὲν γὰρ Ἐλευθερεῦσιν ὅροι πρὸς τὴν Ἀττικὴν ἦσαν· προσχωρησάντων δὲ Ἀθηναίοις τούτων, οὕτως ἤδη Βοιωτίας ὁ Κιθαιρών ἐστιν ὅρος. προσεχώρησαν δὲ Ἐλευθερεῖς οὐ πολέμῳ βιασθέντες, ἀλλὰ πολιτείας τε ἐπιθυμήσαντες παρὰ Ἀθηναίων καὶ κατʼ ἔχθος τὸ Θηβαίων. ἐν τούτῳ τῷ πεδίῳ ναός ἐστι Διονύσου, καὶ τὸ ξόανον ἐντεῦθεν Ἀθηναίοις ἐκομίσθη τὸ ἀρχαῖον· τὸ δὲ ἐν Ἐλευθεραῖς τὸ ἐφʼ ἡμῶν ἐς μίμησιν ἐκείνου πεποίηται.
1.40.2. τῆς δὲ κρήνης οὐ πόρρω ταύτης ἀρχαῖόν ἐστιν ἱερόν, εἰκόνες δὲ ἐφʼ ἡμῶν ἑστᾶσιν ἐν αὐτῷ βασιλέων Ῥωμαίων καὶ ἄγαλμα τε κεῖται χαλκοῦν Ἀρτέμιδος ἐπίκλησιν Σωτείρας. φασὶ δὲ ἄνδρας τοῦ Μαρδονίου στρατοῦ καταδραμόντας τὴν Μεγαρίδα ἀποχωρεῖν ἐς Θήβας ὀπίσω παρὰ Μαρδόνιον ἐθέλειν, γνώμῃ δὲ Ἀρτέμιδος νύκτα τε ὁδοιποροῦσιν ἐπιγενέσθαι καὶ τῆς ὁδοῦ σφᾶς ἁμαρτόντας ἐς τὴν ὀρεινὴν τραπέσθαι τῆς χώρας· πειρωμένους δὲ εἰ στράτευμα ἐγγὺς εἴη πολέμιον ἀφιέναι τῶν βελῶν, καὶ τὴν πλησίον πέτραν στένειν βαλλομένην, τοὺς δὲ αὖθις τοξεύειν προθυμίᾳ πλέονι. 1.40.3. τέλος δὲ αὐτοῖς ἀναλωθῆναι τοὺς ὀιστοὺς ἐς ἄνδρας πολεμίους τοξεύειν προθυμίᾳ πλέονι νομίζουσιν· ἡμέρα τε ὑπεφαίνετο καὶ οἱ Μεγαρεῖς ἐπῄεσαν, μαχόμενοι δὲ ὁπλῖται πρὸς ἀνόπλους καὶ οὐδὲ βελῶν εὐποροῦντας ἔτι φονεύουσιν αὐτῶν τοὺς πολλούς· καὶ ἐπὶ τῷδε Σωτείρας ἄγαλμα ἐποιήσαντο Ἀρτέμιδος. ἐνταῦθα καὶ τῶν δώδεκα ὀνομαζομένων θεῶν ἐστιν ἀγάλματα ἔργα εἶναι λεγόμενα Πραξιτέλους · τὴν δὲ Ἄρτεμιν αὐτὴν Στρογγυλίων ἐποίησε.
1.41.3. οὐ πόρρω δὲ τοῦ Ὕλλου μνήματος Ἴσιδος ναὸς καὶ παρʼ αὐτὸν Ἀπόλλωνός ἐστι καὶ Ἀρτέμιδος· Ἀλκάθουν δέ φασι ποιῆσαι ἀποκτείναντα λέοντα τὸν καλούμενον Κιθαιρώνιον. ὑπὸ τούτου τοῦ λέοντος διαφθαρῆναι καὶ ἄλλους καὶ Μεγαρέως φασὶ τοῦ σφετέρου βασιλέως παῖδα Εὔιππον, τὸν δὲ πρεσβύτερον τῶν παίδων αὐτῷ Τίμαλκον ἔτι πρότερον ἀποθανεῖν ὑπὸ Θησέως, στρατεύοντα ἐς Ἄφιδναν σὺν τοῖς Διοσκούροις· Μεγαρέα δὲ γάμον τε ὑποσχέσθαι θυγατρὸς καὶ ὡς διάδοχον ἕξει τῆς ἀρχῆς, ὅστις τὸν Κιθαιρώνιον λέοντα ἀποκτείναι· διὰ ταῦτα Ἀλκάθουν τὸν Πέλοπος ἐπιχειρήσαντα τῷ θηρίῳ κρατῆσαί τε καὶ ὡς ἐβασίλευσε τὸ ἱερὸν ποιῆσαι τοῦτο, Ἀγροτέραν Ἄρτεμιν καὶ Ἀπόλλωνα Ἀγραῖον ἐπονομάσαντα.
2.2.6. λόγου δὲ ἄξια ἐν τῇ πόλει τὰ μὲν λειπόμενα ἔτι τῶν ἀρχαίων ἐστίν, τὰ δὲ πολλὰ αὐτῶν ἐπὶ τῆς ἀκμῆς ἐποιήθη τῆς ὕστερον. ἔστιν οὖν ἐπὶ τῆς ἀγορᾶς— ἐνταῦθα γὰρ πλεῖστά ἐστι τῶν ἱερῶν—Ἄρτεμίς τε ἐπίκλησιν Ἐφεσία καὶ Διονύσου ξόανα ἐπίχρυσα πλὴν τῶν προσώπων· τὰ δὲ πρόσωπα ἀλοιφῇ σφισιν ἐρυθρᾷ κεκόσμηται· Λύσιον δέ, τὸν δὲ Βάκχειον ὀνομάζουσι.
2.9.6. μετὰ δὲ τὸ Ἀράτου ἡρῷον ἔστι μὲν Ποσειδῶνι Ἰσθμίῳ βωμός, ἔστι δὲ Ζεὺς Μειλίχιος καὶ Ἄρτεμις ὀνομαζομένη Πατρῴα, σὺν τέχνῃ πεποιημένα οὐδεμιᾷ· πυραμίδι δὲ ὁ Μειλίχιος, ἡ δὲ κίονί ἐστιν εἰκασμένη. ἐνταῦθα καὶ βουλευτήριόν σφισι πεποίηται καὶ στοὰ καλουμένη Κλεισθένειος ἀπὸ τοῦ οἰκοδομήσαντος· ᾠκοδόμησε δὲ ἀπὸ λαφύρων ὁ Κλεισθένης αὐτὴν τὸν πρὸς Κίρρᾳ πόλεμον συμπολεμήσας Ἀμφικτύοσι. τῆς δὲ ἀγορᾶς ἐστιν ἐν τῷ ὑπαίθρῳ Ζεὺς χαλκοῦς, τέχνη Λυσίππου, παρὰ δὲ αὐτὸν Ἄρτεμις ἐπίχρυσος.
2.13.3. προσέσται δὲ ἤδη καὶ τῶν ἐς ἐπίδειξιν ἡκόντων τὰ ἀξιολογώτατα. ἔστι γὰρ ἐν τῇ Φλιασίων ἀκροπόλει κυπαρίσσων ἄλσος καὶ ἱερὸν ἁγιώτατον ἐκ παλαιοῦ· τὴν δὲ θεὸν ἧς ἐστι τὸ ἱερὸν οἱ μὲν ἀρχαιότατοι Φλιασίων Γανυμήδαν, οἱ δὲ ὕστερον Ἥβην ὀνομάζουσιν· ἧς καὶ Ὅμηρος μνήμην ἐποιήσατο ἐν τῇ Μενελάου πρὸς Ἀλέξανδρον μονομαχίᾳ φάμενος οἰνοχόον τῶν θεῶν εἶναι, καὶ αὖθις ἐν Ὀδυσσέως ἐς Ἅιδου καθόδῳ γυναῖκα Ἡρακλέους εἶπεν εἶναι. Ὠλῆνι δὲ ἐν Ἥρας ἐστὶν ὕμνῳ πεποιημένα τραφῆναι τὴν Ἥραν ὑπὸ Ὡρῶν, εἶναι δέ οἱ παῖδας Ἄρην τε καὶ Ἥβην.
3.16.3. ὁ δὲ οἰκίας μὲν τῆς ἄλλης ἐκέλευεν αὐτοὺς ἔνθα ἂν ἐθέλωσιν οἰκῆσαι, τὸ δὲ οἴκημα οὐκ ἔφη δώσειν· θυγάτηρ γὰρ ἔτυχέν οἱ παρθένος ἔχουσα ἐν αὐτῷ δίαιταν. ἐς δὲ τὴν ὑστεραίαν παρθένος μὲν ἐκείνη καὶ θεραπεία πᾶσα ἡ περὶ τὴν παῖδα ἠφάνιστο, Διοσκούρων δὲ ἀγάλματα ἐν τῷ οἰκήματι εὑρέθη καὶ τράπεζά τε καὶ σίλφιον ἐπʼ αὐτῇ.
3.16.7. τὸ δὲ χωρίον τὸ ἐπονομαζόμενον Λιμναῖον Ὀρθίας ἱερόν ἐστιν Ἀρτέμιδος. τὸ ξόανον δὲ ἐκεῖνο εἶναι λέγουσιν ὅ ποτε καὶ Ὀρέστης καὶ Ἰφιγένεια ἐκ τῆς Ταυρικῆς ἐκκλέπτουσιν· ἐς δὲ τὴν σφετέραν Λακεδαιμόνιοι κομισθῆναί φασιν Ὀρέστου καὶ ἐνταῦθα βασιλεύοντος. καί μοι εἰκότα λέγειν μᾶλλόν τι δοκοῦσιν ἢ Ἀθηναῖοι. ποίῳ γὰρ δὴ λόγῳ κατέλιπεν ἂν ἐν Βραυρῶνι Ἰφιγένεια τὸ ἄγαλμα; ἢ πῶς, ἡνίκα Ἀθηναῖοι τὴν χώραν ἐκλιπεῖν παρεσκευάζοντο, οὐκ ἐσέθεντο καὶ τοῦτο ἐς τὰς ναῦς; 3.16.8. καίτοι διαμεμένηκεν ἔτι καὶ νῦν τηλικοῦτο ὄνομα τῇ Ταυρικῇ θεῷ, ὥστε ἀμφισβητοῦσι μὲν Καππάδοκες καὶ οἱ τὸν Εὔξεινον οἰκοῦντες τὸ ἄγαλμα εἶναι παρὰ σφίσιν, ἀμφισβητοῦσι δὲ καὶ Λυδῶν οἷς ἐστιν Ἀρτέμιδος ἱερὸν Ἀναιίτιδος. Ἀθηναίοις δὲ ἄρα παρώφθη γενόμενον λάφυρον τῷ Μήδῳ· τὸ γὰρ ἐκ Βραυρῶνος ἐκομίσθη τε ἐς Σοῦσα καὶ ὕστερον Σελεύκου δόντος Σύροι Λαοδικεῖς ἐφʼ ἡμῶν ἔχουσι. 3.16.9. μαρτύρια δέ μοι καὶ τάδε, τὴν ἐν Λακεδαίμονι Ὀρθίαν τὸ ἐκ τῶν βαρβάρων εἶναι ξόανον· τοῦτο μὲν γὰρ Ἀστράβακος καὶ Ἀλώπεκος οἱ Ἴρβου τοῦ Ἀμφισθένους τοῦ Ἀμφικλέους τοῦ Ἄγιδος τὸ ἄγαλμα εὑρόντες αὐτίκα παρεφρόνησαν· τοῦτο δὲ οἱ Λιμνᾶται Σπαρτιατῶν καὶ Κυνοσουρεῖς καὶ οἱ ἐκ Μεσόας τε καὶ Πιτάνης θύοντες τῇ Ἀρτέμιδι ἐς διαφοράν, ἀπὸ δὲ αὐτῆς καὶ ἐς φόνους προήχθησαν, ἀποθανόντων δὲ ἐπὶ τῷ βωμῷ πολλῶν νόσος ἔφθειρε τοὺς λοιπούς. 3.16.10. καί σφισιν ἐπὶ τούτῳ γίνεται λόγιον αἵματι ἀνθρώπων τὸν βωμὸν αἱμάσσειν· θυομένου δὲ ὅντινα ὁ κλῆρος ἐπελάμβανε, Λυκοῦργος μετέβαλεν ἐς τὰς ἐπὶ τοῖς ἐφήβοις μάστιγας, ἐμπίπλαταί τε οὕτως ἀνθρώπων αἵματι ὁ βωμός. ἡ δὲ ἱέρεια τὸ ξόανον ἔχουσά σφισιν ἐφέστηκε· τὸ δέ ἐστιν ἄλλως μὲν κοῦφον ὑπὸ σμικρότητος, ἢν δὲ οἱ 3.16.11. μαστιγοῦντές ποτε ὑποφειδόμενοι παίωσι κατὰ ἐφήβου κάλλος ἢ ἀξίωμα, τότε ἤδη τῇ γυναικὶ τὸ ξόανον γίνεται βαρὺ καὶ οὐκέτι εὔφορον, ἡ δὲ ἐν αἰτίᾳ τοὺς μαστιγοῦντας ποιεῖται καὶ πιέζεσθαι διʼ αὐτούς φησιν. οὕτω τῷ ἀγάλματι ἀπὸ τῶν ἐν τῇ Ταυρικῇ θυσιῶν ἐμμεμένηκεν ἀνθρώπων αἵματι ἥδεσθαι· καλοῦσι δὲ οὐκ Ὀρθίαν μόνον ἀλλὰ καὶ Λυγοδέσμαν τὴν αὐτήν, ὅτι ἐν θάμνῳ λύγων εὑρέθη, περιειληθεῖσα δὲ ἡ λύγος ἐποίησε τὸ ἄγαλμα ὀρθόν.
3.22.12. ἀπὸ δὴ τούτων τῶν πόλεων ἀναστάντες ἐζήτουν ἔνθα οἰκῆσαι σφᾶς χρεὼν εἴη· καί τι καὶ μάντευμα ἦν αὐτοῖς Ἄρτεμιν ἔνθα οἰκήσουσιν ἐπιδείξειν. ὡς οὖν ἐκβᾶσιν ἐς τὴν γῆν λαγὼς ἐπιφαίνεται, τὸν λαγὼν ἐποιήσαντο ἡγεμόνα τῆς ὁδοῦ· καταδύντος δὲ ἐς μυρσίνην πόλιν τε οἰκίζουσιν ἐνταῦθα, οὗπερ ἡ μυρσίνη ἦν, καὶ τὸ δένδρον ἔτι ἐκείνην σέβουσι τὴν μυρσίνην καὶ Ἄρτεμιν ὀνομάζουσι Σώτειραν.
4.1.5. πρῶτοι δʼ οὖν βασιλεύουσιν ἐν τῇ χώρᾳ ταύτῃ Πολυκάων τε ὁ Λέλεγος καὶ Μεσσήνη γυνὴ τοῦ Πολυκάονος. παρὰ ταύτην τὴν Μεσσήνην τὰ ὄργια κομίζων τῶν Μεγάλων θεῶν Καύκων ἦλθεν ἐξ Ἐλευσῖνος ὁ Κελαινοῦ τοῦ Φλύου. Φλῦον δὲ αὐτὸν Ἀθηναῖοι λέγουσι παῖδα εἶναι Γῆς· ὁμολογεῖ δέ σφισι καὶ ὕμνος Μουσαίου Λυκομίδαις ποιηθεὶς ἐς Δήμητρα.
4.1.7. ὡς δὲ ὁ Πανδίονος οὗτος ἦν Λύκος, δηλοῖ τὰ ἐπὶ τῇ εἰκόνι ἔπη τῇ Μεθάπου. μετεκόσμησε γὰρ καὶ Μέθαπος τῆς τελετῆς ἔστιν ἅ· ὁ δὲ Μέθαπος γένος μὲν ἦν Ἀθηναῖος, τελεστὴς δὲ καὶ ὀργίων καὶ παντοίων συνθέτης. οὗτος καὶ Θηβαίοις τῶν Καβείρων τὴν τελετὴν κατεστήσατο, ἀνέθηκε δὲ καὶ ἐς τὸ κλίσιον τὸ Λυκομιδῶν εἰκόνα ἔχουσαν ἐπίγραμμα ἄλλα τε λέγον καὶ ὅσα ἡμῖν ἐς πίστιν συντελεῖ τοῦ λόγου·
4.4.2. ἔστιν ἐπὶ τοῖς ὅροις τῆς Μεσσηνίας ἱερὸν Ἀρτέμιδος καλουμένης Λιμνάτιδος, μετεῖχον δὲ αὐτοῦ μόνοι Δωριέων οἵ τε Μεσσήνιοι καὶ οἱ Λακεδαιμόνιοι. Λακεδαιμόνιοι μὲν δή φασιν ὡς παρθένους αὑτῶν παραγενομένας ἐς τὴν ἑορτὴν αὐτάς τε βιάσαιντο ἄνδρες τῶν Μεσσηνίων καὶ τὸν βασιλέα σφῶν ἀποκτείναιεν πειρώμενον κωλύειν, Τήλεκλον Ἀρχελάου τοῦ Ἀγησιλάου τοῦ Δορύσσου τοῦ Λαβώτα τοῦ Ἐχεστράτου τοῦ Ἄγιδος, πρός τε δὴ τούτοις τὰς βιασθείσας τῶν παρθένων διεργάσασθαι λέγουσιν αὑτὰς ὑπὸ αἰσχύνης· 4.4.3. Μεσσήνιοι δὲ τοῖς ἐλθοῦσι σφῶν ἐς τὸ ἱερὸν πρωτεύουσιν ἐν Μεσσήνῃ κατὰ ἀξίωμα, τούτοις φασὶν ἐπιβουλεῦσαι Τήλεκλον, αἴτιον δὲ εἶναι τῆς χώρας τῆς Μεσσηνίας τὴν ἀρετήν, ἐπιβουλεύοντα δὲ ἐπιλέξαι Σπαρτιατῶν ὁπόσοι πω γένεια οὐκ εἶχον, τούτους δὲ ἐσθῆτι καὶ κόσμῳ τῷ λοιπῷ σκευάσαντα ὡς παρθένους ἀναπαυομένοις τοῖς Μεσσηνίοις ἐπεισαγαγεῖν, δόντα ἐγχειρίδια· καὶ τοὺς Μεσσηνίους ἀμυνομένους τούς τε ἀγενείους νεανίσκους καὶ αὐτὸν ἀποκτεῖναι Τήλεκλον, Λακεδαιμονίους δὲ—οὐ γὰρ ἄνευ τοῦ κοινοῦ ταῦτα βουλεῦσαι σφῶν τὸν βασιλέα—συνειδότας ὡς ἄρξαιεν ἀδικίας, τοῦ φόνου σφᾶς τοῦ Τηλέκλου δίκας οὐκ ἀπαιτῆσαι. ταῦτα μὲν ἑκάτεροι λέγουσι, πειθέσθω δὲ ὡς ἔχει τις ἐς τοὺς ἑτέρους σπουδῆς.
4.31.7. Δαμοφῶντος δέ ἐστι τούτου καὶ ἡ Λαφρία καλουμένη παρὰ Μεσσηνίοις· σέβεσθαι δέ σφισιν ἀπὸ τοιοῦδε αὐτὴν καθέστηκε. Καλυδωνίοις ἡ Ἄρτεμις—ταύτην γὰρ θεῶν μάλιστα ἔσεβον— ἐπίκλησιν εἶχε Λαφρία· Μεσσηνίων δὲ οἱ λαβόντες Ναύπακτον παρὰ Ἀθηναίων—τηνικαῦτα γὰρ Αἰτωλίας ἐγγύτατα ᾤκουν—παρὰ Καλυδωνίων ἔλαβον. τὸ σχῆμα ἑτέρωθι δηλώσω. τὸ μὲν δὴ τῆς Λαφρίας ἀφίκετο ὄνομα ἔς τε Μεσσηνίους καὶ ἐς Πατρεῖς Ἀχαιῶν μόνους, Ἐφεσίαν δὲ Ἄρτεμιν πόλεις τε νομίζουσιν αἱ 4.31.8. πᾶσαι καὶ ἄνδρες ἰδίᾳ θεῶν μάλιστα ἄγουσιν ἐν τιμῇ· τὰ δὲ αἴτια ἐμοὶ δοκεῖν ἐστὶν Ἀμαζόνων τε κλέος, αἳ φήμην τὸ ἄγαλμα ἔχουσιν ἱδρύσασθαι, καὶ ὅτι ἐκ παλαιοτάτου τὸ ἱερὸν τοῦτο ἐποιήθη. τρία δὲ ἄλλα ἐπὶ τούτοις συνετέλεσεν ἐς δόξαν, μέγεθός τε τοῦ ναοῦ τὰ παρὰ πᾶσιν ἀνθρώποις κατασκευάσματα ὑπερηρκότος καὶ Ἐφεσίων τῆς πόλεως ἡ ἀκμὴ καὶ ἐν αὐτῇ τὸ ἐπιφανὲς τῆς θεοῦ.
5.7.8. πρῶτος μὲν ἐν ὕμνῳ τῷ ἐς Ἀχαιίαν ἐποίησεν Ὠλὴν Λύκιος ἀφικέσθαι τὴν Ἀχαιίαν ἐς Δῆλον ἐκ τῶν Ὑπερβορέων τούτων· ἔπειτα δὲ ᾠδὴν Μελάνωπος Κυμαῖος ἐς Ὦπιν καὶ Ἑκαέργην ᾖσεν, ὡς ἐκ τῶν Ὑπερβορέων καὶ αὗται πρότερον ἔτι τῆς Ἀχαιίας ἀφίκοντο καὶ ἐς Δῆλον·
5.27.5. καὶ ἄλλο ἐν Λυδίᾳ θεασάμενος οἶδα διάφορον μὲν θαῦμα ἢ κατὰ τὸν ἵππον τὸν Φόρμιδος, μάγων μέντοι σοφίας οὐδὲ αὐτὸ ἀπηλλαγμένον. ἔστι γὰρ Λυδοῖς ἐπίκλησιν Περσικοῖς ἱερὰ ἔν τε Ἱεροκαισαρείᾳ καλουμένῃ πόλει καὶ ἐν Ὑπαίποις, ἐν ἑκατέρῳ δὲ τῶν ἱερῶν οἴκημά τε καὶ ἐν τῷ οἰκήματί ἐστιν ἐπὶ βωμοῦ τέφρα· χρόα δὲ οὐ κατὰ τέφραν ἐστὶν αὐτῇ τὴν ἄλλην.
6.20.3. ἐν μὲν δὴ τῷ ἔμπροσθεν τοῦ ναοῦ—διπλοῦς γὰρ δὴ πεποίηται—τῆς τε Εἰλειθυίας βωμὸς καὶ ἔσοδος ἐς αὐτό ἐστιν ἀνθρώποις· ἐν δὲ τῷ ἐντὸς ὁ Σωσίπολις ἔχει τιμάς, καὶ ἐς αὐτὸ ἔσοδος οὐκ ἔστι πλὴν τῇ θεραπευούσῃ τὸν θεὸν ἐπὶ τὴν κεφαλὴν καὶ τὸ πρόσωπον ἐφειλκυσμένῃ ὕφος λευκόν· παρθένοι δὲ ἐν τῷ τῆς Εἰλειθυίας ὑπομένουσαι καὶ γυναῖκες ὕμνον ᾄδουσι, καθαγίζους α ι δὲ καὶ θυμιάματα παντοῖα αὐτῷ ἐπισπένδειν οὐ νομίζουσιν οἶνον. καὶ ὅρκος παρὰ τῷ Σωσιπόλιδι ἐπὶ μεγίστοις καθέστηκεν. 6.20.4. λέγεται δὲ καὶ Ἀρκάδων ἐς τὴν Ἠλείαν ἐσβεβληκότων στρατιᾷ καὶ τῶν Ἠλείων σφίσιν ἀντικαθημένων γυναῖκα ἀφικομένην παρὰ τῶν Ἠλείων τοὺς στρατηγούς, νήπιον παῖδα ἔχουσαν ἐπὶ τῷ μαστῷ, λέγειν ὡς τέκοι μὲν αὐτὴ τὸν παῖδα, διδοίη δὲ ἐξ ὀνειράτων συμμαχήσοντα Ἠλείοις. οἱ δὲ ἐν ταῖς ἀρχαῖς—πιστὰ γὰρ τὴν ἄνθρωπον ἡγοῦντο εἰρηκέναι—τιθέασι τὸ παιδίον πρὸ τοῦ στρατεύματος γυμνόν. 6.20.5. ἐπῄεσάν τε δὴ οἱ Ἀρκάδες καὶ τὸ παιδίον ἐνταῦθα ἤδη δράκων ἦν· ταραχθεῖσι δὲ ἐπὶ τῷ θεάματι τοῖς Ἀρκάσι καὶ ἐνδοῦσιν ἐς φυγὴν ἐπέκειντο οἱ Ἠλεῖοι, καὶ νίκην τε ἐπιφανεστάτην ἀνείλοντο καὶ ὄνομα τῷ θεῷ τίθενται Σωσίπολιν. ἔνθα δέ σφισιν ὁ δράκων ἔδοξεν ἐσδῦναι μετὰ τὴν μάχην, τὸ ἱερὸν ἐποίησαν ἐνταῦθα· σὺν δὲ αὐτῷ σέβεσθαι καὶ τὴν Εἰλείθυιαν ἐνόμισαν, ὅτι τὸν παῖδά σφισιν ἡ θεὸς αὕτη προήγαγεν ἐς ἀνθρώπους.
6.25.1. ἔστι δὲ τῆς στοᾶς ὀπίσω τῆς ἀπὸ τῶν λαφύρων τῶν ἐκ Κορκύρας Ἀφροδίτης ναός, τὸ δὲ ἐν ὑπαίθρῳ τέμενος οὐ πολὺ ἀφεστηκὸς ἀπὸ τοῦ ναοῦ. καὶ τὴν μὲν ἐν τῷ ναῷ καλοῦσιν Οὐρανίαν, ἐλέφαντος δέ ἐστι καὶ χρυσοῦ, τέχνη Φειδίου, τῷ δὲ ἑτέρῳ ποδὶ ἐπὶ χελώνης βέβηκε· τῆς δὲ περιέχεται μὲν τὸ τέμενος θριγκῷ, κρηπὶς δὲ ἐντὸς τοῦ τεμένους πεποίηται καὶ ἐπὶ τῇ κρηπῖδι ἄγαλμα Ἀφροδίτης χαλκοῦν ἐπὶ τράγῳ κάθηται χαλκῷ· Σκόπα τοῦτο ἔργον, Ἀφροδίτην δὲ Πάνδημον ὀνομάζουσι. τὰ δὲ ἐπὶ τῇ χελώνῃ τε καὶ ἐς τὸν τράγον παρίημι τοῖς θέλουσιν εἰκάζειν.
7.2.6. τότε δὲ ὡς ἐκράτησαν τῶν ἀρχαίων Μιλησίων οἱ Ἴωνες, τὸ μὲν γένος πᾶν τὸ ἄρσεν ἀπέκτειναν πλὴν ὅσοι τῆς πόλεως ἁλισκομένης ἐκδιδράσκουσι, γυναῖκας δὲ καὶ θυγατέρας τὰς ἐκείνων γαμοῦσι. τοῦ δὲ Νειλέως ὁ τάφος ἰόντων ἐς Διδύμους ἐστὶν οὐ πόρρω τῶν πυλῶν ἐν ἀριστερᾷ τῆς ὁδοῦ· τὸ δὲ ἱερὸν τὸ ἐν Διδύμοις τοῦ Ἀπόλλωνος καὶ τὸ μαντεῖόν ἐστιν ἀρχαιότερον ἢ κατὰ τὴν Ἰώνων ἐσοίκησιν, πολλῷ δὲ πρεσβύτερα ἔτι ἢ κατὰ Ἴωνας τὰ ἐς τὴν Ἄρτεμιν τὴν Ἐφεσίαν ἐστίν. 7.2.7. οὐ μὴν πάντα γε τὰ ἐς τὴν θεὸν ἐπύθετο ἐμοὶ δοκεῖν Πίνδαρος, ὃς Ἀμαζόνας τὸ ἱερὸν ἔφη τοῦτο ἱδρύσασθαι στρατευομένας ἐπὶ Ἀθήνας τε καὶ Θησέα. αἱ δὲ ἀπὸ Θερμώδοντος γυναῖκες ἔθυσαν μὲν καὶ τότε τῇ Ἐφεσίᾳ θεῷ, ἅτε ἐπιστάμεναι τε ἐκ παλαιοῦ τὸ ἱερόν, καὶ ἡνίκα Ἡρακλέα ἔφυγον, αἱ δὲ καὶ Διόνυσον τὰ ἔτι ἀρχαιότερα, ἱκέτιδες ἐνταῦθα ἐλθοῦσαι· οὐ μὴν ὑπὸ Ἀμαζόνων γε ἱδρύθη, Κόρησος δὲ αὐτόχθων καὶ Ἔφεσος—Καΰστρου δὲ τοῦ ποταμοῦ τὸν Ἔφεσον παῖδα εἶναι νομίζουσιν—, οὗτοι τὸ ἱερόν εἰσιν οἱ ἱδρυσάμενοι, καὶ ἀπὸ τοῦ Ἐφέσου τὸ ὄνομά ἐστι τῇ πόλει. 7.2.8. Λέλεγες δὲ τοῦ Καρικοῦ μοῖρα καὶ Λυδῶν τὸ πολὺ οἱ νεμόμενοι τὴν χώραν ἦσαν· ᾤκουν δὲ καὶ περὶ τὸ ἱερὸν ἄλλοι τε ἱκεσίας ἕνεκα καὶ γυναῖκες τοῦ Ἀμαζόνων γένους. Ἄνδροκλος δὲ ὁ Κόδρου—οὗτος γὰρ δὴ ἀπεδέδεικτο Ἰώνων τῶν ἐς Ἔφεσον πλευσάντων βασιλεύς—Λέλεγας μὲν καὶ Λυδοὺς τὴν ἄνω πόλιν ἔχοντας ἐξέβαλεν ἐκ τῆς χώρας· τοῖς δὲ περὶ τὸ ἱερὸν οἰκοῦσι δεῖμα ἦν οὐδέν, ἀλλὰ Ἴωσιν ὅρκους δόντες καὶ ἀνὰ μέρος παρʼ αὐτῶν λαβόντες ἐκτὸς ἦσαν πολέμου. ἀφείλετο δὲ καὶ Σάμον Ἄνδροκλος Σαμίους, καὶ ἔσχον Ἐφέσιοι χρόνον τινὰ Σάμον καὶ τὰς προσεχεῖς νήσους·
7.4.4. τὸ δὲ ἱερὸν τὸ ἐν Σάμῳ τῆς Ἥρας εἰσὶν οἳ ἱδρύσασθαί φασι τοὺς ἐν τῇ Ἀργοῖ πλέοντας, ἐπάγεσθαι δὲ αὐτοὺς τὸ ἄγαλμα ἐξ Ἄργους· Σάμιοι δὲ αὐτοὶ τεχθῆναι νομίζουσιν ἐν τῇ νήσῳ τὴν θεὸν παρὰ τῷ Ἰμβράσῳ ποταμῷ καὶ ὑπὸ τῇ λύγῳ τῇ ἐν τῷ Ἡραίῳ κατʼ ἐμὲ ἔτι πεφυκυίᾳ. εἶναι δʼ οὖν τὸ ἱερὸν τοῦτο ἐν τοῖς μάλιστα ἀρχαῖον ὃ οὐχ ἥκιστα ἄν τις καὶ ἐπὶ τῷ ἀγάλματι τεκμαίροιτο· ἔστι γὰρ δὴ ἀνδρὸς ἔργον Αἰγινήτου Σμίλιδος τοῦ Εὐκλείδου. οὗτος ὁ Σμῖλίς ἐστιν ἡλικίαν κατὰ Δαίδαλον, δόξης δὲ οὐκ ἐς τὸ ἴσον ἀφίκετο·
7.5.4. Ἴωσι δὲ ἔχει μὲν ἐπιτηδειότατα ὡρῶν κράσεως ἡ χώρα, ἔχει δὲ καὶ ἱερὰ οἷα οὐχ ἑτέρωθι, πρῶτον μὲν τὸ τῆς Ἐφεσίας μεγέθους τε ἕνεκα καὶ ἐπὶ τῷ ἄλλῳ πλούτῳ, δύο δὲ οὐκ ἐξειργασμένα Ἀπόλλωνος, τό τε ἐν Βραγχίδαις τῆς Μιλησίας καὶ ἐν Κλάρῳ τῇ Κολοφωνίων. δύο δὲ ἄλλους ἐν Ἰωνίᾳ ναοὺς ἐπέλαβεν ὑπὸ Περσῶν κατακαυθῆναι, τόν τε ἐν Σάμῳ τῆς Ἥρας καὶ ἐν Φωκαίᾳ τῆς Ἀθηνᾶς· θαῦμα δὲ ὅμως ἦσαν καὶ ὑπὸ τοῦ πυρὸς λελυμασμένοι.
7.18.11. ἄγουσι δὲ καὶ Λάφρια ἑορτὴν τῇ Ἀρτέμιδι οἱ Πατρεῖς ἀνὰ πᾶν ἔτος, ἐν ᾗ τρόπος ἐπιχώριος θυσίας ἐστὶν αὐτοῖς. περὶ μὲν τὸν βωμὸν ἐν κύκλῳ ξύλα ἱστᾶσιν ἔτι χλωρὰ καὶ ἐς ἑκκαίδεκα ἕκαστον πήχεις· ἐντὸς δὲ ἐπὶ τοῦ βωμοῦ τὰ αὐότατά σφισι τῶν ξύλων κεῖται. μηχανῶνται δὲ ὑπὸ τὸν καιρὸν τῆς ἑορτῆς καὶ ἄνοδον ἐπὶ τὸν βωμὸν λειοτέραν, ἐπιφέροντες γῆν ἐπὶ τοῦ βωμοῦ τοὺς ἀναβασμούς. 7.18.12. πρῶτα μὲν δὴ πομπὴν μεγαλοπρεπεστάτην τῇ Ἀρτέμιδι πομπεύουσι, καὶ ἡ ἱερωμένη παρθένος ὀχεῖται τελευταία τῆς πομπῆς ἐπὶ ἐλάφων ὑπὸ τὸ ἅρμα ἐζευγμένων· ἐς δὲ τὴν ἐπιοῦσαν τηνικαῦτα ἤδη δρᾶν τὰ ἐς τὴν θυσίαν νομίζουσι, δημοσίᾳ τε ἡ πόλις καὶ οὐχ ἧσσον ἐς τὴν ἑορτὴν οἱ ἰδιῶται φιλοτίμως ἔχουσιν. ἐσβάλλουσι γὰρ ζῶντας ἐς τὸν βωμὸν ὄρνιθάς τε τοὺς ἐδωδίμους καὶ ἱερεῖα ὁμοίως ἅπαντα, ἔτι δὲ ὗς ἀγρίους καὶ ἐλάφους τε καὶ δορκάδας, οἱ δὲ καὶ λύκων καὶ ἄρκτων σκύμνους, οἱ δὲ καὶ τὰ τέλεια τῶν θηρίων· κατατιθέασι δὲ ἐπὶ τὸν βωμὸν καὶ δένδρων καρπὸν τῶν ἡμέρων. 7.18.13. τὸ δὲ ἀπὸ τούτου πῦρ ἐνιᾶσιν ἐς τὰ ξύλα. ἐνταῦθά που καὶ ἄρκτον καὶ ἄλλο τι ἐθεασάμην τῶν ζῴων, τὰ μὲν ὑπὸ τὴν πρώτην ὁρμὴν τοῦ πυρὸς βιαζόμενα ἐς τὸ ἐκτός, τὰ δὲ καὶ ἐκφεύγοντα ὑπὸ ἰσχύος· ταῦτα οἱ ἐμβαλόντες ἐπανάγουσιν αὖθις ἐς τὴν πυράν. τρωθῆναι δὲ οὐδένα ὑπὸ τῶν θηρίων μνημονεύουσιν.
