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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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All subjects (including unvalidated):
subject book bibliographic info
adopt, children, women Kalinowski (2021) 66
adopted, brother of co-regent verus, lucius, with, marcus aurelius Sider (2001) 18
adopted, by alexandrian jews, ideology, alexandrian Honigman (2003) 90, 131, 138
adopted, by egyptians, moses, circumcision Potter Suh and Holladay (2021) 161
adopted, by galba, calpurnius piso, l. Bruun and Edmondson (2015) 190
adopted, by p. vedius antoninus i, vedius antoninus ii, p., vedius ii, m. cl. p. vedius Kalinowski (2021) 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 89, 379, 380, 381
adopted, by vedius i, vedius antoninus iii, p., vedius iii, m. cl. p. vedius phaedrus sabinianus, ‘bauherr’ Kalinowski (2021) 63, 64, 65, 66, 89, 379, 380, 381, 382, 384
adopted, certain jewish practices, caelicolae, non-jews, god-fearers, who Feldman (2006) 199, 200
adopted, children Marek (2019) 466, 467, 468
adopted, father, vedius antoninus ii, p., vedius ii, m. cl. p. vedius, homonymity with son and Kalinowski (2021) 46, 73, 125, 397
adopted, nero Davies (2004) 196
adopted, son of hadrian, aelius caesar, l. Bruun and Edmondson (2015) 190
adopted, son of tiberius, germanicus Bruun and Edmondson (2015) 183, 186, 193, 196, 197, 306
adopted, son, caesar, hadrian’s Rizzi (2010) 112, 114
adopted, son, the Widdicombe (2000) 228
adopted, sons, adoption, in roman society tensions between biological and Peppard (2011) 73, 74, 78, 79, 80, 136, 140
adopted, sons, imperial adoption, techniques for affiliating Peppard (2011) 74, 75, 76, 77
adopted, sons, vedius antoninus i, p., vedius i, ‘adoptivvater’, homonymity with Kalinowski (2021) 46, 246, 247, 397, 398, 399, 400, 401, 402
adopting, judean non-judean women, practices, brootens work Kraemer (2010) 184
adopting, judean non-judean women, practices, cohens arguments Kraemer (2010) 194, 195
adopting, judean non-judean women, practices, elite roman women as patrons of judeans Kraemer (2010) 229
adopting, judean non-judean women, practices, gender issues Kraemer (2010) 196, 197, 198
adopting, judean non-judean women, practices, greek and latin references Kraemer (2010) 189
adopting, judean non-judean women, practices, hellenistic period Kraemer (2010) 194, 195
adopting, judean non-judean women, practices, in pseudo-clementines Kraemer (2010) 229, 230, 231
adopting, judean non-judean women, practices, inscriptions Kraemer (2010) 190, 191, 192
adopting, judean non-judean women, practices, josephuss narrative of fulvia Kraemer (2010) 225, 226
adopting, judean non-judean women, practices, lieus arguments Kraemer (2010) 184, 185
adopting, judean non-judean women, practices, masons argument Kraemer (2010) 193, 194, 195
adopting, judean non-judean women, practices, matthews arguments Kraemer (2010) 185, 223, 226, 227, 228
adopting, judean non-judean women, practices, punishments Kraemer (2010) 181, 182
adopting, judean non-judean women, practices, rabbinic references Kraemer (2010) 188, 190
adopting, judean non-judean women, practices, relationship between ethnicity and devotion to deities Kraemer (2010) 194, 195, 196, 197
adopting, judean non-judean women, practices, theosebēs as general piety Kraemer (2010) 192, 193
adopting, judean non-judean women, practices, theosebēs inscriptions Kraemer (2010) 224, 225
adopting, judean non-judean women, practices, veneration of judean god Kraemer (2010) 195, 196
adopting, judean practices, category of non-judean women, god-fearers Kraemer (2010) 193, 195
adopting, judean practices, conversion and veneration of non-judean women, gods, distinction Kraemer (2010) 186, 187, 190, 193
adopting, judean practices, dio non-judean women, cassius, writings of Kraemer (2010) 181, 182
adopting, judean practices, non-judean women Kraemer (2010) 180, 181
adopting, judean practices, non-judean women, josephus, writings of Kraemer (2010) 181, 183, 221, 222, 223
adopting, judean practices, queen helena of non-judean women, adiabene, narrative of Kraemer (2010) 226
adopting, of perspective Mackey (2022) 254
adopting, orpheus and eurydice, female mourning behavior, orpheus Panoussi(2019) 92, 95, 96, 97, 100
adopting, thessalian kopais traditions through song, thebes Kowalzig (2007) 358, 359, 364, 365, 366, 367, 368, 369, 370, 371, 399
adoption Birnbaum and Dillon (2020) 377, 378
Brule (2003) 135
Bruun and Edmondson (2015) 190, 572, 573
Czajkowski et al (2020) 128, 255
Flynn (2018) 7, 10, 11, 12, 65, 70, 71, 72, 73, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 82, 83, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 95, 101, 106, 107, 179, 180, 182, 183, 184, 185, 187, 188, 189, 190
Gagarin and Cohen (2005) 258, 318, 319
Geljon and Runia (2013) 95
Huebner (2013) 34, 105, 168, 175, 176, 178, 179, 180, 181, 182, 183, 186, 188, 189, 192, 194
Humphreys (2018) 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 42, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 174, 413, 603, 604, 668, 930, 1007, 1008, 1031
Karfíková (2012) 45, 47, 48, 52, 164, 229, 231, 253, 263, 318
Lampe (2003) 177
Mueller (2002) 83, 84, 195, 196
Novenson (2020) 28
Osborne (2001) 215, 223, 237
Shannon-Henderson (2019) 7, 46, 94, 114, 245, 314
deSilva (2022) 60, 62, 63, 64, 73, 78, 88, 150, 211, 213, 214, 247, 269
adoption, and creation of patria potestas over children Phang (2001) 101, 102, 103, 104, 309
adoption, and imperial ideology, testamentary Peppard (2011) 59
adoption, and names Humphreys (2018) 283, 284, 285, 699, 932
adoption, and phratry Humphreys (2018) 36
adoption, and pliny's panegyric, imperial Peppard (2011) 83, 84
adoption, and status Humphreys (2018) 34
adoption, as being, made Peppard (2011) 73
adoption, as master-metaphor in christian divine sonship Peppard (2011) 133, 165, 167, 171
adoption, as master-metaphor in christian divine sonship, alexander's teachings Peppard (2011) 163, 164
adoption, as master-metaphor in christian divine sonship, arian controversy Peppard (2011) 162, 163, 164, 165
adoption, as master-metaphor in christian divine sonship, athanasius's teachings Peppard (2011) 164, 165
adoption, as master-metaphor in christian divine sonship, begottenness as master-metaphor in divine sonship of jesus Peppard (2011) 133, 139, 140, 162, 163, 165, 167, 171
adoption, as master-metaphor in christian divine sonship, dominance in scholarly discourse Peppard (2011) 10, 11, 162, 163, 164, 165, 167
adoption, as master-metaphor in christian divine sonship, philosophical debates of Peppard (2011) 133
adoption, as master-metaphor in christian divine sonship, preoccupation with assigning christological moment Peppard (2011) 134, 138
adoption, as master-metaphor in christian divine sonship, unmixing metaphors in Peppard (2011) 159, 162, 163, 164, 165, 167, 168, 170, 171
adoption, as master-metaphor in fourth century, divine sonship Peppard (2011) 133, 165, 167, 171
adoption, as sons, baptism Widdicombe (2000) 170, 237
adoption, as sons, by nature Widdicombe (2000) 92, 99, 136, 137, 189, 194, 197
adoption, as sons, creature Widdicombe (2000) 237, 238, 239, 240
adoption, as sons, father-son relation Widdicombe (2000) 230, 231
adoption, as sons, moral endeavour Widdicombe (2000) 97, 98, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 136
adoption, as sons, new testament Widdicombe (2000) 228, 229
adoption, as sons, old testament Widdicombe (2000) 231, 232, 233, 234, 235
adoption, as sons, soteriology Widdicombe (2000) 227, 228, 229, 230, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 236, 237, 238, 239, 240, 241
adoption, as sons, the son Widdicombe (2000) 97, 98, 137, 138, 221, 222
adoption, as sons, true Widdicombe (2000) 240, 241
adoption, by augustus Peppard (2011) 62, 75, 77, 78, 117, 136
adoption, by augustus, refusal of pater patriae title Peppard (2011) 63
adoption, by caesar, augustus Peppard (2011) 117, 118, 136
adoption, by claudius, nero Peppard (2011) 74, 78, 79, 80
adoption, by galba, piso Peppard (2011) 59, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 93, 96
adoption, by nerva, trajan Peppard (2011) 59, 76, 83, 84
adoption, by the diadochi, satrapy/satraps Marek (2019) 190, 191
adoption, by the seleucids, satrapy/satraps Marek (2019) 199, 200
adoption, by will Humphreys (2018) 46, 47, 48, 203, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, 224, 230, 231, 232, 233, 313, 315, 316, 762
adoption, childlessness, ascetic Huebner and Laes (2019) 285
adoption, children Huebner and Laes (2019) 268
adoption, contracts, papyri Peppard (2011) 109, 139
adoption, cum marriage, marriage Huebner (2013) 155, 159
adoption, disputed Humphreys (2018) 187, 191, 208, 209, 216, 217, 218, 219, 231, 236, 237, 238, 252, 303, 311, 809, 854, 1059
adoption, dynastic ideology in imperial Peppard (2011) 73, 74, 75, 77, 78, 79
adoption, epikleric Humphreys (2018) 118, 274, 275, 710, 711, 1143, 1144, 1196
adoption, epikleros Humphreys (2018) 48, 63, 67, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 274, 275, 604
adoption, fornication, through Monnickendam (2020) 75
adoption, greek names, of not a meaningful criterion of degree of assimilation Feldman (2006) 195, 196
adoption, holy spirit Widdicombe (2000) 99, 100, 101, 236, 237, 240
adoption, in roman society greek terminology for Peppard (2011) 139
adoption, in roman society inheritance/wealth transfer through Peppard (2011) 51, 55, 135, 136, 140
adoption, in roman society legal frameworks for Peppard (2011) 55, 59, 136
adoption, in roman society papyrus contracts for Peppard (2011) 109, 139
adoption, in roman society preservation of family lines through Peppard (2011) 51, 136
adoption, in roman society rituals and procedures Peppard (2011) 59
adoption, in roman society social status of adoptees, Peppard (2011) 139
adoption, in roman society testamentary Peppard (2011) 59
adoption, in roman society vs. modern western practice Peppard (2011) 51, 136
adoption, incarnation Widdicombe (2000) 231, 232, 233, 234, 235
adoption, isokrates, marriage and Humphreys (2018) 85, 103, 158, 172, 216, 223, 1052
adoption, law Humphreys (2018) 51
adoption, legal frameworks for, testamentary Peppard (2011) 59
adoption, meritocratic vs. dynastic succession, imperial Peppard (2011) 73, 74, 79, 81, 82, 138
adoption, metaphor Albrecht (2014) 248
adoption, metaphor and ebionites Peppard (2011) 146, 147, 156, 159
adoption, metaphor as master-metaphor for christian divine sonship in fourth century Peppard (2011) 133, 165, 167, 171
adoption, metaphor implying upward mobility Peppard (2011) 156, 159, 164
adoption, metaphor in ancient judaism Peppard (2011) 103, 105, 106
adoption, metaphor in arian controversy Peppard (2011) 163, 164, 165, 167
adoption, metaphor in baptism rituals of fourth century Peppard (2011) 168, 170, 171
adoption, metaphor in clement of alexandria Peppard (2011) 155, 163, 164
adoption, metaphor in gospel of mark Peppard (2011) 6, 7, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130
adoption, metaphor in irenaeus Peppard (2011) 155, 156, 157, 158, 159, 163, 164
adoption, metaphor in nicene era Peppard (2011) 162, 163, 164, 165, 167, 168
adoption, metaphor in pauline epistles Peppard (2011) 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 146
adoption, metaphor of origen Peppard (2011) 161, 162
adoption, metaphor of theodotus and his followers Peppard (2011) 147
adoption, metaphor resonance with roman social practice Peppard (2011) 147, 155
adoption, metaphors in mark, gospel of Peppard (2011) 6, 7, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130
adoption, metaphors in pauline epistles Peppard (2011) 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 146, 157, 158, 162, 163, 164, 171
adoption, more prudent than procreation, democritus, presocratic Sorabji (2000) 277
adoption, more prudent, procreation, democritus Sorabji (2000) 277
adoption, motives for Parker (2005) 22, 33, 34, 35
adoption, of akhaian past, argos Kowalzig (2007) 168, 174, 175, 176
adoption, of hadrian by trajan, imperial Peppard (2011) 73
adoption, of hadrian, trajan Peppard (2011) 73
adoption, of husbands name, betrothal Monnickendam (2020) 67, 70, 76, 77
adoption, of israelites, pauline epistles on Peppard (2011) 138, 139
adoption, of jewish practices, john chrysostom, denunciation of christian Kalmin (1998) 69
adoption, of nero by claudius, imperial Peppard (2011) 74, 78, 79, 80
adoption, of nero, emperor Shannon-Henderson (2019) 266, 353
adoption, of new deities, religious authority Eidinow and Kindt (2015) 310
adoption, of piso by galba, imperial Peppard (2011) 59, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 93, 96
adoption, of tamid psalms, liturgy Trudinger (2004) 45
adoption, of tiberius gemellus by caligula, imperial Peppard (2011) 59, 81
adoption, of trajan by nerva, imperial Peppard (2011) 59, 76, 83, 84
adoption, of trajan, nerva Peppard (2011) 59, 83, 84
adoption, onomastics Bruun and Edmondson (2015) 572, 573
adoption, phratry, and Humphreys (2018) 63, 64, 67, 68, 70, 81, 83, 231, 233
adoption, posthumous Humphreys (2018) 162, 191, 228, 1042
Parker (2005) 12, 13, 34
adoption, practice, baptism of jesus reading through lens of jewish Peppard (2011) 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 105, 106, 112
adoption, public attention to, imperial Peppard (2011) 70, 79, 80
adoption, publicity methods for, imperial Peppard (2011) 51, 70, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 83
adoption, rabbinic halakha Monnickendam (2020) 81, 82
adoption, spirit, effects of Frey and Levison (2014) 295, 296, 297
Levison (2009) 4, 268, 273, 274, 276, 277, 278, 279, 280, 281, 424
adoption, tamid psalms, date of Trudinger (2004) 48, 49, 50
adoption, tensions with natural sons, imperial Peppard (2011) 73, 74, 78, 79, 80
adoption, testamentary, imperial Peppard (2011) 59
adoption, theology Yates and Dupont (2020) 61, 62, 63, 68, 69
adoption, theology, baptism, and Yates and Dupont (2020) 61, 62, 63, 68, 69
adoption, transmission of power through, imperial Peppard (2011) 70, 73, 74, 75
adoption, use in christian theology Monnickendam (2020) 76
adoption, will, and Humphreys (2018) 35, 37, 46, 47, 48, 203, 208, 211, 216, 217, 218, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317
adoptionist, christologies, adoption, as master-metaphor in christian divine sonship, rejection of Peppard (2011) 133, 159, 171
adoptions, arranged by, augustus, marriages and Fertik (2019) 47
adoptions, by, augustus Peppard (2011) 75, 76, 77, 78, 81, 117, 136
adoptive, divine sonship paul's master-metaphor of Peppard (2011) 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140
adoptive, father, vedius antoninus iii, p., vedius iii, m. cl. p. vedius phaedrus sabinianus, ‘bauherr’, homonymity with natural and Kalinowski (2021) 73
adoptive, father-son relationship, in aḥiqar son Toloni (2022) 128, 145, 146, 147, 148
adoptive, interpretation of baptism of jesus Peppard (2011) 87, 93, 95, 97, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 122, 125, 126
adoptive, metaphors for, divine sonship Peppard (2011) 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 163, 165, 167, 171
adoptive, metaphors for, divine sonship of jesus Peppard (2011) 133, 134, 135, 137, 138, 139, 140, 146, 147, 155, 157, 158, 159, 171
adoptive, parents Kraemer (2010) 212
adoptive, parents contracts Huebner (2013) 159, 176, 178, 181
adoptive, parents of a daughter-in-law Huebner (2013) 155, 186
adoptive, parents of a son-in-law Huebner (2013) 188, 189, 192, 194
adoptive, parents of females Huebner (2013) 186
adopts, an eastern style, alexander of macedon Isaac (2004) 299
adopts, aphareus, isocrates Papazarkadas (2011) 310
adopts, male heirs, vedius antoninus i, p., vedius i, ‘adoptivvater’ Kalinowski (2021) 62, 63, 65, 66, 379, 381
adopts, plato's comparison with horses, posidonius, stoic Sorabji (2000) 95, 96
grandson/adopted, son of augustus, gaius caesar Bruun and Edmondson (2015) 189, 306
grandson/adopted, son of augustus, lucius caesar Bruun and Edmondson (2015) 189, 306

