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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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subject book bibliographic info
achaemenid, age Toloni (2022), The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis, 156, 167, 168
achaemenid, artaxerxes iii king Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 90
achaemenid, coins Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 161, 162
achaemenid, dynasty, empire Merz and Tieleman (2012), Ambrosiaster's Political Theology, 63, 68, 70, 180
achaemenid, egypt Toloni (2022), The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis, 170
achaemenid, elephantine Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 79, 80, 81
achaemenid, empire Bezzel and Pfeiffer (2021), Prophecy and Hellenism, 1
Clackson et al. (2020), Migration, Mobility and Language Contact in and around the Ancient Mediterranean, 10
Edelmann-Singer et al. (2020), Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions, 248
Toloni (2022), The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis, 153, 176
van Maaren (2022), The Boundaries of Jewishness in the Southern Levant 200 BCE–132 CE, 45, 46, 51
achaemenid, influence Williamson (2021), Urban Rituals in Sacred Landscapes in Hellenistic Asia Minor, 115, 119, 140, 152, 229, 251
achaemenid, jerusalem Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 59
achaemenid, judah Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 60, 63
achaemenid, military colony Toloni (2022), The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis, 170
achaemenid, period Herman, Rubenstein (2018), The Aggada of the Bavli and Its Cultural World. 14, 20, 142, 143
achaemenid, persians Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 4, 29, 31, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 79, 80, 81, 152, 339, 410, 413
achaemenid, persians, portrayals of in the babylonian talmud, as references to the parthian, or sasanian empire Mokhtarian (2021), Rabbis, Sorcerers, Kings, and Priests: The Culture of the Talmud in Ancient Iran. 51
achaemenid, samaria Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 60, 63, 151
achaemenid, sardis Rojas(2019), The Remains of the Past and the Invention of Archaeology in Roman Anatolia: Interpreters, Traces, Horizons, 81
achaemenides Cairns (1989), Virgil's Augustan Epic. 93, 99, 193
achaemenids Bezzel and Pfeiffer (2021), Prophecy and Hellenism, 102, 177
Gruen (2011), Rethinking the Other in Antiquity, 51, 55, 224
Gygax and Zuiderhoek (2021), Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity, 153, 154
Hallmannsecker (2022), Roman Ionia: Constructions of Cultural Identity in Western Asia Minor, 14, 17, 19, 155
achaemenids, achaimenes, patriarch of the Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 141
achaemenids, and alexander the great Gruen (2011), Rethinking the Other in Antiquity, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75
achaemenids, parthians, associated with Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 375, 376
achaemenids, portrayals of in the babylonian talmud, in comparison to rome Mokhtarian (2021), Rabbis, Sorcerers, Kings, and Priests: The Culture of the Talmud in Ancient Iran. 51, 68, 69, 73, 88
achaemenids, portrayals of in the babylonian talmud, political continuity with the sasanian empire Mokhtarian (2021), Rabbis, Sorcerers, Kings, and Priests: The Culture of the Talmud in Ancient Iran. 51, 80, 81, 82
achaemenids/achaemenid, empire/kingdom Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 153, 160, 161, 162, 173, 175, 190, 200, 216, 356, 398
pre-, achaemenid, age, achaemenid, age Toloni (2022), The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis, 165, 166

List of validated texts:
2 validated results for "achaemenides"
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 37, 39-50 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Achaemenid, Empire • Samaria, Achaemenid

 Found in books: Salvesen et al. (2020), Israel in Egypt: The Land of Egypt as Concept and Reality for Jews in Antiquity and the Early Medieval Period, 151; Toloni (2022), The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis, 153, 176

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37 And his brethren said to him: ‘Shalt thou indeed reign over us? or shalt thou indeed have dominion over us?’ And they hated him yet the more for his dreams, and for his words.,And Joseph dreamed a dream, and he told it to his brethren; and they hated him yet the more.,And the Midianites sold him into Egypt unto Potiphar, an officer of Pharaoh’s, the captain of the guard.,And it came to pass, when Joseph was come unto his brethren, that they stripped Joseph of his coat, the coat of many colours that was on him;,And there passed by Midianites, merchantmen; and they drew and lifted up Joseph out of the pit, and sold Joseph to the Ishmaelites for twenty shekels of silver. And they brought Joseph into Egypt.,Come, and let us sell him to the Ishmaelites, and let not our hand be upon him; for he is our brother, our flesh.’ And his brethren hearkened unto him.,And they sat down to eat bread; and they lifted up their eyes and looked, and, behold, a caravan of Ishmaelites came from Gilead, with their camels bearing spicery and balm and ladanum, going to carry it down to Egypt.,And Jacob dwelt in the land of his father’s sojournings, in the land of Canaan.,And Reuben said unto them: ‘Shed no blood; cast him into this pit that is in the wilderness, but lay no hand upon him’—that he might deliver him out of their hand, to restore him to his father.,and they sent the coat of many colours, and they brought it to their father; and said: ‘This have we found. Know now whether it is thy son’s coat or not.’,And he told it to his father, and to his brethren; and his father rebuked him, and said unto him: ‘What is this dream that thou hast dreamed? Shall I and thy mother and thy brethren indeed come to bow down to thee to the earth?’,Come now therefore, and let us slay him, and cast him into one of the pits, and we will say: An evil beast hath devoured him; and we shall see what will become of his dreams.’,And he dreamed yet another dream, and told it to his brethren, and said: ‘Behold, I have dreamed yet a dream: and, behold, the sun and the moon and eleven stars bowed down to me.’,And they saw him afar off, and before he came near unto them, they conspired against him to slay him.,These are the generations of Jacob. Joseph, being seventeen years old, was feeding the flock with his brethren, being still a lad even with the sons of Bilhah, and with the sons of Zilpah, his father’s wives; and Joseph brought evil report of them unto their father.,And Judah said unto his brethren: ‘What profit is it if we slay our brother and conceal his blood?,and they took him, and cast him into the pit—and the pit was empty, there was no water in it.,And when his brethren saw that their father loved him more than all his brethren, they hated him, and could not speak peaceably unto him.,And Israel said unto Joseph: ‘Do not thy brethren feed the flock in Shechem? come, and I will send thee unto them.’ And he said to him: ‘Here am I.’,And all his sons and all his daughters rose up to comfort him; but he refused to be comforted; and he said: ‘Nay, but I will go down to the grave to my son mourning.’ And his father wept for him.,And Jacob rent his garments, and put sackcloth upon his loins, and mourned for his son many days.,And his brethren went to feed their father’s flock in Shechem.,And Reuben heard it, and delivered him out of their hand; and said: ‘Let us not take his life.’,And his brethren envied him; but his father kept the saying in mind. .,And he said: ‘I seek my brethren. Tell me, I pray thee, where they are feeding the flock.’,And he knew it, and said: ‘It is my son’s coat; an evil beast hath devoured him; Joseph is without doubt torn in pieces.’,And they took Joseph’s coat, and killed a he-goat, and dipped the coat in the blood;,Now Israel loved Joseph more than all his children, because he was the son of his old age; and he made him a coat of many colours.,And a certain man found him, and, behold, he was wandering in the field. And the man asked him, saying: ‘What seekest thou?’,for, behold, we were binding sheaves in the field, and, lo, my sheaf arose, and also stood upright; and, behold, your sheaves came round about, and bowed down to my sheaf.’,And the man said: ‘They are departed hence; for I heard them say: Let us go to Dothan.’ And Joseph went after his brethren, and found them in Dothan.,And he said to him: ‘Go now, see whether it is well with thy brethren, and well with the flock; and bring me back word.’ So he sent him out of the vale of Hebron, and he came to Shechem.,And he returned unto his brethren, and said: ‘The child is not; and as for me, whither shall I go?’,And he said unto them: ‘Hear, I pray you, this dream which I have dreamed:,And Reuben returned unto the pit; and, behold, Joseph was not in the pit; and he rent his clothes.,And they said one to another: ‘Behold, this dreamer cometh.39 And it came to pass on a certain day, when he went into the house to do his work, and there was none of the men of the house there within,,And Joseph was brought down to Egypt; and Potiphar, an officer of Pharaoh’s, the captain of the guard, an Egyptian, bought him of the hand of the Ishmaelites, that had brought him down thither.,And she laid up his garment by her, until his master came home.,And Joseph found favour in his sight, and he ministered unto him. And he appointed him overseer over his house, and all that he had he put into his hand.,And it came to pass after these things, that his master’s wife cast her eyes upon Joseph; and she said: ‘Lie with me.’,And it came to pass, when his master heard the words of his wife, which she spoke unto him, saying: ‘After this manner did thy servant to me’; that his wrath was kindled.,And she spoke unto him according to these words, saying: ‘The Hebrew servant, whom thou hast brought unto us, came in unto me to mock me.,that she caught him by his garment, saying: ‘Lie with me.’ And he left his garment in her hand, and fled, and got him out.,And the LORD was with Joseph, and he was a prosperous man; and he was in the house of his master the Egyptian.,But he refused, and said unto his master’s wife: ‘Behold, my master, having me, knoweth not what is in the house, and he hath put all that he hath into my hand;,But the LORD was with Joseph, and showed kindness unto him, and gave him favour in the sight of the keeper of the prison.,And it came to pass from the time that he appointed him overseer in his house, and over all that he had, that the LORD blessed the Egyptian’s house for Joseph’s sake; and the blessing of the LORD was upon all that he had, in the house and in the field.,And he left all that he had in Joseph’s hand; and, having him, he knew not aught save the bread which he did eat. And Joseph was of beautiful form, and fair to look upon.,The keeper of the prison looked not to any thing that was under his hand, because the LORD was with him; and that which he did, the LORD made it to prosper.,And Joseph’s master took him, and put him into the prison, the place where the king’s prisoners were bound; and he was there in the prison.,And it came to pass, when he heard that I lifted up my voice and cried, that he left his garment by me, and fled, and got him out.’,And it came to pass, when she saw that he had left his garment in her hand, and was fled forth,,he is not greater in this house than I; neither hath he kept back any thing from me but thee, because thou art his wife. How then can I do this great wickedness, and sin against God?’,And the keeper of the prison committed to Joseph’s hand all the prisoners that were in the prison; and whatsoever they did there, he was the doer of it.,And it came to pass, as she spoke to Joseph day by day, that he hearkened not unto her, to lie by her, or to be with her.,that she called unto the men of her house, and spoke unto them, saying: ‘See, he hath brought in a Hebrew unto us to mock us; he came in unto me to lie with me, and I cried with a loud voice.,And it came to pass, as I lifted up my voice and cried, that he left his garment by me, and fled out.’,And his master saw that the LORD was with him, and that the LORD made all that he did to prosper in his hand. 40 And Joseph came in unto them in the morning, and saw them, and, behold, they were sad.,And the chief butler told his dream to Joseph, and said to him: ‘In my dream, behold, a vine was before me;,And it came to pass after these things, that the butler of the king of Egypt and his baker offended their lord the king of Egypt.,within yet three days shall Pharaoh lift up thy head, and restore thee unto thine office; and thou shalt give Pharaoh’s cup into his hand, after the former manner when thou wast his butler.,and in the vine were three branches; and as it was budding, its blossoms shot forth, and the clusters thereof brought forth ripe grapes,,But have me in thy remembrance when it shall be well with thee, and show kindness, I pray thee, unto me, and make mention of me unto Pharaoh, and bring me out of this house.,Yet did not the chief butler remember Joseph, but forgot him.,And Joseph said unto him: ‘This is the interpretation of it: the three branches are three days;,And it came to pass the third day, which was Pharaoh’s birthday, that he made a feast unto all his servants; and he lifted up the head of the chief butler and the head of the chief baker among his servants.,And they said unto him: ‘We have dreamed a dream, and there is none that can interpret it.’ And Joseph said unto them: ‘Do not interpretations belong to God? tell it me, I pray you.’,within yet three days shall Pharaoh lift up thy head from off thee, and shall hang thee on a tree; and the birds shall eat thy flesh from off thee.’,and in the uppermost basket there was of all manner of baked food for Pharaoh; and the birds did eat them out of the basket upon my head.’,And he put them in ward in the house of the captain of the guard, into the prison, the place where Joseph was bound.,And the captain of the guard charged Joseph to be with them, and he ministered unto them; and they continued a season in ward.,And Joseph answered and said: ‘This is the interpretation thereof: the three baskets are three days;,And Pharaoh was wroth against his two officers, against the chief of the butlers, and against the chief of the bakers.,And they dreamed a dream both of them, each man his dream, in one night, each man according to the interpretation of his dream, the butler and the baker of the king of Egypt, who were bound in the prison.,and Pharaoh’s cup was in my hand; and I took the grapes, and pressed them into Pharaoh’s cup, and I gave the cup into Pharaoh’s hand.’,When the chief baker saw that the interpretation was good, he said unto Joseph: ‘I also saw in my dream, and, behold, three baskets of white bread were on my head;,And he asked Pharaoh’s officers that were with him in the ward of his master’s house, saying: ‘Wherefore look ye so sad to-day?’,For indeed I was stolen away out of the land of the Hebrews; and here also have I done nothing that they should put me into the dungeon.’,But he hanged the chief baker, as Joseph had interpreted to them.,And he restored the chief butler back unto his butlership; and he gave the cup into Pharaoh’s hand. 41 And the ill-favoured and lean-fleshed kine did eat up the seven well-favoured and fat kine. So Pharaoh awoke.,And, behold, seven other kine came up after them, poor and very ill-favoured and lean-fleshed, such as I never saw in all the land of Egypt for badness.,Then spoke the chief butler unto Pharaoh, saying: ‘I make mention of my faults this day:,And all countries came into Egypt to Joseph to buy corn; because the famine was sore in all the earth.,And there shall arise after them seven years of famine; and all the plenty shall be forgotten in the land of Egypt; and the famine shall consume the land;,And he gathered up all the food of the seven years which were in the land of Egypt, and laid up the food in the cities; the food of the field, which was round about every city, laid he up in the same.,And when all the land of Egypt was famished, the people cried to Pharaoh for bread; and Pharaoh said unto all the Egyptians: ‘Go unto Joseph; what he saith to you, do.’,And the food shall be for a store to the land against the seven years of famine, which shall be in the land of Egypt; that the land perish not through the famine.’,And Pharaoh said unto Joseph: ‘See, I have set thee over all the land of Egypt.’,And unto Joseph were born two sons before the year of famine came, whom Asenath the daughter of Poti-phera priest of On bore unto him.,And in the seven years of plenty the earth brought forth in heaps.,And the lean and ill-favoured kine did eat up the first seven fat kine.,And Joseph laid up corn as the sand of the sea, very much, until they left off numbering; for it was without number.,And when they had eaten them up, it could not be known that they had eaten them; but they were still ill-favoured as at the beginning. So I awoke.,And he made him to ride in the second chariot which he had; and they cried before him: ‘Abrech’; and he set him over all the land of Egypt.,And the famine was over all the face of the earth; and Joseph opened all the storehouses, and sold unto the Egyptians; and the famine was sore in the land of Egypt.,And Joseph called the name of the first-born Manasseh: ‘for God hath made me forget all my toil, and all my father’s house.’,And for that the dream was doubled unto Pharaoh twice, it is because the thing is established by God, and God will shortly bring it to pass.,Behold, there come seven years of great plenty throughout all the land of Egypt.,And the name of the second called he Ephraim: ‘for God hath made me fruitful in the land of my affliction.’,And there was with us there a young man, a Hebrew, servant to the captain of the guard; and we told him, and he interpreted to us our dreams; to each man according to his dream he did interpret.,And Pharaoh spoke unto Joseph: ‘In my dream, behold, I stood upon the brink of the river.,And let them gather all the food of these good years that come, and lay up corn under the hand of Pharaoh for food in the cities, and let them keep it.,And the thin ears swallowed up the seven good ears. And I told it unto the magicians; but there was none that could declare it to me.’,And the thing was good in the eyes of Pharaoh, and in the eyes of all his servants.,That is the thing which I spoke unto Pharaoh: what God is about to do He hath shown unto Pharaoh.,And the seven lean and ill-favoured kine that came up after them are seven years, and also the seven empty ears blasted with the east wind; they shall be seven years of famine.,And it came to pass at the end of two full years, that Pharaoh dreamed: and, behold, he stood by the river.,Now therefore let Pharaoh look out a man discreet and wise, and set him over the land of Egypt.,And, behold, seven ears, withered, thin, and blasted with the east wind, sprung up after them.,And, behold, seven other kine came up after them out of the river, ill favoured and lean-fleshed; and stood by the other kine upon the brink of the river.,Let Pharaoh do this, and let him appoint overseers over the land, and take up the fifth part of the land of Egypt in the seven years of plenty.,And the seven years of plenty, that was in the land of Egypt, came to an end.,And Pharaoh called Joseph’s name Zaphenath-paneah; and he gave him to wife Asenath the daughter of Poti-phera priest of On. And Joseph went out over the land of Egypt.—,And Pharaoh said unto Joseph: ‘I have dreamed a dream, and there is none that can interpret it; and I have heard say of thee, that when thou hearest a dream thou canst interpret it.’,and the plenty shall not be known in the land by reason of that famine which followeth; for it shall be very grievous.,And Pharaoh said unto his servants: ‘Can we find such a one as this, a man in whom the spirit of God is?’,Thou shalt be over my house, and according unto thy word shall all my people be ruled; only in the throne will I be greater than thou.’,And, behold, there came up out of the river seven kine, fat-fleshed and well-favoured; and they fed in the reedgrass.,And, behold, there came up out of the river seven kine, well-favoured and fat-fleshed; and they fed in the reed-grass.,And Pharaoh said unto Joseph: ‘I am Pharaoh, and without thee shall no man lift up his hand or his foot in all the land of Egypt.’,And it came to pass, as he interpreted to us, so it was: I was restored unto mine office, and he was hanged.’,And Joseph said unto Pharaoh: ‘The dream of Pharaoh is one; what God is about to do He hath declared unto Pharaoh.,And he slept and dreamed a second time: and, behold, seven ears of corn came up upon one stalk, rank and good.,The seven good kine are seven years; and the seven good ears are seven years: the dream is one.,And Joseph answered Pharaoh, saying: ‘It is not in me; God will give Pharaoh an answer of peace.’,And Joseph was thirty years old when he stood before Pharaoh king of Egypt.