7.19.1. ἔστι δὲ ἐν τῷ μεταξὺ τοῦ ναοῦ τε τῆς Λαφρίας καὶ τοῦ βωμοῦ πεποιημένον μνῆμα Εὐρυπύλου. τὰ δὲ ὅστις τε ὢν καὶ καθʼ ἥντινα αἰτίαν ἀφίκετο ἐς τὴν γῆν ταύτην, δηλώσει μοι καὶ ταῦτα ὁ λόγος προδιηγησαμένῳ πρότερον ὁποῖα ὑπὸ τοῦ Εὐρυπύλου τὴν ἐπιδημίαν τοῖς ἐνταῦθα ἦν τὰ παρόντα τοῖς ἀνθρώποις. Ἰώνων τοῖς Ἀρόην καὶ Ἄνθειαν καὶ Μεσάτιν οἰκοῦσιν ἦν ἐν κοινῷ τέμενος καὶ ναὸς Ἀρτέμιδος Τρικλαρίας ἐπίκλησιν, καὶ ἑορτὴν οἱ Ἴωνες αὐτῇ καὶ παννυχίδα ἦγον ἀνὰ πᾶν ἔτος. ἱερωσύνην δὲ εἶχε τῆς θεοῦ παρθένος, ἐς ὃ ἀποστέλλεσθαι παρὰ ἄνδρα ἔμελλε. 7.19.2. λέγουσιν οὖν συμβῆναί ποτε ὡς ἱερᾶσθαι μὲν τῆς θεοῦ Κομαιθὼ τὸ εἶδος καλλίστην παρθένον, τυγχάνειν δὲ αὐτῆς ἐρῶντα Μελάνιππον, τά τε ἄλλα τοὺς ἡλικιώτας καὶ ὄψεως εὐπρεπείᾳ μάλιστα ὑπερηρκότα. ὡς δὲ ὁ Μελάνιππος ἐς τὸ ἴσον τοῦ ἔρωτος ὑπηγάγετο τὴν παρθένον, ἐμνᾶτο αὐτὴν παρὰ τοῦ πατρός. ἕπεται δέ πως τῷ γήρᾳ τά τε ἄλλα ὡς τὸ πολὺ ἐναντιοῦσθαι νέοις καὶ οὐχ ἥκιστα ἐς τοὺς ἐρῶντας τὸ ἀνάλγητον, ὅπου καὶ Μελανίππῳ τότε ἐθέλοντι ἐθέλουσαν ἄγεσθαι Κομαιθὼ οὔτε παρὰ τῶν ἑαυτοῦ γονέων οὔτε παρὰ τῶν Κομαιθοῦς ἥμερον ἀπήντησεν οὐδέν. 7.19.3. ἐπέδειξε δὲ ἐπὶ πολλῶν τε δὴ ἄλλων καὶ ἐν τοῖς Μελανίππου παθήμασιν, ὡς μέτεστιν ἔρωτι καὶ ἀνθρώπων συγχέαι νόμιμα καὶ ἀνατρέψαι θεῶν τιμάς, ὅπου καὶ τότε ἐν τῷ τῆς Ἀρτέμιδος ἱερῷ Κομαιθὼ καὶ Μελάνιππος καὶ ἐξέπλησαν τοῦ ἔρωτος τὴν ὁρμήν. καὶ οἱ μὲν ἔμελλον τῷ ἱερῷ καὶ ἐς τὸ ἔπειτα ἴσα καὶ θαλάμῳ χρήσεσθαι· τοὺς δὲ ἀνθρώπους αὐτίκα ἐξ Ἀρτέμιδος μήνιμα ἔφθειρε, τῆς τε γῆς καρπὸν οὐδένα ἀποδιδούσης καὶ νόσοι σφίσιν οὐ κατὰ τὰ εἰωθότα καὶ ἀπʼ αὐτῶν θάνατοι πλείονες ἢ τὰ πρότερα ἐγίνοντο. 7.19.4. καταφυγόντων δὲ αὐτῶν ἐπὶ χρηστήριον τὸ ἐν Δελφοῖς, ἤλεγχεν ἡ Πυθία Μελάνιππον καὶ Κομαιθώ· καὶ ἐκείνους τε αὐτοὺς μάντευμα ἀφίκετο θῦσαι τῇ Ἀρτέμιδι καὶ ἀνὰ πᾶν ἔτος παρθένον καὶ παῖδα οἳ τὸ εἶδος εἶεν κάλλιστοι τῇ θεῷ θύειν. ταύτης μὲν δὴ τῆς θυσίας ἕνεκα ὁ ποταμὸς ὁ πρὸς τῷ ἱερῷ τῆς Τρικλαρίας Ἀμείλιχος ἐκλήθη· 7.19.5. τέως δὲ ὄνομα εἶχεν οὐδέν. παίδων δὲ καὶ παρθένων ὁπόσοι μὲν ἐς τὴν θεὸν οὐδὲν εἰργασμένοι Μελανίππου καὶ Κομαιθοῦς ἕνεκα ἀπώλλυντο, αὐτοί τε οἰκτρότατα καὶ οἱ προσήκοντές σφισιν ἔπασχον, Μελάνιππον δὲ καὶ Κομαιθὼ συμφορᾶς ἐκτὸς γενέσθαι τίθεμαι· μόνον γὰρ δὴ ἀνθρώπῳ ψυχῆς ἐστιν ἀντάξιον κατορθῶσαί τινα ἐρασθέντα. 7.19.6. παύσασθαι δὲ οὕτω λέγονται θύοντες τῇ Ἀρτέμιδι ἀνθρώπους. ἐκέχρητο δὲ αὐτοῖς πρότερον ἔτι ἐκ Δελφῶν ὡς βασιλεὺς ξένος παραγενόμενός σφισιν ἐπὶ τὴν γῆν, ξενικὸν ἅμα ἀγόμενος δαίμονα, τὰ ἐς τὴν θυσίαν τῆς Τρικλαρίας παύσει. Ἰλίου δὲ ἁλούσης καὶ νεμομένων τὰ λάφυρα τῶν Ἑλλήνων, Εὐρύπυλος ὁ Εὐαίμονος λαμβάνει λάρνακα· Διονύσου δὲ ἄγαλμα ἦν ἐν τῇ λάρνακι, ἔργον μὲν ὥς φασιν Ἡφαίστου, δῶρον δὲ ὑπὸ Διὸς ἐδόθη Δαρδάνῳ. 7.19.7. λέγονται δὲ καὶ ἄλλοι λόγοι δύο ἐς αὐτήν, ὡς ὅτε ἔφυγεν Αἰνείας, ἀπολίποι ταύτην τὴν λάρνακα· οἱ δὲ ῥιφῆναί φασιν αὐτὴν ὑπὸ Κασσάνδρας συμφορὰν τῷ εὑρόντι Ἑλλήνων. ἤνοιξε δʼ οὖν ὁ Εὐρύπυλος τὴν λάρνακα καὶ εἶδε τὸ ἄγαλμα καὶ αὐτίκα ἦν ἔκφρων μετὰ τὴν θέαν· τὰ μὲν δὴ πλείονα ἐμαίνετο, ὀλιγάκις δὲ ἐγίνετο ἐν ἑαυτῷ. ἅτε δὲ οὕτω διακείμενος οὐκ ἐς τὴν Θεσσαλίαν τὸν πλοῦν ἐποιεῖτο, ἀλλʼ ἐπί τε Κίρραν καὶ ἐς τὸν ταύτῃ κόλπον· ἀναβὰς δὲ ἐς Δελφοὺς ἐχρᾶτο ὑπὲρ τῆς νόσου. 7.19.8. καὶ αὐτῷ γενέσθαι λέγουσι μάντευμα, ἔνθα ἂν ἐπιτύχῃ θύουσιν ἀνθρώποις θυσίαν ξένην, ἐνταῦθα ἱδρύσασθαί τε τὴν λάρνακα καὶ αὐτὸν οἰκῆσαι. ὁ μὲν δὴ ἄνεμος τὰς ναῦς τοῦ Εὐρυπύλου κατήνεγκεν ἐπὶ τὴν πρὸς τῇ Ἀρόῃ θάλασσαν· ἐκβὰς δὲ ἐς τὴν γῆν καταλαμβάνει παῖδα καὶ παρθένον ἐπὶ τὸν βωμὸν τῆς Τρικλαρίας ἠγμένους. καὶ ὁ μὲν ἔμελλεν οὐ χαλεπῶς συνήσειν τὰ ἐς τὴν θυσίαν· ἀφίκοντο δὲ ἐς μνήμην καὶ οἱ ἐπιχώριοι τοῦ χρησμοῦ, βασιλέα τε ἰδόντες ὃν οὔπω πρότερον ἑωράκεσαν καὶ ἐς τὴν λάρνακα ὑπενόησαν ὡς εἴη τις ἐν αὐτῇ θεός. 7.19.9. καὶ οὕτω τῷ Εὐρυπύλῳ τε ἡ νόσος καὶ τοῖς ἐνταῦθα ἀνθρώποις τὰ ἐς τὴν θυσίαν ἐπαύσθη, τό τε ὄνομα ἐτέθη τὸ νῦν τῷ ποταμῷ Μείλιχος. ἔγραψαν δὲ ἤδη τινὲς οὐ τῷ Θεσσαλῷ συμβάντα Εὐρυπύλῳ τὰ εἰρημένα, ἀλλὰ Εὐρύπυλον Δεξαμενοῦ παῖδα τοῦ ἐν Ὠλένῳ βασιλεύσαντος ἐθέλουσιν ἅμα Ἡρακλεῖ στρατεύσαντα ἐς Ἴλιον λαβεῖν παρὰ τοῦ Ἡρακλέους τὴν λάρνακα· τὰ δὲ ἄλλα κατὰ τὰ αὐτὰ εἰρήκασι καὶ οὗτοι.
7.19.10. ἐγὼ δὲ οὔτε Ἡρακλέα ἀγνοῆσαι τὰ ἐς τὴν λάρνακα εἰ δὴ τοιαῦτα ἦν πείθομαι οὔτε τὰ ἐς αὐτὴν ἐπιστάμενος δοκεῖ μοί ποτε ἂν δοῦναι δῶρον συμμαχήσαντι ἀνδρί· οὔτε μὴν οἱ Πατρεῖς ἄλλον τινὰ ἢ τὸν Εὐαίμονος ἔχουσιν Εὐρύπυλον ἐν μνήμῃ, καί οἱ καὶ ἐναγίζουσιν ἀνὰ πᾶν ἔτος, ἐπειδὰν τῷ Διονύσῳ τὴν ἑορτὴν ἄγωσι.
7.21.7. ἀπὸ δὲ τοῦ Αἰσυμνήτου κατωτέρω ἰόντι ἄλλο ἱερὸν καὶ ἄγαλμα λίθου· καλεῖται μὲν Σωτηρίας, ἱδρύσασθαι δὲ αὐτὸ ἐξ ἀρχῆς ἀποφυγόντα φασὶ τὴν μανίαν Εὐρύπυλον. πρὸς δὲ τῷ λιμένι Ποσειδῶνός τε ναὸς καὶ ἄγαλμά ἐστιν ὀρθὸν λίθου. Ποσειδῶνι δὲ παρὲξ ἢ ὁπόσα ὀνόματα ποιηταῖς πεποιημένα ἐστὶν ἐς ἐπῶν κόσμον καὶ ἰδίᾳ σφίσιν ἐπιχώρια ὄντα ἕκαστοι τίθενται, τοσαίδε ἐς ἅπαντας γεγόνασιν ἐπικλήσεις αὐτῷ, Πελαγαῖος καὶ Ἀσφάλιός τε καὶ Ἵππιος.
8.14.9. Φενεατῶν δὲ ἐκ τῆς ἀκροπόλεως καταβαίνοντι ἔστι μὲν στάδιον, ἔστι δὲ ἐπὶ λόφου μνῆμα Ἰφικλέους ἀδελφοῦ τε Ἡρακλέους καὶ Ἰολάου πατρός. Ἰόλαον μὲν δὴ τὰ πολλὰ Ἡρακλεῖ συγκάμνειν λέγουσιν Ἕλληνες· Ἰφικλῆς δὲ ὁ Ἰολάου πατήρ, ἡνίκα ἐμαχέσατο Ἡρακλῆς πρὸς Ἠλείους τε καὶ Αὐγέαν τὴν προτέραν μάχην, τότε ὑπὸ τῶν παίδων ἐτρώθη τῶν Ἄκτορος, καλουμένων δὲ ἀπὸ Μολίνης τῆς μητρός. καὶ ἤδη κάμνοντα κομίζουσιν οἱ προσήκοντες ἐς Φενεόν· ἐνταῦθα ἀνὴρ Φενεάτης αὐτὸν Βουφάγος καὶ ἡ τοῦ Βουφάγου γυνὴ Πρώμνη περιεῖπόν τε εὖ καὶ ἀποθανόντα ἐκ τοῦ τραύματος ἔθαψαν. 8.14.10. Ἰφικλεῖ μὲν δὴ καὶ ἐς τόδε ἔτι ἐναγίζουσιν ὡς ἥρωι, θεῶν δὲ τιμῶσιν Ἑρμῆν Φενεᾶται μάλιστα καὶ ἀγῶνα ἄγουσιν Ἕρμαια, καὶ ναός ἐστιν Ἑρμοῦ σφισι καὶ ἄγαλμα λίθου· τοῦτο ἐποίησεν ἀνὴρ Ἀθηναῖος Εὔχειρ Εὐβουλίδου. ὄπισθεν δέ ἐστι τοῦ ναοῦ τάφος Μυρτίλου. τοῦτον Ἑρμοῦ παῖδα εἶναι τὸν Μυρτίλον λέγουσιν Ἕλληνες, ἡνιοχεῖν δὲ αὐτὸν Οἰνομάῳ· καὶ ὁπότε ἀφίκοιτό τις μνώμενος τοῦ Οἰνομάου τὴν θυγατέρα, ὁ μὲν ἠπείγετο ὁ Μυρτίλος σὺν τέχνῃ τοῦ Οἰνομάου τὰς ἵππους, ὁ δὲ ἐν τῷ δρόμῳ τὸν μνηστῆρα, ὁπότε ἐγγὺς γένοιτο, κατηκόντιζεν.
8.18.7. ὑπὲρ δὲ τὴν Νώνακριν ὄρη τε καλούμενα Ἀροάνια καὶ σπήλαιόν ἐστιν ἐν αὐτοῖς. ἐς τοῦτο ἀναφυγεῖν τὸ σπήλαιον τὰς θυγατέρας τὰς Προίτου μανείσας λέγουσιν, ἃς ὁ Μελάμπους θυσίαις τε ἀπορρήτοις καὶ καθαρμοῖς κατήγαγεν ἐς χωρίον καλούμενον Λουσούς. τοῦ μὲν δὴ ὄρους τῶν Ἀροανίων Φενεᾶται τὰ πολλὰ ἐνέμοντο· οἱ δὲ ἐν ὅροις ἤδη Κλειτορίων εἰσὶν οἱ Λουσοί. 8.18.8. πόλιν μὲν δή ποτε εἶναι λέγουσι τοὺς Λουσούς, καὶ Ἀγησίλας ἀνὴρ Λουσεὺς ἀνηγορεύθη κέλητι ἵππῳ νικῶν, ὅτε πρώτην ἐπὶ ταῖς δέκα ἐτίθεσαν πυθιάδα Ἀμφικτύονες· τὰ δὲ ἐφʼ ἡμῶν οὐδὲ ἐρείπια ἔτι λειπόμενα ἦν Λουσῶν. τὰς δʼ οὖν θυγατέρας τοῦ Προίτου κατήγαγεν ὁ Μελάμπους ἐς τοὺς Λουσοὺς καὶ ἠκέσατο τῆς μανίας ἐν Ἀρτέμιδος ἱερῷ· καὶ ἀπʼ ἐκείνου τὴν Ἄρτεμιν ταύτην Ἡμερασίαν καλοῦσιν οἱ Κλειτόριοι.
8.23.7. φωράσαντες δὲ οἱ Καφυεῖς τὰ ποιηθέντα ὑπὸ τῶν παιδίων καταλεύουσιν αὐτά· καί σφισι ταῦτα ἐργασαμένοις ἐσέπεσεν ἐς τὰς γυναῖκας νόσος, τὰ ἐν τῇ γαστρὶ πρὸ τοκετοῦ τεθνεῶτα ἐκβάλλεσθαι, ἐς ὃ ἡ Πυθία θάψαι τε τὰ παιδία ἀνεῖπε καὶ ἐναγίζειν αὐτοῖς κατὰ ἔτος· ἀποθανεῖν γὰρ αὐτὰ οὐ σὺν δίκῃ. Καφυεῖς δὲ ποιοῦσι τά τε ἄλλα ἔτι καὶ νῦν κατʼ ἐκεῖνο τὸ μάντευμα καὶ τὴν ἐν ταῖς Κονδυλέαις θεὸν— προσεῖναι γὰρ καὶ τόδε ἔτι τῷ χρησμῷ φασι—καλοῦσιν Ἀπαγχομένην ἐξ ἐκείνου.
8.32.4. ἔστι δὲ ἐν τῇ μοίρᾳ ταύτῃ λόφος πρὸς ἀνίσχοντα ἥλιον καὶ Ἀγροτέρας ἐν αὐτῷ ναὸς Ἀρτέμιδος, ἀνάθημα Ἀριστοδήμου καὶ τοῦτο. τῆς δὲ Ἀγροτέρας ἐστὶν ἐν δεξιᾷ τέμενος· ἐνταῦθα ἔστι μὲν ἱερὸν Ἀσκληπιοῦ καὶ ἀγάλματα αὐτός τε καὶ Ὑγεία, εἰσὶ δὲ ὑποκαταβάντι ὀλίγον θεοὶ— παρέχονται δὲ καὶ οὗτοι σχῆμα τετράγωνον, Ἐργάται δέ ἐστιν αὐτοῖς ἐπίκλησις—Ἀθηνᾶ τε Ἐργάνη καὶ Ἀπόλλων Ἀγυιεύς· τῷ δὲ Ἑρμῇ καὶ Ἡρακλεῖ καὶ Εἰλειθυίᾳ πρόσεστιν ἐξ ἐπῶν τῶν Ὁμήρου φήμη, τῷ μὲν Διός τε αὐτὸν διάκονον εἶναι καὶ ὑπὸ τὸν Ἅιδην ἄγειν τῶν ἀπογινομένων τὰς ψυχάς, Ἡρακλεῖ δὲ ὡς πολλούς τε καὶ χαλεποὺς τελέσειεν ἄθλους· Εἰλειθυίᾳ δὲ ἐποίησεν ἐν Ἰλιάδι ὠδῖνας γυναικῶν μέλειν.
8.39.6. ἐν δὲ τῷ γυμνασίῳ τὸ ἄγαλμα τοῦ Ἑρμοῦ ἀμπεχομένῳ μὲν ἔοικεν ἱμάτιον, καταλήγει δὲ οὐκ ἐς πόδας, ἀλλὰ ἐς τὸ τετράγωνον σχῆμα. πεποίηται δὲ καὶ Διονύσου ναός· ἐπίκλησις μέν ἐστιν αὐτῷ παρὰ τῶν ἐπιχωρίων Ἀκρατοφόρος, τὰ κάτω δὲ οὐκ ἔστι σύνοπτα τοῦ ἀγάλματος ὑπὸ δάφνης τε φύλλων καὶ κισσῶν. ὁπόσον δὲ αὐτοῦ καθορᾶν ἔστιν, ἐπαλήλιπται κιννάβαρι ἐκλάμπειν· εὑρίσκεσθαι δὲ ὑπὸ τῶν Ἰβήρων ὁμοῦ τῷ χρυσῷ λέγεται.
8.48.6. πεποίηται δὲ καὶ Διὸς Τελείου βωμὸς καὶ ἄγαλμα τετράγωνον· περισσῶς γὰρ δή τι τῷ σχήματι τούτῳ φαίνονταί μοι χαίρειν οἱ Ἀρκάδες. καὶ μνήματά ἐστιν ἐνταῦθα Τεγεάτου τοῦ Λυκάονος καὶ Μαιρᾶς γυναικὸς τοῦ Τεγεάτου· θυγατέρα Ἄτλαντός φασιν εἶναι τὴν Μαιράν, ἧς δὴ καὶ Ὅμηρος ἐποιήσατο μνήμην ἐν Ὀδυσσέως λόγοις πρὸς Ἀλκίνουν περί τε ὁδοῦ τῆς ἐς Ἅιδην καὶ ὁπόσων ἐθεάσατο ἐκεῖ τὰς ψυχάς.
8.54.6. τὸ ἀπὸ τούτου δὲ ἄρχεται τὸ ὄρος τὸ Παρθένιον· ἐν δὲ αὐτῷ τέμενος δείκνυται Τηλέφου, καὶ ἐνταῦθα παῖδα ἐκκείμενόν φασιν αὐτὸν ὑπὸ ἐλάφου τραφῆναι. ἀπωτέρω δὲ ὀλίγον Πανός ἐστιν ἱερόν, ἔνθα Φιλιππίδῃ φανῆναι τὸν Πᾶνα καὶ εἰπεῖν ἃ πρὸς αὐτὸν Ἀθηναῖοί τε καὶ κατὰ ταὐτὰ Τεγεᾶται λέγουσι·
9.2.5. κατὰ δὲ τὴν ἔσοδον μάλιστα τὴν ἐς Πλάταιαν τάφοι τῶν πρὸς Μήδους μαχεσαμένων εἰσί. τοῖς μὲν οὖν λοιποῖς ἐστιν Ἕλλησι μνῆμα κοινόν· Λακεδαιμονίων δὲ καὶ Ἀθηναίων τοῖς πεσοῦσιν ἰδίᾳ τέ εἰσιν οἱ τάφοι καὶ ἐλεγεῖά ἐστι Σιμωνίδου γεγραμμένα ἐπʼ αὐτοῖς. οὐ πόρρω δὲ ἀπὸ τοῦ κοινοῦ τῶν Ἑλλήνων Διός ἐστιν Ἐλευθερίου βωμὸς τοῦτον μὲν δὴ χαλκοῦ, τοῦ Διὸς δὲ τόν τε βωμὸν καὶ τὸ ἄγαλμα ἐποίησεν λευκοῦ λίθου. 9.2.6. ἄγουσι δὲ καὶ νῦν ἔτι ἀγῶνα διὰ ἔτους πέμπτου τὰ δὲ Ἐλευθέρια, ἐν ᾧ μέγιστα γέρα πρόκειται δρόμου· θέουσι δὲ ὡπλισμένοι πρὸ τοῦ βωμοῦ. τρόπαιον δέ, ὃ τῆς μάχης τῆς Πλαταιᾶσιν ἀνέθεσαν οἱ Ἕλληνες, πεντεκαίδεκα σταδίοις μάλιστα ἕστηκεν ἀπωτέρω τῆς πόλεως.
9.19.6. τοῦ δὲ Εὐρίπου τὴν Εὔβοιαν κατὰ τοῦτο ἀπὸ τῆς Βοιωτῶν διείργοντος τῆς τε Δήμητρος ἐν δεξιᾷ τὸ ἱερὸν τῆς Μυκαλησσίας καὶ ὀλίγον ἀπʼ αὐτοῦ προελθόντι ἐστὶν Αὐλίς· ὀνομασθῆναι δὲ ἀπὸ τῆς Ὠγύγου θυγατρός φασιν αὐτήν. ναὸς δὲ Ἀρτέμιδός ἐστιν ἐνταῦθα καὶ ἀγάλματα λίθου λευκοῦ, τὸ μὲν δᾷδας φέρον, τὸ δὲ ἔοικε τοξευούσῃ. φασὶ δὲ ἐπὶ τοῦ βωμοῦ μελλόντων ἐκ μαντείας τῆς Κάλχαντος Ἰφιγένειαν τῶν Ἑλλήνων θύειν, τὴν θεὸν ἀντʼ αὐτῆς ἔλαφον τὸ ἱερεῖον ποιῆσαι.
9.27.2. Ἔρωτα δὲ ἄνθρωποι μὲν οἱ πολλοὶ νεώτατον θεῶν εἶναι καὶ Ἀφροδίτης παῖδα ἥγηνται· Λύκιος δὲ Ὠλήν, ὃς καὶ τοὺς ὕμνους τοὺς ἀρχαιοτάτους ἐποίησεν Ἕλλησιν, οὗτος ὁ Ὠλὴν ἐν Εἰλειθυίας ὕμνῳ μητέρα Ἔρωτος τὴν Εἰλείθυιάν φησιν εἶναι. Ὠλῆνος δὲ ὕστερον Πάμφως τε ἔπη καὶ Ὀρφεὺς ἐποίησαν· καί σφισιν ἀμφοτέροις πεποιημένα ἐστὶν ἐς Ἔρωτα, ἵνα ἐπὶ τοῖς δρωμένοις Λυκομίδαι καὶ ταῦτα ᾄδωσιν· ἐγὼ δὲ ἐπελεξάμην ἀνδρὶ ἐς λόγους ἐλθὼν δᾳδουχοῦντι. καὶ τῶν μὲν οὐ πρόσω ποιήσομαι μνήμην· Ἡσίοδον δὲ ἢ τὸν Ἡσιόδῳ Θεογονίαν ἐσποιήσαντα οἶδα γράψαντα ὡς Χάος πρῶτον, ἐπὶ δὲ αὐτῷ Γῆ τε καὶ Τάρταρος καὶ Ἔρως γένοιτο·
9.35.3. παρὰ δὲ Ἐτεοκλέους τοῦ Ὀρχομενίου μαθόντες τρισὶν ἤδη νομίζομεν Χάρισιν εὔχεσθαι· καὶ Ἀγγελίων τε καὶ Τεκταῖος †ὅσοι γε Διονύσου †τὸν Ἀπόλλωνα ἐργασάμενοι Δηλίοις τρεῖς ἐποίησαν ἐπὶ τῇ χειρὶ αὐτοῦ Χάριτας· καὶ Ἀθήνῃσι πρὸ τῆς ἐς τὴν ἀκρόπολιν ἐσόδου Χάριτές εἰσι καὶ αὗται τρεῖς, παρὰ δὲ αὐταῖς τελετὴν ἄγουσιν ἐς τοὺς πολλοὺς ἀπόρρητον.
10.13.7. Ἡρακλῆς δὲ καὶ Ἀπόλλων ἔχονται τοῦ τρίποδος καὶ ἐς μάχην περὶ αὐτοῦ καθίστανται· Λητὼ μὲν δὴ καὶ Ἄρτεμις Ἀπόλλωνα, Ἀθηνᾶ δὲ Ἡρακλέα ἐπέχουσι τοῦ θυμοῦ. Φωκέων καὶ τοῦτό ἐστιν ἀνάθημα, ὅτε σφίσιν ἐπὶ τοὺς Θεσσαλοὺς Τελλίας ἡγήσατο Ἠλεῖος. τὰ μὲν δὴ ἄλλα ἀγάλματα Δίυλλός τε ἐν κοινῷ καὶ Ἀμυκλαῖος, τὴν δὲ Ἀθηνᾶν καὶ Ἄρτεμιν Χίονίς ἐστιν εἰργασμένος· Κορινθίους δὲ εἶναί φασιν αὐτούς. 10.13.8. λέγεται δὲ ὑπὸ Δελφῶν Ἡρακλεῖ τῷ Ἀμφιτρύωνος ἐλθόντι ἐπὶ τὸ χρηστήριον τὴν πρόμαντιν Ξενόκλειαν οὐκ ἐθελῆσαί οἱ χρᾶν διὰ τοῦ Ἰφίτου τὸν φόνον· τὸν δὲ ἀράμενον τὸν τρίποδα ἐκ τοῦ ναοῦ φέρειν ἔξω, εἰπεῖν τε δὴ τὴν πρόμαντιν· ἄλλος ἄρʼ Ἡρακλέης Τιρύνθιος, οὐχὶ Κανωβεύς· πρότερον γὰρ ἔτι ὁ Αἰγύπτιος Ἡρακλῆς ἀφίκετο ἐς Δελφούς. τότε δὲ ὁ Ἀμφιτρύωνος τόν τε τρίποδα ἀποδίδωσι τῷ Ἀπόλλωνι καὶ παρὰ τῆς Ξενοκλείας ὁπόσα ἐδεῖτο ἐδιδάχθη. παραδεξάμενοι δὲ οἱ ποιηταὶ τὸν λόγον μάχην Ἡρακλέους πρὸς Ἀπόλλωνα ὑπὲρ τρίποδος ᾄδουσιν.
10.23.1. Βρέννῳ δὲ καὶ τῇ στρατιᾷ τῶν τε Ἑλλήνων οἱ ἐς Δελφοὺς ἀθροισθέντες ἀντετάξαντο, καὶ τοῖς βαρβάροις ἀντεσήμαινε τὰ ἐκ τοῦ θεοῦ ταχύ τε καὶ ὧν ἴσμεν φανερώτατα. ἥ τε γὰρ γῆ πᾶσα, ὅσην ἐπεῖχεν ἡ τῶν Γαλατῶν στρατιά, βιαίως καὶ ἐπὶ πλεῖστον ἐσείετο τῆς ἡμέρας, βρονταί τε καὶ κεραυνοὶ συνεχεῖς ἐγίνοντο· 10.23.2. καὶ οἱ μὲν ἐξέπληττόν τε τοὺς Κελτοὺς καὶ δέχεσθαι τοῖς ὠσὶ τὰ παραγγελλόμενα ἐκώλυον, τὰ δὲ ἐκ τοῦ οὐρανοῦ οὐκ ἐς ὅντινα κατασκήψαι μόνον ἀλλὰ καὶ τοὺς πλησίον καὶ αὐτοὺς ὁμοίως καὶ τὰ ὅπλα ἐξῆπτε. τά τε τῶν ἡρώων τηνικαῦτά σφισιν ἐφάνη φάσματα, ὁ Ὑπέροχος καὶ ὁ Λαόδοκός τε καὶ Πύρρος· οἱ δὲ καὶ τέταρτον Φύλακον ἐπιχώριον Δελφοῖς ἀπαριθμοῦσιν ἥρωα.
10.23.7. καὶ οἱ μὲν ἐστρατοπεδεύσαντο ἔνθα νὺξ κατελάμβανεν ἀναχωροῦντας, ἐν δὲ τῇ νυκτὶ φόβος σφίσιν ἐμπίπτει Πανικός· τὰ γὰρ ἀπὸ αἰτίας οὐδεμιᾶς δείματα ἐκ τούτου φασὶ γίνεσθαι. ἐνέπεσε μὲν ἐς τὸ στράτευμα ἡ ταραχὴ περὶ βαθεῖαν τὴν ἑσπέραν, καὶ ὀλίγοι τὸ κατʼ ἀρχὰς ἐγένοντο οἱ παραχθέντες ἐκ τοῦ νοῦ, ἐδόξαζόν τε οὗτοι κτύπου τε ἐπελαυνομένων ἵππων καὶ ἐφόδου πολεμίων αἰσθάνεσθαι · μετὰ δὲ οὐ πολὺ καὶ ἐς ἅπαντας διέδρα ἡ ἄγνοια.''. None
1.4.4. So they tried to save Greece in the way described, but the Gauls, now south of the Gates, cared not at all to capture the other towns, but were very eager to sack Delphi and the treasures of the god. They were opposed by the Delphians themselves and the Phocians of the cities around Parnassus ; a force of Aetolians also joined the defenders, for the Aetolians at this time were pre-eminent for their vigorous activity. When the forces engaged, not only were thunderbolts and rocks broken off from Parnassus hurled against the Gauls, but terrible shapes as armed warriors haunted the foreigners. They say that two of them, Hyperochus and Amadocus, came from the Hyperboreans, and that the third was Pyrrhus son of Achilles. Because of this help in battle the Delphians sacrifice to Pyrrhus as to a hero, although formerly they held even his tomb in dishonor, as being that of an enemy. 1.4.5. The greater number of the Gauls crossed over to Asia by ship and plundered its coasts. Some time after, the inhabitants of Pergamus, that was called of old Teuthrania, drove the Gauls into it from the sea. Now this people occupied the country on the farther side of the river Sangarius capturing Ancyra, a city of the Phrygians, which Midas son of Gordius had founded in former time. And the anchor, which Midas found, A legend invented to explain the name “ Ancyra,” which means anchor. was even as late as my time in the sanctuary of Zeus, as well as a spring called the Spring of Midas, water from which they say Midas mixed with wine to capture Silenus. Well then, the Pergameni took Ancyra and Pessinus which lies under Mount Agdistis, where they say that Attis lies buried.' "
1.14.5. Still farther of is a temple to Glory, this too being a thank-offering for the victory over the Persians, who had landed at Marathon. This is the victory of which I am of opinion the Athenians were proudest; while Aeschylus, who had won such renown for his poetry and for his share in the naval battles before Artemisium and at Salamis, recorded at the prospect of death nothing else, and merely wrote his name, his father's name, and the name of his city, and added that he had witnesses to his valor in the grove at Marathon and in the Persians who landed there." '
1.18.5. Hard by is built a temple of Eileithyia, who they say came from the Hyperboreans to Delos and helped Leto in her labour; and from Delos the name spread to other peoples. The Delians sacrifice to Eileithyia and sing a hymn of Olen . But the Cretans suppose that Eileithyia was born at Auunisus in the Cnossian territory, and that Hera was her mother. Only among the Athenians are the wooden figures of Eileithyia draped to the feet. The women told me that two are Cretan, being offerings of Phaedra, and that the third, which is the oldest, Erysichthon brought from Delos .
1.19.6. Across the Ilisus is a district called Agrae and a temple of Artemis Agrotera (the Huntress). They say that Artemis first hunted here when she came from Delos, and for this reason the statue carries a bow. A marvel to the eyes, though not so impressive to hear of, is a race-course of white marble, the size of which can best be estimated from the fact that beginning in a crescent on the heights above the Ilisus it descends in two straight lines to the river bank. This was built by Herodes, an Athenian, and the greater part of the Pentelic quarry was exhausted in its construction.
1.20.3. The oldest sanctuary of Dionysus is near the theater. Within the precincts are two temples and two statues of Dionysus, the Eleuthereus (Deliverer) and the one Alcamenes made of ivory and gold. There are paintings here—Dionysus bringing Hephaestus up to heaven. One of the Greek legends is that Hephaestus, when he was born, was thrown down by Hera. In revenge he sent as a gift a golden chair with invisible fetters. When Hera sat down she was held fast, and Hephaestus refused to listen to any other of the gods save Dionysus—in him he reposed the fullest trust—and after making him drunk Dionysus brought him to heaven. Besides this picture there are also represented Pentheus and Lycurgus paying the penalty of their insolence to Dionysus, Ariadne asleep, Theseus putting out to sea, and Dionysus on his arrival to carry off Ariadne.
1.22.3. When Theseus had united into one state the many Athenian parishes, he established the cults of Aphrodite Pandemos (Common) and of Persuasion. The old statues no longer existed in my time, but those I saw were the work of no inferior artists. There is also a sanctuary of Earth, Nurse of Youth, and of Demeter Chloe (Green). You can learn all about their names by conversing with the priests.
1.27.1. In the temple of Athena Polias (of the City) is a wooden Hermes, said to have been dedicated by Cecrops, but not visible because of myrtle boughs. The votive offerings worth noting are, of the old ones, a folding chair made by Daedalus, Persian spoils, namely the breastplate of Masistius, who commanded the cavalry at Plataea 479 B.C., and a scimitar said to have belonged to Mardonius. Now Masistius I know was killed by the Athenian cavalry. But Mardonius was opposed by the Lacedaemonians and was killed by a Spartan; so the Athenians could not have taken the scimitar to begin with, and furthermore the Lacedaemonians would scarcely have suffered them to carry it off.
1.28.4. On descending, not to the lower city, but to just beneath the Gateway, you see a fountain and near it a sanctuary of Apollo in a cave. It is here that Apollo is believed to have met Creusa, daughter of Erechtheus.... when the Persians had landed in Attica Philippides was sent to carry the tidings to Lacedaemon . On his return he said that the Lacedacmonians had postponed their departure, because it was their custom not to go out to fight before the moon was full. Philippides went on to say that near Mount Parthenius he had been met by Pan, who told him that he was friendly to the Athenians and would come to Marathon to fight for them. This deity, then, has been honored for this announcement.