List of validated texts:
23 validated results for "adoption"
1. Hebrew Bible, Exodus, 2.5, 2.9, 4.22-4.23 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Adoption • Pauline Epistles adoption metaphors in • Pauline Epistles on adoption of Israelites • Spirit, effects of,, adoption • adoption • adoption as master-metaphor in Christian divine sonship, begottenness as master-metaphor in divine sonship of Jesus • adoption in Roman society Greek terminology for • adoption in Roman society papyrus contracts for • adoption in Roman society social status of adoptees • adoption metaphor in Pauline Epistles • adoption metaphor in ancient Judaism • baptism of Jesus reading through lens of Jewish adoption practice • divine sonship Paul's master-metaphor of adoptive • divine sonship adoptive metaphors for • divine sonship of Jesus adoptive metaphors for • papyri adoption contracts

 Found in books: Flynn (2018) 89, 92, 93; Frey and Levison (2014) 296; Peppard (2011) 99, 100, 103, 139; deSilva (2022) 63


2.5. וַתֵּרֶד בַּת־פַּרְעֹה לִרְחֹץ עַל־הַיְאֹר וְנַעֲרֹתֶיהָ הֹלְכֹת עַל־יַד הַיְאֹר וַתֵּרֶא אֶת־הַתֵּבָה בְּתוֹךְ הַסּוּף וַתִּשְׁלַח אֶת־אֲמָתָהּ וַתִּקָּחֶהָ
2.9. וַתֹּאמֶר לָהּ בַּת־פַּרְעֹה הֵילִיכִי אֶת־הַיֶּלֶד הַזֶּה וְהֵינִקִהוּ לִי וַאֲנִי אֶתֵּן אֶת־שְׂכָרֵךְ וַתִּקַּח הָאִשָּׁה הַיֶּלֶד וַתְּנִיקֵהוּ׃
4.22. וְאָמַרְתָּ אֶל־פַּרְעֹה כֹּה אָמַר יְהוָה בְּנִי בְכֹרִי יִשְׂרָאֵל׃ 4.23. וָאֹמַר אֵלֶיךָ שַׁלַּח אֶת־בְּנִי וְיַעַבְדֵנִי וַתְּמָאֵן לְשַׁלְּחוֹ הִנֵּה אָנֹכִי הֹרֵג אֶת־בִּנְךָ בְּכֹרֶךָ׃''. None
2.5. And the daughter of Pharaoh came down to bathe in the river; and her maidens walked along by the river-side; and she saw the ark among the flags, and sent her handmaid to fetch it.
2.9. And Pharaoh’s daughter said unto her: ‘Take this child away, and nurse it for me, and I will give thee thy wages.’ And the woman took the child, and nursed it.
4.22. And thou shalt say unto Pharaoh: Thus saith the LORD: Israel is My son, My first-born. 4.23. And I have said unto thee: Let My son go, that he may serve Me; and thou hast refused to let him go. ‘Behold, I will slay thy first-born.’''. None
2. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 1.26-1.27, 21.8 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Adoption • Pauline Epistles adoption metaphors in • Spirit, effects of, adoption • adoption • adoption in Roman society inheritance/wealth transfer through • adoption metaphor in Pauline Epistles • divine sonship Paul's master-metaphor of adoptive • divine sonship adoptive metaphors for • divine sonship of Jesus adoptive metaphors for