—And Joseph went out from the presence of Pharaoh, and went throughout all the land of Egypt.,Then Pharaoh sent and called Joseph, and they brought him hastily out of the dungeon. And he shaved himself, and changed his raiment, and came in unto Pharaoh.,And the thin ears swallowed up the seven rank and full ears. And Pharaoh awoke, and, behold, it was a dream.,And the seven years of famine began to come, according as Joseph had said; and there was famine in all lands; but in all the land of Egypt there was bread.,And Pharaoh said unto Joseph: ‘Forasmuch as God hath shown thee all this, there is none so discreet and wise as thou.,And, behold, seven ears, thin and blasted with the east wind, sprung up after them.,Pharaoh was wroth with his servants, and put me in the ward of the house of the captain of the guard, me and the chief baker.,And Pharaoh took off his signet ring from his hand, and put it upon Joseph’s hand, and arrayed him in vestures of fine linen, and put a gold chain about his neck.,And we dreamed a dream in one night, I and he; we dreamed each man according to the interpretation of his dream.,And it came to pass in the morning that his spirit was troubled; and he sent and called for all the magicians of Egypt, and all the wise men thereof; and Pharaoh told them his dream; but there was none that could interpret them unto Pharaoh.,And I saw in my dream, and, behold, seven ears came up upon one stalk, full and good. 42 if ye be upright men, let one of your brethren be bound in your prison-house; but go ye, carry corn for the famine of your houses;,And he said unto his brethren: ‘My money is restored; and, lo, it is even in my sack.’ And their heart failed them, and they turned trembling one to another, saying: ‘What is this that God hath done unto us?’,And the sons of Israel came to buy among those that came; for the famine was in the land of Caa.,And he put them all together into ward three days.,But Benjamin, Joseph’s brother, Jacob sent not with his brethren; for he said: ‘Lest peradventure harm befall him.’,And we said unto him: We are upright men; we are no spies.,And Joseph saw his brethren, and he knew them, but made himself strange unto them, and spoke roughly with them; and he said unto them: ‘Whence come ye?’ And they said: ‘From the land of Canaan to buy food.’,and bring your youngest brother unto me; so shall your words be verified, and ye shall not die.’ And they did so.,And he said unto them: ‘Nay, but to see the nakedness of the land ye are come.’,And they laded their asses with their corn, and departed thence.,And he said: ‘My son shall not go down with you; for his brother is dead, and he only is left; if harm befall him by the way in which ye go, then will ye bring down my gray hairs with sorrow to the grave.,Now Jacob saw that there was corn in Egypt, and Jacob said unto his sons: ‘Why do ye look one upon another?’,And Joseph was the governor over the land; he it was that sold to all the people of the land. And Joseph’s brethren came, and bowed down to him with their faces to the earth.,And Joseph said unto them the third day.’ This do, and live; for I fear God:,We are twelve brethren, sons of our father; one is not, and the youngest is this day with our father in the land of Canaan. .,And they came unto Jacob their father unto the land of Canaan, and told him all that had befallen them, saying:,And he turned himself about from them, and wept; and he returned to them, and spoke to them, and took Simeon from among them, and bound him before their eyes.,And they knew not that Joseph understood them; for the interpreter was between them.,Then Joseph commanded to fill their vessels with corn, and to restore every man’s money into his sack, and to give them provision for the way; and thus was it done unto them.,And Reuben answered them, saying: ‘Spoke I not unto you, saying: Do not sin against the child; and ye would not hear? therefore also, behold, his blood is required.’,And he said: ‘Behold, I have heard that there is corn in Egypt. Get you down thither, and buy for us from thence; that we may live, and not die.’,And Jacob their father said unto them: ‘Me have ye bereaved of my children: Joseph is not, and Simeon is not, and ye will take Benjamin away; upon me are all these things come.’,Send one of you, and let him fetch your brother, and ye shall be bound, that your words may be proved, whether there be truth in you; or else, as Pharaoh liveth, surely ye are spies.’,And Joseph remembered the dreams which he dreamed of them, and said unto them: ‘Ye are spies; to see the nakedness of the land ye are come.’,And bring your youngest brother unto me; then shall I know that ye are no spies, but that ye are upright men; so will I deliver you your brother, and ye shall traffic in the land.’,And it came to pass as they emptied their sacks, that, behold, every man’s bundle of money was in his sack; and when they and their father saw their bundles of money, they were afraid.,Hereby ye shall be proved, as Pharaoh liveth, ye shall not go forth hence, except your youngest brother come hither.,And they said one to another: ‘We are verily guilty concerning our brother, in that we saw the distress of his soul, when he besought us, and we would not hear; therefore is this distress come upon us.’,And Joseph’s ten brethren went down to buy corn from Egypt.,And the man, the lord of the land, said unto us: Hereby shall I know that ye are upright men: leave one of your brethren with me, and take corn for the famine of your houses, and go your way.,And Joseph said unto them: ‘That is it that I spoke unto you, saying: Ye are spies.,We are all one man’s sons; we are upright men, thy servants are no spies.’,And Reuben spoke unto his father, saying: ‘Thou shalt slay my two sons, if I bring him not to thee; deliver him into my hand, and I will bring him back to thee.’,And they said: ‘We thy servants are twelve brethren, the sons of one man in the land of Canaan; and, behold, the youngest is this day with our father, and one is not.’,And they said unto him: ‘Nay, my lord, but to buy food are thy servants come.,’The man, the lord of the land, spoke roughly with us, and took us for spies of the country.,And as one of them opened his sack to give his ass provender in the lodging-place, he espied his money; and, behold, it was in the mouth of his sack.,And Joseph knew his brethren, but they knew him not. 43 And they said: ‘The man asked straitly concerning ourselves, and concerning our kindred, saying: Is your father yet alive? have ye another brother? and we told him according to the tenor of these words; could we in any wise know that he would say: Bring your brother down?’,And they made ready the present against Joseph’s coming at noon; for they heard that they should eat bread there.,And the man did as Joseph bade; and the man brought the men into Joseph’s house.,And they sat before him, the firstborn according to his birthright, and the youngest according to his youth; and the men marvelled one with another.,And he said: ‘Peace be to you, fear not; your God, and the God of your father, hath given you treasure in your sacks; I had your money.’ And he brought Simeon out unto them.,And Israel said: ‘Wherefore dealt ye so ill with me, as to tell the man whether ye had yet a brother?’,And Judah said unto Israel his father: ‘Send the lad with me, and we will arise and go, that we may live, and not die, both we, and thou, and also our little ones.,If thou wilt send our brother with us, we will go down and buy thee food;,And it came to pass, when they had eaten up the corn which they had brought out of Egypt, that their father said unto them: ‘Go again, buy us a little food.’,And other money have we brought down in our hand to buy food. We know not who put our money in our sacks.’,And it came to pass, when we came to the lodging-place, that we opened our sacks, and, behold, every man’s money was in the mouth of his sack, our money in full weight; and we have brought it back in our hand.,And when Joseph came home, they brought him the present which was in their hand into the house, and bowed down to him to the earth.,And when Joseph saw Benjamin with them, he said to the steward of his house: ‘Bring the men into the house, and kill the beasts, and prepare the meat; for the men shall dine with me at noon.’,And the men took that present, and they took double money in their hand, and Benjamin; and rose up, and went down to Egypt, and stood before Joseph.,take also your brother, and arise, go again unto the man;,And they said: ‘Thy servant our father is well, he is yet alive.’ And they bowed the head, and made obeisance.,I will be surety for him; of my hand shalt thou require him; if I bring him not unto thee, and set him before thee, then let me bear the blame for ever.,And their father Israel said unto them: ‘If it be so now, do this: take of the choice fruits of the land in your vessels, and carry down the man a present, a little balm, and a little honey, spicery and ladanum, nuts, and almonds;,And the men were afraid, because they were brought into Joseph’s house; and they said: ‘Because of the money that was returned in our sacks at the first time are we brought in; that he may seek occasion against us, and fall upon us, and take us for bondmen, and our asses.’,And Judah spoke unto him, saying: ‘The man did earnestly forewarn us, saying: Ye shall not see my face, except your brother be with you.,And they set on for him by himself, and for them by themselves, and for the Egyptians, that did eat with him, by themselves; because the Egyptians might not eat bread with the Hebrews; for that is an abomination unto the Egyptians.,And he washed his face, and came out; and he refrained himself, and said: ‘Set on bread.’,but if thou wilt not send him, we will not go down, for the man said unto us: Ye shall not see my face, except your brother be with you.’,and said: ‘Oh my lord, we came indeed down at the first time to buy food.,And the famine was sore in the land.,And the man brought the men into Joseph’s house, and gave them water, and they washed their feet; and he gave their asses provender.,For except we had lingered, surely we had now returned a second time.’,And he lifted up his eyes, and saw Benjamin his brother, his mother’s son, and said: ‘Is this your youngest brother of whom ye spoke unto me?’ And he said: ‘God be gracious unto thee, my son.’,And portions were taken unto them from before him; but Benjamin’s portion was five times so much as any of theirs. And they drank, and were merry with him.,And he asked them of their welfare, and said: ‘Is your father well, the old man of whom ye spoke? Is he yet alive?’,And they came near to the steward of Joseph’s house, and they spoke unto him at the door of the house,,and take double money in your hand; and the money that was returned in the mouth of your sacks carry back in your hand; peradventure it was an oversight;,And Joseph made haste; for his heart yearned toward his brother; and he sought where to weep; and he entered into his chamber, and wept there.,and God Almighty give you mercy before the man, that he may release unto you your other brother and Benjamin. And as for me, if I be bereaved of my children, I am bereaved.’ 44 For how shall I go up to my father, if the lad be not with me? lest I look upon the evil that shall come on my father.’,For thy servant became surety for the lad unto my father, saying: If I bring him not unto thee, then shall I bear the blame to my father for ever.,it will come to pass, when he seeth that the lad is not with us, that he will die; and thy servants will bring down the gray hairs of thy servant our father with sorrow to the grave.,And thy servant my father said unto us: Ye know that my wife bore me two sons;,And put my goblet, the silver goblet, in the sack’s mouth of the youngest, and his corn money.’ And he did according to the word that Joseph had spoken.,As soon as the morning was light, the men were sent away, they and their asses.,And they rent their clothes, and laded every man his ass, and returned to the city.,And he overtook them, and he spoke unto them these words.,And Judah and his brethren came to Joseph’s house, and he was yet there; and they fell before him on the ground.,With whomsoever of thy servants it be found, let him die, and we also will be my lord’s bondmen.’,And he searched, beginning at the eldest, and leaving off at the youngest; and the goblet was found in Benjamin’s sack.,Now therefore, let thy servant, I pray thee, abide instead of the lad a bondman to my lord; and let the lad go up with his brethren.,And he commanded the steward of his house, saying: ‘Fill the men’s sacks with food, as much as they can carry, and put every man’s money in his sack’s mouth.,And thou saidst unto thy servants: Except your youngest brother come down with you, ye shall see my face no more.,And when they were gone out of the city, and were not yet far off, Joseph said unto his steward: ‘Up, follow after the men; and when thou dost overtake them, say unto them: Wherefore have ye rewarded evil for good?,Now therefore when I come to thy servant my father, and the lad is not with us; seeing that his soul is bound up with the lad’s soul;,Then they hastened, and took down every man his sack to the ground, and opened every man his sack.,and the one went out from me, and I said: Surely he is torn in pieces; and I have not seen him since;,And he said: ‘Far be it from me that I should do so; the man in whose hand the goblet is found, he shall be my bondman; but as for you, get you up in peace unto your father.’,and if ye take this one also from me, and harm befall him, ye will bring down my gray hairs with sorrow to the grave.,Then Judah came near unto him, and said: ‘Oh my lord, let thy servant, I pray thee, speak a word in my lord’s ears, and let not thine anger burn against thy servant; for thou art even as Pharaoh.,Is not this it in which my lord drinketh, and whereby he indeed divineth? ye have done evil in so doing.’,And our father said: Go again, buy us a little food.,And we said: We cannot go down; if our youngest brother be with us, then will we go down; for we may not see the man’s face, except our youngest brother be with us.,And thou saidst unto thy servants: Bring him down unto me, that I may set mine eyes upon him.,And he said: ‘Now also let it be according unto your words: he with whom it is found shall be my bondman; and ye shall be blameless.’,My lord asked his servants, saying: Have ye a father, or a brother?,And they said unto him: ‘Wherefore speaketh my lord such words as these? Far be it from thy servants that they should do such a thing.,And we said unto my lord: The lad cannot leave his father; for if he should leave his father, his father would die.,And it came to pass when we came up unto thy servant my father, we told him the words of my lord.,And we said unto my lord: We have a father, an old man, and a child of his old age, a little one; and his brother is dead, and he alone is left of his mother, and his father loveth him.,And Joseph said unto them: ‘What deed is this that ye have done? know ye not that such a man as I will indeed divine?’,And Judah said: ‘What shall we say unto my lord? what shall we speak? or how shall we clear ourselves? God hath found out the iniquity of thy servants; behold, we are my lord’s bondmen, both we, and he also in whose hand the cup is found.’,Behold, the money, which we found in our sacks’mouths, we brought back unto thee out of the land of Canaan; how then should we steal out of thy lord’s house silver or gold? 45 For these two years hath the famine been in the land; and there are yet five years, in which there shall be neither plowing nor harvest.,And to his father he sent in like manner ten asses laden with the good things of Egypt, and ten she-asses laden with corn and bread and victual for his father by the way.,And he kissed all his brethren, and wept upon them; and after that his brethren talked with him.,And ye shall tell my father of all my glory in Egypt, and of all that ye have seen; and ye shall hasten and bring down my father hither.’,And Israel said: ‘It is enough; Joseph my son is yet alive; I will go and see him before I die.’,Also regard not your stuff; for the good things of all the land of Egypt are yours.’,And they told him all the words of Joseph, which he had said unto them; and when he saw the wagons which Joseph had sent to carry him, the spirit of Jacob their father revived.,So now it was not you that sent me hither, but God; and He hath made me a father to Pharaoh, and lord of all his house, and ruler over all the land of Egypt.,And Joseph said unto his brethren: ‘I am Joseph; doth my father yet live?’ And his brethren could not answer him; for they were affrighted at his presence.,And he fell upon his brother Benjamin’s neck, and wept; and Benjamin wept upon his neck.,And they told him, saying: ‘Joseph is yet alive, and he is ruler over all the land of Egypt.’ And his heart fainted, for he believed them not.,Then Joseph could not refrain himself before all them that stood by him; and he cried: ‘Cause every man to go out from me.’ And there stood no man with him, while Joseph made himself known unto his brethren.,So he sent his brethren away, and they departed; and he said unto them: ‘See that ye fall not out by the way.’,And now be not grieved, nor angry with yourselves, that ye sold me hither; for God did send me before you to preserve life.,And Joseph said unto his brethren: ‘Come near to me, I pray you.’ And they came near. And he said: ‘I am Joseph your brother, whom ye sold into Egypt.,And they went up out of Egypt, and came into the land of Canaan unto Jacob their father.,and there will I sustain thee; for there are yet five years of famine; lest thou come to poverty, thou, and thy household, and all that thou hast.,and take your father and your households, and come unto me; and I will give you the good of the land of Egypt, and ye shall eat the fat of the land.,And, behold, your eyes see, and the eyes of my brother Benjamin, that it is my mouth that speaketh unto you.,And the sons of Israel did so; and Joseph gave them wagons, according to the commandment of Pharaoh, and gave them provision for the way.,And he wept aloud; and the Egyptians heard, and the house of Pharaoh heard.,Hasten ye, and go up to my father, and say unto him: Thus saith thy son Joseph: God hath made me lord of all Egypt; come down unto me, tarry not.,Now thou art commanded, this do ye: take you wagons out of the land of Egypt for your little ones, and for your wives, and bring your father, and come.,And Pharaoh said unto Joseph: ‘Say unto thy brethren: This do ye: lade your beasts, and go, get you unto the land of Canaan;,To all of them he gave each man changes of raiment; but to Benjamin he gave three hundred shekels of silver, and five changes of raiment.,And the report thereof was heard in Pharaoh’s house, saying: ‘Joseph’s brethren are come’; and it pleased Pharaoh well, and his servants.,And thou shalt dwell in the land of Goshen, and thou shalt be near unto me, thou, and thy children, and thy children’s children, and thy flocks, and thy herds, and all that thou hast;,And God sent me before you to give you a remt on the earth, and to save you alive for a great deliverance. 