1.29.2. Outside the city, too, in the parishes and on the roads, the Athenians have sanctuaries of the gods, and graves of heroes and of men. The nearest is the Academy, once the property of a private individual, but in my time a gymnasium. As you go down to it you come to a precinct of Artemis, and wooden images of Ariste (Best) and Calliste (Fairest). In my opinion, which is supported by the poems of Pamphos, these are surnames of Artemis. There is another account of them, which I know but shall omit. Then there is a small temple, into which every year on fixed days they carry the image of Dionysus Eleuthereus.
1.31.4. Such is the legend. Phlya and Myrrhinus have altars of Apollo Dionysodotus, Artemis Light-bearer, Dionysus Flower-god, the Ismenian nymphs and Earth, whom they name the Great goddess; a second temple contains altars of Demeter Anesidora (Sender-up of Gifts), Zeus Ctesius (God of Gain), Tithrone Athena, the Maid First-born and the goddesses styled August. The wooden image at Myrrhinus is of Colaenis.
1.32.4. here is also a separate monument to one man, Miltiades, the son of Cimon, although his end came later, after he had failed to take Paros and for this reason had been brought to trial by the Athenians. At Marathon every night you can hear horses neighing and men fighting. No one who has expressly set himself to behold this vision has ever got any good from it, but the spirits are not wroth with such as in ignorance chance to be spectators. The Marathonians worship both those who died in the fighting, calling them heroes, and secondly Marathon, from whom the parish derives its name, and then Heracles, saying that they were the first among the Greeks to acknowledge him as a god.
1.38.8. When you have turned from Eleusis to Boeotia you come to the Plataean land, which borders on Attica . Formerly Eleutherae formed the boundary on the side towards Attica, but when it came over to the Athenians henceforth the boundary of Boeotia was Cithaeron. The reason why the people of Eleutherae came over was not because they were reduced by war, but because they desired to share Athenian citizenship and hated the Thebans. In this plain is a temple of Dionysus, from which the old wooden image was carried off to Athens . The image at Eleutherae at the present day is a copy of the old one.
1.40.2. Not far from this fountain is an ancient sanctuary, and in our day likenesses stand in it of Roman emperors, and a bronze image is there of Artemis surnamed Saviour. There is a story that a detachment of the army of Mardonius, having over run Megaris 479 B.C., wished to return to Mardonius at Thebes, but that by the will of Artemis night came on them as they marched, and missing their way they turned into the hilly region. Trying to find out whether there was a hostile force near they shot some missiles. The rock near groaned when struck, and they shot again with greater eagerness, 1.40.3. until at last they used up all their arrows thinking that they were shooting at the enemy. When the day broke, the Megarians attacked, and being men in armour fighting against men without armour who no longer had even a supply of missiles, they killed the greater number of their opponents. For this reason they had an image made of Artemis Saviour. Here are also images of the gods named the Twelve, said to be the work of Praxiteles. But the image of Artemis herself was made by Strongylion.
1.41.3. Not far from the tomb of Hyllus is a temple of Isis, and beside it one of Apollo and of Artemis. They say that Alcathous made it after killing the lion called Cithaeronian. By this lion they say many were slain, including Euippus, the son of Megareus their king, whose elder son Timalcus had before this been killed by Theseus while on a campaign with the Dioscuri against Aphidna . Megareus they say promised that he who killed the Cithaeronian lion should marry his daughter and succeed him in the kingdom. Alcathous therefore, son of Pelops, attacked the beast and overcame it, and when he came to the throne he built this sanctuary, surnaming Artemis Agrotera (Huntress) and Apollo Agraeus ( Hunter ).
2.2.6. The things worthy of mention in the city include the extant remains of antiquity, but the greater number of them belong to the period of its second ascendancy. On the market-place, where most of the sanctuaries are, stand Artemis surnamed Ephesian and wooden images of Dionysus, which are covered with gold with the exception of their faces; these are ornamented with red paint. They are called Lysius and Baccheus,
2.9.6. After the hero-shrine of Aratus is an altar to Isthmian Poseidon, and also a Zeus Meilichius (Gracious) and an Artemis named Patroa (Paternal), both of them very inartistic works. The Meilichius is like a pyramid, the Artemis like a pillar. Here too stand their council-chamber and a portico called Cleisthenean from the name of him who built it. It was built from spoils by Cleisthenes, who helped the Amphictyons in the war at Cirrha . c. 590 B.C. In the market-place under the open sky is a bronze Zeus, a work of Lysippus, Contemporary of Alexander the Great. and by the side of it a gilded Artemis.
2.13.3. I will now add an account of the most remarkable of their famous sights. On the Phliasian citadel is a grove of cypress trees and a sanctuary which from ancient times has been held to be peculiarly holy. The earliest Phliasians named the goddess to whom the sanctuary belongs Ganymeda; but later authorities call her Hebe, whom Homer Hom. Il. 4.2 foll. mentions in the duel between Menelaus and Alexander, saying that she was the cup-bearer of the gods; and again he says, in the descent of Odysseus to Hell, Hom. Od. 11.603 that she was the wife of Heracles. Olen, A mythical poet of Greece, associated with Apollo. in his hymn to Hera, says that Hera was reared by the Seasons, and that her children were Ares and Hebe. of the honors that the Phliasians pay to this goddess the greatest is the pardoning of suppliants.
3.16.3. He replied that they might lodge in any other part of the house they wished, but that they could not have the chamber. For it so happened that his maiden daughter was living in it. By the next day this maiden and all her girlish apparel had disappeared, and in the room were found images of the Dioscuri, a table, and silphium upon it.
3.16.7. The place named Limnaeum (Marshy) is sacred to Artemis Orthia (Upright). The wooden image there they say is that which once Orestes and Iphigenia stole out of the Tauric land, and the Lacedaemonians say that it was brought to their land because there also Orestes was king. I think their story more probable than that of the Athenians. For what could have induced Iphigenia to leave the image behind at Brauron ? Or why did the Athenians, when they were preparing to abandon their land, fail to include this image in what they put on board their ships? 3.16.8. And yet, right down to the present day, the fame of the Tauric goddess has remained so high that the Cappadocians dwelling on the Euxine claim that the image is among them, a like claim being made by those Lydians also who have a sanctuary of Artemis Anaeitis. But the Athenians, we are asked to believe, made light of it becoming booty of the Persians. For the image at Brauron was brought to Susa, and afterwards Seleucus gave it to the Syrians of Laodicea, who still possess it. 3.16.9. I will give other evidence that the Orthia in Lacedaemon is the wooden image from the foreigners. Firstly, Astrabacus and Alopecus, sons of Irbus, son of Amphisthenes, son of Amphicles, son of Agis, when they found the image straightway became insane. Secondly, the Spartan Limnatians, the Cynosurians, and the people of Mesoa and Pitane, while sacrificing to Artemis, fell to quarreling, which led also to bloodshed; many were killed at the altar and the rest died of disease. 3.16.10. Whereat an oracle was delivered to them, that they should stain the altar with human blood. He used to be sacrificed upon whomsoever the lot fell, but Lycurgus changed the custom to a scourging of the lads, and so in this way the altar is stained with human blood. By them stands the priestess, holding the wooden image. Now it is small and light,' "3.16.11. but if ever the scourgers spare the lash because of a lad's beauty or high rank, then at once the priestess finds the image grow so heavy that she can hardly carry it. She lays the blame on the scourgers, and says that it is their fault that she is being weighed down. So the image ever since the sacrifices in the Tauric land keeps its fondness for human blood. They call it not only Orthia, but also Lygodesma (Willow-bound), because it was found in a thicket of willows, and the encircling willow made the image stand upright. " '
3.22.12. When the inhabitants of these cities were expelled, they were anxious to know where they ought to settle, and an oracle was given them that Artemis would show them where they were to dwell. When therefore they had gone on shore, and a hare appeared to them, they looked upon the hare as their guide on the way. When it dived into a myrtle tree, they built a city on the site of the myrtle, and down to this day they worship that myrtle tree, and name Artemis Saviour.
4.1.5. The first rulers then in this country were Polycaon, the son of Lelex, and Messene his wife. It was to her that Caucon, the son of Celaenus, son of Phlyus, brought the rites of the Great Goddesses from Eleusis . Phlyus himself is said by the Athenians to have been the son of Earth, and the hymn of Musaeus to Demeter made for the Lycomidae agrees.
4.1.7. That this Lycus was the son of Pandion is made clear by the lines on the statue of Methapus, who made certain improvements in the mysteries. Methapus was an Athenian by birth, an expert in the mysteries and founder of all kinds of rites. It was he who established the mysteries of the Cabiri at Thebes, and dedicated in the hut of the Lycomidae a statue with an inscription that amongst other things helps to confirm my account:—
4.4.2. There is a sanctuary of Artemis called Limnatis (of the Lake) on the frontier of Messenian, in which the Messenians and the Lacedaemonians alone of the Dorians shared. According to the Lacedaemonians their maidens coming to the festival were violated by Messenian men and their king was killed in trying to prevent it. He was Teleclus the son of Archelaus, son of Agesilaus, son of Doryssus, son of Labotas, son of Echestratus, son of Agis. In addition to this they say that the maidens who were violated killed themselves for shame.' "4.4.3. The Messenians say that a plot was formed by Teleclus against persons of the highest rank in Messene who had come to the sanctuary, his incentive being the excellence of the Messenian land; in furtherance of his design he selected some Spartan youths, all without beards, dressed them in girls' clothes and ornaments, and providing them with daggers introduced them among the Messenians when they were resting; the Messenians, in defending themselves, killed the beardless youths and Teleclus himself; but the Lacedaemonians, they say, whose king did not plan this without the general consent, being conscious that they had begun the wrong, did not demand justice for the murder of Teleclus. These are the accounts given by the two sides; one may believe them according to one's feelings towards either side." '
4.31.7. By Damophon too is the so-called Laphria at Messene . The cult came to be established among them in the following way: Among the people of Calydon, Artemis, who was worshipped by them above all the gods, had the title Laphria, and the Messenians who received Naupactus from the Athenians, being at that time close neighbors of the Aetolians, adopted her from the people of Calydon. I will describe her appearance in another place. Paus. 7.18.8 The name Laphria spread only to the Messenians and to the Achaeans of Patrae . 4.31.8. But all cities worship Artemis of Ephesus, and individuals hold her in honor above all the gods. The reason, in my view, is the renown of the Amazons, who traditionally dedicated the image, also the extreme antiquity of this sanctuary. Three other points as well have contributed to her renown, the size of the temple, surpassing all buildings among men, the eminence of the city of the Ephesians and the renown of the goddess who dwells there.
5.7.8. Olen the Lycian, in his hymn to Achaeia, was the first to say that from these Hyperboreans Achaeia came to Delos . When Melanopus of Cyme composed an ode to Opis and Hecaerge declaring that these, even before Achaeia, came to Delos from the Hyperboreans.
5.27.5. There is another marvel I know of, having seen it in Lydia ; it is different from the horse of Phormis, but like it not innocent of the magic art. The Lydians surnamed Persian have sanctuaries in the city named Hierocaesareia and at Hypaepa. In each sanctuary is a chamber, and in the chamber are ashes upon an altar. But the color of these ashes is not the usual color of ashes.
6.20.3. In the front part of the temple, for it is built in two parts, is an altar of Eileithyia and an entrance for the public; in the inner Part Sosipolis is worshipped, and no one may enter it except the woman who tends the god, and she must wrap her head and face in a white veil. Maidens and matrons wait in the sanctuary of Eileithyia chanting a hymn; they burn all manner of incense to the god, but it is not the custom to pour libations of wine. An oath is taken by Sosipolis on the most important occasions. 6.20.4. The story is that when the Arcadians had invaded the land of Elis, and the Eleans were set in array against them, a woman came to the Elean generals, holding a baby to her breast, who said that she was the mother of the child but that she gave him, because of dreams, to fight for the Eleans. The Elean officers believed that the woman was to be trusted, and placed the child before the army naked. 6.20.5. When the Arcadians came on, the child turned at once into a snake. Thrown into disorder at the sight, the Arcadians turned and fled, and were attacked by the Eleans, who won a very famous victory, and so call the god Sosipolis. On the spot where after the battle the snake seemed to them to go into the ground they made the sanctuary. With him the Eleans resolved to worship Eileithyia also, because this goddess to help them brought her son forth unto men.
6.25.1. Behind the portico built from the spoils of Corcyra is a temple of Aphrodite, the precinct being in the open, not far from the temple. The goddess in the temple they call Heavenly; she is of ivory and gold, the work of Pheidias, and she stands with one foot upon a tortoise. The precinct of the other Aphrodite is surrounded by a wall, and within the precinct has been made a basement, upon which sits a bronze image of Aphrodite upon a bronze he-goat. It is a work of Scopas, and the Aphrodite is named Common. The meaning of the tortoise and of the he-goat I leave to those who care to guess.
7.2.6. When the Ionians had overcome the ancient Milesians they killed every male, except those who escaped at the capture of the city, but the wives of the Milesians and their daughters they married. The grave of Neileus is on the left of the road, not far from the gate, as you go to Didymi . The sanctuary of Apollo at Didymi, and his oracle, are earlier than the immigration of the Ionians, while the cult of Ephesian Artemis is far more ancient still than their coming. 7.2.7. Pindar, however, it seems to me, did not learn everything about the goddess, for he says that this sanctuary was founded by the Amazons during their campaign against Athens and Theseus. See Pind. fr. 174. It is a fact that the women from the Thermodon, as they knew the sanctuary from of old, sacrificed to the Ephesian goddess both on this occasion and when they had fled from Heracles; some of them earlier still, when they had fled from Dionysus, having come to the sanctuary as suppliants. However, it was not by the Amazons that the sanctuary was founded, but by Coresus, an aboriginal, and Ephesus, who is thought to have been a son of the river Cayster, and from Ephesus the city received its name. 7.2.8. The inhabitants of the land were partly Leleges, a branch of the Carians, but the greater number were Lydians. In addition there were others who dwelt around the sanctuary for the sake of its protection, and these included some women of the race of the Amazons. But Androclus the son of Codrus (for he it was who was appointed king of the Ionians who sailed against Ephesus) expelled from the land the Leleges and Lydians who occupied the upper city. Those, however, who dwelt around the sanctuary had nothing to fear; they exchanged oaths of friendship with the Ionians and escaped warfare. Androclus also took Samos from the Samians, and for a time the Ephesians held Samos and the adjacent islands.