 Found in books: Flynn (2018) 90; Levison (2009) 424; Peppard (2011) 135; Vargas (2021) 116


1.26. וַיֹּאמֶר אֱלֹהִים נַעֲשֶׂה אָדָם בְּצַלְמֵנוּ כִּדְמוּתֵנוּ וְיִרְדּוּ בִדְגַת הַיָּם וּבְעוֹף הַשָּׁמַיִם וּבַבְּהֵמָה וּבְכָל־הָאָרֶץ וּבְכָל־הָרֶמֶשׂ הָרֹמֵשׂ עַל־הָאָרֶץ׃ 1.27. וַיִּבְרָא אֱלֹהִים אֶת־הָאָדָם בְּצַלְמוֹ בְּצֶלֶם אֱלֹהִים בָּרָא אֹתוֹ זָכָר וּנְקֵבָה בָּרָא אֹתָם׃
21.8. וַיִּגְדַּל הַיֶּלֶד וַיִּגָּמַל וַיַּעַשׂ אַבְרָהָם מִשְׁתֶּה גָדוֹל בְּיוֹם הִגָּמֵל אֶת־יִצְחָק׃''. None
1.26. And God said: ‘Let us make man in our image, after our likeness; and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.’ 1.27. And God created man in His own image, in the image of God created He him; male and female created He them.
21.8. And the child grew, and was weaned. And Abraham made a great feast on the day that Isaac was weaned.''. None
3. Hebrew Bible, Malachi, 1.6 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Adoptionism, “divine sponsorship”/adoption • adoption as sons, the Son

 Found in books: Ruzer (2020) 83; Widdicombe (2000) 221


1.6. בֵּן יְכַבֵּד אָב וְעֶבֶד אֲדֹנָיו וְאִם־אָב אָנִי אַיֵּה כְבוֹדִי וְאִם־אֲדוֹנִים אָנִי אַיֵּה מוֹרָאִי אָמַר יְהוָה צְבָאוֹת לָכֶם הַכֹּהֲנִים בּוֹזֵי שְׁמִי וַאֲמַרְתֶּם בַּמֶּה בָזִינוּ אֶת־שְׁמֶךָ׃''. None
1.6. A son honoureth his father, And a servant his master; If then I be a father, Where is My honour? And if I be a master, Where is My fear? Saith the LORD of hosts Unto you, O priests, that despise My name. And ye say: ‘Wherein have we despised Thy name?’''. None
4. Hebrew Bible, Psalms, 2.7, 89.24-89.29 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Adoptionism, “divine sponsorship”/adoption • Pauline Epistles adoption metaphors in • Pauline Epistles on adoption of Israelites • Spirit, effects of, adoption • Tamid Psalms, date of adoption • adoption as master-metaphor in Christian divine sonship • adoption as master-metaphor in Christian divine sonship, begottenness as master-metaphor in divine sonship of Jesus • adoption as master-metaphor in Christian divine sonship, preoccupation with assigning christological moment • adoption as master-metaphor in Christian divine sonship, rejection of adoptionist christologies • adoption as master-metaphor in Christian divine sonship, unmixing metaphors in • adoption in Roman society Greek terminology for • adoption in Roman society inheritance/wealth transfer through • adoption in Roman society papyrus contracts for • adoption in Roman society social status of adoptees • adoption metaphor and Ebionites • adoption metaphor as master-metaphor for Christian divine sonship in fourth century • adoption metaphor in Clement of Alexandria • adoption metaphor in Irenaeus • adoption metaphor in Nicene era • adoption metaphor in Pauline Epistles • adoption metaphor in ancient Judaism • adoption metaphor in baptism rituals of fourth century • adoption metaphor of Origen • adoption metaphor of Theodotus and his followers • adoption metaphor resonance with Roman social practice • baptism of Jesus adoptive interpretation of • baptism of Jesus reading through lens of Jewish adoption practice • divine sonship Paul's master-metaphor of adoptive • divine sonship adoption as master-metaphor in fourth century • divine sonship adoptive metaphors for • divine sonship of Jesus adoptive metaphors for • papyri adoption contracts

 Found in books: Levison (2009) 276; Peppard (2011) 95, 97, 105, 106, 134, 135, 139, 147, 155, 157, 161, 168, 170, 171; Ruzer (2020) 83, 84, 99, 100, 103; Trudinger (2004) 50


2.7. אֲסַפְּרָה אֶל חֹק יְהוָה אָמַר אֵלַי בְּנִי אַתָּה אֲנִי הַיּוֹם יְלִדְתִּיךָ׃
89.24. וְכַתּוֹתִי מִפָּנָיו צָרָיו וּמְשַׂנְאָיו אֶגּוֹף׃ 89.25. וֶאֶמוּנָתִי וְחַסְדִּי עִמּוֹ וּבִשְׁמִי תָּרוּם קַרְנוֹ׃ 89.26. וְשַׂמְתִּי בַיָּם יָדוֹ וּבַנְּהָרוֹת יְמִינוֹ׃ 89.27. הוּא יִקְרָאֵנִי אָבִי אָתָּה אֵלִי וְצוּר יְשׁוּעָתִי׃ 89.28. אַף־אָנִי בְּכוֹר אֶתְּנֵהוּ עֶלְיוֹן לְמַלְכֵי־אָרֶץ׃ 89.29. לְעוֹלָם אשמור־אֶשְׁמָר־ לוֹ חַסְדִּי וּבְרִיתִי נֶאֱמֶנֶת לוֹ׃' '. None
2.7. I will tell of the decree: The LORD said unto me: 'Thou art My son, this day have I begotten thee." '
89.24. And I will beat to pieces his adversaries before him, And smite them that hate him. 89.25. But My faithfulness and My mercy shall be with him; And through My name shall his horn be exalted. 89.26. I will set his hand also on the sea, And his right hand on the rivers. 89.27. He shall call unto Me: Thou art my Father, My God, and the rock of my salvation. . 89.28. I also will appoint him first-born, The highest of the kings of the earth. 89.29. For ever will I keep for him My mercy, And My covet shall stand fast with him.' ". None
5. Hebrew Bible, 2 Samuel, 7.6-7.16 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Adoptionism, “divine sponsorship”/adoption • Pauline Epistles adoption metaphors in • adoption • adoption in Roman society inheritance/wealth transfer through • adoption metaphor in Pauline Epistles • adoption metaphor in ancient Judaism • baptism of Jesus reading through lens of Jewish adoption practice • divine sonship Paul's master-metaphor of adoptive • divine sonship adoptive metaphors for • divine sonship of Jesus adoptive metaphors for

 Found in books: Peppard (2011) 105, 135; Ruzer (2020) 83, 103, 104; deSilva (2022) 211


7.6. כִּי לֹא יָשַׁבְתִּי בְּבַיִת לְמִיּוֹם הַעֲלֹתִי אֶת־בְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל מִמִּצְרַיִם וְעַד הַיּוֹם הַזֶּה וָאֶהְיֶה מִתְהַלֵּךְ בְּאֹהֶל וּבְמִשְׁכָּן׃ 7.7. בְּכֹל אֲשֶׁר־הִתְהַלַּכְתִּי בְּכָל־בְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל הֲדָבָר דִּבַּרְתִּי אֶת־אַחַד שִׁבְטֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל אֲשֶׁר צִוִּיתִי לִרְעוֹת אֶת־עַמִּי אֶת־יִשְׂרָאֵל לֵאמֹר לָמָּה לֹא־בְנִיתֶם לִי בֵּית אֲרָזִים׃ 7.8. וְעַתָּה כֹּה־תֹאמַר לְעַבְדִּי לְדָוִד כֹּה אָמַר יְהוָה צְבָאוֹת אֲנִי לְקַחְתִּיךָ מִן־הַנָּוֶה מֵאַחַר הַצֹּאן לִהְיוֹת נָגִיד עַל־עַמִּי עַל־יִשְׂרָאֵל׃ 7.9. וָאֶהְיֶה עִמְּךָ בְּכֹל אֲשֶׁר הָלַכְתָּ וָאַכְרִתָה אֶת־כָּל־אֹיְבֶיךָ מִפָּנֶיךָ וְעָשִׂתִי לְךָ שֵׁם גָּדוֹל כְּשֵׁם הַגְּדֹלִים אֲשֶׁר בָּאָרֶץ׃' '7.11. וּלְמִן־הַיּוֹם אֲשֶׁר צִוִּיתִי שֹׁפְטִים עַל־עַמִּי יִשְׂרָאֵל וַהֲנִיחֹתִי לְךָ מִכָּל־אֹיְבֶיךָ וְהִגִּיד לְךָ יְהוָה כִּי־בַיִת יַעֲשֶׂה־לְּךָ יְהוָה׃ 7.12. כִּי יִמְלְאוּ יָמֶיךָ וְשָׁכַבְתָּ אֶת־אֲבֹתֶיךָ וַהֲקִימֹתִי אֶת־זַרְעֲךָ אַחֲרֶיךָ אֲשֶׁר יֵצֵא מִמֵּעֶיךָ וַהֲכִינֹתִי אֶת־מַמְלַכְתּוֹ׃ 7.13. הוּא יִבְנֶה־בַּיִת לִשְׁמִי וְכֹנַנְתִּי אֶת־כִּסֵּא מַמְלַכְתּוֹ עַד־עוֹלָם׃ 7.14. אֲנִי אֶהְיֶה־לּוֹ לְאָב וְהוּא יִהְיֶה־לִּי לְבֵן אֲשֶׁר בְּהַעֲוֺתוֹ וְהֹכַחְתִּיו בְּשֵׁבֶט אֲנָשִׁים וּבְנִגְעֵי בְּנֵי אָדָם׃ 7.15. וְחַסְדִּי לֹא־יָסוּר מִמֶּנּוּ כַּאֲשֶׁר הֲסִרֹתִי מֵעִם שָׁאוּל אֲשֶׁר הֲסִרֹתִי מִלְּפָנֶיךָ׃ 7.16. וְנֶאְמַן בֵּיתְךָ וּמַמְלַכְתְּךָ עַד־עוֹלָם לְפָנֶיךָ כִּסְאֲךָ יִהְיֶה נָכוֹן עַד־עוֹלָם׃''. None
7.6. For I have not dwelt in any house since that time that I brought up the children of Yisra᾽el out of Miżrayim, even to this day, but I have walked in a tent and in a tabernacle. 7.7. In all the places where I have walked with all the children of Yisra᾽el, did I speak a word with any of the rulers of Yisra᾽el, whom I commanded as shepherds of my people Yisra᾽el, saying, Why do you not build me a house of cedar? 7.8. Now therefore so shalt thou say to my servant David, Thus says the Lord of hosts, I took thee from the sheepfold, from following the sheep, to be ruler over my people, over Yisra᾽el: 7.9. and I was with thee wherever thou didst go, and have cut off all thy enemies out of thy sight, and have made thee a great name, like the name of the great men that are on the earth. 7.10. Moreover I have appointed a place for my people Yisra᾽el, and planted them, that they may dwell in a place of their own, and be troubled no more; neither shall the children of wickedness torment them any more, as at the beginning, 7.11. and as since the time that I commanded judges to be over my people Yisra᾽el; but I will give thee rest from all thy enemies, and the Lord tells thee that he will make thee a house. 7.12. And when the days are fulfilled, and thou shalt sleep with thy fathers, I will set up thy seed after thee, who shall issue from thy bowels, and I will establish his kingdom. 7.13. He shall build a house for my name, and I will make firm the throne of his kingdom for ever. 7.14. I will be his father, and he will be my son. If he commit iniquity, I will chasten him with the rod of men, and with such plagues as befall the sons of Adam: 7.15. but my covet love shall not depart away from him, as I took it from Sha᾽ul, whom I put away before thee. 7.16. And thy house and thy kingdom shall be established for ever before thee: thy throne shall be firm for ever.''. None
6. Hebrew Bible, Isaiah, 42.1 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Adoptionism, “divine sponsorship”/adoption • Piso, adoption by Galba • adoption in Roman society papyrus contracts for • baptism of Jesus adoptive interpretation of • imperial adoption of Piso by Galba • papyri adoption contracts