46 And the sons of Reuben: Hanoch, and Pallu, and Hezron, and Carmi.,These are the sons of Bilhah, whom Laban gave unto Rachel his daughter, and these she bore unto Jacob; all the souls were seven.,These are the sons of Rachel, who were born to Jacob; all the souls were fourteen.,And He said: ‘I am God, the God of thy father; fear not to go down into Egypt; for I will there make of thee a great nation.,his sons, and his sons’sons with him, his daughters, and his sons’daughters, and all his seed brought he with him into Egypt.,And the sons of Dan: Hushim.,And Israel said unto Joseph: ‘Now let me die, since I have seen thy face, that thou art yet alive.’,And the sons of Judah: Er, and O, and Shelah, and Perez, and Zerah; but Er and O died in the land of Canaan. And the sons of Perez were Hezron and Hamul.,And the sons of Naphtali: Jahzeel, and Guni, and Jezer, and Shillem.,The sons of Rachel Jacob’s wife: Joseph and Benjamin.,And the sons of Gad: Ziphion, and Haggi, Shuni, and Ezbon, Eri, and Arodi, and Areli.,I will go down with thee into Egypt; and I will also surely bring thee up again; and Joseph shall put his hand upon thine eyes.’,And unto Joseph in the land of Egypt were born Manasseh and Ephraim, whom Asenath the daughter of Poti-phera priest of On bore unto him.,And the sons of Simeon: Jemuel, and Jamin, and Ohad, and Jachin, and Zohar, and Shaul the son of a Canaanitish woman.,And the sons of Levi: Gershon, Kohath, and Merari.,and the men are shepherds, for they have been keepers of cattle; and they have brought their flocks, and their herds, and all that they have.,And the sons of Benjamin: Bela, and Becher, and Ashbel, Gera, and Naaman, Ehi, and Rosh, Muppim, and Huppim, and Ard.,And the sons of Asher: Imnah, and Ishvah, and Ishvi, and Beriah, and Serah their sister; and the sons of Beriah: Heber, and Malchiel.,that ye shall say: Thy servants have been keepers of cattle from our youth even until now, both we, and our fathers; that ye may dwell in the land of Goshen; for every shepherd is an abomination unto the Egyptians.’,And it shall come to pass, when Pharaoh shall call you, and shall say: What is your occupation?,And the sons of Zebulun: Sered, and Elon, and Jahleel.,All the souls belonging to Jacob that came into Egypt, that came out of his loins, besides Jacob’s sons’wives, all the souls were threescore and six.,And these are the names of the children of Israel, who came into Egypt, Jacob and his sons: Reuben, Jacob’s first-born.,These are the sons of Zilpah, whom Laban gave to Leah his daughter, and these she bore unto Jacob, even sixteen souls.,And Jacob rose up from Beer-sheba; and the sons of Israel carried Jacob their father, and their little ones, and their wives, in the wagons which Pharaoh had sent to carry him.,These are the sons of Leah, whom she bore unto Jacob in Paddan-aram, with his daughter Dinah; all the souls of his sons and his daughters were thirty and three.,And Joseph said unto his brethren, and unto his father’s house: ‘I will go up, and tell Pharaoh, and will say unto him: My brethren, and my father’s house, who were in the land of Canaan, are come unto me;,And they took their cattle, and their goods, which they had gotten in the land of Canaan, and came into Egypt, Jacob, and all his seed with him;,And Israel took his journey with all that he had, and came to Beer-sheba, and offered sacrifices unto the God of his father Isaac.,And God spoke unto Israel in the visions of the night, and said: ‘Jacob, Jacob.’ And he said: ‘Here am I.’,And Joseph made ready his chariot, and went up to meet Israel his father, to Goshen; and he presented himself unto him, and fell on his neck, and wept on his neck a good while.,And the sons of Issachar: Tola, and Puvah, and Iob, and Shimron.,And the sons of Joseph, who were born to him in Egypt, were two souls; all the souls of the house of Jacob, that came into Egypt, were threescore and ten.,And he sent Judah before him unto Joseph, to show the way before him unto Goshen; and they came into the land of Goshen. 47 And they said: ‘Thou hast saved our lives. Let us find favour in the sight of my lord, and we will be Pharaoh’s bondmen.’,And they said unto Pharaoh: ‘To sojourn in the land are we come; for there is no pasture for thy servants’flocks; for the famine is sore in the land of Canaan. Now therefore, we pray thee, let thy servants dwell in the land of Goshen.’,And Joseph sustained his father, and his brethren, and all his father’s household, with bread, according to the want of their little ones.,And Joseph gathered up all the money that was found in the land of Egypt, and in the land of Canaan, for the corn which they bought; and Joseph brought the money into Pharaoh’s house.,And when that year was ended, they came unto him the second year, and said unto him: ‘We will not hide from my lord, how that our money is all spent; and the herds of cattle are my lord’s; there is nought left in the sight of my lord, but our bodies, and our lands.,And he said: ‘Swear unto me.’ And he swore unto him. And Israel bowed down upon the bed’s head.,And Jacob blessed Pharaoh, and went out from the presence of Pharaoh.,And it shall come to pass at the ingatherings, that ye shall give a fifth unto Pharaoh, and four parts shall be your own, for seed of the field, and for your food, and for them of your households, and for food for your little ones.’,And Joseph said: ‘Give your cattle, and I will give you bread for your cattle, if money fail.’,And Joseph placed his father and his brethren, and gave them a possession in the land of Egypt, in the best of the land, in the land of Rameses, as Pharaoh had commanded.,Then Joseph went in and told Pharaoh, and said: ‘My father and my brethren, and their flocks, and their herds, and all that they have, are come out of the land of Canaan; and, behold, they are in the land of Goshen.’,But when I sleep with my fathers, thou shalt carry me out of Egypt, and bury me in their burying-place.’ And he said: ‘I will do as thou hast said.’,So Joseph bought all the land of Egypt for Pharaoh; for the Egyptians sold every man his field, because the famine was sore upon them; and the land became Pharaoh’s.,And Israel dwelt in the land of Egypt, in the land of Goshen; and they got them possessions therein, and were fruitful, and multiplied exceedingly.,And as for the people, he removed them city by city, from one end of the border of Egypt even to the other end thereof.,And Jacob said unto Pharaoh: ‘The days of the years of my sojournings are a hundred and thirty years; few and evil have been the days of the years of my life, and they have not attained unto the days of the years of the life of my fathers in the days of their sojournings.’,And when the money was all spent in the land of Egypt, and in the land of Canaan, all the Egyptians came unto Joseph, and said: ‘Give us bread; for why should we die in thy presence? for our money faileth.’,And Joseph made it a statute concerning the land of Egypt unto this day, that Pharaoh should have the fifth; only the land of the priests alone became not Pharaoh’s.,And there was no bread in all the land; for the famine was very sore, so that the land of Egypt and the land of Canaan languished by reason of the famine.,And Pharaoh spoke unto Joseph, saying: ‘Thy father and thy brethren are come unto thee;,And Joseph brought in Jacob his father, and set him before Pharaoh. And Jacob blessed Pharaoh.,Then Joseph said unto the people: ‘Behold, I have bought you this day and your land for Pharaoh. Lo, here is seed for you, and ye shall sow the land.,And Pharaoh said unto his brethren: ‘What is your occupation?’ And they said unto Pharaoh: ‘Thy servants are shepherds, both we, and our fathers.’,Only the land of the priests bought he not, for the priests had a portion from Pharaoh, and did eat their portion which Pharaoh gave them; wherefore they sold not their land.,And Jacob lived in the land of Egypt seventeen years; so the days of Jacob, the years of his life, were a hundred forty and seven years.,And the time drew near that Israel must die; and he called his son Joseph, and said unto him: ‘If now I have found favour in thy sight, put, I pray thee, thy hand under my thigh, and deal kindly and truly with me; bury me not, I pray thee, in Egypt.,And Pharaoh said unto Jacob: ‘How many are the days of the years of thy life?’,And from among his brethren he took five men, and presented them unto Pharaoh.,the land of Egypt is before thee; in the best of the land make thy father and thy brethren to dwell; in the land of Goshen let them dwell. And if thou knowest any able men among them, then make them rulers over my cattle.’,And they brought their cattle unto Joseph. And Joseph gave them bread in exchange for the horses, and for the flocks, and for the herds, and for the asses; and he fed them with bread in exchange for all their cattle for that year.,Wherefore should we die before thine eyes, both we and our land? buy us and our land for bread, and we and our land will be bondmen unto Pharaoh; and give us seed, that we may live, and not die, and that the land be not desolate.’ 48 And thy issue, that thou begettest after them, shall be thine; they shall be called after the name of their brethren in their inheritance.,And he blessed Joseph, and said: ‘The God before whom my fathers Abraham and Isaac did walk, the God who hath been my shepherd all my life long unto this day,,And his father refused, and said: ‘I know it, my son, I know it; he also shall become a people, and he also shall be great; howbeit his younger brother shall be greater than he, and his seed shall become a multitude of nations.’,And as for me, when I came from Paddan, Rachel died unto me in the land of Canaan in the way, when there was still some way to come unto Ephrath; and I buried her there in the way to Ephrath—the same is Beth-lehem.’,the angel who hath redeemed me from all evil, bless the lads; and let my name be named in them, and the name of my fathers Abraham and Isaac; and let them grow into a multitude in the midst of the earth.’,And he blessed them that day, saying: ‘By thee shall Israel bless, saying: God make thee as Ephraim and as Manasseh.’ And he set Ephraim before Manasseh.,And Israel beheld Joseph’s sons, and said: ‘Who are these?’,And Joseph said unto his father: ‘Not so, my father, for this is the first-born; put thy right hand upon his head.’,And Joseph said unto his father: ‘They are my sons, whom God hath given me here.’ And he said: ‘Bring them, I pray thee, unto me, and I will bless them.’,Moreover I have given to thee one aportion above thy brethren, which I took out of the hand of the Amorite with my sword and with my bow.’,And Israel said unto Joseph: ‘I had not thought to see thy face; and, lo, God hath let me see thy seed also.’,And Israel said unto Joseph: ‘Behold, I die; but God will be with you, and bring you back unto the land of your fathers.,And Joseph brought them out from between his knees; and he fell down on his face to the earth.,And Jacob said unto Joseph: ‘God Almighty appeared unto me at Luz in the land of Canaan, and blessed me,,And Israel stretched out his right hand, and laid it upon Ephraim’s head, who was the younger, and his left hand upon Manasseh’s head, guiding his hands wittingly; for Manasseh was the first-born.,And now thy two sons, who were born unto thee in the land of Egypt before I came unto thee into Egypt, are mine; Ephraim and Manasseh, even as Reuben and Simeon, shall be mine.,And one told Jacob, and said: ‘Behold, thy son Joseph cometh unto thee.’ And Israel strengthened himself, and sat upon the bed.,And when Joseph saw that his father was laying his right hand upon the head of Ephraim, it displeased him, and he held up his father’s hand, to remove it from Ephraim’s head unto Manasseh’s head.,And it came to pass after these things, that one said to Joseph: ‘Behold, thy father is sick.’ And he took with him his two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim.,And Joseph took them both, Ephraim in his right hand toward Israel’s left hand, and Manasseh in his left hand toward Israel’s right hand, and brought them near unto him.,Now the eyes of Israel were dim for age, so that he could not see. And he brought them near unto him; and he kissed them, and embraced them.,and said unto me: Behold, I will make thee fruitful, and multiply thee, and I will make of thee a company of peoples; and will give this land to thy seed after thee for an everlasting possession. 49 All these are the twelve tribes of Israel, and this is it that their father spoke unto them and blessed them; every one according to his blessing he blessed them.,Judah, thee shall thy brethren praise; Thy hand shall be on the neck of thine enemies; Thy father’s sons shall bow down before thee.,The sceptre shall not depart from Judah, Nor the ruler’s staff from between his feet, As long as men come to Shiloh; And unto him shall the obedience of the peoples be.,Dan shall judge his people, As one of the tribes of Israel.,Unstable as water, have not thou the excellency; Because thou wentest up to thy father’s bed; Then defiledst thou it—he went up to my couch.,There they buried Abraham and Sarah his wife; there they buried Isaac and Rebekah his wife; and there I buried Leah.,Judah is a lion’s whelp; From the prey, my son, thou art gone up. He stooped down, he couched as a lion, And as a lioness; who shall rouse him up?,But his bow abode firm, And the arms of his hands were made supple, By the hands of the Mighty One of Jacob, From thence, from the Shepherd, the Stone of Israel,,The field and the cave that is therein, which was purchased from the children of Heth.’,Let my soul not come into their council; Unto their assembly let my glory not be not united; For in their anger they slew men, And in their self-will they houghed oxen.,His eyes shall be red with wine, And his teeth white with milk.,The archers have dealt bitterly with him, And shot at him, and hated him;,And when Jacob made an end of charging his sons, he gathered up his feet into the bed, and expired, and was gathered unto his people.,Gad, a troop shall troop upon him; But he shall troop upon their heel.,Naphtali is a hind let loose: He giveth goodly words.,Joseph is a fruitful vine, A fruitful vine by a fountain; Its branches run over the wall. .,Simeon and Levi are brethren; Weapons of violence their kinship.,Benjamin is a wolf that raveneth; In the morning he devoureth the prey, And at even he divideth the spoil.’,Zebulun shall dwell at the shore of the sea, And he shall be a shore for ships, And his flank shall be upon Zidon.,As for Asher, his bread shall be fat, And he shall yield royal dainties.,in the cave that is in the field of Machpelah, which is before Mamre, in the land of Canaan, which Abraham bought with the field from Ephron the Hittite for a possession of a burying-place.,Cursed be their anger, for it was fierce, And their wrath, for it was cruel; I will divide them in Jacob, And scatter them in Israel,I wait for Thy salvation, O Lord.,The blessings of thy father Are mighty beyond the blessings of my progenitors Unto the utmost bound of the everlasting hills; They shall be on the head of Joseph, And on the crown of the head of the prince among his brethren.,For he saw a resting-place that it was good, And the land that it was pleasant; And he bowed his shoulder to bear, And became a servant under task-work,Issachar is a large-boned ass, Couching down between the sheep-folds.,Reuben, thou art my first-born, My might, and the first-fruits of my strength; The excellency of dignity, and the excellency of power.,Assemble yourselves, and hear, ye sons of Jacob; And hearken unto Israel your father.,Even by the God of thy father, who shall help thee, And by the Almighty, who shall bless thee, With blessings of heaven above, Blessings of the deep that coucheth beneath, Blessings of the breasts, and of the womb.,And be charged them, and said unto them: ‘I am to be gathered unto my people; bury me with my fathers in the cave that is in the field of Ephron the Hittite,,Binding his foal unto the vine, And his ass’s colt unto the choice vine; He washeth his garments in wine, And his vesture in the blood of grapes;,And Jacob called unto his sons, and said: ‘Gather yourselves together, that I may tell you that which shall befall you in the end of days.,Dan shall be a serpent in the way, A horned snake in the path, That biteth the horse’s heels, So that his rider falleth backward. 50 So Joseph died, being a hundred and ten years old. And they embalmed him, and he was put in a coffin in Egypt.,And Joseph saw Ephraim’s children of the third generation; the children also of Machir the son of Manasseh were born upon Joseph’s knees.,And Pharaoh said: ‘Go up, and bury thy father, according as he made thee swear.’,And they came to the threshing-floor of Atad, which is beyond the Jordan, and there they wailed with a very great and sore wailing; and he made a mourning for his father seven days.,My father made me swear, saying: Lo, I die; in my grave which I have digged for me in the land of Canaan, there shalt thou bury me. Now therefore let me go up, I pray thee, and bury my father, and I will come back.’ .,And Joseph returned into Egypt, he, and his brethren, and all that went up with him to bury his father, after he had buried his father.,and all the house of Joseph, and his brethren, and his father’s house; only their little ones, and their flocks, and their herds, they left in the land of Goshen.,And they sent a message unto Joseph, saying: ‘Thy father did command before he died, saying:,And Joseph said unto his brethren: ‘I die; but God will surely remember you, and bring you up out of this land unto the land which He swore to Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob.’,Now therefore fear ye not; I will sustain you, and your little ones.’ And he comforted them, and spoke kindly unto them.,And Joseph dwelt in Egypt, he, and his father’s house; and Joseph lived a hundred and ten years.,And Joseph went up to bury his father; and with him went up all the servants of Pharaoh, the elders of his house, and all the elders of the land of Egypt,,And when Joseph’s brethren saw that their father was dead, they said: ‘It may be that Joseph will hate us, and will fully requite us all the evil which we did unto him.’,And as for you, ye meant evil against me; but God meant it for good, to bring to pass, as it is this day, to save much people alive.,And Joseph said unto them: ‘Fear not; for am I in the place of God?,And there went up with him both chariots and horsemen; and it was a very great company.,So shall ye say unto Joseph: Forgive, I pray thee now, the transgression of thy brethren, and their sin, for that they did unto thee evil. And now, we pray thee, forgive the transgression of the servants of the God of thy father.’ And Joseph wept when they spoke unto him.,And his brethren also went and fell down before his face; and they said: ‘Behold, we are thy bondmen.’,And Joseph commanded his servants the physicians to embalm his father. And the physicians embalmed Israel.,For his sons carried him into the land of Canaan, and buried him in the cave of the field of Machpelah, which Abraham bought with the field, for a possession of a burying-place, of Ephron the Hittite, in front of Mamre.,And when the inhabitants of the land, the Canaanites, saw the mourning in the floor of Atad, they said: ‘This is a grievous amourning to the Egyptians.’ Wherefore the name of it was called Abel-mizraim, which is beyond the Jordan.,And forty days were fulfilled for him; for so are fulfilled the days of embalming. And the Egyptians wept for him threescore and ten days.,And when the days of weeping for him were past, Joseph spoke unto the house of Pharaoh, saying: ‘If now I have found favour in your eyes, speak, I pray you, in the ears of Pharaoh, saying:,And Joseph fell upon his father’s face, and wept upon him, and kissed him.,And his sons did unto him according as he commanded them.,And Joseph took an oath of the children of Israel, saying: ‘God will surely remember you, and ye shall carry up my bones from hence.’ ' None
2. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.30, 1.242-1.249, 1.261-1.266, 1.378-1.380, 1.602, 1.613-1.615, 2.44, 2.90, 2.97-2.99, 2.261, 2.762, 3.273, 3.280, 3.435-3.440, 3.500-3.505, 3.588-3.691, 6.788, 6.836-6.840 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Achaemenides

 Found in books: Cairns (1989), Virgil's Augustan Epic. 93, 99, 193; Farrell (2021), Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity, 87, 88, 130, 201, 209, 214, 215, 216, 240

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1.30 Troas, reliquias Danaum atque immitis Achilli,
1.242
Antenor potuit, mediis elapsus Achivis, 1.243 Illyricos penetrare sinus, atque intima tutus 1.244 regna Liburnorum, et fontem superare Timavi, 1.245 unde per ora novem vasto cum murmure montis 1.246 it mare proruptum et pelago premit arva soti. 1.247 Hic tamen ille urbem Patavi sedesque locavit 1.248 Teucrorum, et genti nomen dedit, armaque fixit 1.249 Troia; nunc placida compostus pace quiescit:
1.261
Hic tibi (fabor enim, quando haec te cura remordet, 1.262 longius et volvens fatorum arcana movebo) 1.263 bellum ingens geret Italia, populosque feroces 1.264 contundet, moresque viris et moenia ponet,' '1.266 ternaque transierint Rutulis hiberna subactis.