7.4.4. Some say that the sanctuary of Hera in Samos was established by those who sailed in the Argo, and that these brought the image from Argos . But the Samians themselves hold that the goddess was born in the island by the side of the river Imbrasus under the withy that even in my time grew in the Heraeum. That this sanctuary is very old might be inferred especially by considering the image; for it is the work of an Aeginetan, Smilis, the son of Eucleides. This Smilis was a contemporary of Daedalus, though of less repute.
7.5.4. The land of the Ionians has the finest possible climate, and sanctuaries such as are to be found nowhere else. First because of its size and wealth is that of the Ephesian goddess, and then come two unfinished sanctuaries of Apollo, the one in Branchidae, in Milesian territory, and the one at Clarus in the land of the Colophonians. Besides these, two temples in Ionia were burnt down by the Persians, the one of Hera in Samos and that of Athena at Phocaea . Damaged though they are by fire, I found them a wonder.
7.18.11. Every year too the people of Patrae celebrate the festival Laphria in honor of their Artemis, and at it they employ a method of sacrifice peculiar to the place. Round the altar in a circle they set up logs of wood still green, each of them sixteen cubits long. On the altar within the circle is placed the driest of their wood. Just before the time of the festival they construct a smooth ascent to the altar, piling earth upon the altar steps. 7.18.12. The festival begins with a most splendid procession in honor of Artemis, and the maiden officiating as priestess rides last in the procession upon a car yoked to deer. It is, however, not till the next day that the sacrifice is offered, and the festival is not only a state function but also quite a popular general holiday. For the people throw alive upon the altar edible birds and every kind of victim as well; there are wild boars, deer and gazelles; some bring wolf-cubs or bear-cubs, others the full-grown beasts. They also place upon the altar fruit of cultivated trees. 7.18.13. Next they set fire to the wood. At this point I have seen some of the beasts, including a bear, forcing their way outside at the first rush of the flames, some of them actually escaping by their strength. But those who threw them in drag them back again to the pyre. It is not remembered that anybody has ever been wounded by the beasts.
7.19.1. Between the temple of Laphria and the altar stands the tomb of Eurypylus. Who he was and for what reason he came to this land I shall set forth presently; but I must first describe what the condition of affairs was at his arrival. The Ionians who lived in Aroe, Antheia and Mesatis had in common a precinct and a temple of Artemis surnamed Triclaria, and in her honor the Ionians used to celebrate every year a festival and an all-night vigil. The priesthood of the goddess was held by a maiden until the time came for her to be sent to a husband.' "7.19.2. Now the story is that once upon a time it happened that the priestess of the goddess was Comaetho, a most beautiful maiden, who had a lover called Melanippus, who was far better and handsomer than his fellows. When Melanippus had won the love of the maiden, he asked the father for his daughter's hand. It is somehow a characteristic of old age to oppose the young in most things, and especially is it insensible to the desires of lovers. So Melanippus found it; although both he and Comaetho were eager to wed, he met with nothing but harshness from both his own parents and from those of his lover." '7.19.3. The history of Melanippus, like that of many others, proved that love is apt both to break the laws of men and to desecrate the worship of the gods, seeing that this pair had their fill of the passion of love in the sanctuary of Artemis. And hereafter also were they to use the sanctuary as a bridal-chamber. Forthwith the wrath of Artemis began to destroy the inhabitants; the earth yielded no harvest, and strange diseases occurred of an unusually fatal character. 7.19.4. When they appealed to the oracle at Delphi the Pythian priestess accused Melanippus and Comaetho. The oracle ordered that they themselves should be sacrificed to Artemis, and that every year a sacrifice should be made to the goddess of the fairest youth and the fairest maiden. Because of this sacrifice the river flowing by the sanctuary of Triclaria was called Ameilichus ( relentless). Previously the river had no name.' "7.19.5. The innocent youths and maidens who perished because of Melanippus and Comaetho suffered a piteous fate, as did also their relatives; but the pair, I hold, were exempt from suffering, for the one thing With the reading of the MSS.: “for to man only is it worth one's life to be successful in love.” that is worth a man's life is to be successful in love." '7.19.6. The sacrifice to Artemis of human beings is said to have ceased in this way. An oracle had been given from Delphi to the Patraeans even before this, to the effect that a strange king would come to the land, bringing with him a strange divinity, and this king would put an end to the sacrifice to Triclaria. When Troy was captured, and the Greeks divided the spoils, Eurypylus the son of Euaemon got a chest. In it was an image of Dionysus, the work, so they say, of Hephaestus, and given as a gift by Zeus to Dardanus. 7.19.7. But there are two other accounts of it. One is that this chest was left by Aeneas when he fled; the other that it was thrown away by Cassandra to be a curse to the Greek who found it. Be this as it may, Eurypylus opened the chest, saw the image, and forthwith on seeing it went mad. He continued to be insane for the greater part of the time, with rare lucid intervals. Being in this condition he did not proceed on his voyage to Thessaly, but made for the town and gulf of Cirrha. Going up to Delphi he inquired of the oracle about his illness. 7.19.8. They say that the oracle given him was to the effect that where he should come across a people offering a strange sacrifice, there he was to set down the chest and make his home. Now the ships of Eurypylus were carried down by the wind to the sea off Aroe. On landing he came across a youth and a maiden who had been brought to the altar of Triclaria. So Eurypylus found it easy to understand about the sacrifice, while the people of the place remembered their oracle seeing a king whom they had never seen before, they also suspected that the chest had some god inside it. 7.19.9. And so the malady of Eurypylus and the sacrifice of these people came to an end, and the river was given its present name Meilichus. Certain writers have said that the events I have related happened not to the Thessalian Eurypylus, but to Eurypylus the son of Dexamenus who was king in Olenus, holding that this man joined Heracles in his campaign against Troy and received the chest from Heracles. The rest of their story is the same as mine.
7.19.10. But I cannot bring myself to believe that Heracles did not know the facts about the chest, if they were as described, nor, if he were aware of them, do I think that he would ever have given it to an ally as a gift. Further, the people of Patrae have no tradition of a Eurypylus save the son of Euaemon, and to him every year they sacrifice as to a hero, when they celebrate the festival in honor of Dionysus.
7.21.7. As you go lower down from the Dictator there is another sanctuary with an image of stone. It is called the sanctuary of Recovery, and the story is that it was originally founded by Eurypylus on being cured of his madness. At the harbor is a temple of Poseidon with a standing image of stone. Besides the names given by poets to Poseidon to adorn their verses, and in addition to his local names, all men give him the following surnames—Marine, Giver of Safety, God of Horses.
8.14.9. As you go down from the acropolis of Pheneus you come to a stadium, and on a hill stands a tomb of Iphicles, the brother of Heracles and the father of Iolaus. Iolaus, according to the Greek account, shared most of the labours of Heracles, but his father Iphicles, in the first battle fought by Heracles against the Eleans and Augeas, was wounded by the sons of Actor, who were called after their mother Moline. In a fainting condition he was carried by his relatives to Pheneus, where he was carefully nursed by Buphagus, a citizen of Pheneus, and by his wife Promne, who also buried him when he died of his wound. 8.14.10. They still sacrifice to Iphicles as to a hero, and of the gods the people of Pheneus worship most Hermes, in whose honor they celebrate the games called Hermaea; they have also a temple of Hermes, and a stone image, made by an Athenian, Eucheir the son of Eubulides. Behind the temple is the grave of Myrtilus. The Greeks say that he was the son of Hermes, and that he served as charioteer to Oenomaus. Whenever a man arrived to woo the daughter of Oenomaus, Myrtilus craftily drove on the mares, while Oenomaus on the course shot down the wooer when he came near.
8.18.7. Above Nonacris are the Aroanian Mountains, in which is a cave. To this cave, legend says, the daughters of Proetus fled when struck with madness; Melampus by secret sacrifices and purifications brought them down to a place called Lusi . Most of the Aroanian mountain belongs to Pheneus, but Lusi is on the borders of Cleitor. 8.18.8. They say that Lusi was once a city, and Agesilas was proclaimed as a man of Lusi when victor in the horse-race at the eleventh Pythian festival held by the Amphictyons; 546 B.C but when I was there not even ruins of Lusi remained. Well, the daughters of Proetus were brought down by Melampus to Lusi, and healed of their madness in a sanctuary of Artemis. Wherefore Or, “Since that time.” this Artemis is called Hemerasia (She who soothes) by the Cleitorians.
8.23.7. The Caphyans, detecting what the children had done, stoned them to death. When they had done this, a malady befell their women, whose babies were stillborn, until the Pythian priestess bade them bury the children, and sacrifice to them every year as sacrifice is made to heroes, because they had been wrongly put to death. The Caphyans still obey this oracle, and call the goddess at Condyleae, as they say the oracle also bade them, the Strangled Lady from that day to this.
8.32.4. There is also in this district a hill to the east, and on it a temple of Artemis Huntress this too was dedicated by Aristodemus. To the right of the Huntress is a precinct. Here there is a sanctuary of Asclepius, with images of the god and of Health, and a little lower down there are gods, also of square shape, surnamed Workers, Athena Worker and Apollo, God of Streets. To Hermes, Heracles and Eileithyia are attached traditions from the poems of Homer: that Hermes is the minister of Zeus and leads the souls of the departed down to Hades, Hom. Od. 24.1, Hom. Od. 24.10, Hom. Od. 24.l00 . and that Heracles accomplished many difficult tasks; Hom. Il. 8.362 foll. Eileithyia, he says in the Iliad, cares for the pangs of women. Hom. Il. 16.187 and Hom. Il. 19.103 .
8.39.6. The image of Hermes in the gymnasium is like to one dressed in a cloak; but the statue does not end in feet, but in the square shape. A temple also of Dionysus is here, who by the inhabitants is surnamed Acratophorus, but the lower part of the image cannot be seen for laurel-leaves and ivy. As much of it as can be seen is painted . . . with cinnabar to shine. It is said to be found by the Iberians along with the gold.
8.48.6. There is also an altar of Zeus Teleius (Full-grown), with a square image, a shape of which the Arcadians seem to me to be exceedingly fond. There are also here tombs of Tegeates, the son of Lycaon, and of Maera, the wife of Tegeates. They say that Maera was a daughter of Atlas, and Homer makes mention of her in the passage Hom. Od. 11.326 where Odysseus tells to Alcinous his journey to Hades, and of those whose ghosts he beheld there.
8.54.6. At this point begins Mount Parthenius. On it is shown a sacred enclosure of Telephus, where it is said that he was exposed when a child and was suckled by a deer. A little farther on is a sanctuary of Pan, where Athenians and Tegeans agree that he appeared to Philippides and conversed with him.
9.2.5. Roughly at the entrance into Plataea are the graves of those who fought against the Persians. of the Greeks generally there is a common tomb, but the Lacedaemonians and Athenians who fell have separate graves, on which are written elegiac verses by Simonides. Not far from the common tomb of the Greeks is an altar of Zeus, God of Freedom. This then is of bronze, but the altar and the image he made of white marble. 9.2.6. Even at the present day they hold every four years games called Eleutheria (of Freedom), in which great prizes are offered for running. The competitors run in armour before the altar. The trophy which the Greeks set up for the battle at Plataea stands about fifteen stades from the city.
9.19.6. At this place the Euripus separates Euboea from Boeotia . On the right is the sanctuary of Mycalessian Demeter, and a little farther on is Aulis, said to have been named after the daughter of Ogygus. Here there is a temple of Artemis with two images of white marble; one carries torches, and the other is like to one shooting an arrow. The story is that when, in obedience to the soothsaying of Calchas, the Greeks were about to sacrifice Iphigeneia on the altar, the goddess substituted a deer to be the victim instead of her. They preserve in the temple what still survives of the
9.27.2. Most men consider Love to be the youngest of the gods and the son of Aphrodite. But Olen the Lycian, who composed the oldest Greek hymns, says in a hymn to Eileithyia that she was the mother of Love. Later than Olen, both Pamphos and Orpheus wrote hexameter verse, and composed poems on Love, in order that they might be among those sung by the Lycomidae to accompany the ritual. I read them after conversation with a Torchbearer. of these things I will make no further mention. Hesiod, Hes. Th. 116 foll. or he who wrote the Theogony fathered on Hesiod, writes, I know, that Chaos was born first, and after Chaos, Earth, Tartarus and Love.
9.35.3. It was from Eteocles of Orchomenus that we learned the custom of praying to three Graces. And Angelion and Tectaus, sons of Dionysus, The text here is corrupt. The two emendations mentioned in the critical notes would give either (a) “the pair who made . . ."or (b) “who made the statue of Dionysodotus for the Delians. . .” who made the image of Apollo for the Delians, set three Graces in his hand. Again, at Athens, before the entrance to the Acropolis, the Graces are three in number; by their side are celebrated mysteries which must not be divulged to the many.
10.13.7. Heracles and Apollo are holding on to the tripod, and are preparing to fight about it. Leto and Artemis are calming Apollo, and Athena is calming Heracles. This too is an offering of the Phocians, dedicated when Tellias of Elis led them against the Thessalians. Athena and Artemis were made by Chionis, the other images are works shared by Diyllus and Amyclaeus. They are said to be Corinthians. 10.13.8. The Delphians say that when Heracles the son of Amphitryon came to the oracle, the prophetess Xenocleia refused to give a response on the ground that he was guilty of the death of Iphitus. Whereupon Heracles took up the tripod and carried it out of the temple. Then the prophetess said:— Then there was another Heracles, of Tiryns, not the Canopian. For before this the Egyptian Heracles had visited Delphi . On the occasion to which I refer the son of Amphitryon restored the tripod to Apollo, and was told by Xenocleia all he wished to know. The poets adopted the story, and sing about a fight between Heracles and Apollo for a tripod.
10.23.1. Brennus and his army were now faced by the Greeks who had mustered at Delphi, and soon portents boding no good to the barbarians were sent by the god, the clearest recorded in history. For the whole ground occupied by the Gallic army was shaken violently most of the day, with continuous thunder and lightning. 10.23.2. The thunder both terrified the Gauls and prevented them hearing their orders, while the bolts from heaven set on fire not only those whom they struck but also their neighbors, themselves and their armour alike. Then there were seen by them ghosts of the heroes Hyperochus, Laodocus and Pyrrhus; according to some a fourth appeared, Phylacus, a local hero of Delphi .
10.23.7. They encamped where night overtook them in their retreat, and during the night there fell on them a “panic.” For causeless terrors are said to come from the god Pan. It was when evening was turning to night that the confusion fell on the army, and at first only a few became mad, and these imagined that they heard the trampling of horses at a gallop, and the attack of advancing enemies; but after a little time the delusion spread to all.''. None
65. Philostratus The Athenian, Life of Apollonius, 4.16 (2nd cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis

 Found in books: Demoen and Praet (2009) 294; Naiden (2013) 143


4.16. δεομένων δὲ καὶ τῶν ἄλλων τοῦ λόγου τούτου καὶ φιληκόως ἐχόντων αὐτοῦ “ἀλλ' οὐχὶ βόθρον” εἶπεν “̓Οδυσσέως ὀρυξάμενος, οὐδὲ ἀρνῶν αἵματι ψυχαγωγήσας ἐς διάλεξιν τοῦ ̓Αχιλλέως ἦλθον, ἀλλ' εὐξάμενος, ὁπόσα τοῖς ἥρωσιν ̓Ινδοί φασιν εὔχεσθαι, “ὦ ̓Αχιλλεῦ,” ἔφην “τεθνάναι σε οἱ πολλοὶ τῶν ἀνθρώπων φασίν, ἐγὼ δὲ οὐ ξυγχωρῶ τῷ λόγῳ, οὐδὲ Πυθαγόρας σοφίας ἐμῆς πρόγονος. εἰ δὴ ἀληθεύομεν, δεῖξον ἡμῖν τὸ σεαυτοῦ εἶδος, καὶ γὰρ ἂν ὄναιο ἄγαν τῶν ἐμῶν ὀφθαλμῶν, εἰ μάρτυσιν αὐτοῖς τοῦ εἶναι χρήσαιο.” ἐπὶ τούτοις σεισμὸς μὲν περὶ τὸν κολωνὸν βραχὺς ἐγένετο, πεντάπηχυς δὲ νεανίας ἀνεδόθη Θετταλικὸς τὴν χλαμύδα, τὸ δὲ εἶδος οὐκ ἀλαζών τις ἐφαίνετο, ὡς ἐνίοις ὁ ̓Αχιλλεὺς δοκεῖ, δεινός τε ὁρώμενος οὐκ ἐξήλλαττε τοῦ φαιδροῦ, τὸ δὲ κάλλος οὔπω μοι δοκεῖ ἐπαινέτου ἀξίου ἐπειλῆφθαι καίτοι ̔Ομήρου πολλὰ ἐπ' αὐτῷ εἰπόντος, ἀλλὰ ἄρρητον εἶναι καὶ καταλύεσθαι μᾶλλον ὑπὸ τοῦ ὑμνοῦντος ἢ παραπλησίως ἑαυτῷ ᾅδεσθαι. ὁρώμενος δέ, ὁπόσον εἶπον, μείζων ἐγίγνετο καὶ διπλάσιος καὶ ὑπὲρ τοῦτο, δωδεκάπηχυς γοῦν ἐφάνη μοι, ὅτε δὴ τελεώτατος ἑαυτοῦ ἐγένετο, καὶ τὸ κάλλος ἀεὶ ξυνεπεδίδου τῷ μήκει. τὴν μὲν δὴ κόμην οὐδὲ κείρασθαί ποτε ἔλεγεν, ἀλλὰ ἄσυλον φυλάξαι τῷ Σπερχειῷ, ποταμῶν γὰρ πρώτῳ Σπερχειῷ χρήσασθαι, τὰ γένεια δ' αὐτῷ πρώτας ἐκβολὰς εἶχε. προσειπὼν δέ με “ἀσμένως” εἶπεν “ἐντετύχηκά σοι, πάλαι δεόμενος ἀνδρὸς τοιῦδε: Θετταλοὶ γὰρ τὰ ἐναγίσματα χρόνον ἤδη πολὺν ἐκλελοίπασί μοι, καὶ μηνίειν μὲν οὔπω ἀξιῶ, μηνίσαντος γὰρ ἀπολοῦνται μᾶλλον ἢ οἱ ἐνταῦθά ποτε ̔́Ελληνες, ξυμβουλίᾳ δὲ ἐπιεικεῖ χρῶμαι, μὴ ὑβρίζειν σφᾶς ἐς τὰ νόμιμα, μηδὲ κακίους ἐλέγχεσθαι τουτωνὶ τῶν Τρώων, οἳ τοσούσδε ἄνδρας ὑπ' ἐμοῦ ἀφαιρεθέντες δημοσίᾳ τε θύουσί μοι καὶ ὡραίων ἀπάρχονται καὶ ἱκετηρίαν τιθέμενοι σπονδὰς αἰτοῦσιν, ἃς ἐγὼ οὐ δώσω: τὰ γὰρ ἐπιορκηθέντα τούτοις ἐπ' ἐμὲ οὐκ ἐάσει τὸ ̓́Ιλιόν ποτε τὸ ἀρχαῖον ἀναλαβεῖν εἶδος, οὐδὲ τυχεῖν ἀκμῆς, ὁπόση περὶ πολλὰς τῶν καθῃρημένων ἐγένετο, ἀλλ' οἰκήσουσιν αὐτὸ βελτίους οὐδὲν ἢ εἰ χθὲς ἥλωσαν. ἵν' οὖν μὴ καὶ τὰ Θετταλῶν ἀποφαίνω ὅμοια, πρέσβευε παρὰ τὸ κοινὸν αὐτῶν ὑπὲρ ὧν εἶπον.” “πρεσβεύσω”, ἔφην “ὁ γὰρ νοῦς τῆς πρεσβείας ἦν μὴ ἀπολέσθαι αὐτούς. ἀλλ' ἐγώ τί σου, ̓Αχιλλεῦ, δέομαι.” “ξυνίημι”, ἔφη “δῆλος γὰρ εἶ περὶ τῶν Τρωικῶν ̔ἐρωτήσων': ἐρώτα δὲ λόγους πέντε, οὓς αὐτός τε βούλει καὶ Μοῖραι ξυγχωροῦσιν.” ἠρόμην οὖν πρῶτον, εἰ κατὰ τὸν τῶν ποιητῶν λόγον ἔτυχε τάφου. “κεῖμαι μέν,” εἶπεν “ὡς ἔμοιγε ἥδιστον καὶ Πατρόκλῳ ἐγένετο, ξυνέβημεν γὰρ δὴ κομιδῇ νέοι, ξυνέχει δὲ ἄμφω χρυσοῦς ἀμφορεὺς κειμένους, ὡς ἕνα. Μουσῶν δὲ θρῆνοι καὶ Νηρηίδων, οὓς ἐπ' ἐμοὶ γενέσθαι φασί, Μοῦσαι μὲν οὐδ' ἀφίκοντό ποτε ἐνταῦθα, Νηρηίδες δὲ ἔτι φοιτῶσι.” μετὰ ταῦτα δὲ ἠρόμην, εἰ ἡ Πολυξένη ἐπισφαγείη αὐτῷ, ὁ δὲ ἀληθὲς μὲν ἔφη τοῦτο εἶναι, σφαγῆναι δὲ αὐτὴν οὐχ ὑπὸ τῶν ̓Αχαιῶν, ἀλλ' ἑκοῦσαν ἐπὶ τὸ σῆμα ἐλθοῦσαν καὶ τὸν ἑαυτῆς τε κἀκείνου ἔρωτα μεγάλων ἀξιῶσαι προσπεσοῦσαν ξίφει ὀρθῷ. τρίτον ἠρόμην: ἡ ̔Ελένη, ὦ ̓Αχιλλεῦ, ἐς Τροίαν ἦλθεν ἢ ̔Ομήρῳ ἔδοξεν ὑποθέσθαι ταῦτα;” “πολὺν” ἔφη “χρόνον ἐξηπατώμεθα πρεσβευόμενοί τε παρὰ τοὺς Τρῶας καὶ ποιούμενοι τὰς ὑπὲρ αὐτῆς μάχας, ὡς ἐν τῷ ̓Ιλίῳ οὔσης, ἡ δ' Αἴγυπτὸν τε ᾤκει καὶ τὸν Πρωτέως οἶκον ἁρπασθεῖσα ὑπὸ τοῦ Πάριδος. ἐπεὶ δὲ ἐπιστεύθη τοῦτο, ὑπὲρ αὐτῆς τῆς Τροίας λοιπὸν ἐμαχόμεθα, ὡς μὴ αἰσχρῶς ἀπέλθοιμεν.” ἡψάμην καὶ τετάρτης ἐρωτήσεως καὶ θαυμάζειν ἔφην, εἰ τοσούσδε ὁμοῦ καὶ τοιούσδε ἄνδρας ἡ ̔Ελλὰς ἤνεγκεν, ὁπόσους ̔́Ομηρος ἐπὶ τὴν Τροίαν ξυντάττει. ὁ δὲ ̓Αχιλλεὺς “οὐδὲ οἱ βάρβαροι” ἔφη “πολὺ ἡμῶν ἐλείποντο, οὕτως ἡ γῆ πᾶσα ἀρετῆς ἤνθησε.” πέμπτον δ' ἠρόμην: τί παθὼν ̔́Ομηρος τὸν Παλαμήδην οὐκ οἶδεν, ἢ οἶδε μέν, ἐξαιρεῖ δὲ τοῦ περὶ ὑμῶν λόγου; “εἰ Παλαμήδης” εἶπεν “ἐς Τροίαν οὐκ ἦλθεν, οὐδὲ Τροία ἐγένετο: ἐπεὶ δὲ ἀνὴρ σοφώτατός τε καὶ μαχιμώτατος ἀπέθανεν, ὡς ̓Οδυσσεῖ ἔδοξεν, οὐκ ἐσάγεται αὐτὸν ἐς τὰ ποιήματα ̔́Ομηρος, ὡς μὴ τὰ ὀνείδη τοῦ ̓Οδυσσέως ᾅδοι.” καὶ ἐπολοφυράμενος αὐτῷ ὁ ̓Αχιλλεὺς ὡς μεγίστῳ τε καὶ καλλίστῳ νεωτάτῳ τε καὶ πολεμικωτάτῳ σωφροσύνῃ τε ὑπερβαλομένῳ πάντας καὶ πολλὰ ξυμβαλομένῳ ταῖς Μούσαις “ἀλλὰ σύ,” ἔφη “̓Απολλώνιε, σοφοῖς γὰρ πρὸς σοφοὺς ἐπιτήδεια, τοῦ τε τάφου ἐπιμελήθητι καὶ τὸ ἄγαλμα τοῦ Παλαμήδους ἀνάλαβε φαύλως ἐρριμμένον: κεῖται δὲ ἐν τῇ Αἰολίδι κατὰ Μήθυμναν τὴν ἐν Λέσβῳ.” ταῦτα εἰπὼν καὶ ἐπὶ πᾶσι τὰ περὶ τὸν νεανίαν τὸν ἐκ Πάρου ἀπῆλθε ξὺν ἀστραπῇ μετρίᾳ, καὶ γὰρ δὴ καὶ ἀλεκτρυόνες ἤδη ᾠδῆς ἥπτοντο."". None
4.16. Therest of the company also besought him to tell them all about it, and as they were in a mood to listen to him, he said: Well, it was not by digging a ditch like Odysseus, nor by tempting souls with the blood of sheep, that I obtained a conversation with Achilles; but I offered up the prayer which the Indians say they use in approaching their heroes. “O Achilles,' I said, “most of mankind declare that you are dead, but I cannot agree with them, nor can Pythagoras, my spiritual ancestor. If then we hold the truth, show to us your own form; for you would profit not a little by showing yourself to my eyes, if you should be able to use them to attest your existence.” Thereupon a slight earthquake shook the neighborhood of the barrow, and a youth issued forth five cubits high, wearing a cloak ofThessalian fashion; but in appearance he was by no means the braggart figure which some imagine Achilles to have been. Though he was stern to look upon, he had never lost his bright look; and it seems to me that his beauty has never received its meed of praise, even though Homer dwelt at length upon it; for it was really beyond the power of words, and it is easier for the singer to ruin his fame in this respect than to praise him as he deserved. At first sight he was of the size which I have mentioned, but he grew bigger, till he was twice as large and even more than that; at any rate he appeared to me to be twelve cubits high just at that moment when he reached his complete stature, and his beauty grew apace with his length. He told me then that he had never at any time shorn off his hair, bit preserved it to inviolate for the river Spercheus, for this was the river of his first intimacy; but on his cheeks you saw the first down.And he addressed me and said: “I am pleased to have met you, since I have long wanted a man like yourself. For the Thessalians for a long time past have failed to present their offerings to my tomb, and I do not yet wish to show my wrath against them; for if I did so, they would perish more thoroughly than ever the Hellenes did on this spot; accordingly I resort to gentle advice, and would warn them not to violate ancient custom, nor to prove themselves worse men than the Trojans here, who though they were robbed of so many of their heroes by myself, yet sacrifice publicly to me, and also give me the tithes of their fruits of season, and olive branch in hand ask for a truce from my hostility. But this I will not grant, for the perjuries which they committed against me will not suffer Ilium ever to resume its pristine beauty, nor to regain the prosperity which yet has favored many a city that was destroyed of old; nay, if they rebuild it, things shall go as hard with them as if their city had been captured only yesterday. In order then to save me from bringing the Thessalian polity then to the same condition, you must go as my envoy to their council in behalf of the object I have mentioned.” “I will be your envoy,” I replied, “for the object of my embassy were to save them from ruin. But, O Achilles, I would ask something of you.” “I understand,” said he, “for it is plain you are going to ask about the Trojan war. So ask me five questions about whatever you like, and that the Fates approve of.” I accordingly asked him firstly, if he had obtained burial in accordance with the story of the poets. “I lie here,” he answered, “as was most delightful to myself and Patroclus; for you know we met in mere youth, and a single golden jar holds the remains of both of us, as if we were one. But as for the dirges of the Muses and Nereids, which they say are sung over me, the Muses, I may tell you, never once came here at all, though the Nereids still resort to the spot.” Next I asked him, if Polyxena was really slaughtered over his tomb; and he replied that this was true, but that she was not slain by the Achaeans, but that she came of her own free will to the sepulcher, and that so high was the value she set on her passion for him and she for her, that she threw herself upon an upright sword. The third questions was this: “Did Helen, O Achilles, really come to Troy or was it Homer that was pleased to make up the story?' “For a long time,” he replied, “we were deceived and tricked into sending envoys to the Trojans and fighting battles in her behalf, in the belief that she was in Ilium, whereas she really was living in Egypt and in the house of Proteus, whither she had been snatched away by Paris. But when we became convinced thereof, we continued to fight to win Troy itself, so as not to disgrace ourselves by retreat.” The fourth question which I ventured upon was this: “I wonder,” I said, “that Greece ever produced at any one time so many and such distinguished heroes as Homer says were gathered against Troy.' But Achilles answered: “Why even the barbarians did not fall far short of us, so abundantly then did excellence flourish all over the earth.” And my fifth question was this: “Why was it that Homer knew nothing about Palamedes, or if he knew him, then kept him out of your story?' “If Palamedes,' he answered, “never came to Troy, then Troy never existed either. But since this wisest and most warlike hero fell in obedience to Odysseus' whim, Homer does not introduce him into his poems, lest he should have to record the shame of Odysseus in his song.” And withal Achilles raised a wail over him as over one who was the greatest and most beautiful of men, the youngest and also the most warlike, one who in sobriety surpassed all others, and had often foregathered with the Muses. “But you,” he added, “O Apollonius, since sages have a tender regard for one another, you must care for his tomb and restore the image of Palamedes that has been so contemptuously cast aside; and it lies in Aeolis close to Methymna in Lesbos.' Wit these words and with the closing remarks concerning the youth from Paros, Achilles vanished with a flash of summer lightning, for indeed the cocks were already beginning their chant."". None
66. None, None, nan (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis

 Found in books: Lampe (2003) 427; Waldner et al (2016) 74


67. None, None, nan (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Apollo, with Artemis, in Calasiris’ dream • Artemis • Artemis, • Artemis, with Apollo, in Calasiris’ dream

 Found in books: Bowersock (1997) 88; Lipka (2021) 214; Pinheiro et al (2012a) 70; Repath and Whitmarsh (2022) 83


68. None, None, nan (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis Ephesia • Artemis, • Artemis, A. Phos-phoros of Byzantium • Artemis, A. at Ephesus • Artemis, apparition of • Artemis, cave of • Artemis, priests of • Artemis, temple of

 Found in books: Bowersock (1997) 88, 90; Dignas Parker and Stroumsa (2013) 142, 145, 146; Elsner (2007) 234; Pinheiro Bierl and Beck (2013) 21; Pinheiro et al (2012a) 70, 116, 118, 132, 139, 148; Stephens and Winkler (1995) 276


69. None, None, nan (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis Soteira, and seafaring • Artemis Soteira, on Icaros (in the Persina Gulf) • Artemis, Tauropolos

 Found in books: Hitch (2017) 52; Jim (2022) 87


70. None, None, nan (2nd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis, Charicleia as priestess of • Artemis, Charicleia’s affinity with/likened to

 Found in books: Ekroth (2013) 46, 48; Lipka (2021) 205, 215; Pinheiro et al (2012a) 53; Repath and Whitmarsh (2022) 37, 113, 130; Stephens and Winkler (1995) 442


71. None, None, nan (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis Orthia, sanctuary of (Sparta) • Sparta, sanctuary of Artemis Orthia

 Found in books: Bricault and Bonnet (2013) 185; Elsner (2007) 41


72. None, None, nan (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis premarital offerings to

 Found in books: Parker (2005) 440; Petrovic and Petrovic (2016) 200


73. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 2.51 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis Ephesia • Temple of Artemis (Ephesos)

 Found in books: Dignas (2002) 189; Keddie (2019) 156


2.51. After the expedition and the misfortunes which overtook it in Pontus and the treacheries of Seuthes, the king of the Odrysians, he returned to Asia, having enlisted the troops of Cyrus as mercenaries in the service of Agesilaus, the Spartan king, to whom he was devoted beyond measure. About this time he was banished by the Athenians for siding with Sparta. When he was in Ephesus and had a sum of money, he entrusted one half of it to Megabyzus, the priest of Artemis, to keep until his return, or if he should never return, to apply to the erection of a statue in honour of the goddess. But the other half he sent in votive offerings to Delphi. Next he came to Greece with Agesilaus, who had been recalled to carry on the war against Thebes. And the Lacedaemonians conferred on him a privileged position.''. None
74. None, None, nan (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis-Selene • Hekate-Selene-Artemis

 Found in books: Bortolani et al (2019) 46, 267; Pachoumi (2017) 82, 131, 132, 133, 135, 136, 137


75. Demosthenes, Orations, 21.114-21.115, 43.66
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis, • Artemis, Aristoboule • Artemis, Boulaia

 Found in books: Edmonds (2019) 194; Mikalson (2016) 62, 194, 267, 268, 269; Naiden (2013) 101


21.114. This man, then, is so impious, so abandoned, so ready to say or do anything, without stopping for a moment to ask whether it is true or false, whether it touches an enemy or a friend, or any such question, that after accusing me of murder and bringing that grave charge against me, he suffered me to conduct initiatory rites and sacrifices for the Council, and to inaugurate the victims on behalf of you and all the State; 21.115. he suffered me as head of the Sacred Embassy to lead it in the name of the city to the Nemean shrine of Zeus; he raised no objection when I was chosen with two colleagues to inaugurate the sacrifice to the Dread Goddesses. The Eumenides (Furies), whose sanctuary was a cave under the Areopagus. Would he have allowed all this, if he had had one jot or tittle of proof for the charges that he was trumping up against me? I cannot believe it. So then this is conclusive proof that he was seeking in mere wanton spite to drive me from my native land.
43.66. (To the clerk.) Now please read the words of the oracle brought from Delphi, from the shrine of the god, that you may see that it speaks in the same terms concerning relatives as do the laws of Solon. Oracle May good fortune attend you. The people of the Athenians make inquiry about the sign which has appeared in the heavens, asking what the Athenians should do, or to what god they should offer sacrifice or make prayer, in order that the issue of the sign may be for their advantage. It will be well for the Athenians with reference to the sign which has appeared in the heavens that they sacrifice with happy auspices to Zeus most high, to Athena most high, to Heracles, to Apollo the deliverer, and that they send due offerings to the Amphiones; Possibly, Amphion and Zethus; but their tomb was near Thebes . See Paus. 9.17.4 that they sacrifice for good fortune to Apollo, god of the ways, to Leto and to Artemis, and that they make the streets steam with the savour of sacrifice; that they set forth bowls of wine and institute choruses and wreathe themselves with garlands after the custom of their fathers, in honor of all the Olympian gods and goddesses, lifting up the right hand and the left, and that they be mindful to bring gifts of thanksgiving after the custom of their fathers. And ye shall offer sacrificial gifts after the custom of your fathers to the hero-founder after whom ye are named; and for the dead their relatives shall make offerings on the appointed day according to established custom. ''. None
76. Epigraphy, Ig I , 7, 35, 52, 78, 84, 136, 369, 383, 948
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis (goddess), sanctuary at Athens • Artemis Brauronia, sacred precint on the acropolis of • Artemis, Agrotera • Artemis, Boulaia • Artemis, Brauronia • Artemis, Kolainis • Artemis, Kuria of Termessus • Artemis, Mounichia • Artemis, cults of, Pergaia (Halikarnassos) • Artemis, cults of, Pergaia (Kos) • buildings in the shrine of Artemis • sanctuary, of Artemis at Brauron • temple, of Artemis in the sanctuary at Brauron • thiasoi and thiasotai, of Artemis