 Found in books: Peppard (2011) 95, 96, 109; Ruzer (2020) 99


42.1. הֵן עַבְדִּי אֶתְמָךְ־בּוֹ בְּחִירִי רָצְתָה נַפְשִׁי נָתַתִּי רוּחִי עָלָיו מִשְׁפָּט לַגּוֹיִם יוֹצִיא׃
42.1. שִׁירוּ לַיהוָה שִׁיר חָדָשׁ תְּהִלָּתוֹ מִקְצֵה הָאָרֶץ יוֹרְדֵי הַיָּם וּמְלֹאוֹ אִיִּים וְיֹשְׁבֵיהֶם׃''. None
42.1. Behold My servant, whom I uphold; Mine elect, in whom My soul delighteth; I have put My spirit upon him, He shall make the right to go forth to the nations.''. None
7. New Testament, 1 Corinthians, 1.21, 13.2, 15.28 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Pauline Epistles adoption metaphors in • Pauline Epistles on adoption of Israelites • Spirit, effects of, adoption • adoption • adoption as master-metaphor in Christian divine sonship, preoccupation with assigning christological moment • adoption as sons, moral endeavour • adoption metaphor in Pauline Epistles • baptism of Jesus adoptive interpretation of • divine sonship Paul's master-metaphor of adoptive • divine sonship adoptive metaphors for • divine sonship of Jesus adoptive metaphors for • imperial adoption meritocratic vs. dynastic succession

 Found in books: Levison (2009) 279; Peppard (2011) 110, 137, 138; Widdicombe (2000) 104, 105; deSilva (2022) 211, 247


1.21. ἐπειδὴ γὰρ ἐν τῇ σοφίᾳ τοῦ θεοῦ οὐκ ἔγνω ὁ κόσμος διὰ τῆς σοφίας τὸν θεόν, εὐδόκησεν ὁ θεὸς διὰ τῆς μωρίας τοῦ κηρύγματος σῶσαι τοὺς πιστεύοντας.
13.2. κἂν ἔχω προφητείαν καὶ εἰδῶ τὰ μυστήρια πάντα καὶ πᾶσαν τὴν γνῶσιν, κἂν ἔχω πᾶσαν τὴν πίστιν ὥστε ὄρη μεθιστάνειν, ἀγάπην δὲ μὴ ἔχω, οὐθέν εἰμι.
15.28. ὅταν δὲ ὑποταγῇ αὐτῷ τὰ πάντα, τότε καὶ αὐτὸς ὁ υἱὸς ὑποταγήσεται τῷ ὑποτάξαντι αὐτῷ τὰ πάντα, ἵνα ᾖ ὁ θεὸς πάντα ἐν πᾶσιν.''. None
1.21. For seeing that in the wisdom of God, the world through its wisdomdidn't know God, it was God's good pleasure through the foolishness ofthe preaching to save those who believe." "
13.2. If I have the gift of prophecy, and know all mysteries and allknowledge; and if I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, butdon't have love, I am nothing." '
15.28. When all things have been subjected to him, then theSon will also himself be subjected to him who subjected all things tohim, that God may be all in all.'". None
8. New Testament, Acts, 13.30-13.34 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Adoptionism, “divine sponsorship”/adoption • Pauline Epistles adoption metaphors in • Pauline Epistles on adoption of Israelites • adoption as master-metaphor in Christian divine sonship, preoccupation with assigning christological moment • adoption metaphor in Pauline Epistles • divine sonship Paul's master-metaphor of adoptive • divine sonship adoptive metaphors for • divine sonship of Jesus adoptive metaphors for • imperial adoption meritocratic vs. dynastic succession

 Found in books: Peppard (2011) 134, 138; Ruzer (2020) 103


13.30. ὁ δὲ θεὸς ἤγειρεν αὐτὸν ἐκ νεκρῶν· 13.31. ὃς ὤφθη ἐπὶ ἡμέρας πλείους τοῖς συναναβᾶσιν αὐτῷ ἀπὸ τῆς Γαλιλαίας εἰς Ἰερουσαλήμ, οἵτινες νῦν εἰσὶ μάρτυρες αὐτοῦ πρὸς τὸν λαόν. 13.32. καὶ ἡμεῖς ὑμᾶς εὐαγγελιζόμεθα τὴν πρὸς τοὺς πατέρας ἐπαγγελίαν γενομένην 13.33. ὅτι ταύτην ὁ θεὸς ἐκπεπλήρωκεν τοῖς τέκνοις ἡμῶν ἀναστήσας Ἰησοῦν, ὡς καὶ ἐν τῷ ψαλμῶ γέγραπται τῷ δευτέρῳ Υἱός μου εἶ σύ, ἐγὼ σήμ ν γεγέννηκά σε. 13.34. ὅτι δὲ ἀνέστησεν αὐτὸν ἐκ νεκρῶν μηκέτι μέλλοντα ὑποστρέφειν εἰς διαφθοράν, οὕτως εἴρηκεν ὅτιΔώσω ὑμῖν τὰ ὅσια Δαυεὶδ τὰ πιστά.''. None
13.30. But God raised him from the dead, 13.31. and he was seen for many days by those who came up with him from Galilee to Jerusalem, who are his witnesses to the people. 13.32. We bring you good news of the promise made to the fathers, ' "13.33. that God has fulfilled the same to us, their children, in that he raised up Jesus. As it is also written in the second psalm, 'You are my Son. Today I have become your father.' " '13.34. "Concerning that he raised him up from the dead, now no more to return to corruption, he has spoken thus: \'I will give you the holy and sure blessings of David.\ '. None
9. New Testament, Colossians, 1.13 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • adoption

 Found in books: Karfíková (2012) 164; deSilva (2022) 211


1.13. ὃς ἐρύσατο ἡμᾶς ἐκ τῆς ἐξουσίας τοῦ σκότους καὶ μετέστησεν εἰς τὴν βασιλείαν τοῦ υἱοῦ τῆς ἀγάπης αὐτοῦ,''. None
1.13. who delivered us out of the power of darkness, and translated us into the Kingdom of the Son of his love; ''. None
10. New Testament, Ephesians, 1.3-1.14, 5.23 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Augustus adoption by Caesar • Augustus adoptions by • Father-Son relation, adoption as sons • Pauline Epistles adoption metaphors in • Son, the, adopted • adoption • adoption as sons, New Testament • adoption as sons, Old Testament • adoption as sons, moral endeavour • adoption as sons, soteriology • adoption as sons, the Son • adoption by Augustus • adoption in Roman society inheritance/wealth transfer through • adoption in Roman society legal frameworks for • adoption in Roman society preservation of family lines through • adoption in Roman society tensions between biological and adopted sons • adoption in Roman society vs. modern Western practice • adoption metaphor in Pauline Epistles • adoption, use in Christian theology • baptism of Jesus adoptive interpretation of • baptism of Jesus reading through lens of Jewish adoption practice • betrothal, adoption of husbands name • divine sonship Paul's master-metaphor of adoptive • divine sonship adoptive metaphors for • divine sonship of Jesus adoptive metaphors for • incarnation, adoption

 Found in books: Karfíková (2012) 47, 164; Monnickendam (2020) 76; Peppard (2011) 112, 136, 137; Widdicombe (2000) 98, 228, 230, 231; deSilva (2022) 60, 62, 63, 64, 73, 78, 88, 150, 214, 247, 269