1.378
Sum pius Aeneas, raptos qui ex hoste Penates 1.379 classe veho mecum, fama super aethera notus. 1.380 Italiam quaero patriam et genus ab Iove summo.
1.602
gentis Dardaniae, magnum quae sparsa per orbem.
1.613
Obstipuit primo aspectu Sidonia Dido, 1.614 casu deinde viri tanto, et sic ore locuta est:
2.44
dona carere dolis Danaum? Sic notus Ulixes?
2.90
gessimus. Invidia postquam pellacis Ulixi—
2.97
Hinc mihi prima mali labes, hinc semper Ulixes 2.98 criminibus terrere novis, hinc spargere voces 2.99 in volgum ambiguas, et quaerere conscius arma.
2.261
Thessandrus Sthenelusque duces, et dirus Ulixes,
2.762
custodes lecti Phoenix et dirus Ulixes
3.273
et terram altricem saevi exsecramur Ulixi.
3.280
Actiaque Iliacis celebramus litora ludis.
3.435
unum illud tibi, nate dea, proque omnibus unum 3.436 praedicam, et repetens iterumque iterumque monebo: 3.437 Iunonis magnae primum prece numen adora; 3.438 Iunoni cane vota libens, dominamque potentem 3.439 supplicibus supera donis: sic denique victor 3.440 Trinacria finis Italos mittere relicta.
3.500
Si quando Thybrim vicinaque Thybridis arva 3.501 intraro, gentique meae data moenia cernam, 3.502 cognatas urbes olim populosque propinquos, 3.503 Epiro, Hesperia, quibus idem Dardanus auctor 3.504 atque idem casus, unam faciemus utramque 3.505 Troiam animis; maneat nostros ea cura nepotes.
3.588
Postera iamque dies primo surgebat Eoo, 3.589 umentemque Aurora polo dimoverat umbram: 3.590 cum subito e silvis, macie confecta suprema, 3.591 ignoti nova forma viri miserandaque cultu 3.592 procedit, supplexque manus ad litora tendit. 3.593 Respicimus: dira inluvies inmissaque barba, 3.594 consertum tegumen spinis; at cetera Graius, 3.595 3.596 Isque ubi Dardanios habitus et Troia vidit 3.597 arma procul, paulum aspectu conterritus haesit, 3.598 continuitque gradum; mox sese ad litora praeceps 3.599 cum fletu precibusque tulit: Per sidera testor, 3.600 per superos atque hoc caeli spirabile lumen, 3.601 tollite me, Teucri; quascumque abducite terras; 3.602 hoc sat erit. Scio me Danais e classibus unum, 3.603 et bello Iliacos fateor petiisse Penatis; 3.604 pro quo, si sceleris tanta est iniuria nostri, 3.605 spargite me in fluctus, vastoque inmergite ponto. 3.606 Si pereo, hominum manibus periisse iuvabit. 3.607 Dixerat, et genua amplexus genibusque volutans 3.608 haerebat. Qui sit, fari, quo sanguine cretus, 3.609 hortamur; quae deinde agitet fortuna, fateri. 3.610 Ipse pater dextram Anchises, haud multa moratus, 3.611 dat iuveni, atque animum praesenti pignore firmat. 3.612 Ille haec, deposita tandem formidine, fatur: 3.613 Sum patria ex Ithaca, comes infelicis Ulixi, 3.614 nomine Achaemenides, Troiam genitore Adamasto 3.615 paupere—mansissetque utinam fortuna!—profectus. 3.616 Hic me, dum trepidi crudelia limina linquunt, 3.617 inmemores socii vasto Cyclopis in antro 3.618 deseruere. Domus sanie dapibusque cruentis, 3.619 intus opaca, ingens; ipse arduus, altaque pulsat 3.620 sidera—Di, talem terris avertite pestem!— 3.621 nec visu facilis nec dictu adfabilis ulli. 3.622 Visceribus miserorum et sanguine vescitur atro. 3.623 Vidi egomet, duo de numero cum corpora nostro 3.624 prensa manu magna, medio resupinus in antro, 3.625 frangeret ad saxum, sanieque aspersa natarent 3.626 limina; vidi atro cum membra fluentia tabo 3.627 manderet, et tepidi tremerent sub dentibus artus. 3.628 Haud impune quidem; nec talia passus Ulixes, 3.629 oblitusve sui est Ithacus discrimine tanto. 3.630 Nam simul expletus dapibus vinoque sepultus 3.631 cervicem inflexam posuit, iacuitque per antrum 3.632 immensus, saniem eructans et frusta cruento 3.633 per somnum commixta mero, nos magna precati 3.634 numina sortitique vices, una undique circum 3.635 fundimur, et telo lumen terebramus acuto,— 3.636 ingens, quod torva solum sub fronte latebat, 3.637 Argolici clipei aut Phoebeae lampadis instar,— 3.638 et tandem laeti sociorum ulciscimur umbras. 3.639 Sed fugite, O miseri, fugite, atque ab litore funem 3.640 rumpite. 3.641 Nam qualis quantusque cavo Polyphemus in antro 3.642 lanigeras claudit pecudes atque ubera pressat, 3.644 infandi Cyclopes, et altis montibus errant. 3.645 Tertia iam lunae se cornua lumine complent, 3.646 cum vitam in silvis inter deserta ferarum 3.647 lustra domosque traho, vastosque ab rupe Cyclopas 3.648 prospicio, sonitumque pedum vocemque tremesco. 3.649 Victum infelicem, bacas lapidosaque corna, 3.650 dant rami et volsis pascunt radicibus herbae. 3.651 Omnia conlustrans, hanc primum ad litora classem 3.652 conspexi venientem. Huic me, quaecumque fuisset, 3.653 addixi: satis est gentem effugisse nefandam. 3.654 Vos animam hanc potius quocumque absumite leto. 3.655 Vix ea fatus erat, summo cum monte videmus 3.656 ipsum inter pecudes vasta se mole moventem 3.658 monstrum horrendum, informe, ingens, cui lumen ademptum. 3.659 Trunca manu pinus regit et vestigia firmat; 3.660 lanigerae comitantur oves—ea sola voluptas 3.661 solamenque mali. 3.662 Postquam altos tetigit fluctus et ad aequora venit, 3.663 luminis effossi fluidum lavit inde cruorem, 3.664 dentibus infrendens gemitu, graditurque per aequor 3.665 iam medium, necdum fluctus latera ardua tinxit. 3.666 Nos procul inde fugam trepidi celerare, recepto 3.667 supplice sic merito, tacitique incidere funem; 3.668 vertimus et proni certantibus aequora remis. 3.669 Sensit, et ad sonitum vocis vestigia torsit; 3.670 verum ubi nulla datur dextra adfectare potestas, 3.671 nec potis Ionios fluctus aequare sequendo, 3.672 clamorem immensum tollit, quo pontus et omnes 3.673 contremuere undae, penitusque exterrita tellus 3.674 Italiae, curvisque immugiit Aetna cavernis. 3.675 At genus e silvis Cyclopum et montibus altis 3.676 excitum ruit ad portus et litora complent. 3.677 Cernimus adstantis nequiquam lumine torvo 3.678 Aetnaeos fratres, caelo capita alta ferentis, 3.679 concilium horrendum: quales cum vertice celso 3.680 aeriae quercus, aut coniferae cyparissi 3.681 constiterunt, silva alta Iovis, lucusve Dianae. 3.682 Praecipites metus acer agit quocumque rudentis 3.683 excutere, et ventis intendere vela secundis. 3.684 Contra iussa monent Heleni Scyllam atque Charybdin 3.685 inter, utramque viam leti discrimine parvo, 3.686 ni teneant cursus; certum est dare lintea retro. 3.687 Ecce autem Boreas angusta ab sede Pelori 3.688 missus adest. Vivo praetervehor ostia saxo 3.689 Pantagiae Megarosque sinus Thapsumque iacentem. 3.690 Talia monstrabat relegens errata retrorsus 3.691 litora Achaemenides; comes infelicis Ulixi.
6.788
Huc geminas nunc flecte acies, hanc aspice gentem
6.836
Ille triumphata Capitolia ad alta Corintho 6.837 victor aget currum, caesis insignis Achivis. 6.838 Eruet ille Argos Agamemnoniasque Mycenas, 6.839 ipsumque Aeaciden, genus armipotentis Achilli, 6.840 ultus avos Troiae, templa et temerata Minervae.'' None
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1.30 hould utterly o'erwhelm her Tyrian towers, " 1.242 Aeneas meanwhile climbed the cliffs, and searched 1.243 the wide sea-prospect; haply Antheus there, 1.244 torm-buffeted, might sail within his ken, 1.245 with biremes, and his Phrygian mariners, 1.246 or Capys or Caicus armor-clad, 1.247 upon a towering deck. No ship is seen; 1.248 but while he looks, three stags along the shore 1.249 come straying by, and close behind them comes
1.261
distributed the spoil, with that rare wine 1.262 which good Acestes while in Sicily 1.263 had stored in jars, and prince-like sent away 1.264 with his Ioved guest;—this too Aeneas gave; ' "1.265 Arms and the man I sing, who first made way, ,predestined exile, from the Trojan shore ,to Italy, the blest Lavinian strand. ,Smitten of storms he was on land and sea ,by violence of Heaven, to satisfy ,stern Juno's sleepless wrath; and much in war ,he suffered, seeking at the last to found ,the city, and bring o'er his fathers' gods ,to safe abode in Latium ; whence arose ,the Latin race, old Alba's reverend lords, ,O Muse, the causes tell! What sacrilege, ,or vengeful sorrow, moved the heavenly Queen ,to thrust on dangers dark and endless toil ,a man whose largest honor in men's eyes ,In ages gone an ancient city stood— , Carthage, a Tyrian seat, which from afar ,made front on Italy and on the mouths ,of Tiber 's stream; its wealth and revenues ,were vast, and ruthless was its quest of war. ,'T is said that Juno, of all lands she loved, ,most cherished this,—not Samos ' self so dear. ,Here were her arms, her chariot; even then ,a throne of power o'er nations near and far, ,if Fate opposed not, 't was her darling hope ,to 'stablish here; but anxiously she heard ,that of the Trojan blood there was a breed ,then rising, which upon the destined day ,should utterly o'erwhelm her Tyrian towers, ,a people of wide sway and conquest proud ,should compass Libya 's doom;—such was the web ,the Fatal Sisters spun. Such was the fear ,of Saturn's daughter, who remembered well ,what long and unavailing strife she waged ,for her loved Greeks at Troy . Nor did she fail ,to meditate th' occasions of her rage, ,and cherish deep within her bosom proud ,its griefs and wrongs: the choice by Paris made; ,her scorned and slighted beauty; a whole race ,rebellious to her godhead; and Jove's smile ,that beamed on eagle-ravished Ganymede. ,With all these thoughts infuriate, her power ,pursued with tempests o'er the boundless main ,the Trojans, though by Grecian victor spared ,and fierce Achilles; so she thrust them far ,from Latium ; and they drifted, Heaven-impelled, ,year after year, o'er many an unknown sea— ,Below th' horizon the Sicilian isle ,just sank from view, as for the open sea ,with heart of hope they sailed, and every ship ,clove with its brazen beak the salt, white waves. ,But Juno of her everlasting wound ,knew no surcease, but from her heart of pain ,thus darkly mused: “Must I, defeated, fail ,of what I will, nor turn the Teucrian King ,from Italy away? Can Fate oppose? ,Had Pallas power to lay waste in flame ,the Argive fleet and sink its mariners, ,revenging but the sacrilege obscene ,by Ajax wrought, Oileus' desperate son? ,She, from the clouds, herself Jove's lightning threw, ,scattered the ships, and ploughed the sea with storms. ,Her foe, from his pierced breast out-breathing fire, ,in whirlwind on a deadly rock she flung. ,But I, who move among the gods a queen, ,Jove's sister and his spouse, with one weak tribe ,make war so long! Who now on Juno calls? ,So, in her fevered heart complaining still, ,unto the storm-cloud land the goddess came, ,a region with wild whirlwinds in its womb, , Aeolia named, where royal Aeolus ,in a high-vaulted cavern keeps control ,o'er warring winds and loud concourse of storms. ,There closely pent in chains and bastions strong, ,they, scornful, make the vacant mountain roar, ,chafing against their bonds. But from a throne ,of lofty crag, their king with sceptred hand ,allays their fury and their rage confines. ,Did he not so, our ocean, earth, and sky ,were whirled before them through the vast ie. ,But over-ruling Jove, of this in fear, ,hid them in dungeon dark: then o'er them piled ,huge mountains, and ordained a lawful king ,to hold them in firm sway, or know what time, ,with Jove's consent, to loose them o'er the world. ,“Thou in whose hands the Father of all gods ,and Sovereign of mankind confides the power ,to calm the waters or with winds upturn, ,great Aeolus! a race with me at war ,now sails the Tuscan main towards Italy, ,bringing their Ilium and its vanquished powers. ,Uprouse thy gales. Strike that proud navy down! ,Hurl far and wide, and strew the waves with dead! ,Twice seven nymphs are mine, of rarest mould; ,of whom Deiopea, the most fair, ,I give thee in true wedlock for thine own, ,to mate thy noble worth; she at thy side ,shall pass long, happy years, and fruitful bring ,Then Aeolus: “'T is thy sole task, O Queen, ,to weigh thy wish and will. My fealty ,thy high behest obeys. This humble throne ,is of thy gift. Thy smiles for me obtain ,authority from Jove. Thy grace concedes ,my station at your bright Olympian board, ,Replying thus, he smote with spear reversed ,the hollow mountain's wall; then rush the winds ,through that wide breach in long, embattled line, ,and sweep tumultuous from land to land: ,with brooding pinions o'er the waters spread, ,east wind and south, and boisterous Afric gale ,upturn the sea; vast billows shoreward roll; ,the shout of mariners, the creak of cordage, ,follow the shock; low-hanging clouds conceal ,from Trojan eyes all sight of heaven and day; ,night o'er the ocean broods; from sky to sky ,the thunders roll, the ceaseless lightnings glare; ,and all things mean swift death for mortal man. ,Straightway Aeneas, shuddering with amaze, ,groaned loud, upraised both holy hands to Heaven, ,and thus did plead: “O thrice and four times blest, ,ye whom your sires and whom the walls of Troy ,looked on in your last hour! O bravest son , Greece ever bore, Tydides! O that I ,had fallen on Ilian fields, and given this life ,struck down by thy strong hand! where by the spear ,of great Achilles, fiery Hector fell, ,and huge Sarpedon; where the Simois ,in furious flood engulfed and whirled away ,While thus he cried to Heaven, a shrieking blast ,smote full upon the sail. Up surged the waves ,to strike the very stars; in fragments flew ,the shattered oars; the helpless vessel veered ,and gave her broadside to the roaring flood, ,where watery mountains rose and burst and fell. ,Now high in air she hangs, then yawning gulfs ,lay bare the shoals and sands o'er which she drives. ,Three ships a whirling south wind snatched and flung ,on hidden rocks,—altars of sacrifice ,Italians call them, which lie far from shore ,a vast ridge in the sea; three ships beside ,an east wind, blowing landward from the deep, ,drove on the shallows,—pitiable sight,— ,and girdled them in walls of drifting sand. ,That ship, which, with his friend Orontes, bore ,the Lycian mariners, a great, plunging wave ,struck straight astern, before Aeneas' eyes. ,Forward the steersman rolled and o'er the side ,fell headlong, while three times the circling flood ,spun the light bark through swift engulfing seas. ,Look, how the lonely swimmers breast the wave! ,And on the waste of waters wide are seen ,weapons of war, spars, planks, and treasures rare, ,once Ilium 's boast, all mingled with the storm. ,Now o'er Achates and Ilioneus, ,now o'er the ship of Abas or Aletes, ,bursts the tempestuous shock; their loosened seams ,Meanwhile how all his smitten ocean moaned, ,and how the tempest's turbulent assault ,had vexed the stillness of his deepest cave, ,great Neptune knew; and with indigt mien ,uplifted o'er the sea his sovereign brow. ,He saw the Teucrian navy scattered far ,along the waters; and Aeneas' men ,o'erwhelmed in mingling shock of wave and sky. ,Saturnian Juno's vengeful stratagem ,her brother's royal glance failed not to see; ,and loud to eastward and to westward calling, ,he voiced this word: “What pride of birth or power ,is yours, ye winds, that, reckless of my will, ,audacious thus, ye ride through earth and heaven, ,and stir these mountain waves? Such rebels I— ,nay, first I calm this tumult! But yourselves ,by heavier chastisement shall expiate ,hereafter your bold trespass. Haste away ,and bear your king this word! Not unto him ,dominion o'er the seas and trident dread, ,but unto me, Fate gives. Let him possess ,wild mountain crags, thy favored haunt and home, ,O Eurus! In his barbarous mansion there, ,let Aeolus look proud, and play the king ,He spoke, and swiftlier than his word subdued ,the swelling of the floods; dispersed afar ,th' assembled clouds, and brought back light to heaven. ,Cymothoe then and Triton, with huge toil, ,thrust down the vessels from the sharp-edged reef; ,while, with the trident, the great god's own hand ,assists the task; then, from the sand-strewn shore ,out-ebbing far, he calms the whole wide sea, ,and glides light-wheeled along the crested foam. ,As when, with not unwonted tumult, roars ,in some vast city a rebellious mob, ,and base-born passions in its bosom burn, ,till rocks and blazing torches fill the air ,(rage never lacks for arms)—if haply then ,some wise man comes, whose reverend looks attest ,a life to duty given, swift silence falls; ,all ears are turned attentive; and he sways ,with clear and soothing speech the people's will. ,So ceased the sea's uproar, when its grave Sire ,looked o'er th' expanse, and, riding on in light, ,Aeneas' wave-worn crew now landward made, ,and took the nearest passage, whither lay ,the coast of Libya . A haven there ,walled in by bold sides of a rocky isle, ,offers a spacious and secure retreat, ,where every billow from the distant main ,breaks, and in many a rippling curve retires. ,Huge crags and two confronted promontories ,frown heaven-high, beneath whose brows outspread ,the silent, sheltered waters; on the heights ,the bright and glimmering foliage seems to show ,a woodland amphitheatre; and yet higher ,rises a straight-stemmed grove of dense, dark shade. ,Fronting on these a grotto may be seen, ,o'erhung by steep cliffs; from its inmost wall ,clear springs gush out; and shelving seats it has ,of unhewn stone, a place the wood-nymphs love. ,In such a port, a weary ship rides free ,Hither Aeneas of his scattered fleet ,saving but seven, into harbor sailed; ,with passionate longing for the touch of land, ,forth leap the Trojans to the welcome shore, ,and fling their dripping limbs along the ground. ,Then good Achates smote a flinty stone, ,secured a flashing spark, heaped on light leaves, ,and with dry branches nursed the mounting flame. ,Then Ceres' gift from the corrupting sea ,they bring away; and wearied utterly ,ply Ceres' cunning on the rescued corn, ,and parch in flames, and mill 'twixt two smooth stones. ,Aeneas meanwhile climbed the cliffs, and searched ,the wide