 Found in books: Connelly (2007) 200; Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 234; Gygax (2016) 100; Humphreys (2018) 647, 681; Lalone (2019) 169; Mikalson (2016) 125, 135, 152, 170, 285; Papazarkadas (2011) 23, 25, 27, 29, 88, 89


7. The Council and People decided. - was the prytany. - was secretary. - was chairman. - proposed: concerning the request of the Praxiergidai to write up the oracle of the god and the decrees formerly made about them (5) on a stone stele and set it down on the acropolis (polei) behind the old temple; . . . . . . ; and the money . . . . . . of the goddess according to ancestral tradition . . . the payment officers (kolakretai) shall give them the money. (10) Apollo issued the following oracle: it is better for the Praxiergidai to put the peplos on the goddess and make preliminary sacrifice to the Fates, to Zeus Leader of the Fates, to Earth . . . Uninscribed space These are the ancestral traditions of the Praxiergidai . . . . . . Uncertain amount of text missing (15) . . . provide (?) (parechen) . . . for the Praxiergi?dai . . . the fleece (koidion) . . . according to tradition . . . provide (parechen) (20) . . . Thargelion . . . the archon shall give (?) . . . in accordance with ancestral tradition. The Praxiergidai shall put on the peplos. (25) The Praxiergidai shall pay for (apotinen?) (?) a medimnos of barley. text from Attic Inscriptions Online, IG I3
7 - Decree about genos Praxiergidai

35. The Council and People decided.? . . . -kos proposed: to install a priestess for Athena Nike to be allotted? from all Athenian women, (5) and that the sanctuary (hieron) be provided with gates in whatever way Kallikrates may specify; and the official sellers (poletas) are to place the contract within the prytany of Leontis; the priestess is to receive fifty drachmas and (10) to receive the backlegs and skins of the public sacrifices (demosion); and that a temple (neon) be built in whatever way Kallikrates may specify and a stone altar. Hestiaios proposed: that three men be selected (15) from the Council; and they shall make the specifications with Kallikrates and show them to? the Council? in accordance with the contracts? . . . text from Attic Inscriptions Online, IG I3
35 - Decree about priestess and temple of Athena Nike

52. Face A Decree 1 The Council and the People decided. KekropisVII was in prytany. Mnesitheos was secretary. Eupeithes was chairman. Kallias proposed: to repay to the gods the monies which are due, since the three thousand talents which were voted for Athena have been brought up to the acropolis, in local currency. The (5) repayment shall be made from the monies which have been voted for repayment to the gods, that which is now in the hands of the Greek Treasurers (ellenotamiais) and the rest which is part of these monies, and from the proceeds of the ten-per-cent (dekates) when the collection of that is sold. Let the thirty accountants (logistai) now in office reckon what is due to the gods accurately, and let the Council have full power for the convening of the accountants (logiston). Let the (10) prytany (prutanes) together with the Council repay the monies, and delete the records when they have repaid them, seeking out the boards (pinakia) and the writing tablets (grammateia) and anything that may be written anywhere else. Let the priests and the religious officials (hieropoioi) and anybody else who knows reveal what is written. Treasurers (tamias) of these treasures shall be appointed by lot when the other officials (archas) are appointed, as with those of the (15) sacred treasures of Athena. Let these keep the treasures of the gods on the acropolis in the Rear Chamber (opisthodomoi) as far as is possible and righteous (osion), and let them join in opening and closing the doors of the Rear Chamber (opisthodomo) and in sealing with the treasurers of the treasures of Athena. Obtaining the treasures from the current treasurers and the superintendents (epistaton) and the religious officials (hieropoion) in the sanctuaries, who now handle the treasures, (20) let them measure and weigh them out in the presence of the Council on the acropolis, and let the treasurers (tamiai) appointed by lot take them over from the current officials (archonton) and inscribe everything on a single stele, god by god, how much treasure belongs to each, and the total of the whole, silver and gold separately. And for the future let (25) the treasurers in office inscribe on a stele and give an account (logon) of the treasures in hand and the income of the gods and anything expended during the year, to the accountants (logistas), and let them render their accounts (euthunas). And let them give their account (logon) from Panathenaia to Panathenaia, in the same way as those responsible for the treasures of Athena. The stelai on which they inscribe the sacred treasures let the treasurers (tamiai) (30) place on the acropolis. When the monies have been repaid to the gods, the remaining monies shall be used for the dockyard and the walls . . . Face B Decree 2 The Council and the People decided. – was in prytany. – was secretary; – was chairman. – proposed: . . . . . . stone . . . and the gold Victories and the Propylaia . . . . . . entirely . . . use . . . (5) in accordance with what has been decreed; and the acropolis . . . . . . and repair or complete or fit out (episkeuazen), spending ten talents each year until . . . and it is repaired or completed or fitted out (episkeuasthei) as finely as possible. Let the work be overseen jointly by the treasurers (tamiai) and the superintendents (epistatai); and the plan? shall be made by the architect of the Propylaia. Let (10) him supervise with the superintendents (epistaton)? so that the acropolis is . . . in the best and cheapest? way and that what is necessary? is repaired or completed or fitted out (episkeuasthesetai). The other monies of Athena, what is now on the acropolis and whatever may be brought up in future, shall not be used or have expenditure made? from them for any purpose other than these, above ten thousand drachmas, (15) or for repairs or completions or fittings out if any are needed. The monies shall not be used for anything else unless the People vote immunity (adeian) as when they vote about capital tax (esphoras): if anybody proposes or puts to the vote when immunity (adeias) has not been voted that the monies of Athena shall be used, let him be liable to the same penalties as when somebody proposes or puts to the vote that there shall be a capital tax. (20) Payment to all? the gods each year of what is due to each shall be made to the treasurers (tamiasi) of Athena by the Greek Treasurers (ellenotamias). When from the two hundred talents which the People voted for repayment what is due to the other gods has been repaid, let the treasures of Athena be kept on the right in the Rear Chamber (opisthodomo) and those (25) of the other gods on the left. As for those of the sacred treasures which are unweighed or uncounted, let the current treasurers (tamiai) with the four boards of officials (archon) which gave account (logon) from Panathenaia to Panathenaia weigh those of them which are gold, silver or gilded silver and count the rest . . . text from Attic Inscriptions Online, IG I3
52 - Decrees relating to the treasury of the Other Gods ("Kallias\' decrees")

84. Gods. Decree 1 The Council and the People decided. Pandionis was in prytany, Aristoxenos was secretary, Antiochides was chairman, Antiphon was archon (418/
7); Adosios proposed: to fence in the sanctuary (hieron) of Kodros and Neleus and Basile and (5) to lease (misthōsai) the sacred precinct (temenos) according to the specifications (suggraphas). Let the official sellers (pōlētai) make the contract (apomisthōsantōn) for the fencing in. Let the king (basileus) lease (apomisthōsatō) the sacred precinct according to the specifications, and let him despatch the boundary-commissioners (horistas) to demarcate these sanctuaries (hiera) so that they may be in the best and most pious condition. The money for the fencing in shall come from the sacred precinct. They shall carry out these provisions before the end of this Council\'s term of office, (10) otherwise each shall be liable to a fine of one thousand drachmas according to what has been proposed (eiremena). Decree 2 Adosios proposed: in other respects in accordance with the Council’s proposal, but let the king (basileus) and the official sellers (pōlētai) lease (misthōsatō) the sacred precinct of Neleus and Basile for twenty years according to the specifications. The lessee (misthōsamenos) shall fence in the sanctuary (hieron) of Kodros and Neleus and Basile at his own expense. Whatever (15) rent the sacred precinct may produce in each year, let him deposit the money in the ninth prytany (prutaneias) with the receivers (apodektai), and let the receivers (apodektais) hand it over to the treasurers of the Other Gods according to the law. If the king (basileus) or anyone else of those instructed about these matters does not carry out what has been decreed in the prytany (prutaneias) of Aigeis, (20) let him be liable to a fine of 10,000 drachmas. The purchaser of the mud (ilun) shall remove it from the ditch (taphro) during this very Council after paying to Neleus the price at which he made the purchase. Let the king (basileus) erase the name of the purchaser of the mud (ilun) once he has paid the fee (misthōsin). Let the king (basileus) write up instead (anteggraphsato) on the wall the name of the lessee (misthōsamenos) of the sacred precinct and for how much he has rented (misthōsētai) it (25) and the names of the guarantors in accordance with the law that concerns the sacred precincts (temenōn). So that anyone who wishes may be able to know, let the secretary (grammateus) of the Council inscribe this decree on a stone stele and place it in the Neleion next to the railings (ikria).10 Let the payment officers (kolakretai) give the money to this end. The king (basileus) shall lease (misthoun) the sacred precinct of Neleus and of Basile on the following terms: (30) that the lessee (misthōsamenos) fence in the sanctuary (hieron) of Kodros and Neleus and Basile according to the specifications (suggraphas) during the term of the Council that is about to enter office, and that he work the sacred precinct of Neleus and Basile on the following terms: that he plant young sprouts of olive trees, no fewer than 200, and more if he wishes; that the lessee (misthōsamenos) have control of the ditch (taphro) and the water from Zeus,11 (
35) as much as flows in between the Dionysion and the gates whence the initiates march out to the sea, and as much as flows in between the public building (oikias tes demosias)12 and the gates leading out to the bath of Isthmonikos; lease (misthoun) it for twenty years. text from Attic Inscriptions Online, IG I3
84 - Decree on the administration of the property of Kodros, Neleus and Basile

136. Fragments a+c Relief Pasiphon of Phrearrhioi was secretary. Decree 1 The Council and the People decided; – was in prytany; Pasiphon was secretary; -kles was chairman; Kleokritos (413/2) was archon (?); . . . proposed: . . . a rite of expulsion (?) (diapompaion) from the city . . . –stratos. After this (5) make a vow . . . from each tribe will sacrifice, if . . . the enemy . . . and the other things which . . . advises (parainei) . . . for Bendis and the statue (agalma) . . . and the stele (10) . . . they will take care . . . the People . . . and for this purpose . . . for Bendis . . . . . . always each of the two . . . (15) . . . Thracian woman . . . . . . . . . Fragment b . . . . . . nine . . . (20) . . . and a cult tax (eparche-) . . . . . . which occurred . . . . . . the cult tax (eparches) for . . . . . . for whatever it is sold . . . . . . and his assistants (paredroi); and the . . . (25) . . . as handsomely as possible; and to sacrifice . . . . . . the Council and anyone else who . . . . . . perform the all-night rite (pannuchida) as handsomely as possible . . . . . . on the eleventh of the month . . . . . . whether the wife of the priest (?) ought . . . (30) . . . (from) all the Athenians, let them send . . . . . . as soon as possible; and whatever (the god) responds . . . . . . shall receive of the sacrifices made publicly . . . . . . from ten sacrificial victims;10 and the other skins . . . . . . in future the religious officials (hieropoious) shall carry out an allotment about these matters . . . (
35) . . . on each occasion for Bendis at a cost of fifty drachmas . . . . . . prytany; and let the payment officers (kolakretai) give the money . . . . . . the Council shall be authorised . . . Let the secretary of the Council write up this decree on a stone stele and set it down in the Bendideion?;11 and let the official sellers (poletai) put the work out to contract; and let the payment officers (kolakretai) provide the money. Decree 2 (40) . . . proposed: in other respects in accordance with ...12 . . . text from Attic Inscriptions Online, IG I3
136 - Decree about the cult of Bendis
'
369. These are the debts reckoned by the accountants (logistai) in the four years from Panathenaia to Panathenaia. Athena (Polias) 426/5 BC These sums the treasurers handed over, Androkles of Phlya and his colleagues, to the Greek treasurers (hellenotamiais), - of - and his colleagues, for the generals Hippokrates of Cholargos and his colleagues, in the prytany of KekropisVII, the second prytany, four days from its entry, under the (5) Council for which Megakleides was first secretary, in the archonship of Euthynos (426/5), 20 tal.; the interest on this was 5,696 dr.. Second grant (dosis), in the prytany of KekropisVII, the second prytany, seven days were left of the prytany, 50 tal.; interest on this, 2 tal. 1,9
70 dr.. Third grant, in the prytany of PandionisIII, the fourth prytany, five days from the prytany’s entry, 28 tal. 5,610 dr. 3½ ob.; interest on this, 1 tal. 1,
719 dr. 2 ob.. Fourth grant, in the prytany of AkamantisV, (10) the eighth prytany, five days from the entry of the prytany, 44 tal. 3,000 dr.; interest on this, 1 tal. 4,
700 dr. 1 ob.. Fifth grant, in the prytany of AkamantisV, the eighth prytany, ten days from the entry of the prytany, 100 tal.; interest on this, 3 tal. 5,940 dr.. Sixth grant, in the prytany of ErechtheisI, the tenth prytany, seven days from the entry of the prytany, 18 tal. 3,000 dr.; the interest on this was 4,1
73 dr. 4 ob.. Total of the payment of principal in the period of office of Androkles (15) and his colleagues, 261 tal. 5,610 dr. 3½ ob.. Total of the interest on the money paid in (16) the period of office of Androkles and his colleagues, 11 tal. 199 dr. 1 ob.. 425/4 BC (16) These sums the treasurers handed over, Phokiades of Oion and his colleagues, in the archonship of Stratokles (425/4) and under the Council for which Pleistias was first secretary, for the generals around the Peloponnese, Demosthenes son of Alkisthenes of Aphidna, in the prytany of OineisVI, the fourth prytany, on the third day from the prytany’s entry, from the (20) Rear Chamber (opisthodomo), 30 tal.; the interest on this was 5,910 dr.. Another grant, to the generals, Nikias son of Nikeratos of Kydantidai and his colleagues, in the prytany of PandionisIII, the ninth prytany, on the fifteenth day from the prytany’s entry, 100 tal.; the interest on this was 2 tal. 3,800 dr.. Total of the payment of principal in the period of office of Phokiades and his colleagues, 130 tal.. Total of the interest on the money paid in the period of office of Phokiades and his colleagues, 3 tal. 3,
710 dr.. 424/3 BC (25) These sums the treasurers handed over, Thoukydides of Acherdous and his colleagues, in the archonship of Isarchos (424/3) and under the Council for which Epilykos was first secretary, to the old Greek treasurers (hellenotamiais), - of - and his colleagues, and the new, Charopides of Skambonidai and his colleagues, in the prytany of HippothontisVIII, the first prytany, on the twenty-sixth of the prytany, . . . 32 tal. 5,983 dr.; the interest on this was 4,665 dr. 5 ob.. Second grant, in the prytany (30) of -, the - prytany, on the twelfth of the prytany, ≥ 23 tal. . . . . . . Third grant, in the prytany of ErechtheisI, . . . 5 tal. 4,800 dr.?; the interest on this was 632 dr. 1½ ob.. Fourth grant, in the prytany of AkamantisV, the eighth prytany, on the thirtieth of the prytany, 100 tal.; the interest on this was 1 tal. 2960 dr.?. Total of the payment of principal in the period of office of Thoukydides and his colleagues, (
35) 163 tal.. Total of the interest on the money paid in the period of office of Thoukydides and his (36) colleagues, ≥ 2 tal. 5,210 dr.. 423/2 BC (36) These sums the treasurers handed over, Timokles of Eitea and his colleagues, in the archonship of Ameinias (423/2) and under the Council for which Demetrios of Kollytos was first secretary, . . . of Myrrhinous and his colleagues, in the prytany of AkamantisV, the first prytany, on the twelfth of the prytany, 64 tal. 4,
720 dr.; the interest on this was (40) 4,244 dr. 5 ob.. Second grant, in the prytany of PandionisIII, the third prytany, on the twelfth of the prytany, 2 tal. 5,500 dr.; the interest on this was 163 dr. 5 ob.. Third grant, in the prytany of -, the fourth prytany, on the fourth of the prytany, from the Samians?, 11 tal. 3,300 dr.; interest on this was 582 dr. 1 ob.. Fourth grant, in the prytany of AiantisIX, the eighth prytany, on the twenty-fourth of the prytany, 100 tal.; interest on this was 1,
700 dr.. (45) Fifth grant, in the prytany of LeontisIV, the tenth prytany, on the third of the prytany, 18 tal. 122 dr. 2½ ob.; interest on this, 122 dr. 2½ ob.. Total of the payment of principal in the period of office of Timokles and his colleagues, 192 tal. 1,642 dr. 2½ ob.. Total of the interest on the money paid in the period of office of Timokles and his colleagues 1 tal. 813 dr. 1½ ob.. Total of the whole of Athena’s payments in the four years from Panathenaia to Panathenaia,
74
7 tal. 1,253 dr.. (50) Total of the whole of Athena’s interest in the four years from Panathenaia to Panathenaia, (51) ≥ 18 tal. 3,9
35 dr. Athena Nike (51) These sums of Athena Nike, in the prytany of -, the - prytany, on the fourth of the prytany, Timokles of Eitea and his colleagues handed over: 6 tal.; the interest on this was ≥ 100 dr.. Other Gods These debts to the Other Gods were reckoned by the accountants (logistai) in the four years from (55) Panathenaia to Panathenaia. These sums the treasurers of the Other Gods, Gorgoinos son of Oineides of Ikarion and his colleagues, handed over from the monies of each god, in the archonship of Ameinias (423/2), to the generals . . . , . . . under the Council for which Demetrios was first secretary in the prytany of AkamantisV? the first prytany? . . . of Hekatombaion? . . . . . . : Artemis Agrotera . . . (60) . . . interest on this ≥ 360 dr.. . . . . . . interest on this . . . ≥ 5,1
70 dr. . . . . . . Poseidon at Sounion ≥ 5 tal. 2,000 dr.; interest on this ≥ 3
70 dr. . . . . . . interest on this . . . Artemis at Mounichia 1 tal. 4,551 dr. 1½ ob.; interest on this . . . ≥ 226 dr. 1 ob.; interest on this . . . (65) . . . ≥ 1,9
76 dr. 2 ob. . . . ≥ 14 dr. 4 ob.; interest on this ≥ 2½ ob.; Aphrodite at the Hippolyteion . . . ≥ 3 dr. 5½ ob.; the Muses ≥ 500 dr.; interest on this 6 dr. 2 ob.; Apollo Zoster . . . Adrasteia 86 dr.; interest on this 1 dr.; Bendis 86 dr.; interest on this 1 dr.; . . . ≥ 1¾ ob.; Apollo . . . interest on this 8 dr. . . . Herakles at Kynosarges (
70) 20 dr.; interest on this 1½ ob. . . . Demophon . . . interest on this . . . Athena at Pallenis ≥ 1 tal. 5,200 dr.; interest on this 129 dr. 3¾ ob.; Apollo . . . . . . Artemis Brauronia 1,396 dr. 4 ob.; interest on this ≥ 16 dr. . . . . . . ≥ 1,110 dr. . . . Athena at the Derioneian Palladion ≥ 850 dr.; interest on this ≥ 11 dr. . . . ≥ 1,
700 dr. . . . interest on this 20 dr. ½ ob.; Poseidon Kalaureatis . . . (
75) interest on this . . . Total of the principal of the Other Gods paid in the first grant in the period of office of Gorgoinos 30 tal. 5,990 dr.; total of the interest on this payment ≥ 2,120 dr.. The treasurers of the Other Gods handed over the second grant, Gorgoinos son of Oineides of Ikarion and his colleagues, god by god, from the monies, in the prytany of LeontisIV, the tenth prytany, on the twenty-third (ogdoei phthinontos) of Skirophorion, on the twentieth of the prytany: Artemis Agrotera (80) 4 tal. 1,950 dr.; interest on this 14 dr. 4½ ob.; Aphrodite in the Gardens 2 tal. 5,1
75 dr. 1 ob.; interest on this 9 dr. 4½ ob. . . . ≥ 2,
840 dr.; interest on this 1 dr. 3¾ ob.; Dionysos,
356 dr. 1 ob.; interest on this 1½ ob.. . . . interest on this . . . Poseidon at Sounion 4 tal. 1,
52
7 dr. 4½ ob.; interest on this 14 dr. 2¾ ob.; . . . 4,
749 dr. 4 ob.; interest on this 2 dr. 4½ ob.; Artemis at Mounichia . . . . . . ≥ 1 dr. 2 ob.; Theseus 808 dr. 4½ ob.; interest on this 2¾ ob.; Ilissos 402 dr. 1 ob.; interest on this (85) 1½ ob.; . . . interest on this . . . Hephaistos 1 tal. 1,
748 dr.; interest on this 4 dr. 2½ ob. Aphrodite at the Hippolyteion ≥ 1 dr. 2 ob.; interest on this . . . Muses
521 dr.; interest on this 1¾ ob.; god of strangers (theo chseniko) . . . . . . interest on this . . . Herakles at Kynosarges 80 dr.; interest on this ½ ob.; Demophon . . . Athena at Pallenis 3,418 dr. 1 ob.; interest on this 1 dr. 5½ ob.; Apollo . . . interest . . . Artemis Brauronia
353 dr. 2½ ob.; interest on this 1½ ob.; (90) . . . Athena at the Palladion 2 dr. 1½ ob.; interest on this . . . . . . 144 dr. 3 ob.; interest on this ½ ob.. Mother at Agrai ≥ 200 dr. . . . ≥ 2 dr.; interest on this ½ ob.; Athena Zosteria ≥ 100 dr. . . . 42
7 dr.; interest on this 1½ ob.. Total of the principal of the Other Gods paid in the second grant in the period of office of Gorgoinos 23 tal. 5,998 dr.; (95) total interest on this money 82 dr.. Total of the principal paid in the period of office of Gorgoinos 54 tal. 5,988 dr.. Total of all the interest on this money ≥ 2,200 dr.. Accumulated interest on payments made before this accounting period This was reckoned by the accountants (logistai) as interest over the four years on the monies of the Goddess for which the previous accountants reckoned the interest and handed over in the seven years, on four thousand talents, (100) one talent, four thousand five hundred and twenty-two drachmas: the interest on this was 195 tal. 1,
713 dr. 3 ob.. They reckoned as interest for the Other Gods in the four years on what the previous accountants reckoned and handed over in the seven years, five hundred talents, two hundred talents, sixty talents, six talents, one thousand and ninety drachmas, five drachmas, (105) four drachmas in the four years 3
7 tal. 2,338 dr. 2½ ob.. They also reckoned interest for the monies of Athena Nike in the four years which the previous accountants reckoned and handed over in the seven years, twenty talents, two talents three thousand and ninety drachmas, eight drachmas, two obols, 1 tal. 592 dr. 5 ob.. They reckoned as interest on the monies of Hermes in the four years, which the previous (110) accountants reckoned and handed over in the seven years, ≥ one talent four hundred and ninety drachmas . . . ≥ 316 dr.. Summary of Athena Nike, principal owed in eleven years, 28 tal. 3,548 dr. 2 ob.; of Athena Nike, the interest was ≥ 5 tal. 191 dr. 2½ ob., but ≤ 6 tal. 1,131 dr. 2½ ob.. of Athena Polias, in eleven years, principal owed, 4,
748 tal. 5,
7
75 dr.; (115) of Athena Polias, the interest in eleven years was 1,243 tal. 3,804 dr.. In eleven years of Athena Nike and Polias 4,
7
7
7 tal. 3,323 dr. 2 ob.; in eleven years the total interest of Polias and Nike ≥ 1,248 tal. 3,995 dr. 2½ ob., but ≤ 1,249 tal. 4,9
35 dr. 2½ ob.. For the Other Gods, total of the principal paid in eleven years 821 tal. 1,08
7 dr.; (120) for the Other Gods, total of the whole interest in eleven years . . . . . . Whole principal in eleven years for all the gods ≥ 5,599 tal. 4,900 dr.; total of the whole interest in eleven years for all the gods . . . . . . text from Attic Inscriptions Online, IG I3
369 - Loans from the sacred treasuries, 433/2-423/2 BC
'. None
77. Epigraphy, Ig Ii2, 47, 120, 380, 776, 1177, 1184, 1259, 1297-1298, 1388, 1454, 1496, 1514-1525, 1527-1530, 1672, 2492, 4962
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis (goddess) • Artemis (goddess), sanctuary at Athens • Artemis (goddess), sanctuary at Brauron • Artemis at Athens, thiasotai of, • Artemis, Agrotera • Artemis, Aristoboule • Artemis, Boulaia • Artemis, Brauron • Artemis, Brauronia • Artemis, Mounichia • Artemis, Oulia • Artemis, Phosphoros • Artemis, acropolis • Artemis, cults of, Eileithyia (Thasos) • Artemis, cults of, Pergaia (Halikarnassos) • Artemis, cults of, Pergaia (Kos) • Artemis, men and • Artemis, of Delos • Athens, sanctuary of Artemis Brauronia • Divinities (Greek and Roman), Artemis • Temple of Artemis of Brauron • buildings in the shrine of Artemis • dedications, to Artemis • dedications, to Artemis Brauronia • festivals, Artemis Brauronia • thiasoi and thiasotai, of Artemis