1.3. Εὐλογητὸς ὁ θεὸς καὶ πατὴρ τοῦ κυρίου ἡμῶν Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ, ὁ εὐλογήσας ἡμᾶς ἐν πάσῃ εὐλογίᾳ πνευματικῇ ἐν τοῖς ἐπουρανίοις ἐν Χριστῷ, 1.4. καθὼς ἐξελέξατο ἡμᾶς ἐν αὐτῷ πρὸ καταβολῆς κόσμου, εἶναι ἡμᾶς ἁγίους καὶ ἀμώμους κατενώπιον αὐτοῦ ἐν ἀγάπῃ, 1.5. προορίσας ἡμᾶς εἰς υἱοθεσίαν διὰ Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ εἰς αὐτόν, κατὰ τὴν εὐδοκίαν τοῦ θελήματος αὐτοῦ, 1.6. εἰς ἔπαινον δόξης τῆς χάριτος αὐτοῦ ἧς ἐχαρίτωσεν ἡμᾶς ἐν τῷ ἠγαπημένῳ, 1.7. ἐν ᾧ ἔχομεν τὴν ἀπολύτρωσιν διὰ τοῦ αἵματος αὐτοῦ, τὴν ἄφεσιν τῶν παραπτωμάτων, 1.8. κατὰ τὸ πλοῦτος τῆς χάριτος αὐτοῦ 1.9. ἧς ἐπερίσσευσεν εἰς ἡμᾶς ἐν πάσῃ σοφίᾳ καὶ φρονήσει γνωρίσας ἡμῖν τὸ μυστήριον τοῦ θελήματος αὐτοῦ, κατὰ τὴν εὐδοκίαν αὐτοῦ ἣν προέθετο ἐν αὐτῷ 1.10. εἰς οἰκονομίαν τοῦ πληρώματος τῶν καιρῶν, ἀνακεφαλαιώσασθαι τὰ πάντα ἐν τῷ χριστῷ, τὰ ἐπὶ τοῖς οὐρανοῖς καὶ τὰ ἐπὶ τῆς γῆς· ἐν αὐτῷ, 1.11. ἐν ᾧ καὶ ἐκληρώθημεν προορισθέντες κατὰ πρόθεσιν τοῦ τὰ πάντα ἐνεργοῦντος κατὰ τὴν βουλὴν τοῦ θελήματος αὐτοῦ, 1.12. εἰς τὸ εἶναι ἡμᾶς εἰς ἔπαινον δόξης αὐτοῦ τοὺς προηλπικότας ἐν τῷ χριστῷ· 1.13. ἐν ᾧ καὶ ὑμεῖς ἀκούσαντες τὸν λόγον τῆς ἀληθείας, τὸ εὐαγγέλιον τῆς σωτηρίας ὑμῶν, ἐν ᾧ καὶ πιστεύσαντες, ἐσφραγίσθητε τῷ πνεύματι τῆς ἐπαγγελίας τῷ ἁγίῳ, 1.14. ὅ ἐστιν ἀρραβὼν τῆς κληρονομίας ἡμῶν, εἰς ἀπολύτρωσιν τῆς περιποιήσεως, εἰς ἔπαινον τῆς δόξης αὐτοῦ.
5.23. ὅτι ἀνήρ ἐστιν κεφαλὴ τῆς γυναικὸς ὡς καὶ ὁ χριστὸς κεφαλὴ τῆς ἐκκλησίας, αὐτὸς σωτὴρ τοῦ σώματος.''. None
1.3. Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who has blessed us with every spiritual blessing in the heavenly places in Christ; 1.4. even as he chose us in him before the foundation of the world, that we would be holy and without blemish before him in love; 1.5. having predestined us for adoption as sons through Jesus Christ to himself, according to the good pleasure of his desire, 1.6. to the praise of the glory of his grace, by which he freely bestowed favor on us in the Beloved, 1.7. in whom we have our redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of our trespasses, according to the riches of his grace, 1.8. which he made to abound toward us in all wisdom and prudence, 1.9. making known to us the mystery of his will, according to his good pleasure which he purposed in him 1.10. to an administration of the fullness of the times, to sum up all things in Christ, the things in the heavens, and the things on the earth, in him; 1.11. in whom also we were assigned an inheritance, having been foreordained according to the purpose of him who works all things after the counsel of his will; 1.12. to the end that we should be to the praise of his glory, we who had before hoped in Christ: 1.13. in whom you also, having heard the word of the truth, the gospel of your salvation, -- in whom, having also believed, you were sealed with the Holy Spirit of promise, ' "1.14. who is a pledge of our inheritance, to the redemption of God's own possession, to the praise of his glory. " '
5.23. For the husband is the head of the wife, and Christ also is the head of the assembly, being himself the savior of the body. ''. None
11. New Testament, Galatians, 4.4-4.7, 5.6, 5.21 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Holy Spirit, adoption • Pauline Epistles adoption metaphors in • Son, the, adopted • Spirit, effects of, adoption • Spirit, effects of,, adoption • adoption • adoption as sons, New Testament • adoption as sons, creature • adoption as sons, moral endeavour • adoption as sons, soteriology • adoption as sons, true • adoption metaphor in Irenaeus • adoption metaphor in Pauline Epistles • divine sonship Paul's master-metaphor of adoptive • divine sonship adoptive metaphors for • divine sonship of Jesus adoptive metaphors for

 Found in books: Frey and Levison (2014) 295, 297; Karfíková (2012) 47, 164; Levison (2009) 273, 274, 278, 279; Peppard (2011) 137, 157, 158; Widdicombe (2000) 101, 228, 236, 240; deSilva (2022) 64, 73, 211, 213, 247


4.4. ὅτε δὲ ἦλθεν τὸ πλήρωμα τοῦ χρόνου, ἐξαπέστειλεν ὁ θεὸς τὸν υἱὸν αὐτοῦ, γενόμενον ἐκ γυναικός, γενόμενον ὑπὸ νόμον, 4.5. ἵνα τοὺς ὑπὸ νόμον ἐξαγοράσῃ, ἵνα τὴν υἱοθεσίαν ἀπολάβωμεν. 4.6. Ὅτι δέ ἐστε υἱοί, ἐξαπέστειλεν ὁ θεὸς τὸ πνεῦμα τοῦ υἱοῦ αὐτοῦ εἰς τὰς καρδίας ἡμῶν, κρᾶζον Ἀββά ὁ πατήρ. 4.7. ὥστε οὐκέτι εἶ δοῦλος ἀλλὰ υἱός· εἰ δὲ υἱός, καὶ κληρονόμος διὰ θεοῦ.
5.6. ἐν γὰρ Χριστῷ Ἰησοῦ οὔτε περιτομή τι ἰσχύει οὔτε ἀκροβυστία, ἀλλὰ πίστις διʼ ἀγάπης ἐνεργουμένη.
5.21. φθόνοι, μέθαι, κῶμοι, καὶ τὰ ὅμοια τούτοις, ἃ προλέγω ὑμῖν καθὼς προεῖπον ὅτι οἱ τὰ τοιαῦτα πράσσοντες βασιλείαν θεοῦ οὐ κληρονομήσουσιν.''. None
4.4. But when the fullness of the time came,God sent out his Son, born to a woman, born under the law, 4.5. thathe might redeem those who were under the law, that we might receive theadoption of sons. 4.6. And because you are sons, God sent out theSpirit of his Son into your hearts, crying, "Abba, Father!" 4.7. Soyou are no longer a bondservant, but a son; and if a son, then an heirof God through Christ.
5.6. For in Christ Jesusneither circumcision amounts to anything, nor uncircumcision, but faithworking through love.
5.21. envyings,murders, drunkenness, orgies, and things like these; of which Iforewarn you, even as I also forewarned you, that those who practicesuch things will not inherit the Kingdom of God. ''. None
12. New Testament, Philippians, 2.9-2.10 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • adoption • adoption as sons, the Son

 Found in books: Widdicombe (2000) 221; deSilva (2022) 213


2.9. διὸ καὶ ὁ θεὸς αὐτὸν ὑπερύψωσεν, καὶ ἐχαρίσατο αὐτῷ τὸ ὄνομα τὸ ὑπὲρ πᾶν ὄνομα, 2.10. ἵνα ἐν τῷ ὀνόματι Ἰησοῦπᾶν γόνυ κάμψῃἐπουρανίων καὶ ἐπιγείων καὶ καταχθονίων,''. None
2.9. Therefore God also highly exalted him, and gave to him the name which is above every name; 2.10. that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, of those in heaven, those on earth, and those under the earth, ''. None
13. New Testament, Romans, 1.3-1.4, 8.3, 8.9-8.17, 8.19-8.20, 8.23-8.24, 8.29, 8.32, 9.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Adoptionism, “divine sponsorship”/adoption • Augustus adoption by Caesar • Augustus adoptions by • Father-Son relation, adoption as sons • Metaphor, Adoption • Pauline Epistles adoption metaphors in • Pauline Epistles on adoption of Israelites • Son, the, adopted • Spirit, effects of,, adoption • adoption • adoption as master-metaphor in Christian divine sonship, Alexander's teachings • adoption as master-metaphor in Christian divine sonship, Arian controversy • adoption as master-metaphor in Christian divine sonship, Athanasius's teachings • adoption as master-metaphor in Christian divine sonship, begottenness as master-metaphor in divine sonship of Jesus • adoption as master-metaphor in Christian divine sonship, dominance in scholarly discourse • adoption as master-metaphor in Christian divine sonship, preoccupation with assigning christological moment • adoption as master-metaphor in Christian divine sonship, unmixing metaphors in • adoption as sons, New Testament • adoption as sons, Old Testament • adoption as sons, by nature • adoption as sons, moral endeavour • adoption as sons, soteriology • adoption as sons, the Son • adoption by Augustus • adoption in Roman society Greek terminology for • adoption in Roman society inheritance/wealth transfer through • adoption in Roman society legal frameworks for • adoption in Roman society papyrus contracts for • adoption in Roman society preservation of family lines through • adoption in Roman society social status of adoptees • adoption in Roman society tensions between biological and adopted sons • adoption in Roman society vs. modern Western practice • adoption metaphor implying upward mobility • adoption metaphor in Arian controversy • adoption metaphor in Clement of Alexandria • adoption metaphor in Irenaeus • adoption metaphor in Nicene era • adoption metaphor in Pauline Epistles • adoption metaphor in ancient Judaism • adoption metaphor of Origen • baptism of Jesus reading through lens of Jewish adoption practice • divine sonship Paul's master-metaphor of adoptive • divine sonship adoptive metaphors for • divine sonship of Jesus adoptive metaphors for • imperial adoption meritocratic vs. dynastic succession • incarnation, adoption • papyri adoption contracts