sea-prospect; haply Antheus there, ,storm-buffeted, might sail within his ken, ,with biremes, and his Phrygian mariners, ,or Capys or Caicus armor-clad, ,upon a towering deck. No ship is seen; ,but while he looks, three stags along the shore ,come straying by, and close behind them comes ,the whole herd, browsing through the lowland vale ,in one long line. Aeneas stopped and seized ,his bow and swift-winged arrows, which his friend, ,trusty Achates, close beside him bore. ,His first shafts brought to earth the lordly heads ,of the high-antlered chiefs; his next assailed ,the general herd, and drove them one and all ,in panic through the leafy wood, nor ceased ,the victory of his bow, till on the ground ,lay seven huge forms, one gift for every ship. ,Then back to shore he sped, and to his friends ,distributed the spoil, with that rare wine ,which good Acestes while in Sicily ,had stored in jars, and prince-like sent away ,with his Ioved guest;—this too Aeneas gave; ,“Companions mine, we have not failed to feel ,calamity till now. O, ye have borne ,far heavier sorrow: Jove will make an end ,also of this. Ye sailed a course hard by ,infuriate Scylla's howling cliffs and caves. ,Ye knew the Cyclops' crags. Lift up your hearts! ,No more complaint and fear! It well may be ,some happier hour will find this memory fair. ,Through chance and change and hazard without end, ,our goal is Latium ; where our destinies ,beckon to blest abodes, and have ordained ,that Troy shall rise new-born! Have patience all! ,Such was his word, but vexed with grief and care, ,feigned hopes upon his forehead firm he wore, ,and locked within his heart a hero's pain. ,Now round the welcome trophies of his chase ,they gather for a feast. Some flay the ribs ,and bare the flesh below; some slice with knives, ,and on keen prongs the quivering strips impale, ,place cauldrons on the shore, and fan the fires. ,Then, stretched at ease on couch of simple green, ,they rally their lost powers, and feast them well ,on seasoned wine and succulent haunch of game. ,But hunger banished and the banquet done, ,in long discourse of their lost mates they tell, ,'twixt hopes and fears divided; for who knows ,whether the lost ones live, or strive with death, ,or heed no more whatever voice may call? ,Chiefly Aeneas now bewails his friends, ,Orontes brave and fallen Amycus, ,or mourns with grief untold the untimely doom ,After these things were past, exalted Jove, ,from his ethereal sky surveying clear ,the seas all winged with sails, lands widely spread, ,and nations populous from shore to shore, ,paused on the peak of heaven, and fixed his gaze ,on Libya . But while he anxious mused, ,near him, her radiant eyes all dim with tears, ,nor smiling any more, Venus approached, ,and thus complained: “O thou who dost control ,things human and divine by changeless laws, ,enthroned in awful thunder! What huge wrong ,could my Aeneas and his Trojans few ,achieve against thy power? For they have borne ,unnumbered deaths, and, failing Italy, ,the gates of all the world against them close. ,Hast thou not given us thy covet ,that hence the Romans when the rolling years ,have come full cycle, shall arise to power ,from Troy 's regenerate seed, and rule supreme ,the unresisted lords of land and sea? ,O Sire, what swerves thy will? How oft have I ,in Troy 's most lamentable wreck and woe ,consoled my heart with this, and balanced oft ,our destined good against our destined ill! ,But the same stormful fortune still pursues ,my band of heroes on their perilous way. ,When shall these labors cease, O glorious King? ,Antenor, though th' Achaeans pressed him sore, ,found his way forth, and entered unassailed , Illyria 's haven, and the guarded land ,of the Liburni. Straight up stream he sailed ,where like a swollen sea Timavus pours ,a nine-fold flood from roaring mountain gorge, ,and whelms with voiceful wave the fields below. ,He built Patavium there, and fixed abodes ,for Troy 's far-exiled sons; he gave a name ,to a new land and race; the Trojan arms ,were hung on temple walls; and, to this day, ,lying in perfect peace, the hero sleeps. ,But we of thine own seed, to whom thou dost ,a station in the arch of heaven assign, ,behold our navy vilely wrecked, because ,a single god is angry; we endure ,this treachery and violence, whereby ,wide seas divide us from th' Hesperian shore. ,Is this what piety receives? Or thus ,Smiling reply, the Sire of gods and men, ,with such a look as clears the skies of storm ,chastely his daughter kissed, and thus spake on: ,“Let Cytherea cast her fears away! ,Irrevocably blest the fortunes be ,of thee and thine. Nor shalt thou fail to see ,that City, and the proud predestined wall ,encompassing Lavinium . Thyself ,shall starward to the heights of heaven bear ,Aeneas the great-hearted. Nothing swerves ,my will once uttered. Since such carking cares ,consume thee, I this hour speak freely forth, ,and leaf by leaf the book of fate unfold. ,Thy son in Italy shall wage vast war ,and, quell its nations wild; his city-wall ,and sacred laws shall be a mighty bond ,about his gathered people. Summers three ,shall Latium call him king; and three times pass ,the winter o'er Rutulia's vanquished hills. ,His heir, Ascanius, now Iulus called ,(Ilus it was while Ilium 's kingdom stood), ,full thirty months shall reign, then move the throne ,from the Lavinian citadel, and build ,Here three full centuries shall Hector's race ,have kingly power; till a priestess queen, ,by Mars conceiving, her twin offspring bear; ,then Romulus, wolf-nursed and proudly clad ,in tawny wolf-skin mantle, shall receive ,the sceptre of his race. He shall uprear ,and on his Romans his own name bestow. ,To these I give no bounded times or power, ,but empire without end. Yea, even my Queen, ,Juno, who now chastiseth land and sea ,with her dread frown, will find a wiser way, ,and at my sovereign side protect and bless ,the Romans, masters of the whole round world, ,who, clad in peaceful toga, judge mankind. ,Such my decree! In lapse of seasons due, ,the heirs of Ilium 's kings shall bind in chains , Mycenae 's glory and Achilles' towers, ,and over prostrate Argos sit supreme. ,of Trojan stock illustriously sprung, ,lo, Caesar comes! whose power the ocean bounds, ,whose fame, the skies. He shall receive the name ,Iulus nobly bore, great Julius, he. ,Him to the skies, in Orient trophies dress, ,thou shalt with smiles receive; and he, like us, ,shall hear at his own shrines the suppliant vow. ,Then will the world grow mild; the battle-sound ,will be forgot; for olden Honor then, ,with spotless Vesta, and the brothers twain, ,Remus and Romulus, at strife no more, ,will publish sacred laws. The dreadful gates ,whence issueth war, shall with close-jointed steel ,be barred impregnably; and prisoned there ,the heaven-offending Fury, throned on swords, ,and fettered by a hundred brazen chains, ,These words he gave, and summoned Maia's son, ,the herald Mercury, who earthward flying, ,should bid the Tyrian realms and new-built towers ,welcome the Trojan waifs; lest Dido, blind ,to Fate's decree, should thrust them from the land. ,He takes his flight, with rhythmic stroke of wing, ,across th' abyss of air, and soon draws near ,unto the Libyan mainland. He fulfils ,his heavenly task; the Punic hearts of stone ,grow soft beneath the effluence divine; ,and, most of all, the Queen, with heart at ease ,But good Aeneas, pondering all night long ,his many cares, when first the cheerful dawn ,upon him broke, resolved to take survey ,of this strange country whither wind and wave ,had driven him,—for desert land it seemed,— ,to learn what tribes of man or beast possess ,a place so wild, and careful tidings bring ,back to his friends. His fleet of ships the while, ,where dense, dark groves o'er-arch a hollowed crag, ,he left encircled in far-branching shade. ,Then with no followers save his trusty friend ,Achates, he went forth upon his way, ,two broad-tipped javelins poising in his hand. ,Deep to the midmost wood he went, and there ,his Mother in his path uprose; she seemed ,in garb and countece a maid, and bore, ,like Spartan maids, a weapon; in such guise ,Harpalyce the Thracian urges on ,her panting coursers and in wild career ,outstrips impetuous Hebrus as it flows. ,Over her lovely shoulders was a bow, ,slender and light, as fits a huntress fair; ,her golden tresses without wimple moved ,in every wind, and girded in a knot ,her undulant vesture bared her marble knees. ,She hailed them thus: “Ho, sirs, I pray you tell ,if haply ye have noted, as ye came, ,one of my sisters in this wood astray? ,She bore a quiver, and a lynx's hide ,her spotted mantle was; perchance she roused ,So Venus spoke, and Venus' son replied: ,“No voice or vision of thy sister fair ,has crossed my path, thou maid without a name! ,Thy beauty seems not of terrestrial mould, ,nor is thy music mortal! Tell me, goddess, ,art thou bright Phoebus' sister? Or some nymph, ,the daughter of a god? Whate'er thou art, ,thy favor we implore, and potent aid ,in our vast toil. Instruct us of what skies, ,or what world's end, our storm-swept lives have found! ,Strange are these lands and people where we rove, ,compelled by wind and wave. Lo, this right hand ,Then Venus: “Nay, I boast not to receive ,honors divine. We Tyrian virgins oft ,bear bow and quiver, and our ankles white ,lace up in purple buskin. Yonder lies ,the Punic power, where Tyrian masters hold ,Agenor's town; but on its borders dwell ,the Libyans, by battles unsubdued. ,Upon the throne is Dido, exiled there ,from Tyre, to flee th' unnatural enmity ,of her own brother. 'T was an ancient wrong; ,too Iong the dark and tangled tale would be; ,I trace the larger outline of her story: ,Sichreus was her spouse, whose acres broad ,no Tyrian lord could match, and he was-blessed ,by his ill-fated lady's fondest love, ,whose father gave him her first virgin bloom ,in youthful marriage. But the kingly power ,among the Tyrians to her brother came, ,Pygmalion, none deeper dyed in crime ,in all that land. Betwixt these twain there rose ,a deadly hatred,—and the impious wretch, ,blinded by greed, and reckless utterly ,of his fond sister's joy, did murder foul ,upon defenceless and unarmed Sichaeus, ,and at the very altar hewed him down. ,Long did he hide the deed, and guilefully ,deceived with false hopes, and empty words, ,her grief and stricken love. But as she slept, ,her husband's tombless ghost before her came, ,with face all wondrous pale, and he laid bare ,his heart with dagger pierced, disclosing so ,the blood-stained altar and the infamy ,that darkened now their house. His counsel was ,to fly, self-banished, from her ruined land, ,and for her journey's aid, he whispered where ,his buried treasure lay, a weight unknown ,of silver and of gold. Thus onward urged, ,Dido, assembling her few trusted friends, ,prepared her flight. There rallied to her cause ,all who did hate and scorn the tyrant king, ,or feared his cruelty. They seized his ships, ,which haply rode at anchor in the bay, ,and loaded them with gold; the hoarded wealth ,of vile and covetous Pygmalion ,they took to sea. A woman wrought this deed. ,Then came they to these lands where now thine eyes ,behold yon walls and yonder citadel ,of newly rising Carthage . For a price ,they measured round so much of Afric soil ,as one bull's hide encircles, and the spot ,received its name, the Byrsa. But, I pray, ,what men are ye? from what far land arrived, ,and whither going?” When she questioned thus, ,her son, with sighs that rose from his heart's depths, ,“Divine one, if I tell ,my woes and burdens all, and thou could'st pause ,to heed the tale, first would the vesper star ,th' Olympian portals close, and bid the day ,in slumber lie. of ancient Troy are we— ,if aught of Troy thou knowest! As we roved ,from sea to sea, the hazard of the storm ,cast us up hither on this Libyan coast. ,I am Aeneas, faithful evermore ,to Heaven's command; and in my ships I bear ,my gods ancestral, which I snatched away ,from peril of the foe. My fame is known ,above the stars. I travel on in quest ,of Italy, my true home-land, and I ,from Jove himself may trace my birth divine. ,With twice ten ships upon the Phryglan main ,I launched away. My mother from the skies ,gave guidance, and I wrought what Fate ordained. ,Yet now scarce seven shattered ships survive ,the shock of wind and wave; and I myself ,friendless, bereft, am wandering up and down ,this Libyan wilderness! Behold me here, ,from Europe and from Asia exiled still!” ,But Venus could not let him longer plain, ,“Whoe'er thou art, ,I deem that not unblest of heavenly powers, ,with vital breath still thine, thou comest hither ,unto our Tyrian town. Go steadfast on, ,and to the royal threshold make thy way! ,I bring thee tidings that thy comrades all ,are safe at land; and all thy ships, conveyed ,by favoring breezes, safe at anchor lie; ,or else in vain my parents gave me skill ,to read the skies. Look up at yonder swans! ,A flock of twelve, whose gayly fluttering file, ,erst scattered by Jove's eagle swooping down ,from his ethereal haunt, now form anew ,their long-drawn line, and make a landing-place, ,or, hovering over, scan some chosen ground, ,or soaring high, with whir of happy wings, ,re-circle heaven in triumphant song: ,likewise, I tell thee, thy Iost mariners ,are landed, or fly landward at full sail. ,She ceased and turned away. A roseate beam ,from her bright shoulder glowed; th' ambrosial hair ,breathed more than mortal sweetness, while her robes ,fell rippling to her feet. Each step revealed ,the veritable goddess. Now he knew ,that vision was his mother, and his words ,pursued the fading phantom as it fled: ,“Why is thy son deluded o'er and o'er ,with mocking dreams,—another cruel god? ,Hast thou no hand-clasp true, nor interchange ,of words unfeigned betwixt this heart and thine?” ,Such word of blame he spoke, and took his way ,toward the city's rampart. Venus then ,o'erveiled them as they moved in darkened air,— ,a liquid mantle of thick cloud divine,— ,that viewless they might pass, nor would any ,obstruct, delay, or question why they came. ,To Paphos then she soared, her Ioved abode, ,where stands her temple, at whose hundred shrines ,garlands of myrtle and fresh roses breathe, ,Meanwhile the wanderers swiftly journey on ,along the clear-marked road, and soon they climb ,the brow of a high hill, which close in view ,o'er-towers the city's crown. The vast exploit, ,where lately rose but Afric cabins rude, ,Aeneas wondered at: the smooth, wide ways; ,the bastioned gates; the uproar of the throng. ,The Tyrians toil unwearied; some up-raise ,a wall or citadel, from far below ,lifting the ponderous stone; or with due care ,choose where to build, and close the space around ,with sacred furrow; in their gathering-place ,the people for just governors, just laws, ,and for their reverend senate shout acclaim. ,Some clear the harbor mouth; some deeply lay ,the base of a great theatre, and carve out ,proud columns from the mountain, to adorn ,their rising stage with lofty ornament. ,so busy bees above a field of flowers ,in early summer amid sunbeams toil, ,leading abroad their nation's youthful brood; ,or with the flowing honey storing close ,the pliant cells, until they quite run o'er ,with nectared sweet; while from the entering swarm ,they take their little loads; or lined for war, ,rout the dull drones, and chase them from the hive; ,brisk is the task, and all the honeyed air ,breathes odors of wild thyme. “How blest of Heaven. ,These men that see their promised ramparts rise!” ,Aeneas sighed; and swift his glances moved ,from tower to tower; then on his way he fared, ,veiled in the wonder-cloud, whence all unseen ,of human eyes,—O strange the tale and true!