 Found in books: Connelly (2007) 189, 193, 200; Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 100, 525; Gabrielsen and Paganini (2021) 43; Humphreys (2018) 387, 668, 673, 1039, 1100, 1102, 1103; Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020) 108, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 131, 132, 134; Mikalson (2016) 34, 60, 65, 93, 102, 113, 135, 153, 170, 192, 211, 247; Papazarkadas (2011) 80, 88, 143, 301, 307; Radicke (2022) 391; Renberg (2017) 251


47. . . . upon the table the following: . . . 1 mast-head cup; mast-head cup(s?) . . . a mast-head cup(?) into which the olive oil . . . another mast-head cup; a drinking cup (5) . . . made of metal(?); a statuette . . . a canteen-flask; a box; an incense-censer . . . a small tripod; small shield(s?) . . . 2 large shields; a large cupping-glass with a chain attached; 1 strigil (10) with a chain attached; a large strigil; another one with a chain attached; 2 cupping-glasses; a drinking cup; a canteen- flask or small cup; a cooling vessel; a brooch; 4 crowns Uninscribed line The following objects made of iron: (15) a large ring with a chain attached; a large strigil; medical forceps; 5 surgeon’s knives and forceps; 2 tablets/platters . . . tongs; 3 medical forceps; 4 strigils; (20) a ring with a chain; a statuette and . . . throughout the sanctuary worked in low relief . . . Decree The People decided. Athenodoros proposed. Concerning what the priest of Asklepios, Euthydemos, says, the People (25) shall resolve: in order that the preliminary sacrifices (prothumata) may be offered which Euthydemos the priest of Asklepios recommends (exegetai), and the other sacrifices take place on behalf of the People of the Athenians, the People shall resolve: that the overseers (epistatas) of the Asklepieion shall make the preliminary sacrifices (prothumata) that Euthydemos recommends (exegetai), (30) with money from the quarry set aside for the god, and pay the other money towards the building of the sanctuary; and in order that the Athenians may distribute as much meat as possible, the religious officials (hieropoios) in office shall take care of the (35) festival with respect to what comes from the People (dēmo); and distribute the meat of the leading ox to the prytany members and to the nine archons and the religious officials and those participating in the procession, and distribute the other meat to the Athenians . . . text from Attic Inscriptions Online, IG II2
47 - Assembly decree concerning sacrifices in cult of Asklepios in Piraeus

776. . . . . . . for good fortune, the Council shall decide: that the presiding committee (proedrous) allotted to preside at the forthcoming Assembly shall put the matter on the agenda and submit the opinion of the Council (5) to the People, that it seems good to the Council to accept the good things that the priestess says? occurred in the sacrifices that she made for the health and preservation of the Council and the People and children and women and king Demetrios and queen (10) Phthia and their descendants; and since the priestess of Athena took care well and with love of honour (philotimōs) of the adornment of the table according to tradition and the other things which the laws and decrees of the People prescribed, and continues (15) at every opportunity to be honour-loving (philotimoumenē) towards the goddess, and in the archonship of Alkibiades (237/6) she dedicated from her own resources a Theran and . . . and a garment of plaited hair; and contributed to the Praxiergidai a hundred drachmas for the ancestral sacrifice from (20) her own resources; so, therefore, that the People may be seen to be honouring those who rate most highly piety to the gods, to praise the priestess of Athena Polias -te daughter of Polyeuktos of Bate and (25) crown her with a foliage crown for her piety towards the goddess; and to praise also her husband Archestratos son of Euthykrates of Amphitrope and crown him with a foliage crown for his piety towards the goddess and love of honour (philotimias) (30) towards the Council and People; and the prytany secretary shall inscribe this decree on a stone stele and stand it on the acropolis . . . . . . text from Attic Inscriptions Online, IG II2
776 - Honours for the priestess of Athena Polias

1177. . . . the demarch in office at any time shall take care of the Thesmophorion together with the priestess, that no-one releases anything or gathers a thiasos or installs sacred objects (5) or performs purification rites or approaches the altars or the pit (megaron) without the priestess except when it is the festival of the Thesmophoria or the Plerosia or the Kalamaia (10) or the Skira or another day on which the women come together according to ancestral tradition; that the Piraeans shall resolve: if anyone does any of these things in contravention of these provisions, the demarch (15) shall impose a penalty and bring him before a law court under the laws that are in place with respect to these things; and concerning the gathering of wood in the sanctuaries, if anyone gathers wood, may the old laws (archaious nomous) (20) be valid, those that are in place with respect to these matters; and the boundary officers (horistas) shall inscribe this decree together with the demarch and stand it by the way up to the Thesmophorion. text from Attic Inscriptions Online, IG II2
1177 - Decree of deme Piraeus concerning the Thesmophorion
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1184. . . . the sacred remembrancers. Both (female) officials together shall give to the priestess for (5) the festival and for managing the Thesmophoria: a half-sixth of barley, a half-sixth of wheat, a half- sixth of barley groats, a half-sixth of wheatmeal, a half-sixth of figs, a chous (10) of wine, half a chous of olive-oil, two cups of honey, a choinix of white sesame, a choinix of black, a choinix of poppy seeds, two fresh cheeses (weighing) no less than a stater each, (15) and two staters of garlic, and a torch worth no less than two obols and 4 drachmas of silver. The (female) officials shall give these things. And in order that this will take place on behalf of the deme of Cholargos (20) according to what is written for all time, those (male) in office in the archonship of Ktesikles (334/3) shall erect a stele and inscribe this decree on a stone stele in the Pythion, and they shall give an account of their (25) expenditure to the demesmen of Cholargos. text from Attic Inscriptions Online, IG II2
1184 - Sacrificial regulation for the Thesmophoria at Cholargos

2492. On the following terms the Aixoneans have leased the Phelleïs to Autokles son of Auteas and to Auteas son of Autokles for forty years, for one hundred and fifty-two drachmas each year, on condition that they undertake (5) plantings and use it in whatever other way they wish. They shall pay the rent in the month of Hekatombaion, and if they do not pay it, the Aixoneans shall have right of seizure (enechurasian) both of the crops from the property (chōriou) and of all the other property of the one who does not pay. (10) The Aixoneans shall not be permitted to sell or lease it to anyone else, until the forty years have expired. If enemy troops prevent access or destroy anything, the Aixoneans shall have half of what is produced on the property. When the forty years (15)have expired, the lessees shall hand over half of the land uncultivated (cherron), and such trees as there are on the property. The Aixoneans shall send in a vinedresser (ampelourgon) for the last five years. The term of the lease begins with the archonship of Euboulos (345/4) for the cereals (Dēmētriou karpou), and with the successor of Euboulos (20) for the woody products (xulinou); and having inscribed the lease on stone stelai, the treasurers in the demarchy of Demosthenes shall stand one in the sanctuary of Hebe, inside, and the other in the hall (leschei), and boundary markers on the property no less than three feet high, two on each side; and if any (25)property-based tax (eisphora) is levied on the property for the city, the Aixoneans shall pay it, and if the lessees pay it, it shall be counted towards their rent. No one shall be permitted to take any earth dug on the property away from the property itself. If anyone makes or puts to the vote a proposal contrary to this (30)agreement (sunthēkas) before the forty years have expired, he shall be liable to the lessees to a legal action for damage (blabēs). Eteokles son of Skaon of Aixone proposed: whereas the lessees of the Phelleïs, Autokles and Auteas, have agreed to cut back (ekkopsai) the olive trees for the Aixoneans, to choose men who, (35) together wih the demarch and the treasurers and the lessee will sell the olive trees to the highest bidder, and having calculated the interest (tokon) on the money thus obtained at the rate of one drachma (per mina per month), to subtract half of it from the rent and inscribe on the stelai that the rent is that much less. (40) The Aixoneans are to receive the interest (tokon) on the money from the sale of the olive trees. The buyer is to cut back the olive trees when Anthias has collected the harvest (karpon) in the archonship following that of Archias (346/5), before the ploughing (aroto), and leave stumps (mukētas) of no less than a palm high in the pits (perichutrismasin), (45) so that the olive trees become as fine and big as possible in these (forty) years. These men were chosen to sell the olive trees: Eteokles, Nauson, Hagnotheos. text from Attic Inscriptions Online, IG II2
2492 - Lease of public land by the deme Aixone, 345/4 BC

4962. Face A (front) Gods. Make preliminary (prothuesthai) sacrifices according to this: for Maleatas, three round cakes (popana); for Apollo, three round (5) cakes; for Hermes, three round cakes; for Iaso, three round cakes; for Akeso, three round cakes; for Panakeia, three round cakes; for the Dogs, three round cakes; (10) for the Hunters with Dogs, three round cakes. Euthydemos of Eleusis, priest of Asklepios, erected the stelai (15) by the altars, on which (stelai) he first depicted the round cakes that are required to be preliminarily sacrificed. Face B (left) For Helios, (20) a propitiatory cake, a honeycomb. For Mnemosyne, a propitiatory cake, (25) a honey- comb. Three wineless altars. Face C (TOP) (30) Three wineless altars. Face D (back) Wineless. text from Attic Inscriptions Online, IG II2
4962 - Sacrificial regulation for the cult of Asklepios and associated deities at Piraeus
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78. Epigraphy, Seg, 21.541, 23.215, 23.220, 26.121, 29.135, 29.1088, 34.103, 34.1107, 37.30, 43.756, 50.1101, 52.48, 52.104
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis (goddess) • Artemis (goddess), sanctuary at Athens • Artemis (goddess), sanctuary at Magnesia-on-the-Maeander • Artemis Ortheia • Artemis Phosphoros • Artemis, Agrotera • Artemis, Bargylia • Artemis, Brauron • Artemis, Brauronia • Artemis, Ephesia • Artemis, Hekate • Artemis, Miletos • Artemis, Mounichia • Artemis, Pergaia (Halicarnassus) • Artemis, Tauropolis • Artemis, acropolis • Artemis, cults of, Ortheia (Messene) • Artemis, cults of, at Aulis • Artemis, of Delos • Artemis, of Oinoe • Artemis,, Oupesia • Athens, sanctuary of Artemis Brauronia • Aulis, sanctuary of Artemis at • Aulis, sanctuary of Artemis at,, statues of priestesses from • Claudia Siteris, Artemis at Messene • Eirana, d.Nymphodotos, Artemis at Messene • Kallis, d. Aristokles, Artemis at Messene • Messene,, sanctuary of Artemis Ortheia • Pausanias,, on Artemis Phosphoros • Temple of Artemis (Ephesos) • altars, of Artemis of Brauron • buildings in the shrine of Artemis • dedications, to Artemis Brauronia • festivals, Artemis Brauronia • priests and priestesses, of Artemis of Oinoe • statues, of Artemis Brauronia • temple, of Artemis in Ephesos • temples, of Artemis Brauronia • thiasoi and thiasotai, of Artemis

 Found in books: Bricault and Bonnet (2013) 184; Connelly (2007) 148, 155, 156, 157, 330; Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 100, 189, 544; Hallmannsecker (2022) 130; Henderson (2020) 153; Horster and Klöckner (2014) 113, 124; Humphreys (2018) 880; Keddie (2019) 156; Lupu(2005) 51; Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020) 64, 118, 122, 139, 291; Mikalson (2016) 34, 93, 134, 153, 232; Papazarkadas (2011) 23, 28, 29, 89, 142, 307; Stavrianopoulou (2006) 146, 231; Versnel (2011) 107


21.541. Gods The Greater Demarchy (dēmarchia hē mezōn) Α Metageitnion, on the twelfth, for Apollo Lykeios, in the city, (5) a sheep, no taking away (ou phora), 12 dr.; - on the twentieth (dekatei proterai), for Hera Thelchinia, on the hill (em pagōi) at Erchia, a lamb (arna), (10) all black, no taking away (ou phora), 7 dr.; - Boedromion, on the twenty-seventh (tetradi phthinontos), for the Nymphs, (15) on the hill at Erchia, a sheep, 10 dr.; - Pyanopsion, on the fourteenth, for the heroines (20) in the hollow (en aulōni) at Erchia, a sheep, no taking away (ou phora), for the priestess the skin, 10 dr.; - Gamelion, on the seventh, (25) for Kourotrophos, in the Delphinion at Erchia, a piglet, 3 dr.; - for Apollo Delphinios, at Erchia, (30) a sheep, 12 dr.; - on the eighth, for Apollo Apotropaios, at Erchia (35) towards Paiania, a goat, 12 dr.; - Anthesterion, at the Diasia, in the city (en astei) at Agrai, (40) for Zeus Meilichios, a sheep, wineless (nēphalios) up until (the roasting of) the innards, 12 dr.; - Elaphebolion, (45) on the sixteenth, for Semele, at the same altar, a goat, to be handed over to the women, (50) for the priestess the skin, no taking away (ou phora), 10 dr.; - Thargelion, on the fourth, for Leto, at the (55) Pythion at Erchia, a goat, 10 dr.; - Skirophorion, on the third, for Kourotrophos, (60) on the acropolis (em polei) at Erchia, a piglet, 3 dr.; - for Athena Polias, on the acropolis at Erchia, a sheep (65) instead of a bovine (antibous), 10 dr.; total 111 dr. Β Metageitnion, on the twelfth, at the Eleusinion in the city, for Demeter, (5) a sheep, 10 dr.; - on the sixteenth, for Kourotrophos, in Hekate’s (sanctuary) at Erchia, a piglet, (10) 3 dr.; - for Artemis Hekate, at Erchia, a goat, 10 dr.; - Boedromion, (15) on the fourth, for Basile, at Erchia, a ewe-lamb (amnē), white, burnt whole (holokautos), wineless (nēphalios), (20) 7 dr.; - on the twenty-seventh (tetradi phthinontos) on the hill at Erchia, for Acheloos, (25) a sheep, 12 dr.; - Gamelion on the ninth, at the Erosouria (?), on the acropolis (30) at Erchia, for Athena, a ewe-lamb, 7 dr.; - on the twenty- seventh (tetradi phthinontos), for Kourotrophos, in (35) Hera’s (sanctuary) at Erchia, a piglet, 3 dr.; - for Hera, at Erchia, a sheep, for the priestess the skin, 10 dr.; (40) - Mounichion, on the fourth, for the Herakleidai, a sheep, no taking away (ou phora), at Erchia, 12 dr.; (45) - Thargelion on the fourth, for Apollo Pythios, at Erchia, a goat, to be handed over (50) to the Pythaistai, 12 dr.; - for Apollo Paion, on the hill at Erchia, a sheep, 12 dr.; (55) - Skirophorion, on the third, for Aglauros, on the acropolis at Erchia, a sheep, no taking away (ou phora), 10 dr.; (60) - total 108 dr. Γ Hekatombaion, on the twenty- first (dekatei husterai), for Kourotrophos, at (5) Sotidai at Erchia, a piglet, no taking away (ou phora), 3 dr.; - for Artemis at Sotidai at Erchia, (10) a goat, no taking away (ou phora), the skin to be consecrated, 10 dr.; - Metageitnion, on the twelfth, (15) for Zeus Polieus, on the acropolis in the city, a sheep, no taking away (ou phora), 12 dr.; - on the twenty-fifth (hektei phthinontos), (20) for Zeus Epopetes, on the hill at Erchia, a piglet, burnt whole (holokautos), wineless (nēphalios), (25) 3 dr.; - Boedromion, on the twenty-seventh (tetradi phthinontos), for Alochos, on the hill (30) at Erchia, a sheep, 10 dr.; - Gamelion, on the eighth, for Apollo Apotropaios, (35) at Erchia, a goat, to be handed over to the Pythaistai, 12 dr.; - on the twenty-seventh (tetradi phthinontos), for Zeus (40) Teleios, in Hera’s (sanctuary) at Erchia, a sheep, 12 dr.; - Anthesterion, on the second, (45) for Dionysos, at Erchia, a kid (eriphos), very young (proptorthi(os)), 5 dr.; - Mounichion, on the twentieth (dekatei proterai), (50) for Leukaspis, at Erchia, a sheep, wineless (nēphalios), no taking away (ou phora), 12 dr.; - Thargelion, (55) on the fourth, for Zeus, on the hill at Erchia, a sheep, 12 dr.; - Skirophorion, (60) on the third, for Zeus Polieus, on the acropolis at Erchia, a sheep, no taking away (ou phora), 12 dr.; (65) - on the sixteenth, . . . Δ Hekatombaion, on the twenty- first (dekatei husterai), for Kourotrophos, on (5) the peak (epi to akro) at Erchia, a piglet, no taking away (ou phora), 3 dr.; - for Artemis on the peak at Erchia, (10) a goat, no taking away (ou phora), the skin to be consecrated, 10 dr.; - Metageitnion, on the twelfth; (15) for Athena Polias, on the acropolis in the city, a sheep, 10 dr.; - Boedromion, on the fifth, (20) for Epops, at Erchia, a piglet, burnt whole (holokautos), wineless (nēphali(os)), 3 dr.; - on the twenty-seventh (tetradi phthinontos), (25) for Hermes, on the hill at Erchia, a sheep, 12 dr.; - Gamelion, on the twenty-seventh (tetradi phthinontos) (30) for Poseidon, in Hera’s (sanctuary) at Erchia, a sheep, 12 dr.; - Elaphebolion, on the sixteenth, (35) for Dionysos, at Erchia, a goat, to be handed over to the women, no taking away (ou phora), for the priestess (40) the skin, 12 dr.; - Mounichion, on the twenty-first (dekatei husterai), for the Tritopatreis, at Erchia, (45) a sheep, wineless (nēphalios), no taking away (ou phora), 12 dr.; - Thargelion, on the fourth, for the Anakes, (50) at Erchia, a sheep, 12 dr.; - on the nineteenth, for Menedeios, at Erchia, (55) a sheep, no taking away, 12 dr.; - Skirophorion, on the third, for Poseidon, on the acropolis (60) at Erchia, a sheep, 12 dr.; total 110 dr. Ε Metageitnion, on the nine- teenth, for the heroines at (5) the rush-bed (epi schoinōi) at Erchia, a sheep, no taking away (ou phora), for the priestess the skin, 10 dr.; - Boedromion, (10) on the fifth, at Erchia, for Epops, a piglet, burnt whole (holokautos), wineless (nēphalios), (15) 3 dr.; - on the twenty-seventh (tetradi phthinontos), for Earth (Gēi), on the hill at Erchia, a sheep, (20) pregt, no taking away (ou phora), 10 dr.; - Posideon, on the sixteenth, for Zeus, on the (25) rock or rocky place (em petrēi) at Erchia, a sheep, no taking away (ou phora), 12 dr.; - for Zeus Horios, at Erchia, a piglet, (30) no taking away (ou phora), 3 dr.; - Gamelion, on the seventh, for Apollo Lykeios, (35) at Erchia, a sheep, to be handed over to the Pythaistai, no taking away (ou phora), 12 dr.; - on the eighth, (40) for Apollo Nymphegetes, at Erchia, a goat, 12 dr.; - for the Nymphs, at (45) the same altar, a goat, 10 dr.; - Thargelion, on the fourth, for Hermes, (50) in the agora at Erchia, a ram, let the herald make the sacrifice to him (55) and receive the perquisites (gera) just like the demarch, 10 dr.; - on the sixteenth, (60) for Zeus Epakrios, on Hymettos, a lamb (arēn), wineless (nēphalios), no taking away (ou phora), 7 dr.; - Skirophorion, . . . text from Attic Inscriptions Online, SEG
21.541 - Sacrificial calendar of Erchia

52.104. Gods. -les son of Hierokles of Philaidai proposed: in order that everything in the sanctuary of the Brauronian goddess may be secure (sa) and sound (hugiē), and the temple, both the ancient one (archaios)? and the Parthenon, and the houses (oikoi) may be roofed, and the Amphipoleion in which the bears (arktoi) (5) reside and the upper storey (huperōia) above the Amphipoleion, and the gymnasium and the wrestling-ground (palaistra) and the stables (hippōnes), and everything else which the city built and dedicated to the goddess for the preservation of the Athenian People, for good fortune, the lawgivers (nomothetais) shall decide, that the inspectors (exetastas) from the Council and the treasurers (tamias) (10) of the Other Gods, having inspected all these things accurately, the number of the doors and of the tables and of everything else, that they may be in place for the goddess, are to hand (the report) over (paradidonai) to the superintendents (epistatais) and write them up (anagraphein) on the same stele on which the other dedications are recorded; and so that such repairs as are needed (15) in the sanctuary are carried out, the architect elected for the sanctuaries shall be required to go to the sanctuary, whenever the superintendents (epistatai) order him, and he shall first take care of the statue, whatever is needed, next examining whatever has need of repair (episkeuēs) in the sanctuary, and having compiled the specifications (suggraphas) he will hand them over to the official sellers (pōlētais), (20) and the sellers (pōlētas) will let a contract for them in the Council according to the law, and the receivers (apodektas) shall allocate to the contractors for the works the money from the revenue of Artemis, apportioning (merizontes) . . . ; but if the superintendents (epistatai) do not instruct the architect . . . . . . superintendents (?) (epistata-) . . . (25) . . . text from Attic Inscriptions Online, SEG
52.104 - Law concerning repairs to buildings in the sanctuary of Artemis at Brauron
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79. Strabo, Geography, 4.1.4, 5.1.9, 6.1.10, 9.2.11, 10.1.12, 12.2.7, 12.3.37, 14.1.6, 14.1.23, 14.1.26, 14.1.29
 Tagged with subjects: • Aegeira, cult of Artemis Agrotera at • Apollo Delios/Dalios (Delos), inseparable from earlier Artemis • Artemis • Artemis Agrotera • Artemis Enodia • Artemis Ephesia • Artemis Ephesia, Ephesos • Artemis Hecate • Artemis Hegemone • Artemis Kalliste • Artemis Kynthia (Paros), Oupis (Ephesos) • Artemis Orthia • Artemis Patroa • Artemis Perasia • Artemis Pergaia • Artemis, Artemis Amarynthia • Artemis, Dionysus and • Artemis, Ephesia • Artemis, Persian • Artemis, S. Biagio at Metapontion • Artemis, S. Biagio at Metapontion, Artemis of Lousoi and • Artemis, S. Biagio at Metapontion, archaeology of • Artemis, S. Biagio at Metapontion, bestial and hunting imagery • Artemis, S. Biagio at Metapontion, fluid worshipping group • Artemis, animals, association with • Artemis, arktoi (she-bears), young girls serving Artemis as • Artemis, at Ephesus • Artemis, at Sardis • Artemis, children, as nurturer of • Artemis, cruel death, providing vengeance against • Artemis, cult and rites • Artemis, hunting and butchering, association with • Artemis, images and iconography • Artemis, migration/movement of peoples, association with • Artemis, pillar/column, worshipped in form of • Artemis, political assemblies and civic life, association with • Artemis, theater and tragedy, connection to • Artemis, torch associated with • Boeotia, Artemis, bell-shaped figurines of • Corinth, cults of Artemis and Dionysus at • Delos, Artemis, cult of • Dionysus, Artemis and • Ikaria, wooden representation of Artemis on • Karneia Painter, volute-krater with Artemis entering Dionysiac circle, from Tarentum • Minoan-Mycenaean religion and art, Artemis and • Nilsson, Martin, on Artemis • Rhea, Artemis and • Rhodes, Artemis on • Sicyon, cult statue of Artemis in • Sparta, sanctuary/cult of Artemis Orthia • Tarentum, volute-krater by Karneia Painter with Artemis entering Dionysiac circle, from • Temple of Artemis (Ephesos) • animals, Artemis as “Mistress of Beasts,” • arktoi (she-bears), young girls serving Artemis as • bears, arktoi (she-bears), young girls serving Artemis as • butchering and hunting, association of Artemis with • coins, with cult statue of Artemis Pergaia • death sentences and suicides, Artemis associated with • eagles, Artemis and • geese, alabastron from Delos with Artemis holding • goats, Artemis/hunting goddesses and • hunting and butchering, association of Artemis with • justice and political life, association of Artemis with political assemblies and civic life • justice and political life, death sentences and suicides, Artemis associated with • krateriskoi dedicated to Artemis • migration/movement of peoples, Artemis associated with • perfumes and ointments, Artemis and • pillars/columns, Artemis worshipped in form of • priest(ess)/priesthood, of Artemis Perasia • statue of goddess from, wet-nurse festival for Artemis in • suicides and death sentences, Artemis associated with • temple, Artemis Perasia of Hierapolis-Kastabala • the dead, Artemis providing vengeance against cruel death • the dead, death sentences and suicides, Artemis associated with • theater and tragedy, Artemis and