 Found in books: Albrecht (2014) 248; Frey and Levison (2014) 295, 296, 297; Karfíková (2012) 47, 52, 318; Peppard (2011) 103, 135, 136, 138, 139, 162, 163, 164; Ruzer (2020) 103, 104; Widdicombe (2000) 97, 136, 194, 197, 228, 231; deSilva (2022) 63, 64, 73, 78, 211, 213, 247


1.3. περὶ τοῦ υἱοῦ αὐτοῦ, τοῦ γενομένου ἐκ σπέρματος Δαυεὶδ κατὰ σάρκα, 1.4. τοῦ ὁρισθέντος υἱοῦ θεοῦ ἐν δυνάμει κατὰ πνεῦμα ἁγιωσύνης ἐξ ἀναστάσεως νεκρῶν, Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ τοῦ κυρίου ἡμῶν,
8.3. τὸ γὰρ ἀδύνατον τοῦ νόμου, ἐν ᾧ ἠσθένει διὰ τῆς σαρκός, ὁ θεὸς τὸν ἑαυτοῦ υἱὸν πέμψας ἐν ὁμοιώματι σαρκὸς ἁμαρτίας καὶ περὶ ἁμαρτίας κατέκρινε τὴν ἁμαρτίαν ἐν τῇ σαρκί,
8.9. Ὑμεῖς δὲ οὐκ ἐστὲ ἐν σαρκὶ ἀλλὰ ἐν πνεύματι. εἴπερ πνεῦμα θεοῦ οἰκεῖ ἐν ὑμῖν. εἰ δέ τις πνεῦμα Χριστοῦ οὐκ ἔχει, οὗτος οὐκ ἔστιν αὐτοῦ. 8.10. εἰ δὲ Χριστὸς ἐν ὑμῖν, τὸ μὲν σῶμα νεκρὸν διὰ ἁμαρτίαν, τὸ δὲ πνεῦμα ζωὴ διὰ δικαιοσύνην. 8.11. εἰ δὲ τὸ πνεῦμα τοῦ ἐγείραντος τὸν Ἰησοῦν ἐκ νεκρῶν οἰκεῖ ἐν ὑμῖν, ὁ ἐγείρας ἐκ νεκρῶν Χριστὸν Ἰησοῦν ζωοποιήσει καὶ τὰ θνητὰ σώματα ὑμῶν διὰ τοῦ ἐνοικοῦντος αὐτοῦ πνεύματος ἐν ὑμῖν. 8.12. Ἄρα οὖν, ἀδελφοί, ὀφειλέται ἐσμέν, οὐ τῇ σαρκὶ τοῦ κατὰ σάρκα ζῇν, 8.13. εἰ γὰρ κατὰ σάρκα ζῆτε μέλλετε ἀποθνήσκειν, εἰ δὲ πνεύματι τὰς πράξεις τοῦ σώματος θανατοῦτε ζήσεσθε. 8.14. ὅσοι γὰρ πνεύματι θεοῦ ἄγονται, οὗτοι υἱοὶ θεοῦ εἰσίν. 8.15. οὐ γὰρ ἐλάβετε πνεῦμα δουλείας πάλιν εἰς φόβον, ἀλλὰ ἐλάβετε πνεῦμα υἱοθεσίας, ἐν ᾧ κράζομεν 8.16. Ἀββά ὁ πατήρ· αὐτὸ τὸ πνεῦμα συνμαρτυρεῖ τῷ πνεύματι ἡμῶν ὅτι ἐσμὲν τέκνα θεοῦ. 8.17. εἰ δὲ τέκνα, καὶ κληρονόμοι· κληρονόμοι μὲν θεοῦ, συνκληρονόμοι δὲ Χριστοῦ, εἴπερ συνπάσχομεν ἵνα καὶ συνδοξασθῶμεν.
8.19. ἡ γὰρ ἀποκαραδοκία τῆς κτίσεως τὴν ἀποκάλυψιν τῶν υἱῶν τοῦ θεοῦ ἀπεκδέχεται· 8.20. τῇ γὰρ ματαιότητι ἡ κτίσις ὑπετάγη, οὐχ ἑκοῦσα ἀλλὰ διὰ τὸν ὑποτάξαντα, ἐφʼ ἑλπίδι
8.23. οὐ μόνον δέ, ἀλλὰ καὶ αὐτοὶ τὴν ἀπαρχὴν τοῦ πνεύματος ἔχοντες ἡμεῖς καὶ αὐτοὶ ἐν ἑαυτοῖς στενάζομεν, υἱοθεσίαν ἀπεκδεχόμενοι τὴν ἀπολύτρωσιν τοῦ σώματος ἡμῶν. 8.24. τῇ γὰρ ἐλπίδι ἐσώθημεν· ἐλπὶς δὲ βλεπομένη οὐκ ἔστιν ἐλπίς, ὃ γὰρ βλέπει τίς ἐλπίζει;
8.29. ὅτι οὓς προέγνω, καὶ προώρισεν συμμόρφους τῆς εἰκόνος τοῦ υἱοῦ αὐτοῦ, εἰς τὸ εἶναι αὐτὸν πρωτότοκον ἐν πολλοῖς ἀδελφοῖς·

8.32. ὅς γε τοῦ ἰδίου υἱοῦ οὐκ ἐφείσατο, ἀλλὰ ὑπὲρ ἡμῶν πάντων παρέδωκεν αὐτόν, πῶς οὐχὶ καὶ σὺν αὐτῷ τὰ πάντα ἡμῖν χαρίσεται;
9.4. ὧν ἡ υἱοθεσία καὶ ἡ δόξα καὶ αἱ διαθῆκαι καὶ ἡ νομοθεσία καὶ ἡ λατρεία καὶ αἱ ἐπαγγελίαι,' '. None
1.3. concerning his Son, who was born of the seed of David according to the flesh, 1.4. who was declared to be the Son of God with power, according to the Spirit of holiness, by the resurrection from the dead, Jesus Christ our Lord, ' "
8.3. For what the law couldn't do, in that it was weak through the flesh, God did, sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh and for sin, he condemned sin in the flesh; " "
8.9. But you are not in the flesh but in the Spirit, if it is so that the Spirit of God dwells in you. But if any man doesn't have the Spirit of Christ, he is not his. " '8.10. If Christ is in you, the body is dead because of sin, but the spirit is alive because of righteousness. 8.11. But if the Spirit of him who raised up Jesus from the dead dwells in you, he who raised up Christ Jesus from the dead will also give life to your mortal bodies through his Spirit who dwells in you. 8.12. So then, brothers, we are debtors, not to the flesh, to live after the flesh. 8.13. For if you live after the flesh, you must die; but if by the Spirit you put to death the deeds of the body, you will live. 8.14. For as many as are led by the Spirit of God, these are children of God. 8.15. For you didn\'t receive the spirit of bondage again to fear, but you received the Spirit of adoption, by whom we cry, "Abba! Father!" 8.16. The Spirit himself testifies with our spirit that we are children of God; 8.17. and if children, then heirs; heirs of God, and joint-heirs with Christ; if indeed we suffer with him, that we may also be glorified with him.
8.19. For the creation waits with eager expectation for the sons of God to be revealed. 8.20. For the creation was subjected to vanity, not of its own will, but because of him who subjected it, in hope
8.23. Not only so, but ourselves also, who have the first fruits of the Spirit, even we ourselves groan within ourselves, waiting for adoption, the redemption of our body. 8.24. For we were saved in hope, but hope that is seen is not hope. For who hopes for that which he sees?
8.29. For whom he foreknew, he also predestined to be conformed to the image of his Son, that he might be the firstborn among many brothers. ' "

8.32. He who didn't spare his own Son, but delivered him up for us all, how would he not also with him freely give us all things? " '
9.4. who are Israelites; whose is the adoption, the glory, the covets, the giving of the law, the service, and the promises; ' '. None
14. New Testament, John, 1.9-1.14, 1.17-1.18 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Adoptionism, “divine sponsorship”/adoption • Holy Spirit, adoption • adoption • adoption as master-metaphor in Christian divine sonship • adoption as master-metaphor in Christian divine sonship, Arian controversy • adoption as master-metaphor in Christian divine sonship, Athanasius's teachings • adoption as master-metaphor in Christian divine sonship, begottenness as master-metaphor in divine sonship of Jesus • adoption as master-metaphor in Christian divine sonship, dominance in scholarly discourse • adoption as master-metaphor in Christian divine sonship, unmixing metaphors in • adoption as sons, by nature • adoption as sons, creature • adoption as sons, moral endeavour • adoption as sons, soteriology • adoption metaphor as master-metaphor for Christian divine sonship in fourth century • adoption metaphor in Arian controversy • adoption metaphor in Nicene era • adoption metaphor of Origen • divine sonship adoption as master-metaphor in fourth century • divine sonship adoptive metaphors for

 Found in books: Karfíková (2012) 253; Peppard (2011) 161, 165; Ruzer (2020) 88; Widdicombe (2000) 99, 103, 236, 238, 239