— ,Deep in the city's heart there was a grove ,of beauteous shade, where once the Tyrians, ,cast here by stormful waves, delved out of earth ,that portent which Queen Juno bade them find,— ,the head of a proud horse,—that ages long ,their boast might be wealth, luxury and war. ,Upon this spot Sidonian Dido raised ,a spacious fane to Juno, which became ,splendid with gifts, and hallowed far and wide ,for potency divine. Its beams were bronze, ,and on loud hinges swung the brazen doors. ,A rare, new sight this sacred grove did show, ,which calmed Aeneas' fears, and made him bold ,to hope for safety, and with lifted heart ,from his low-fallen fortunes re-aspire. ,For while he waits the advent of the Queen, ,he scans the mighty temple, and admires ,the city's opulent pride, and all the skill ,its rival craftsmen in their work approve. ,Behold! he sees old Ilium 's well-fought fields ,in sequent picture, and those famous wars ,now told upon men's lips the whole world round. ,There Atreus' sons, there kingly Priam moved, ,and fierce Pelides pitiless to both. ,Aeneas paused, and, weeping, thus began: ,“Alas, Achates, what far region now, ,what land in all the world knows not our pain? ,See, it is Priam! Virtue's wage is given— ,O even here! Here also there be tears ,for what men bear, and mortal creatures feel ,each other's sorrow. Therefore, have no fear! ,So saying, he received into his heart ,that visionary scene, profoundly sighed, ,and let his plenteous tears unheeded flow. ,There he beheld the citadel of Troy ,girt with embattled foes; here, Greeks in flight ,some Trojan onset 'scaped; there, Phrygian bands ,before tall-plumed Achilles' chariot sped. ,The snowy tents of Rhesus spread hard by ,(he sees them through his tears), where Diomed ,in night's first watch burst o'er them unawares ,with bloody havoc and a host of deaths; ,then drove his fiery coursers o'er the plain ,before their thirst or hunger could be stayed ,on Trojan corn or Xanthus ' cooling stream. ,Here too was princely Troilus, despoiled, ,routed and weaponless, O wretched boy! ,Ill-matched against Achilles! His wild steeds ,bear him along, as from his chariot's rear ,he falls far back, but clutches still the rein; ,his hair and shoulders on the ground go trailing, ,and his down-pointing spear-head scrawls the dust. ,Elsewhere, to Pallas' ever-hostile shrine, ,daughters of Ilium, with unsnooded hair, ,and lifting all in vain her hallowed pall, ,walked suppliant and sad, beating their breasts, ,with outspread palms. But her unswerving eyes ,the goddess fixed on earth, and would not see. ,Achilles round the Trojan rampart thrice ,had dragged the fallen Hector, and for gold ,was making traffic of the lifeless clay. ,Aeneas groaned aloud, with bursting heart, ,to see the spoils, the car, the very corpse ,of his lost friend,—while Priam for the dead ,stretched forth in piteous prayer his helpless hands. ,There too his own presentment he could see ,surrounded by Greek kings; and there were shown ,hordes from the East, and black-browed Memnon's arms; ,her band of Amazons, with moon-shaped shields, ,Penthesilea led; her martial eye ,flamed on from troop to troop; a belt of gold ,beneath one bare, protruded breast she bound— ,While on such spectacle Aeneas' eyes ,looked wondering, while mute and motionless ,he stood at gaze, Queen Dido to the shrine ,in lovely majesty drew near; a throng ,of youthful followers pressed round her way. ,So by the margin of Eurotas wide ,or o'er the Cynthian steep, Diana leads ,her bright processional; hither and yon ,are visionary legions numberless ,of Oreads; the regt goddess bears ,a quiver on her shoulders, and is seen ,emerging tallest of her beauteous train; ,while joy unutterable thrills the breast ,of fond Latona: Dido not less fair ,amid her subjects passed, and not less bright ,her glow of gracious joy, while she approved ,her future kingdom's pomp and vast emprise. ,Then at the sacred portal and beneath ,the temple's vaulted dome she took her place, ,encompassed by armed men, and lifted high ,upon a throne; her statutes and decrees ,the people heard, and took what lot or toil ,her sentence, or impartial urn, assigned. ,But, lo! Aeneas sees among the throng ,Antheus, Sergestus, and Cloanthus bold, ,with other Teucrians, whom the black storm flung ,far o'er the deep and drove on alien shores. ,Struck dumb was he, and good Achates too, ,half gladness and half fear. Fain would they fly ,to friendship's fond embrace; but knowing not ,what might befall, their hearts felt doubt and care. ,Therefore they kept the secret, and remained ,forth-peering from the hollow veil of cloud, ,haply to learn what their friends' fate might be, ,or where the fleet was landed, or what aim ,had brought them hither; for a chosen few ,from every ship had come to sue for grace, ,The doors swung wide; and after access given ,and leave to speak, revered Ilioneus ,with soul serene these lowly words essayed: ,“O Queen, who hast authority of Jove ,to found this rising city, and subdue ,with righteous goverce its people proud, ,we wretched Trojans, blown from sea to sea, ,beseech thy mercy; keep the curse of fire ,from our poor ships! We pray thee, do no wrong ,unto a guiltless race. But heed our plea! ,No Libyan hearth shall suffer by our sword, ,nor spoil and plunder to our ships be borne; ,such haughty violence fits not the souls ,of vanquished men. We journey to a land ,named, in Greek syllables, Hesperia : ,a storied realm, made mighty by great wars ,and wealth of fruitful land; in former days ,Oenotrians had it, and their sons, 't is said, ,have called it Italy, a chieftain's name ,to a whole region given. Thitherward ,our ships did fare; but with swift-rising flood ,the stormful season of Orion's star ,drove us on viewless shoals; and angry gales ,dispersed us, smitten by the tumbling surge, ,among innavigable rocks. Behold, ,we few swam hither, waifs upon your shore! ,What race of mortals this? What barbarous land, ,that with inhospitable laws ye thrust ,a stranger from your coasts, and fly to arms, ,nor grant mere foothold on your kingdom's bound? ,If man thou scornest and all mortal power, ,A king we had; Aeneas,—never man ,in all the world more loyal, just and true, ,nor mightier in arms! If Heaven decree ,his present safety, if he now do breathe ,the air of earth and is not buried low ,among the dreadful shades, then fear not thou! ,For thou wilt never rue that thou wert prompt ,to do us the first kindness. O'er the sea ,in the Sicilian land, are cities proud, ,with martial power, and great Acestes there ,is of our Trojan kin. So grant us here ,to beach our shattered ships along thy shore, ,and from thy forest bring us beam and spar ,to mend our broken oars. Then, if perchance ,we find once more our comrades and our king, ,and forth to Italy once more set sail, ,to Italy, our Latin hearth and home, ,we will rejoicing go. But if our weal ,is clean gone by, and thee, blest chief and sire, ,these Libyan waters keep, and if no more ,Iulus bids us hope,—then, at the least, ,to yon Sicilian seas, to friendly lands ,whence hither drifting with the winds we came, ,let us retrace the journey and rejoin ,good King Acestes.” So Ilioneus ,ended his pleading; the Dardanidae ,Then Dido, briefly and with downcast eyes, ,her answer made: “O Teucrians, have no fear! ,Bid care begone! It was necessity, ,and my young kingdom's weakness, which compelled ,the policy of force, and made me keep ,such vigilant sentry my wide co'ast along. ,Aeneas and his people, that fair town ,of Troy—who knows them not? The whole world knows ,those valorous chiefs and huge, far-flaming wars. ,Our Punic hearts are not of substance all ,insensible and dull: the god of day ,drives not his fire-breathing steeds so far ,from this our Tyrian town. If ye would go ,to great Hesperia, where Saturn reigned, ,or if voluptuous Eryx and the throne ,of good Acestes be your journey's end, ,I send you safe; I speed you on your way. ,But if in these my realms ye will abide, ,associates of my power, behold, I build ,this city for your own! Choose haven here ,for your good ships. Beneath my royal sway ,Trojan and Tyrian equal grace will find. ,But O, that this same storm had brought your King. ,Aeneas, hither! I will bid explore ,our Libya 's utmost bound, where haply he ,By these fair words to joy profoundly stirred, ,Father Aeneas and Achates brave ,to cast aside the cloud that wrapped them round ,yearned greatly; and Achates to his King ,spoke thus: “O goddess-born, in thy wise heart ,what purpose rises now? Lo! All is well! ,Thy fleet and followers are safe at land. ,One only comes not, who before our eyes ,sank in the soundless sea. All else fulfils ,thy mother's prophecy.” Scarce had he spoke ,when suddenly that overmantling cloud ,was cloven, and dissolved in lucent air; ,forth stood Aeneas. A clear sunbeam smote ,his god-like head and shoulders. Venus' son ,of his own heavenly mother now received ,youth's glowing rose, an eye of joyful fire, ,and tresses clustering fair. 'T is even so ,the cunning craftsman unto ivory gives ,new beauty, or with circlet of bright gold ,encloses silver or the Parian stone. ,Thus of the Queen he sued, while wonderment ,fell on all hearts. “Behold the man ye seek, ,for I am here! Aeneas, Trojan-born, ,brought safely hither from yon Libyan seas! ,O thou who first hast looked with pitying eye ,on Troy 's unutterable grief, who even to us ,(escaped our Grecian victor, and outworn ,by all the perils land and ocean know), ,to us, bereft and ruined, dost extend ,such welcome to thy kingdom and thy home! ,I have no power, Dido, to give thanks ,to match thine ample grace; nor is there power ,in any remt of our Dardan blood, ,now fled in exile o'er the whole wide world. ,May gods on high (if influence divine ,bless faithful lives, or recompense be found ,in justice and thy self-approving mind) ,give thee thy due reward. What age was blest ,by such a birth as thine? What parents proud ,such offspring bore? O, while the rivers run ,to mingle with the sea, while shadows pass ,along yon rounded hills from vale to vale, ,and while from heaven's unextinguished fire ,the stars be fed—so Iong thy glorious name, ,thy place illustrious and thy virtue's praise, ,abide undimmed.—Yet I myself must go ,to lands I know not where.” After this word ,his right hand clasped his Ioved Ilioneus, ,his left Serestus; then the comrades all, ,Sidonian Dido felt her heart stand still ,when first she looked on him; and thrilled again ,to hear what vast adventure had befallen ,so great a hero. Thus she welcomed him: ,“What chance, O goddess-born, o'er danger's path ,impels? What power to this wild coast has borne? ,Art thou Aeneas, great Anchises' son, ,whom lovely Venus by the Phrygian stream ,of Simois brought forth unto the day? ,Now I bethink me of when Teucer came ,to Sidon, exiled, and of Belus' power ,desired a second throne. For Belus then, ,our worshipped sire, despoiled the teeming land ,of Cyprus, as its conqueror and king. ,And since that hour I oft have heard the tale ,of fallen Troy, of thine own noble name, ,and of Achaean kings. Teucer was wont, ,although their foe, to praise the Teucrian race, ,and boasted him of that proud lineage sprung. ,Therefore, behold, our portals are swung wide ,for all your company. I also bore ,hard fate like thine. I too was driven of storms ,and after long toil was allowed at last ,to call this land my home. O, I am wise ,in sorrow, and I help all suffering souls!” ,So saying, she bade Aeneas welcome take ,beneath her royal roof, and to the gods ,made sacrifice in temples, while she sent ,unto the thankful Trojans on the shore ,a score of bulls, and of huge, bristling swine, ,a herd of a whole hundred, and a flock ,of goodly lambs, a hundred, who ran close ,beside the mother-ewes: and all were given ,in joyful feast to please the Heavenly Powers. ,Her palace showed a monarch's fair array ,all glittering and proud, and feasts were spread ,within the ample court. Rich broideries ,hung deep incarnadined with Tyrian skill; ,the board had massy silver, gold-embossed, ,where gleamed the mighty deeds of all her sires, ,a graven chronicle of peace and war ,prolonged, since first her ancient line began, ,Aeneas now ,(for love in his paternal heart spoke loud ,and gave no rest) bade swift Achates run ,to tell Ascanius all, and from the ship ,to guide him upward to the town,—for now ,the father's whole heart for Ascanius yearned. ,And gifts he bade them bring, which had been saved ,in Ilium 's fall: a richly broidered cloak ,heavy with golden emblems; and a veil ,by leaves of saffron lilies bordered round, ,which Argive Helen o'er her beauty threw, ,her mother Leda's gift most wonderful, ,and which to Troy she bore, when flying far ,in lawless wedlock from Mycenae 's towers; ,a sceptre, too, once fair Ilione's, ,eldest of Priam's daughters; and round pearls ,strung in a necklace, and a double crown ,of jewels set in gold. These gifts to find, ,But Cytherea in her heart revolved ,new wiles, new schemes: how Cupid should transform ,his countece, and, coming in the guise ,of sweet Ascanius, still more inflame ,the amorous Queen with gifts, and deeply fuse ,through all her yielding frame his fatal fire. ,Sooth, Venus feared the many-languaged guile ,which Tyrians use; fierce Juno's hate she feared, ,and falling night renewed her sleepless care. ,Therefore to Love, the light-winged god, she said: ,“Sweet son, of whom my sovereignty and power ,alone are given! O son, whose smile may scorn ,the shafts of Jove whereby the Titans fell, ,to thee I fly, and humbly here implore ,thy help divine. Behold, from land to land ,Aeneas, thine own brother, voyages on ,storm-driven, by Juno's causeless enmity. ,Thou knowest it well, and oft hast sighed to see ,my sighs and tears. Dido the Tyrian now ,detains him with soft speeches; and I fear ,such courtesy from Juno means us ill; ,she is not one who, when the hour is ripe, ,bids action pause. I therefore now intend ,the Tyrian Queen to snare, and siege her breast ,with our invading fire, before some god ,shall change her mood. But let her bosom burn ,with love of my Aeneas not less than mine. ,This thou canst bring to pass. I pray thee hear ,the plan I counsel. At his father's call ,Ascanius, heir of kings, makes haste to climb ,to yon Sidonian citadel; my grace ,protects him, and he bears gifts which were saved ,from hazard of the sea and burning Troy . ,Him lapped in slumber on Cythera 's hill, ,or in Idalia's deep and hallowing shade, ,myself will hide, lest haply he should learn ,our stratagem, and burst in, foiling all. ,Wear thou his shape for one brief night thyself, ,and let thy boyhood feign another boy's ,familiar countece; when Dido there, ,beside the royal feast and flowing wine, ,all smiles and joy, shall clasp thee to her breast ,while she caresses thee, and her sweet lips ,touch close with thine, then let thy secret fire ,breathe o'er her heart, to poison and betray.” ,The love-god to his mother's dear behest ,gave prompt assent. He put his pinions by ,and tripped it like Iulus, light of heart. ,But Venus o'er Ascanius' body poured ,a perfect sleep, and, to her heavenly breast ,enfolding him, far, far away upbore ,to fair Idalia's grove, where fragrant buds ,of softly-petalled marjoram embower ,Cupid straightway ,obeyed his mother's word and bore the gifts, ,each worthy of a king, as offerings ,to greet the Tyrian throne; and as he went ,he clasped Achates' friendly hand, and smiled. ,Father Aeneas now, and all his band ,of Trojan chivalry, at social feast, ,on lofty purple-pillowed couches lie; ,deft slaves fresh water on their fingers pour, ,and from reed-woven basketry renew ,the plenteous bread, or bring smooth napery ,of softest weave; fifty handmaidens serve, ,whose task it is to range in order fair ,the varied banquet, or at altars bright ,throw balm and incense on the sacred fires. ,A hundred more serve with an equal band ,of beauteous pages, whose obedient skill ,piles high the generous board and fills the bowl. ,The Tyrians also to the festal hall ,come thronging, and receive their honor due, ,each on his painted couch; with wondering eyes ,Aeneas' gifts they view, and wondering more, ,mark young Iulus' radiant brows divine, ,his guileful words, the golden pall he bears, ,and broidered veil with saffron lilies bound. ,The Tyrian Queen ill-starred, already doomed ,to her approaching woe, scanned ardently, ,with kindling cheek and never-sated eyes, ,the precious gifts and wonder-gifted boy. ,He round Aeneas' neck his arms entwined, ,fed the deep yearning of his seeming sire, ,then sought the Queen's embrace; her eyes, her soul ,clave to him as she strained him to her breast. ,For Dido knew not in that fateful hour ,how great a god betrayed her. He began, ,remembering his mother (she who bore ,the lovely Acidalian Graces three), ,to make the dear name of Sichaeus fade, ,and with new life, new love, to re-possess ,When the main feast is over, they replace ,the banquet with huge bowls, and crown the wine ,with ivy-leaf and rose. Loud rings the roof ,with echoing voices; from the gilded vault ,far-blazing cressets swing, or torches bright ,drive the dark night away. The Queen herself ,called for her golden chalice studded round ,with jewels, and o'er-brimming it with wine ,as Belus and his proud successors use, ,commanded silence, and this utterance made: ,“Great Jove, of whom are hospitable laws ,for stranger-guest, may this auspicious day ,bless both our Tyrians and the wanderers ,from Trojan shore. May our posterity ,keep this remembrance! Let kind Juno smile, ,and Bacchus, Iord of mirth, attend us here! ,And, O ye Tyrians, come one and all, ,and with well-omened words our welcome share!” ,So saying, she outpoured the sacred drop ,due to the gods, and lightly from the rim ,sipped the first taste, then unto Bitias gave ,with urgent cheer; he seized it, nothing loth, ,quaffed deep and long the foaming, golden bowl, ,then passed to others. On a gilded Iyre ,the flowing-haired Iopas woke a song ,taught him by famous Atlas: of the moon ,he sang, the wanderer, and what the sun's ,vast labors be; then would his music tell ,whence man and beast were born, and whence were bred ,clouds, lightnings, and Arcturus' stormful sign, ,the Hyades, rain-stars, and nigh the Pole ,the great and lesser Wain; for well he knew ,why colder suns make haste to quench their orb ,in ocean-stream, and wintry nights be slow. ,Loudly the Tyrians their minstrel praised, ,and Troy gave prompt applause. Dido the while ,with varying talk prolonged the fateful night, ,and drank both long and deep of love and wine. ,Now many a tale of Priam would she crave, ,of Hector many; or what radiant arms ,Aurora's son did wear; what were those steeds ,of Diomed, or what the stature seemed ,of great Achilles. “Come, illustrious guest, ,begin the tale,” she said, “begin and tell ,the perfidy of Greece, thy people's fall, ,and all thy wanderings. For now,—Ah, me! ,Seven times the summer's burning stars have seen ,thee wandering far o'er alien lands and seas.” " '1.266 “Companions mine, we have not failed to feel
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but empire without end. Yea, even my Queen, 1.379 Juno, who now chastiseth land and sea 1.380 with her dread frown, will find a wiser way, ' "
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leading abroad their nation's youthful brood; " 1.613 veiled in the wonder-cloud, whence all unseen 1.614 of human eyes,—O strange the tale and true!— ' "
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that horse which loomed so large. Thymoetes then
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a mark for every eye, defenceless, dazed,
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Such groans and anguish turned all rage away 2.98 and stayed our lifted hands. We bade him tell 2.99 his birth, his errand, and from whence might be