 Found in books: Bernabe et al (2013) 221; Bianchetti et al (2015) 76; Borg (2008) 39; Demoen and Praet (2009) 252; Dignas (2002) 146, 176, 189, 226; Edmunds (2021) 22; Ekroth (2013) 46; Hallmannsecker (2022) 91; Keddie (2019) 156; Kowalzig (2007) 103, 124, 297; Marek (2019) 514, 516; Naiden (2013) 49, 96; Nuno et al (2021) 77; Simon (2021) 175, 187, 190; Sweeney (2013) 145, 148


4.1.4. Marseilles, founded by the Phocaeans, is built in a stony region. Its harbour lies beneath a rock, which is shaped like a theatre, and looks towards the south. It is well surrounded with walls, as well as the whole city, which is of considerable size. Within the citadel are placed the Ephesium and the sanctuary of the Delphian Apollo. This latter sanctuary is common to all the Ionians; the Ephesium is a temple consecrated to Artemis of Ephesus. They say that when the Phocaeans were about to quit their country, an oracle commanded them to take from Diana of Ephesus a conductor for their voyage. On arriving at Ephesus they therefore inquired how they might be able to obtain from the goddess what was enjoined them. The goddess appeared in a dream to Aristarcha, one of the most honourable women of the city, and commanded her to accompany the Phocaeans, and to take with her a likeness of the sacred objects. These things being performed, and the colony being settled, the Phocaeans founded a sanctuary, and evinced their great respect for Aristarcha by making her priestess. All the colonies sent out from Marseilles hold this goddess in peculiar reverence, preserving both the shape of the cult image xoanon, and also every rite observed in the metropolis.' "
5.1.9. That Diomedes did hold sovereignty over the country around this sea, is proved both by the Diomedean islands, and the traditions concerning the Daunii and Argos-Hippium. of these we shall narrate as much as may be serviceable to history, and shall leave alone the numerous falsehoods and myths; such, for instance, as those concerning Phaethon and the Heliades changed into alders near the river Eridanus, which exists nowhere, although said to be near the Po; of the islands Electrides, opposite the mouths of the Po, and the Meleagrides, found in them; none of which things exist in these localities. However, some have narrated that honours are paid to Diomedes amongst the Heneti, and that they sacrifice to him a white horse; two groves are likewise pointed out, one sacred to the Argian Juno, and the other to the Aetolian Diana. They have too, as we might expect, fictions concerning these groves; for instance, that the wild beasts in them grow tame, that the deer herd with wolves, and they suffer men to approach and stroke them; and that when pursued by dogs, as soon as they have reached these groves, the dogs no longer pursue them. They say, too, that a certain person, well known for the facility with which he offered himself as a pledge for others, being bantered on this subject by some hunters who came up with him having a wolf in leash, they said in jest, that if he would become pledge for the wolf and pay for the damage he might do, they would loose the bonds. To this the man consented, and they let loose the wolf, who gave chase to a herd of horses unbranded, and drove them into the stable of the person who had become pledge for him. The man accepted the gift, branded the horses with the representation of a wolf, and named them Lucophori. They were distinguished rather for their swiftness than gracefulness. His heirs kept the same brand and the same name for this race of horses, and made it a rule never to part with a single mare, in order that they might remain sole possessors of the race, which became famous. At the present day, however, as we have before remarked, this rage for horse-breeding has entirely ceased. After the Timavum comes the sea-coast of Istria as far as Pola, which appertains to Italy. Between the two is the fortress of Tergeste, distant from Aquileia 180 stadia. Pola is situated in a gulf forming a kind of port, and containing some small islands, fruitful, and with good harbours. This city was anciently founded by the Colchians sent after Medea, who not being able to fulfil their mission, condemned themselves to exile. As Callimachus says, It a Greek would call The town of Fugitives, but in their tongue 'Tis Pola named. The different parts of Transpadana are inhabited by the Heneti and the Istrii as far as Pola; above the Heneti, by the Carni, the Cenomani, the Medoaci, and the Symbri. These nations were formerly at enmity with the Romans, but the Cenomani and Heneti allied themselves with that nation, both prior to the expedition of Hannibal, when they waged war with the Boii and Symbrii, and also after that time." '
6.1.10. After Locri comes the Sagra, a river which has a feminine name. On its banks are the altars of the Dioscuri, near which ten thousand Locri, with Rhegini, clashed with one hundred and thirty thousand Crotoniates and gained the victory — an occurrence which gave rise, it is said, to the proverb we use with incredulous people, Truer than the result at Sagra. And some have gone on to add the fable that the news of the result was reported on the same day to the people at the Olympia when the games were in progress, and that the speed with which the news had come was afterwards verified. This misfortune of the Crotoniates is said to be the reason why their city did not endure much longer, so great was the multitude of men who fell in the battle. After the Sagra comes a city founded by the Achaeans, Caulonia, formerly called Aulonia, because of the glen which lies in front of it. It is deserted, however, for those who held it were driven out by the barbarians to Sicily and founded the Caulonia there. After this city comes Scylletium, a colony of the Athenians who were with Menestheus (and now called Scylacium). Though the Crotoniates held it, Dionysius included it within the boundaries of the Locri. The Scylletic Gulf, which, with the Hipponiate Gulf forms the aforementioned isthmus, is named after the city. Dionysius undertook also to build a wall across the isthmus when he made war upon the Leucani, on the pretext, indeed, that it would afford security to the people inside the isthmus from the barbarians outside, but in truth because he wished to break the alliance which the Greeks had with one another, and thus command with impunity the people inside; but the people outside came in and prevented the undertaking.
9.2.11. Also Mycalessus, a village, is in the Tanagraean territory. It is situated on the road that leads from Thebes to Chalcis; and in the Boeotian dialect it is called Mycalettus. And Harma is likewise in the Tanagraean territory; it is a deserted village near Mycalettus, and received its name from the chariot of Amphiaraus, and is a different place from the Harma in Attica, which is near Phyle, a deme of Attica bordering on Tanagra. Here originated the proverb, when the lightning flashes through Harma; for those who are called the Pythaistae look in the general direction of Harma, in accordance with an oracle, and note any flash of lightning in that direction, and then, when they see the lightning flash, take the offering to Delphi. They would keep watch for three months, for three days and nights each month, from the altar of Zeus Astrapaeus; this altar is within the walls between the Pythium and the Olympium. In regard to the Harma in Boeotia, some say that Amphiaraus fell in the battle out of his chariot near the place where his sanctuary now is, and that the chariot was drawn empty to the place which bears the same name; others say that the chariot of Adrastus, when he was in flight, was smashed to pieces there, but that Adrastus safely escaped on Areion. But Philochorus says that Adrastus was saved by the inhabitants of the village, and that on this account they obtained equal rights of citizenship from the Argives.
10.1.12. Now in general these cities were in accord with one another, and when differences arose concerning the Lelantine Plain they did not so completely break off relations as to wage their wars in all respects according to the will of each, but they came to an agreement as to the conditions under which they were to conduct the fight. This fact, among others, is disclosed by a certain pillar in the Amarynthium, which forbids the use of long distance missiles. In fact among all the customs of warfare and of the use of arms there neither is, nor has been, any single custom; for some use long distance missiles, as, for example, bowmen and slingers and javelin-throwers, whereas others use close-fighting arms, as, for example, those who use sword, or outstretched spear; for the spear is used in two ways, one in hand-to-hand combat and the other for hurling like a javelin; just as the pike serves both purposes, for it can be used both in close combat and as a missile for hurling, which is also true of the sarissa and the hyssus.
12.2.7. Only two prefectures have cities, Tyanitis the city Tyana, which lies below the Taurus at the Cilician Gates, where for all is the easiest and most commonly used pass into Cilicia and Syria. It is called Eusebeia near the Taurus; and its territory is for the most part fertile and level. Tyana is situated upon a mound of Semiramis, which is beautifully fortified. Not far from this city are Castabala and Cybistra, towns still nearer to the mountain. At Castabala is the sanctuary of the Perasian Artemis, where the priestesses, it is said, walk with naked feet over hot embers without pain. And here, too, some tell us over and over the same story of Orestes and Tauropolus, asserting that she was called Perasian because she was brought from the other side. So then, in the prefecture Tyanitis, one of the ten above mentioned is Tyana (I am not enumerating along with these prefectures those that were acquired later, I mean Castabala and Cybistra and the places in Cilicia Tracheia, where is Elaeussa, a very fertile island, which was settled in a noteworthy manner by Archelaus, who spent the greater part of his time there), whereas Mazaca, the metropolis of the tribe, is in the Cilician prefecture, as it is called. This city, too, is called Eusebeia, with the additional words near the Argaeus, for it is situated below the Argaeus, the highest mountain of all, whose summit never fails to have snow upon it; and those who ascend it (those are few) say that in clear weather both seas, both the Pontus and the Issian Sea, are visible from it. Now in general Mazaca is not naturally a suitable place for the founding of a city, for it is without water and unfortified by nature; and, because of the neglect of the prefects, it is also without walls (perhaps intentionally so, in order that people inhabiting a plain, with hills above it that were advantageous and beyond range of missiles, might not, through too much reliance upon the wall as a fortification, engage in plundering). Further, the districts all round are utterly barren and untilled, although they are level; but they are sandy and are rocky underneath. And, proceeding a little farther on, one comes to plains extending over many stadia that are volcanic and full of fire-pits; and therefore the necessaries of life must be brought from a distance. And further, that which seems to be an advantage is attended with peril, for although almost the whole of Cappadocia is without timber, the Argaeus has forests all round it, and therefore the working of timber is close at hand; but the region which lies below the forests also contains fires in many places and at the same time has an underground supply of cold water, although neither the fire nor the water emerges to the surface; and therefore most of the country is covered with grass. In some places, also, the ground is marshy, and at night flames rise therefrom. Now those who are acquainted with the country can work the timber, since they are on their guard, but the country is perilous for most people, and especially for cattle, since they fall into the hidden fire-pits.
12.3.37. The whole of the country around is held by Pythodoris, to whom belong, not only Phanaroea, but also Zelitis and Megalopolitis. Concerning Phanaroea I have already spoken. As for Zelitis, it has a city Zela, fortified on a mound of Semiramis, with the sanctuary of Anaitis, who is also revered by the Armenians. Now the sacred rites performed here are characterized by greater sanctity; and it is here that all the people of Pontus make their oaths concerning their matters of greatest importance. The large number of temple-servants and the honors of the priests were, in the time of the kings, of the same type as I have stated before, but at the present time everything is in the power of Pythodoris. Many persons had abused and reduced both the multitude of temple-servants and the rest of the resources of the sanctuary. The adjacent territory, also, was reduced, having been divided into several domains — I mean Zelitis, as it is called (which has the city Zela on a mound); for in, early times the kings governed Zela, not as a city, but as a sacred precinct of the Persian gods, and the priest was the master of the whole thing. It was inhabited by the multitude of temple-servants, and by the priest, who had an abundance of resources; and the sacred territory as well as that of the priest was subject to him and his numerous attendants. Pompey added many provinces to the boundaries of Zelitis, and named Zela, as he did Megalopolis, a city, and he united the latter and Culupene and Camisene into one state; the latter two border on both Lesser Armenia and Laviansene, and they contain rock-salt, and also an ancient fortress called Camisa, now in ruins. The later Roman prefects assigned a portion of these two governments to the priests of Comana, a portion to the priest of Zela, and a portion to Ateporix, a dynast of the family of tetrarchs of Galatia; but now that Ateporix has died, this portion, which is not large, is subject to the Romans, being called a province (and this little state is a political organization of itself, the people having incorporated Carana into it, from which fact its country is called Caranitis), whereas the rest is held by Pythodoris and Dyteutus.
14.1.6. Ephorus says: Miletus was first founded and fortified above the sea by the Cretans, where the Milatos of olden times is now situated, being settled by Sarpedon, who brought colonists from the Cretan Milatos and named the city after that Miletus, the place formerly being in the possession of the Leleges; but later Neleus and his followers fortified the present city. The present city has four harbors, one of which is large enough for a fleet. Many are the achievements of this city, but the greatest is the number of its colonizations; for the Euxine Pontus has been colonized everywhere by these people, as also the Propontis and several other regions. At any rate, Anaximenes of Lampsacus says that the Milesians colonized the islands Icaros and Leros; and, near the Hellespont, Limnae in the Chersonesus, as also Abydus and Arisba and Paesus in Asia; and Artace and Cyzicus in the island of the Cyziceni; and Scepsis in the interior of the Troad. I, however, in my detailed description speak of the other cities, which have been omitted by him. Both Milesians and Delians invoke an Apollo Ulius, that is, as god of health and healing, for the verb ulein means to be healthy; whence the noun ule and the salutation, Both health and great joy to thee; for Apollo is the god of healing. And Artemis has her name from the fact that she makes people Artemeas. And both Helius and Selene are closely associated with these, since they are the causes of the temperature of the air. And both pestilential diseases and sudden deaths are imputed to these gods.
14.1.23. After the completion of the temple of Artemis, which, he says, was the work of Cheirocrates (the same man who built Alexandreia and the same man who proposed to Alexander to fashion Mt. Athos into his likeness, representing him as pouring a libation from a kind of ewer into a broad bowl, and to make two cities, one on the right of the mountain and the other on the left, and a river flowing from one to the other) — after the completion of the temple, he says, the great number of dedications in general were secured by means of the high honor they paid their artists, but the whole of the altar was filled, one might say, with the works of Praxiteles. They showed me also some of the works of Thrason, who made the chapel of Hecate, the waxen image of Penelope, and the old woman Eurycleia. They had eunuchs as priests, whom they called Megabyzi. And they were always in quest of persons from other places who were worthy of this preferment, and they held them in great honor. And it was obligatory for maidens to serve as colleagues with them in their priestly office. But though at the present some of their usages are being preserved, yet others are not; but the sanctuary remains a place of refuge, the same as in earlier times, although the limits of the refuge have often been changed; for example, when Alexander extended them for a stadium, and when Mithridates shot an arrow from the corner of the roof and thought it went a little farther than a stadium, and when Antony doubled this distance and included within the refuge a part of the city. But this extension of the refuge proved harmful, and put the city in the power of criminals; and it was therefore nullified by Augustus Caesar.
14.1.26. After the outlet of the Cayster River comes a lake that runs inland from the sea, called Selinusia; and next comes another lake that is confluent with it, both affording great revenues. of these revenues, though sacred, the kings deprived the goddess, but the Romans gave them back; and again the tax-gatherers forcibly converted the tolls to their own use; but when Artemidorus was sent on an embassy, as he says, he got the lakes back for the goddess, and he also won the decision over Heracleotis, which was in revolt, his case being decided at Rome; and in return for this the city erected in the sanctuary a golden image of him. In the innermost recess of the lake there is a sanctuary of a king, which is said to have been built by Agamemnon.
14.1.29. After Colophon one comes to the mountain Coracius and to an isle sacred to Artemis, whither deer, it has been believed, swim across and give birth to their young. Then comes Lebedus, which is one hundred and twenty stadia distant from Colophon. This is the meeting-place and settlement of all the Dionysiac artists in Ionia as far as the Hellespont; and this is the place where both games and a general festal assembly are held every year in honor of Dionysus. They formerly lived in Teos, the city of the Ionians that comes next after Colophon, but when the sedition broke out they fled for refuge to Ephesus. And when Attalus settled them in Myonnesus between Teos and Lebedus the Teians sent an embassy to beg of the Romans not to permit Myonnesus to be fortified against them; and they migrated to Lebedus, whose inhabitants gladly received them because of the dearth of population by which they were then afflicted. Teos, also, is one hundred and twenty stadia distant from Lebedus; and in the intervening distance there is an island Aspis, by some called Arconnesus. And Myonnesus is settled on a height that forms a peninsula.''. None
80. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.323, 1.498-1.504, 7.403
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Diana (Artemis) • Diana/Artemis

 Found in books: Farrell (2021) 108; Giusti (2018) 121; Panoussi(2019) 155, 208; Radicke (2022) 477, 496


1.323. succinctam pharetra et maculosae tegmine lyncis,
1.498. Qualis in Eurotae ripis aut per iuga Cynthi 1.499. exercet Diana choros, quam mille secutae 1.500. hinc atque hinc glomerantur oreades; illa pharetram 1.501. fert umero, gradiensque deas supereminet omnis: 1.502. Latonae tacitum pertemptant gaudia pectus: 1.503. talis erat Dido, talem se laeta ferebat 1.504. per medios, instans operi regnisque futuris.' '. None
1.323. But the same stormful fortune still pursues
1.498. Dido, assembling her few trusted friends, 1.499. prepared her flight. There rallied to her cause 1.500. all who did hate and scorn the tyrant king, 1.501. or feared his cruelty. They seized his ships, 1.502. which haply rode at anchor in the bay, 1.503. and loaded them with gold; the hoarded wealth 1.504. of vile and covetous Pygmalion
7.403. let me seek strength in war, come whence it will! ''. None
81. Vergil, Georgics, 4.464-4.467
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis, of Ephesus (Ephesia)

 Found in books: Pinheiro Bierl and Beck (2013) 253; de Jáuregui et al. (2011) 321


4.464. Ipse cava solans aegrum testudine amorem 4.465. te, dulcis coniunx, te solo in litore secum, 4.466. te veniente die, te decedente canebat. 4.467. Taenarias etiam fauces, alta ostia Ditis,''. None
4.464. Arched mountain-wise closed round him, and within 4.465. Its mighty bosom welcomed, and let speed 4.466. To the deep river-bed. And now, with eye' "4.467. of wonder gazing on his mother's hall"'. None
82. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis Pergaia • Hageso, Artemis, on Rhodes

 Found in books: Connelly (2007) 140; Horster and Klöckner (2014) 129


83. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis, Aristoboule • Artemis, Demosyne • Artemis, Mounichia

 Found in books: Humphreys (2018) 1094, 1103; Mikalson (2016) 194


84. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis Pergaia • Artemis, Kindyas (Bargylia) • Artemis, Miletos • Artemis, Pergaia (Halicarnassus) • Artemis, at Ephesus • Artemis, at Magnesia on the Maeander • Artemis, cults of, Leukophrene (Magnesia on the Meder) • Artemis, cults of, at Aigeira (Arkadia) • Artemis, cults of, at Delos • Artemis, cults of, at Ephesos • Artemis, cults of, at Miletos • Artemis,, and virgin priestesses • Chariklea, zakoros of Artemis at Ephesos • Ephesos, Sanctuary of Artemis at • Komaitho, Artemis Triklaria at Patrai • loans, festivals of Artemis

 Found in books: Bricault and Bonnet (2013) 183; Connelly (2007) 41, 168, 214; Horster and Klöckner (2014) 45, 113; Lupu(2005) 51, 52, 95, 96, 99, 108; Stavrianopoulou (2006) 136


85. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis, Hekate • Artemis, Kindyas (Bargylia) • Artemis, Miletos • Artemis, Phylake • Artemis, at Eleutherna • Artemis, at Ephesus • Artemis, at Magnesia on the Maeander • Artemis, cults of, Hymnia(Orchomenos) • Artemis, cults of, Pergaia (Halikarnassos) • Artemis, cults of, Pergaia (Kos) • Artemis, cults of, at Mounychia • Artemis, titles of Delphinia • Artemis, titles of Hekate • Chariklea, zakoros of Artemis at Ephesos • Pausanias,, on Artemis at Patras • Pausanias,, on Artemis at Tegea • loans, festivals of Artemis

 Found in books: Connelly (2007) 44, 106, 182, 200; Ekroth (2013) 156, 157, 223; Hitch (2017) 70; Lupu(2005) 99, 100, 108, 333; Parker (2005) 414, 436, 466; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti (2022) 179, 180; Stavrianopoulou (2006) 136


86. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis, Miletos • Artemis, at Ephesus • Artemis, at Magnesia on the Maeander • loans, festivals of Artemis

 Found in books: Lupu(2005) 108; Stavrianopoulou (2006) 146


87. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis, Agrotera • Artemis, Boulaia • Artemis, Brauronia

 Found in books: Mikalson (2016) 205; Papazarkadas (2011) 80, 301, 307


88. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis, Callimachus’s hymn to • Artemis, Ephesia • Artemis, Ephesos • Artemis, Sardeis • Artemis, as gymnasiarchs • Artemis, at Ephesus • Artemis, chastity as aspect of • Artemis, cult of • Artemis, duties of • Artemis, festivals in • Artemis, mysteries of • Artemis, of C. Vibius Salutaris • Artemis, testimony of devotion to (NT) • Callimachus, Hymn to Artemis • Larcia Theogenis Iuliane, as prytanis, gymnasiarch, and priestess of Artemis • Strabo, on birth of Artemis and Apollo • Strabo, on mysteries related to Artemis • boule and demos, decree on worship of Artemis • kourêtes, protect Artemis from Hera at birth • statues, of Artemis, in procession • temple, of Artemis in Ephesos

 Found in books: Bricault and Bonnet (2013) 34, 183, 184, 185; Hallmannsecker (2022) 130, 143; Kalinowski (2021) 94, 95, 98, 102, 104, 106, 107, 110, 270, 325; Lupu(2005) 95, 96; Stavrianopoulou (2006) 15, 212; Versnel (2011) 107


89. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis (goddess), sanctuary at Athens • Artemis Brauronia, sacred precint on the acropolis of • Artemis, Agrotera • Artemis, Boulaia • Artemis, Brauronia • Artemis, Kolainis • Artemis, Kuria of Termessus • Artemis, Mounichia • Artemis, cults of, Pergaia (Halikarnassos) • Artemis, cults of, Pergaia (Kos) • buildings in the shrine of Artemis • sanctuary, of Artemis at Brauron • temple, of Artemis in the sanctuary at Brauron • thiasoi and thiasotai, of Artemis

 Found in books: Connelly (2007) 200; Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 234; Gygax (2016) 100; Humphreys (2018) 647, 681; Lalone (2019) 169; Mikalson (2016) 125, 135, 152, 170, 285; Papazarkadas (2011) 23, 25, 27, 29, 88, 89


90. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis Soteira, and warfare • Artemis Soteira, as the most popular Soteira • Artemis Soteira, in Boeae • Artemis Soteira, multiple functions of • Artemis, titles of Delphinia

 Found in books: Henderson (2020) 175; Jim (2022) 145; Parker (2005) 466


91. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis

 Found in books: Bremmer (2008) 218; Naiden (2013) 162


92. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis, A. Ephesia • Artemis, A. Patmia • Syme, Apollo Dalios, Artemis Dalia, Leto

 Found in books: Bremmer (2008) 253; Kowalzig (2007) 77


93. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis, Leukophryene • Artemis, Meander

 Found in books: Mikalson (2016) 295; Stavrianopoulou (2013) 185


94. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis • Artemis, priests of

 Found in books: Dignas Parker and Stroumsa (2013) 145; Lipka (2021) 208, 215





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