1.9. Ἦν τὸ φῶς τὸ ἀληθινὸν ὃ φωτίζει πάντα ἄνθρωπον ἐρχόμενον εἰς τὸν κόσμον. 1.10. ἐν τῷ κόσμῳ ἦν, καὶ ὁ κόσμος διʼ αὐτοῦ ἐγένετο, καὶ ὁ κόσμος αὐτὸν οὐκ ἔγνω. 1.11. Εἰς τὰ ἴδια ἦλθεν, καὶ οἱ ἴδιοι αὐτὸν οὐ παρέλαβον. 1.12. ὅσοι δὲ ἔλαβον αὐτόν, ἔδωκεν αὐτοῖς ἐξουσίαν τέκνα θεοῦ γενέσθαι, τοῖς πιστεύουσιν εἰς τὸ ὄνομα αὐτοῦ, 1.13. οἳ οὐκ ἐξ αἱμάτων οὐδὲ ἐκ θελήματος σαρκὸς οὐδὲ ἐκ θελήματος ἀνδρὸς ἀλλʼ ἐκ θεοῦ ἐγεννήθησαν. 1.14. Καὶ ὁ λόγος σὰρξ ἐγένετο καὶ ἐσκήνωσεν ἐν ἡμῖν, καὶ ἐθεασάμεθα τὴν δόξαν αὐτοῦ, δόξαν ὡς μονογενοῦς παρὰ πατρός, πλήρης χάριτος καὶ ἀληθείας·?̔
1.17. ὅτι ὁ νόμος διὰ Μωυσέως ἐδόθη, ἡ χάρις καὶ ἡ ἀλήθεια διὰ Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ ἐγένετο. 1.18. θεὸν οὐδεὶς ἑώρακεν πώποτε· μονογενὴς θεὸς ὁ ὢν εἰς τὸν κόλπον τοῦ πατρὸς ἐκεῖνος ἐξηγήσατο.''. None
1.9. The true light that enlightens everyone was coming into the world. ' "1.10. He was in the world, and the world was made through him, and the world didn't recognize him. " "1.11. He came to his own, and those who were his own didn't receive him. " "1.12. But as many as received him, to them he gave the right to become God's children, to those who believe in his name: " '1.13. who were born not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God. 1.14. The Word became flesh, and lived among us. We saw his glory, such glory as of the one and only Son of the Father, full of grace and truth.
1.17. For the law was given through Moses. Grace and truth came through Jesus Christ. 1.18. No one has seen God at any time. The one and only Son, who is in the bosom of the Father, he has declared him. ''. None
15. New Testament, Luke, 3.22-3.38 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Adoptionism, “divine sponsorship”/adoption • Pauline Epistles adoption metaphors in • adoption as master-metaphor in Christian divine sonship, preoccupation with assigning christological moment • adoption in Roman society inheritance/wealth transfer through • adoption metaphor in Pauline Epistles • divine sonship Paul's master-metaphor of adoptive • divine sonship adoptive metaphors for • divine sonship of Jesus adoptive metaphors for

 Found in books: Peppard (2011) 134, 135; Ruzer (2020) 99, 100, 103


3.22. καὶ καταβῆναι τὸ πνεῦμα τὸ ἅγιον σωματικῷ εἴδει ὡς περιστερὰν ἐπʼ αὐτόν, καὶ φωνὴν ἐξ οὐρανοῦ γενέσθαι Σὺ εἶ ὁ υἱός μου ὁ ἀγαπητός, ἐν σοὶ εὐδόκησα. 3.23. Καὶ αὐτὸς ἦν Ἰησοῦς ἀρχόμενος ὡσεὶ ἐτῶν τριάκοντα, ὢν υἱός, ὡς ἐνομίζετο, Ἰωσήφ τοῦ Ἡλεί 3.24. τοῦ Ματθάτ τοῦ Λευεί τοῦ Μελχεί τοῦ Ἰανναί τοῦ Ἰωσήφ 3.25. τοῦ Ματταθίου τοῦ Ἀμώς τοῦ Ναούμ τοῦ Ἐσλεί τοῦ Ναγγαί 3.26. τοῦ Μαάθ τοῦ Ματταθίου τοῦ Σεμεείν τοῦ Ἰωσήχ τοῦ Ἰωδά 3.27. τοῦ Ἰωανάν τοῦ Ῥησά τοῦ Ζοροβάβελ τοῦ Σαλαθιήλ τοῦ Νηρεί 3.28. τοῦ Μελχεί τοῦ Ἀδδεί τοῦ Κωσάμ τοῦ Ἐλμαδάμ τοῦ Ἤρ 3.29. τοῦ Ἰησοῦ τοῦ Ἐλιέζερ τοῦ Ἰωρείμ τοῦ Μαθθάτ τοῦ Λευεί 3.30. τοῦ Συμεών τοῦ Ἰούδα τοῦ Ἰωσήφ τοῦ Ἰωνάμ τοῦ Ἐλιακείμ 3.31. τοῦ Μελεά τοῦ Μεννά τοῦ Ματταθά τοῦ Ναθάμ τοῦ Δαυείδ 3.32. τοῦ Ἰεσσαί τοῦ Ἰωβήλ τοῦ Βοός τοῦ Σαλά τοῦ Ναασσών 3.33. τοῦ Ἀδμείν τοῦ Ἀρνεί τοῦ Ἑσρών τοῦ Φαρές τοῦ Ἰούδα 3.34. τοῦ Ἰακώβ τοῦ Ἰσαάκ τοῦ Ἀβραάμ τοῦ Θαρά τοῦ Ναχώρ 3.35. τοῦ Σερούχ τοῦ Ῥαγαύ τοῦ Φάλεκ τοῦ Ἔβερ τοῦ Σαλά 3.36. τοῦ Καινάμ τοῦ Ἀρφαξάδ τοῦ Σήμ τοῦ Νῶε τοῦ Λάμεχ 3.37. τοῦ Μαθουσαλά τοῦ Ἑνώχ τοῦ Ἰάρετ τοῦ Μαλελεήλ τοῦ Καινάμ 3.38. τοῦ Ἐνώς τοῦ Σήθ τοῦ Ἀδάμ τοῦ θεοῦ.''. None
3.22. and the Holy Spirit descended in a bodily form as a dove on him; and a voice came out of the sky, saying "You are my beloved Son. In you I am well pleased." 3.23. Jesus himself, when he began to teach, was about thirty years old, being the son (as was supposed) of Joseph, the son of Heli, 3.24. the son of Matthat, the son of Levi, the son of Melchi, the son of Jannai, the son of Joseph, 3.25. the son of Mattathias, the son of Amos, the son of Nahum, the son of Esli, the son of Naggai, 3.26. the son of Maath, the son of Mattathias, the son of Semein, the son of Joseph, the son of Judah, 3.27. the son of Joa, the son of Rhesa, the son of Zerubbabel, the son of Shealtiel, the son of Neri, 3.28. the son of Melchi, the son of Addi, the son of Cosam, the son of Elmodam, the son of Er, 3.29. the son of Josa, the son of Eliezer, the son of Jorim, the son of Matthat, the son of Levi, 3.30. the son of Simeon, the son of Judah, the son of Joseph, the son of Jo, the son of Eliakim, 3.31. the son of Melea, the son of Me, the son of Mattatha, the son of Nathan, the son of David, 3.32. the son of Jesse, the son of Obed, the son of Boaz, the son of Salmon, the son of Nahshon, 3.33. the son of Amminadab, the son of Aram, the son of Joram, the son of Hezron, the son of Perez, the son of Judah, 3.34. the son of Jacob, the son of Isaac, the son of Abraham, the son of Terah, the son of Nahor, 3.35. the son of Serug, the son of Reu, the son of Peleg, the son of Eber, the son of Shelah 3.36. the son of Cai, the son of Arphaxad, the son of Shem, the son of Noah, the son of Lamech, 3.37. the son of Methuselah, the son of Enoch, the son of Jared, the son of Mahalaleel, the son of Cai, 3.38. the son of Enos, the son of Seth, the son of Adam, the son of God. ''. None
16. New Testament, Mark, 1.11 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • adoption • adoption in Roman society papyrus contracts for • baptism of Jesus adoptive interpretation of • papyri adoption contracts

 Found in books: Novenson (2020) 28; Peppard (2011) 107, 109


1.11. καὶ φωνὴ ἐγένετο ἐκ τῶν οὐρανῶν Σὺ εἶ ὁ υἱός μου ὁ ἀγαπητός, ἐν σοὶ εὐδόκησα.''. None
1.11. A voice came out of the sky, "You are my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased."''. None
17. Tacitus, Annals, 11.11.1, 12.25, 12.26.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Augustus adoptions by • Nero (emperor), adoption of • Nero adoption by Claudius • Nero, adopted • Piso, adoption by Galba • adoption • adoption by Augustus • adoption in Roman society tensions between biological and adopted sons • imperial adoption dynastic ideology in • imperial adoption meritocratic vs. dynastic succession • imperial adoption of Nero by Claudius • imperial adoption of Piso by Galba • imperial adoption public attention to • imperial adoption publicity methods for • imperial adoption tensions with natural sons

 Found in books: Davies (2004) 196; Peppard (2011) 78, 79; Shannon-Henderson (2019) 245, 266


12.25. C. Antistio M. Suillio consulibus adoptio in Domitium auctoritate Pallantis festinatur, qui obstrictus Agrippinae ut conciliator nuptiarum et mox stupro eius inligatus, stimulabat Claudium consuleret rei publicae, Britannici pueritiam robore circumdaret: sic apud divum Augustum, quamquam nepotibus subnixum, viguisse privignos; a Tiberio super propriam stirpem Germanicum adsumptum: se quoque accingeret iuvene partem curarum capessituro. his evictus triennio maiorem natu Domitium filio anteponit, habita apud senatum oratione eundem in quem a liberto acceperat modum. adnotabant periti nullam antehac adoptionem inter patricios Claudios reperiri, eosque ab Atto Clauso continuos duravisse.' '. None
11.11.1. \xa0Under the same consulate, eight hundred years from the foundation of Rome, sixty-four from their presentation by Augustus, came a performance of the Secular Games. The calculations employed by the two princes I\xa0omit, as they have been sufficiently explained in the books which I\xa0have devoted to the reign of Domitian. For he too exhibited Secular Games, and, as the holder of a quindecimviral priesthood and as praetor at the time, I\xa0followed them with more than usual care: a\xa0fact which I\xa0recall not in vanity, but because from of old this responsibility has rested with the Fifteen, and because it was to magistrates in especial that the task fell of discharging the duties connected with the religious ceremonies. During the presence of Claudius at the Circensian Games, when a cavalcade of boys from the great families opened the mimic battle of Troy, among them being the emperor's son, Britannicus, and Lucius Domitius, â\x80\x94 soon to be adopted as heir to the throne and to the designation of Nero, â\x80\x94 the livelier applause given by the populace to Domitius was accepted as prophetic. Also there was a common tale that serpents had watched over his infancy like warders: a\xa0fable retouched to resemble foreign miracles, since Nero â\x80\x94 certainly not given to self-depreciation â\x80\x94 used to say that only a single snake had been noticed in his bedroom." '
12.25. \xa0In the consulate of Gaius Antistius and Marcus Suillius, the adoption of Domitius was hurried forward by the influence of Pallas, who, pledged to Agrippina as the agent in her marriage, then bound to her by lawless love, kept goading Claudius to consult the welfare of the country and to supply the boyish years of Britannicus with a stable protection:â\x80\x94 "So, in the family of the divine Augustus, though he had grandsons to rely upon, yet his step-children rose to power; Tiberius had issue of his own, but he adopted Germanicus; let Claudius also gird to himself a young partner, who would undertake a share of his responsibilities!" The emperor yielded to the pressure, and gave Domitius, with his three years\' seniority, precedence over his son, reproducing in his speech to the senate the arguments furnished by his freedman. It was noted by the expert that, prior to this, there was no trace of an adoption in the patrician branch of the Claudian house, which had lasted without interruption from Attus Clausus downward. <
12.26.2. \xa0Thanks, however, were returned to the sovereign; a\xa0more refined flattery was bestowed on Domitius; and the law was carried providing for his adoption into the Claudian family and the designation of Nero. Agrippina herself was dignified by the title of Augusta. When the transaction was over, no one was so devoid of pity as not to feel compunction for the lot of Britannicus. Stripped little by little of the services of the very slaves, the boy turned into derision the officious importunities of his stepmother, whose hypocrisy he understood. For report credits him with no lack of intelligence, possibly with truth, or possibly through the sympathy inspired by his dangers he has retained a reputation which was never put to the proof. <'". None
18. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Spirit, effects of, adoption • adoption

 Found in books: Levison (2009) 278, 280; deSilva (2022) 78


19. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Mark, Gospel of adoption metaphors in • Spirit, effects of, adoption • adoption metaphor in Gospel of Mark

 Found in books: Levison (2009) 277; Peppard (2011) 127


20. Irenaeus, Refutation of All Heresies, 3.20.2, 4.15.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • adoption • adoption as master-metaphor in Christian divine sonship, rejection of adoptionist christologies • adoption as master-metaphor in Christian divine sonship, unmixing metaphors in • adoption metaphor and Ebionites • adoption metaphor implying upward mobility • adoption metaphor in Irenaeus • divine sonship of Jesus adoptive metaphors for

 Found in books: Behr (2000) 126; Osborne (2001) 215, 237; Peppard (2011) 159


3.20.2. For before the Romans possessed their kingdom, while as yet the Macedonians held Asia, Ptolemy the son of Lagus, being anxious to adorn thewhich he had founded in Alexandria, with a collection of the writings of all men, which were works of merit, made request to the people of Jerusalem, that they should have their Scriptures translated into the Greek language. And they-- for at that time they were still subject to the Macedonians--sent to Ptolemy seventy of their elders, who were thoroughly skilled in the Scriptures and in both the languages, to carry out what he had desired. But he, wishing to test them individually, and fearing lest they might perchance, by taking counsel together, conceal the truth in the Scriptures, by their interpretation, separated them from each other, and commanded them all to write the same translation. He did this with respect to all the books. But when they came together in the same place before Ptolemy, and each of them compared his own interpretation with that of every other, God was indeed glorified, and the Scriptures were acknowledged as truly divine. For all of them read out the common translation which they had prepared in the very same words and the very same names, from beginning to end, so that even the Gentiles present perceived that the Scriptures had been interpreted by the inspiration of God. And there was nothing astonishing in God having done this,--He who, when, during the captivity of the people under Nebuchadnezzar, the Scriptures had been corrupted, and when, after seventy years, the Jews had returned to their own land, then, in the times of Artaxerxes king of the Persians, inspired Esdras the priest, of the tribe of Levi, to recast all the words of the former prophets, and to re-establish with the people the Mosaic legislation.
3.20.2. This, therefore, was the object of the long-suffering of God, that man, passing through all things, and acquiring the knowledge of moral discipline, then attaining to the resurrection from the dead, and learning by experience what is the source of his deliverance, may always live in a state of gratitude to the Lord, having obtained from Him the gift of incorruptibility, that he might love Him the more; for "he to whom more is forgiven, loveth more:" and that he may know himself, how mortal and weak he is; while he also understands respecting God, that He is immortal and powerful to such a degree as to confer immortality upon what is mortal, and eternity upon what is temporal; and may understand also the other attributes of God displayed towards himself, by means of which being instructed he may think of God in accordance with the divine greatness. For the glory of man is God, but His works are the glory of God; and the receptacle of all His. wisdom and power is man. Just as the physician is proved by his patients, so is God also revealed through men. And therefore Paul declares, "For God hath concluded all in unbelief, that He may have mercy upon all;" not saying this in reference to spiritual Aeons, but to man, who had been disobedient to God, and being cast off from immortality, then obtained mercy, receiving through the Son of God that adoption which is accomplished by Himself. For he who holds, without pride and boasting, the true glory (opinion) regarding created things and the Creator, who is the Almighty God of all, and who has granted existence to all; such an one, continuing in His love and subjection, and giving of thanks, shall also receive from Him the greater glory of promotion, looking forward to the time when he shall become like Him who died for him, for He, too, "was made in the likeness of sinful flesh," to condemn sin, and to cast it, as now a condemned thing, away beyond the flesh, but that He might call man forth into His own likeness, assigning him as His own imitator to God, and imposing on him His Father\'s law, in order that he may see God, and granting him power to receive the Father; being the Word of God who dwelt in man, and became the Son of man, that He might accustom man to receive God, and God to dwell in man, according to the good pleasure of the Father.
4.15.2. And not only so, but the Lord also showed that certain precepts were enacted for them by Moses, on account of their hardness of heart, and because of their unwillingness to be obedient, when, on their saying to Him, "Why then did Moses command to give a writing of divorcement, and to send away a wife?" He said to them, "Because of the hardness of your hearts he permitted these things to you; but from the beginning it was not so;" thus exculpating Moses as a faithful servant, but acknowledging one God, who from the beginning made male and female, and reproving them as hard-hearted and disobedient. And therefore it was that they received from Moses this law of divorcement, adapted to their hard nature. But why say I these things concerning the Old Testament? For in the New also are the apostles found doing this very thing, on the ground which has been mentioned, Paul plainly declaring, But these things I say, not the Lord." And again: "But this I speak by permission, not by commandment." And again: "Now, as concerning virgins, I have no commandment from the Lord; yet I give my judgment, as one that hath obtained mercy of the Lord to be faithful." But further, in another place he says: "That Satan tempt you not for your incontinence." If, therefore, even in the New Testament, the apostles are found granting certain precepts in consideration of human infirmity, because of the incontinence of some, lest such persons, having grown obdurate, and despairing altogether of their salvation, should become apostates from God,--it ought not to be wondered at, if also in the Old Testament the same God permitted similar indulgences for the benefit of His people, drawing them on by means of the ordices already mentioned, so that they might obtain the gift of salvation through them, while they obeyed the Decalogue, and being restrained by Him, should not revert to idolatry, nor apostatize from God, but learn to love Him with the whole heart. And if certain persons, because of the disobedient and ruined Israelites, do assert that the giver (doctor) of the law was limited in power, they will find in our dispensation, that "many are called, but few chosen;" and that there are those who inwardly are wolves, yet wear sheep\'s clothing in the eyes of the world (foris); and that God has always preserved freedom, and the power of self-government in man, while at the same time He issued His own exhortations, in order that those who do not obey Him should be righteously judged (condemned) because they have not obeyed Him; and that those who have obeyed and believed on Him should be honoured with immortality.''. None
21. None, None, nan (5th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Caelicolae, non-Jews (God-Fearers) who adopted certain Jewish practices • non-Judean women, adopting Judean practices, Greek and Latin references

 Found in books: Feldman (2006) 199; Kraemer (2010) 189


22. Demosthenes, Orations, 42.21, 43.13, 43.51
 Tagged with subjects: • adoption • adoption motives for • adoption posthumous • adoption, by will • adoption, disputed • epikleros, adoption • phratry, and adoption

 Found in books: Humphreys (2018) 42, 66, 67, 68, 70, 71, 75, 76, 78, 82, 90, 232, 233, 303, 603, 604, 854; Parker (2005) 22, 33, 34


42.21. Ought I, then, to continue in the same class, when the same fortune does not attend me now as formerly? Do not demand that; it would not be just. No; do you also take your turn and share for a little while in the class that performs public services, since those engaged in mining have suffered reverses while you farmers are prospering beyond what is your due. For a considerable time you have enjoyed the income of two estates, that of your natural father, Callippus, and that of him who adopted you, Philostratus, the orator, and you have never done anything for your fellow-citizens here. i.e. the members of the jury.
43.13. And I was the one to render him this service, since I was husband to the daughter of Eubulides, she having been adjudged to me as being the nearest of kin, and I introduced this boy to the clansmen of Hagnias and Eubulides, to which fellowship Theopompus, the father of Macartatus here, belonged during his lifetime, and to which Macartatus now belongs.
43.51. Whenever a man dies without making a will, if he leaves female children his estate shall go with them, but if not, the persons herein mentioned shall be entitled to his property: if there be brothers by the same father, and if there be lawfully born sons of brothers, they shall take the share of the father. But if there are no brothers or sons of brothers, their descendants shall inherit it in like manner; but males and the sons of males shall take precedence, if they are of the same ancestors, even though they be more remote of kin. The text is not wholly certain, and the precise meaning is therefore open to debate. The law is quoted also in Isaeus 7.20, where the note of Wyse should be consulted. See also Meier and Schömann, Der Attisch Process, p. 586, and Savage, The Athenian Family, pp. 128 ff. If there are no relatives on the father’s side within the degree of children of cousins, those on the mother’s side shall inherit in like manner. But if there shall be no relatives on either side within the degree mentioned, the nearest of kin on the father’s side shall inherit. But no illegitimate child of either sex shall have the right of succession either to religious rites or civic privileges, from the time of the archonship of Eucleides. This was in 403 B.C. ' '. None
23. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Adoption • adoption • adoptive parents contracts

 Found in books: Czajkowski et al (2020) 128; Huebner (2013) 181, 183





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