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inside your walls, nor anywise restore
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I stood there sole surviving; when, behold, ' "
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gave heed to sad Cassandra's voice divine? " 3.280 When from the deep the shores had faded far,
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carce finding voice, her lips addressed me thus : 3.436 “Have I true vision? Bringest thou the word 3.437 of truth, O goddess-born? Art still in flesh? 3.438 Or if sweet light be fled, my Hector, where?” 3.439 With flood of tears she spoke, and all the grove 3.440 reechoed to her cry. Scarce could I frame
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“offspring of Troy, interpreter of Heaven! ' "3.501 Who knowest Phoebus' power, and readest well " '3.502 the tripod, stars, and vocal laurel leaves ' "3.503 to Phoebus dear, who know'st of every bird " '3.504 the ominous swift wing or boding song, 3.505 o, speak! For all my course good omens showed,
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the monster waves, and ever and anon 3.589 flings them at heaven, to lash the tranquil stars. 3.590 But Scylla, prisoned in her eyeless cave, 3.591 thrusts forth her face, and pulls upon the rocks 3.592 hip after ship; the parts that first be seen 3.593 are human; a fair-breasted virgin she, 3.594 down to the womb; but all that lurks below 3.595 is a huge-membered fish, where strangely join 3.596 the flukes of dolphins and the paunch of wolves. 3.597 Better by far to round the distant goal 3.598 of the Trinacrian headlands, veering wide 3.599 from thy true course, than ever thou shouldst see 3.600 that shapeless Scylla in her vaulted cave, ' "3.601 where grim rocks echo her dark sea-dogs' roar. " '3.602 Yea, more, if aught of prescience be bestowed 3.603 on Helenus, if trusted prophet he, 3.604 and Phoebus to his heart true voice have given, 3.605 o goddess-born, one counsel chief of all ' "3.606 I tell thee oft, and urge it o'er and o'er. " "3.607 To Juno's godhead lift thy Ioudest prayer; " '3.608 to Juno chant a fervent votive song, 3.609 and with obedient offering persuade 3.610 that potent Queen. So shalt thou, triumphing, 3.611 to Italy be sped, and leave behind 3.612 Trinacria . When wafted to that shore, ' "3.613 repair to Cumae 's hill, and to the Lake " '3.614 Avernus with its whispering grove divine. 3.615 There shalt thou see a frenzied prophetess, 3.616 who from beneath the hollow scarped crag 3.617 ings oracles, or characters on leaves ' "3.618 mysterious names. Whate'er the virgin writes, " '3.619 on leaves inscribing the portentous song, 3.620 he sets in order, and conceals them well 3.621 in her deep cave, where they abide unchanged 3.622 in due array. Yet not a care has she, 3.623 if with some swinging hinge a breeze sweeps in, 3.624 to catch them as they whirl: if open door 3.625 disperse them flutterlig through the hollow rock, 3.626 he will not link their shifted sense anew, 3.627 nor re-invent her fragmentary song. 3.628 oft her uswered votaries depart, ' "3.629 corning the Sibyl's shrine. But deem not thou " "3.630 thy tarrying too Iong, whate'er thy stay. " '3.631 Though thy companions chide, though winds of power 3.632 invite thy ship to sea, and well would speed 3.633 the swelling sail, yet to that Sibyl go. 3.634 Pray that her own lips may sing forth for thee 3.635 the oracles, uplifting her dread voice 3.636 in willing prophecy. Her rede shall tell 3.637 of Italy, its wars and tribes to be, 3.638 and of what way each burden and each woe 3.639 may be escaped, or borne. Her favoring aid 3.640 will grant swift, happy voyages to thy prayer. 3.641 Such counsels Heaven to my lips allows. 3.642 arise, begone! and by thy glorious deeds ' "3.643 When Asia 's power and Priam's race and throne, ,though guiltless, were cast down by Heaven's decree, ,when Ilium proud had fallen, and Neptune's Troy ,in smouldering ash lay level with the ground, ,to wandering exile then and regions wild ,the gods by many an augury and sign ,compelled us forth. We fashioned us a fleet ,within Antander's haven, in the shade ,of Phrygian Ida's peak (though knowing not ,whither our fate would drive, or where afford ,a resting-place at last), and my small band ,of warriors I arrayed. As soon as smiled ,the light of summer's prime, my reverend sire ,Anchises bade us on the winds of Fate ,to spread all sail. Through tears I saw recede ,my native shore, the haven and the plains ,where once was Troy . An exile on the seas, ,with son and followers and household shrines, ,There is a far-off land where warriors breed, ,where Thracians till the boundless plains, and where ,the cruel-eyed Lycurgus once was king. ,Troy's old ally it was, its deities ,had brotherhood with ours before our fall. ,Thither I fared, and on its winding shores ,set my first walls, though partial Fate opposed ,our entrance there. In memory of my name ,Unto Dione's daughter, and all gods ,who blessed our young emprise, due gifts were paid; ,and unto the supreme celestial King ,I slew a fair white bull beside the sea. ,But haply near my place of sacrifice ,a mound was seen, and on the summit grew ,a copse of corner and a myrtle tree, ,with spear-like limbs outbranched on every side. ,This I approached, and tried to rend away ,from its deep roots that grove of gloomy green, ,and dress my altars in its leafy boughs. ,But, horrible to tell, a prodigy ,smote my astonished eyes: for the first tree, ,which from the earth with broken roots I drew, ,dripped black with bloody drops, and gave the ground ,dark stains of gore. Cold horror shook my frame, ,and every vein within me froze for fear. ,Once more I tried from yet another stock ,the pliant stem to tear, and to explore ,the mystery within,—but yet again ,the foul bark oozed with clots of blackest gore! ,From my deep-shaken soul I made a prayer ,to all the woodland nymphs and to divine ,Gradivus, patron of the Thracian plain, ,to bless this sight, to lift its curse away. ,But when at a third sheaf of myrtle spears ,I fell upon my knees, and tugged amain ,against the adverse ground (I dread to tell!), ,a moaning and a wail from that deep grave ,burst forth and murmured in my listening ear: ,“Why wound me, great Aeneas, in my woe? ,O, spare the dead, nor let thy holy hands ,do sacrilege and sin! I, Trojan-born, ,was kin of thine. This blood is not of trees. ,Haste from this murderous shore, this land of greed. ,O, I am Polydorus! Haste away! ,Here was I pierced; a crop of iron spears ,has grown up o'er my breast, and multiplied ,to all these deadly javelins, keen and strong.” ,Then stood I, burdened with dark doubt and fear ,For once this Polydorus, with much gold, ,ill-fated Priam sent by stealth away ,for nurture with the Thracian king, what time ,Dardania's war Iooked hopeless, and her towers ,were ringed about by unrelenting siege. ,That king, when Ilium 's cause was ebbing low, ,and fortune frowned, gave o'er his plighted faith ,to Agamemnon's might and victory; ,he scorned all honor and did murder foul ,on Polydorus, seizing lawlessly ,on all the gold. O, whither at thy will, ,curst greed of gold, may mortal hearts be driven? ,Soon as my shuddering ceased, I told this tale ,of prodigies before the people's chiefs, ,who sat in conclave with my kingly sire, ,and bade them speak their reverend counsel forth. ,All found one voice; to leave that land of sin, ,where foul abomination had profaned ,a stranger's right; and once more to resign ,our fleet unto the tempest and the wave. ,But fit and solemn funeral rites were paid ,to Polydorus. A high mound we reared ,of heaped-up earth, and to his honored shade ,built a perpetual altar, sadly dressed ,in cypress dark and purple pall of woe. ,Our Ilian women wailed with loosened hair; ,new milk was sprinkled from a foaming cup, ,and from the shallow bowl fresh blood out-poured ,upon the sacred ground. So in its tomb ,we laid his ghost to rest, and loudly sang, ,After these things, when first the friendly sea ,looked safe and fair, and o'er its tranquil plain ,light-whispering breezes bade us launch away, ,my men drew down our galleys to the brine, ,thronging the shore. Soon out of port we ran, ,and watched the hills and cities fading far. ,There is a sacred island in mid-seas, ,to fruitful Doris and to Neptune dear, ,which grateful Phoebus, wielder of the bow, ,the while it drifted loose from land to land, ,chained firmly where the crags of Gyaros ,and Myconos uptower, and bade it rest ,immovable, in scorn of wind and wave. ,Thither I sped; by this my weary ships ,found undisturbed retreat and haven fair. ,To land we came and saw with reverent eyes ,Apollo's citadel. King Anius, ,his people's king, and priest at Phoebus' fane, ,came forth to meet us, wearing on his brow ,the fillets and a holy laurel crown. ,Unto Anchises he gave greeting kind, ,claimed old acquaintance, grasped us by the hand, ,Then, kneeling at the shrine of time-worn stone: ,“Thou who at Thymbra on the Trojan shore ,hast often blessed my prayer, O, give to me ,a hearth and home, and to this war-worn band ,defensive towers and offspring multiplied ,in an abiding city; give to Troy ,a second citadel, that shall survive ,Achilles' wrath and all our Argive foe. ,Whom shall we follow? Whither lies our way? ,Where wilt thou grant us an abiding-place? ,Send forth, O King, thy voice oracular, ,and on our spirits move.” Scarce had I spoke ,when sudden trembling through the laurels ran ,and smote the holy portals; far and wide ,the mighty ridges of the mountain shook, ,and from the opening shrine the tripod moaned. ,Prostrate to earth we fall, as on our ears ,this utterance breaks: “O breed of iron men, ,ye sons of Dardanus! the self-same land ,where bloomed at first your far-descended stem ,shall to its bounteous bosom draw ye home. ,Seek out your ancient Mother! There at last ,Aeneas' race shall reign on every shore, ,and his sons' sons, and all their house to be.” ,So Phoebus spoke; and mighty joy uprose ,from all my thronging people, who would know ,where Phoebus' city lay, and whitherward ,the god ordained the wandering tribe's return. ,Then spake my father, pondering olden days ,and sacred memories of heroes gone: ,“Hear, chiefs and princes, what your hopes shall be! ,The Isle of Crete, abode of lofty Jove, ,rests in the middle sea. Thence Ida soars; ,there is the cradle of our race. It boasts ,a hundred cities, seats of fruitful power. ,Thence our chief sire, if duly I recall ,the olden tale, King Teucer sprung, who first ,touched on the Trojan shore, and chose his seat ,of kingly power. There was no Ilium then ,nor towered Pergama; in lowly vales ,their dwelling; hence the ancient worship given ,to the Protectress of Mount Cybele, ,mother of Gods, what time in Ida's grove ,the brazen Corybantic cymbals clang, ,or sacred silence guards her mystery, ,and lions yoked her royal chariot draw. ,Up, then, and follow the behests divine! ,Pour offering to the winds, and point your keels ,unto that realm of Minos. It is near. ,if Jove but bless, the third day's dawn should see ,our ships at Cretan land.” So, having said, ,he slew the victims for each altar's praise. ,A bull to Neptune, and a bull to thee, ,o beauteous Apollo! A black lamb ,unto the clouds and storms; but fleece of snow ,The tale was told us that Idomeneus, ,from his hereditary kindgom driven, ,had left his Crete abandoned, that no foe ,now harbored there, but all its dwellings lay ,unteted of man. So forth we sailed ,out of the port of Delos, and sped far ,along the main. The maenad-haunted hills ,of Naxos came in view; the ridges green ,of fair Donysa, with Olearos, ,and Paros, gleaming white, and Cyclades ,scattered among the waves, as close we ran ,where thick-strewn islands vex the channelled seas ,with rival shout the sailors cheerly called: ,“On, comrades! On, to Crete and to our sires!” ,Freely behind us blew the friendly winds, ,and gave smooth passage to that fabled shore, ,the land of the Curetes, friends of Jove. ,There eagerly I labored at the walls ,of our long-prayed-for city; and its name ,was Pergamea; to my Trojan band, ,pleased with such name, I gave command to build ,But scarce the ships were beached along the strand ,(While o'er the isle my busy mariners ,ploughed in new fields and took them wives once more, — ,I giving homes and laws) when suddenly ,a pestilence from some infectious sky ,seized on man's flesh, and horribly exhaled ,o'er trees and crops a fatal year of plague. ,Some breathed their last, while others weak and worn ,lived on; the dog-star parched the barren fields; ,grass withered, and the sickly, mouldering corn ,refused us life. My aged father then ,bade us re-cross the waves and re-implore ,Apollo's mercy at his island shrine; ,if haply of our weariness and woe ,he might vouchsafe the end, or bid us find ,'T was night, and sleep possessed all breathing things; ,when, lo! the sacred effigies divine, ,the Phrygian gods which through the flames I bore ,from fallen Troy, seemed in a vision clear ,to stand before me where I slumbering lay, ,bathed in bright beams which from the moon at full ,streamed through the latticed wall: and thus they spoke ,to soothe my care away. “Apollo's word, ,which in far Delos the god meant for thee, ,is uttered here. Behold, he sends ourselves ,to this thy house, before thy prayer is made. ,We from Troy 's ashes have companioned thee ,in every fight; and we the swollen seas, ,guided by thee, in thine own ships have crossed; ,our power divine shall set among the stars ,thy seed to be, and to thy city give ,dominion evermore. For mighty men ,go build its mighty walls! Seek not to shun ,the hard, long labors of an exile's way. ,Change this abode! Not thine this Cretan shore, ,nor here would Delian Phoebus have thee bide. ,There is a land the roving Greeks have named ,Hesperia. It is a storied realm ,made mighty by great wars and fruitful land. ,Oenotrians had it, and their sons, 't is said, ,have called it Italy, a chieftain's name ,to a whole region given. That land alone ,our true abode can be; for Dardanus ,was cradled there, and old Iasius, ,their blood the oldest of our ancient line. ,Arise! go forth and cheer thy father gray ,with the glad tidings! Bid him doubt no more! ,Ausonia seek and Corythus; for Jove ,denies this Cretan realm to thine and thee.” ,I marvelled at the heavenly presences ,so vocal and so bright, for 't was not sleep; ,but face to face I deemed I could discern ,each countece august and holy brow, ,each mantled head; and from my body ran ,cold sweat of awe. From my low couch I sprang, ,lifting to heaven my suppliant hands and prayer, ,and o'er my hearth poured forth libations free. ,After th' auspicious offering, I told ,Anchises the whole tale in order due. ,He owned our stock two-branched, of our great sires ,the twofold line, and that his thought had strayed, ,in new confusion mingling ancient names; ,then spoke: “O son, in Ilium 's doom severe ,afflicted ever! To my ears alone ,this dark vicissitude Cassandra sang. ,I mind me now that her wild tongue foretold ,such destiny. For oft she called aloud ,‘Hesperia!’ oft ‘ Italia 's kingdom!’ called. ,But who had faith that Teucer's sons should come ,to far Hesperia? What mortal ear ,gave heed to sad Cassandra's voice divine? ,Now Phoebus speaks. Obedient let us be, ,and, warned by him, our happier Iot pursue!” ,He spoke: with heart of hope we all obeyed; ,again we changed abode; and, leaving there ,a feeble few, again with spreading sails ,When from the deep the shores had faded far, ,and only sky and sea were round our way, ,full in the zenith hung a purple cloud, ,storm-laden, dark as night, and every wave ,grew black and angry, while perpetual gales ,came rolling o'er the main, and mountain-high ,the wreckful surges rose; our ships were hurled ,wide o'er the whirling waters; thunder-clouds ,and misty murk of night made end of all ,the light of heaven, save where the rifted storm ,flashed with the oft-reiterate shaft of Jove. ,Then went we drifting, beaten from our course, ,upon a trackless sea. Not even the eyes ,of Palinurus could tell night from noon ,or ken our way. Three days of blinding dark, ,three nights without a star, we roved the seas; ,The fourth, land seemed to rise. Far distant hills ,and rolling smoke we saw. Down came our sails, ,out flew the oars, and with prompt stroke the crews ,swept the dark waves and tossed the crested foam. ,From such sea-peril safe, I made the shores ,of Strophades,—a name the Grecians gave ,to islands in the broad Ionic main, — ,the Strophades, where dread Celaeno bides, ,with other Harpies, who had quit the halls ,of stricken Phineus, and for very fear ,fled from the routed feast; no prodigy ,more vile than these, nor plague more pitiless ,ere rose by wrath divine from Stygian wave; ,birds seem they, but with face like woman-kind; ,foul-flowing bellies, hands with crooked claws, ,and ghastly lips they have, with hunger pale. ,Scarce had we made the haven, when, behold! ,Fair herds of cattle roaming a wide plain, ,and horned goats, untended, feeding free ,in pastures green, surprised our happy eyes. ,with eager blades we ran to take and slay, ,asking of every god, and chicfly Jove, ,to share the welcome prize: we ranged a feast, ,with turf-built couches and a banquet-board ,along the curving strand. But in a trice, ,down from the high hills swooping horribly, ,the Harpies loudly shrieking, flapped their wings, ,snatched at our meats, and with infectious touch ,polluted all; infernal was their cry, ,the stench most vile. Once more in covert far ,beneath a caverned rock, and close concealed ,with trees and branching shade, we raised aloft ,our tables, altars, and rekindled fires. ,Once more from haunts unknown the clamorous flock ,from every quarter flew, and seized its prey ,with taloned feet and carrion lip most foul. ,I called my mates to arms and opened war ,on that accursed brood. My band obeyed; ,and, hiding in deep grass their swords and shields, ,in ambush lay. But presently the foe ,swept o'er the winding shore with loud alarm : ,then from a sentry-crag, Misenus blew ,a signal on his hollow horn. My men ,flew to the combat strange, and fain would wound ,with martial steel those foul birds of the sea; ,but on their sides no wounding blade could fall, ,nor any plume be marred. In swiftest flight ,to starry skies they soared, and left on earth ,their half-gnawed, stolen feast, and footprints foul. ,Celaeno only on a beetling crag ,took lofty perch, and, prophetess of ill, ,shrieked malediction from her vulture breast: ,“Because of slaughtered kine and ravished herd, ,sons of Laomedon, have ye made war? ,And will ye from their rightful kingdom drive ,the guiltless Harpies? Hear, O, hear my word ,(Long in your bosoms may it rankle sore!) ,which Jove omnipotent to Phoebus gave, ,Phoebus to me: a word of doom, which I, ,the Furies' elder sister, here unfold: ,‘To Italy ye fare. The willing winds ,your call have heard; and ye shall have your prayer ,in some Italian haven safely moored. ,But never shall ye rear the circling walls ,of your own city, till for this our blood ,by you unjustly spilt, your famished jaws ,She spoke: her pinions bore her to the grove, ,and she was seen no more. But all my band ,shuddered with shock of fear in each cold vein; ,their drooping spirits trusted swords no more, ,but turned to prayers and offerings, asking grace, ,scarce knowing if those creatures were divine, ,or but vast birds, ill-omened and unclean. ,Father Anchises to the gods in heaven ,uplifted suppliant hands, and on that shore ,due ritual made, crying aloud; “Ye gods ,avert this curse, this evil turn away! ,Smile, Heaven, upon your faithful votaries.” ,Then bade he launch away, the chain undo, ,set every cable free and spread all sail. ,O'er the white waves we flew, and took our way ,where'er the helmsman or the winds could guide. ,Now forest-clad Zacynthus met our gaze, ,engirdled by the waves; Dulichium, ,same, and Neritos, a rocky steep, ,uprose. We passed the cliffs of Ithaca ,that called Laertes king, and flung our curse ,on fierce Ulysses' hearth and native land. ,nigh hoar Leucate's clouded crest we drew, ,where Phoebus' temple, feared by mariners, ,loomed o'er us; thitherward we steered and reached ,the little port and town. Our weary fleet ,So, safe at land, our hopeless peril past, ,we offered thanks to Jove, and kindled high ,his altars with our feast and sacrifice; ,then, gathering on Actium 's holy shore, ,made fair solemnities of pomp and game. ,My youth, anointing their smooth, naked limbs, ,wrestled our wonted way. For glad were we, ,who past so many isles of Greece had sped ,and 'scaped our circling foes. Now had the sun ,rolled through the year's full circle, and the waves ,were rough with icy winter's northern gales. ,I hung for trophy on that temple door ,a swelling shield of brass (which once was worn ,by mighty Abas) graven with this line: ,SPOIL OF AENEAS FROM TRIUMPHANT FOES. ,Then from that haven I command them forth; ,my good crews take the thwarts, smiting the sea ,with rival strokes, and skim the level main. ,Soon sank Phaeacia's wind-swept citadels ,out of our view; we skirted the bold shores ,of proud Epirus, in Chaonian land, ,Here wondrous tidings met us, that the son ,of Priam, Helenus, held kingly sway ,o'er many Argive cities, having wed ,the Queen of Pyrrhus, great Achilles' son, ,and gained his throne; and that Andromache ,once more was wife unto a kindred lord. ,Amazement held me; all my bosom burned ,to see the hero's face and hear this tale ,of strange vicissitude. So up I climbed, ,leaving the haven, fleet, and friendly shore. ,That self-same hour outside the city walls, ,within a grove where flowed the mimic stream ,of a new Simois, Andromache, ,with offerings to the dead, and gifts of woe, ,poured forth libation, and invoked the shade ,of Hector, at a tomb which her fond grief ,had consecrated to perpetual tears, ,though void; a mound of fair green turf it stood, ,and near it rose twin altars to his name. ,She saw me drawing near; our Trojan helms ,met her bewildered eyes, and, terror-struck ,at the portentous sight, she swooning fell ,and lay cold, rigid, lifeless, till at last, ,scarce finding voice, her lips addressed me thus : ,“Have I true vision? Bringest thou the word ,of truth, O goddess-born? Art still in flesh? ,Or if sweet light be fled, my Hector, where?” ,With flood of tears she spoke, and all the grove ,reechoed to her cry. Scarce could I frame ,brief answer to her passion, but replied ,with broken voice and accents faltering: ,“I live, 't is true. I lengthen out my days ,through many a desperate strait. But O, believe ,that what thine eyes behold is vision true. ,Alas! what lot is thine, that wert unthroned ,from such a husband's side? What after-fate ,could give thee honor due? Andromache, ,With drooping brows and lowly voice she cried : ,“O, happy only was that virgin blest, ,daughter of Priam, summoned forth to die ,in sight of Ilium, on a foeman's tomb! ,No casting of the lot her doom decreed, ,nor came she to her conqueror's couch a slave. ,Myself from burning Ilium carried far ,o'er seas and seas, endured the swollen pride ,of that young scion of Achilles' race, ,and bore him as his slave a son. When he ,sued for Hermione, of Leda's line, ,and nuptial-bond with Lacedaemon's Iords, ,I, the slave-wife, to Helenus was given, ,and slave was wed with slave. But afterward ,Orestes, crazed by loss of her he loved, ,and ever fury-driven from crime to crime, ,crept upon Pyrrhus in a careless hour ,and murdered him upon his own hearth-stone. ,Part of the realm of Neoptolemus ,fell thus to Helenus, who called his lands ,Chaonian, and in Trojan Chaon's name ,his kingdom is Chaonia. Yonder height ,is Pergamus, our Ilian citadel. ,What power divine did waft thee to our shore, ,not knowing whither? Tell me of the boy ,Ascanius! Still breathes he earthly air? ,In Troy she bore him—is he mourning still ,that mother ravished from his childhood's eyes? ,what ancient valor stirs the manly soul ,of thine own son, of Hector's sister's child?” ,Thus poured she forth full many a doleful word ,with unavailing tears. But as she ceased, ,out of the city gates appeared the son ,of Priam, Helenus, with princely train. ,He welcomed us as kin, and glad at heart ,gave guidance to his house, though oft his words ,fell faltering and few, with many a tear. ,Soon to a humbler Troy I lift my eyes, ,and of a mightier Pergamus discern ,the towering semblance; there a scanty stream ,runs on in Xanthus ' name, and my glad arms ,the pillars of a Scaean gate embrace. ,My Teucrian mariners with welcome free ,enjoyed the friendly town; his ample halls ,our royal host threw wide; full wine-cups flowed ,within the palace; golden feast was spread, ,and many a goblet quaffed. Day followed day, ,while favoring breezes beckoned us to sea, ,and swelled the waiting canvas as they blew. ,Then to the prophet-priest I made this prayer: ,“offspring of Troy, interpreter of Heaven! ,Who knowest Phoebus' power, and readest well ,the tripod, stars, and vocal laurel leaves ,to Phoebus dear, who know'st of every bird ,the ominous swift wing or boding song, ,o, speak! For all my course good omens showed, ,and every god admonished me to sail ,in quest of Italy 's far-distant shores; ,but lone Celaeno, heralding strange woe, ,foretold prodigious horror, vengeance dark, ,and vile, unnatural hunger. How elude ,such perils? Or by what hard duty done ,may such huge host of evils vanquished be?” ,Then Helenus, with sacrifice of kine ,in order due, implored the grace of Heaven, ,unloosed the fillets from his sacred brow, ,and led me, Phoebus, to thy temple's door, ,awed by th' o'er-brooding godhead, whose true priest, ,“O goddess-born, indubitably shines ,the blessing of great gods upon thy path ,across the sea; the heavenly King supreme ,thy destiny ordains; 't is he unfolds ,the grand vicissitude, which now pursues ,a course immutable. I will declare ,of thy large fate a certain bounded part; ,that fearless thou may'st view the friendly sea, ,and in Ausonia's haven at the last ,find thee a fixed abode. Than this no more ,the Sister Fates to Helenus unveil, ,and Juno, Saturn's daughter, grants no more. ,First, that Italia (which nigh at hand ,thou deemest, and wouldst fondly enter in ,by yonder neighboring bays) lies distant far ,o'er trackless course and long, with interval ,of far-extended lands. Thine oars must ply ,the waves of Sicily ; thy fleet must cleave ,the large expanse of that Ausonian brine; ,the waters of Avernus thou shalt see, ,and that enchanted island where abides ,Aeaean Circe, ere on tranquil shore ,thou mayest plant thy nation. Lo! a sign ,I tell thee; hide this wonder in thy heart: ,Beside a certain stream's sequestered wave, ,thy troubled eyes, in shadowy flex grove ,that fringes on the river, shall descry ,a milk-white, monstrous sow, with teeming brood ,of thirty young, new littered, white like her, ,all clustering at her teats, as prone she lies. ,There is thy city's safe, predestined ground, ,and there thy labors' end. Vex not thy heart ,about those ‘tables bitten’, for kind fate ,thy path will show, and Phoebus bless thy prayer. ,But from these lands and yon Italian shore, ,where from this sea of ours the tide sweeps in, ,escape and flee, for all its cities hold ,pernicious Greeks, thy foes: the Locri there ,have builded walls; the wide Sallentine fields ,are filled with soldiers of Idomeneus; ,there Meliboean Philoctetes' town, ,petilia, towers above its little wall. ,Yea, even when thy fleet has crossed the main, ,and from new altars built along the shore ,thy vows to Heaven are paid, throw o'er thy head ,a purple mantle, veiling well thy brows, ,lest, while the sacrificial fire ascends ,in offering to the gods, thine eye behold ,some face of foe, and every omen fail. ,Let all thy people keep this custom due, ,and thou thyself be faithful; let thy seed ,forever thus th' immaculate rite maintain. ,After departing hence, thou shalt be blown ,toward Sicily, and strait Pelorus' bounds ,will open wide. Then take the leftward way: ,those leftward waters in long circuit sweep, ,far from that billowy coast, the opposing side. ,These regions, so they tell, in ages gone ,by huge and violent convulsion riven ,(Such mutability is wrought by time), ,sprang wide asunder; where the doubled strand ,sole and continuous lay, the sea's vast power ,burst in between, and bade its waves divide ,Hesperia's bosom from fair Sicily, ,while with a straitened firth it interflowed ,their fields and cities sundered shore from shore. ,The right side Scylla keeps; the left is given ,to pitiless Charybdis, who draws down ,to the wild whirling of her steep abyss ,the monster waves, and ever and anon ,flings them at heaven, to lash the tranquil stars. ,But Scylla, prisoned in her eyeless cave, ,thrusts forth her face, and pulls upon the rocks ,ship after ship; the parts that first be seen ,are human; a fair-breasted virgin she, ,down to the womb; but all that lurks below ,is a huge-membered fish, where strangely join ,the flukes of dolphins and the paunch of wolves. , Better by far to round the distant goal ,of the Trinacrian headlands, veering wide ,from thy true course, than ever thou shouldst see ,that shapeless Scylla in her vaulted cave, ,where grim rocks echo her dark sea-dogs' roar. ,Yea, more, if aught of prescience be bestowed ,on Helenus, if trusted prophet he, ,and Phoebus to his heart true voice have given, ,o goddess-born, one counsel chief of all ,I tell thee oft, and urge it o'er and o'er. ,To Juno's godhead lift thy Ioudest prayer; ,to Juno chant a fervent votive song, ,and with obedient offering persuade ,that potent Queen. So shalt thou, triumphing, ,to Italy be sped, and leave behind , Trinacria . When wafted to that shore, ,repair to Cumae 's hill, and to the Lake ,Avernus with its whispering grove divine. ,There shalt thou see a frenzied prophetess, ,who from beneath the hollow scarped crag ,sings oracles, or characters on leaves ,mysterious names. Whate'er the virgin writes, ,on leaves inscribing the portentous song, ,she sets in order, and conceals them well ,in her deep cave, where they abide unchanged ,in due array. Yet not a care has she, ,if with some swinging hinge a breeze sweeps in, ,to catch them as they whirl: if open door ,disperse them flutterlig through the hollow rock, ,she will not link their shifted sense anew, ,nor re-invent her fragmentary song. ,oft her uswered votaries depart, ,scorning the Sibyl's shrine. But deem not thou ,thy tarrying too Iong, whate'er thy stay. ,Though thy companions chide, though winds of power ,invite thy ship to sea, and well would speed ,the swelling sail, yet to that Sibyl go. ,Pray that her own lips may sing forth for thee ,the oracles, uplifting her dread voice ,in willing prophecy. Her rede shall tell ,of Italy, its wars and tribes to be, ,and of what way each burden and each woe ,may be escaped, or borne. Her favoring aid ,will grant swift, happy voyages to thy prayer. ,Such counsels Heaven to my lips allows. ,arise, begone! and by thy glorious deeds ,So spake the prophet with benigt voice. ,Then gifts he bade be brought of heavy gold ,and graven ivory, which to our ships ,he bade us bear; each bark was Ioaded full ,with messy silver and Dodona 's pride ,of brazen cauldrons; a cuirass he gave ,of linked gold enwrought and triple chain; ,a noble helmet, too, with flaming crest ,and lofty cone, th' accoutrement erewhile ,of Neoptolemus. My father too ,had fit gifts from the King; whose bounty then ,gave steeds and riders; and new gear was sent ,to every sea-worn ship, while he supplied ,Anchises bade us speedily set sail, ,nor lose a wind so fair; and answering him, ,Apollo's priest made reverent adieu: ,“Anchises, honored by the love sublime ,of Venus, self and twice in safety borne ,from falling Troy, chief care of kindly Heaven, ,th' Ausonian shore is thine. Sail thitherward! ,For thou art pre-ordained to travel far ,o'er yonder seas; far in the distance lies ,that region of Ausonia, Phoebus' voice ,to thee made promise of. Onward, I say, ,o blest in the exceeding loyal love ,of thy dear son! Why keep thee longer now? ,Why should my words yon gathering winds detain?” ,Likewise Andromache in mournful guise ,took last farewell, bringing embroidered robes ,of golden woof; a princely Phrygian cloak ,she gave Ascanius, vying with the King ,in gifts of honor; and threw o'er the boy ,the labors of her loom, with words like these: ,“Accept these gifts, sweet youth, memorials ,of me and my poor handicraft, to prove ,th' undying friendship of Andromache, ,once Hector's wife. Take these last offerings ,of those who are thy kin—O thou that art ,of my Astyanax in all this world ,the only image! His thy lovely eyes! ,Thy hands, thy lips, are even what he bore, ,and like thy own his youthful bloom would be.” ,Thus I made answer, turning to depart ,with rising tears: “Live on, and be ye blessed, ,whose greatness is accomplished! As for me, ,from change to change Fate summons, and I go; ,but ye have won repose. No leagues of sea ,await your cleaving keel. Not yours the quest ,of fading Italy 's delusive shore. ,Here a new Xanthus and a second Troy ,your labor fashioned and your eyes may see— ,more blest, I trust, less tempting to our foes! ,If e'er on Tiber and its bordering vales ,I safely enter, and these eyes behold ,our destined walls, then in fraternal bond ,let our two nations live, whose mutual boast ,is one Dardanian blood, one common story. , Epirus with Hesperia shall be ,one Troy in heart and soul. But this remains ,Forth o'er the seas we sped and kept our course ,nigh the Ceraunian headland, where begins ,the short sea-passage unto Italy . ,Soon sank the sun, while down the shadowed hills ,stole deeper gloom; then making shore, we flung ,our bodies on a dry, sea-bordering sand, ,couched on earth's welcome breast; the oars were ranged ,in order due; the tides of slumber dark ,o'erflowed our lives. But scarce the chariot ,of Night, on wings of swift, obedient Hours, ,had touched the middle sky, when wakeful sprang ,good Palinurus from his pillowed stone: ,with hand at ear he caught each airy gust ,and questioned of the winds; the gliding stars ,he called by name, as onward they advanced ,through the still heaven; Arcturus he beheld, ,the Hyades, rain-bringers, the twin Bears, ,and vast Orion girt in golden arms. ,He blew a trumpet from his ship; our camp ,stirred to the signal for embarking; soon ,Scarce had Aurora's purple from the sky ,warned off the stars, when Iying very low ,along th' horizon, the dimmed hills we saw ,of Italy ; Achates first gave cry ,“ Italia !” with answering shouts of joy, ,my comrades' voices cried, “ Italia, hail!” ,Anchises, then, wreathed a great bowl with flowers ,and filled with wine, invoking Heaven to bless, ,and thus he prayed from our ship's lofty stern: ,“O Iords of land and sea and every storm! ,Breathe favoring breezes for our onward way!” ,Fresh blew the prayed-for winds. A haven fair ,soon widened near us; and its heights were crowned ,by a Greek fane to Pallas. Yet my men ,furled sail and shoreward veered the pointing prow. ,the port receding from the orient wave ,is curved into a bow; on either side ,the jutting headlands toss the salt sea-foam ,and hide the bay itself. Like double wall ,the towered crags send down protecting arms, ,while distant from the shore the temple stands. ,Here on a green sward, the first omen given, ,I saw four horses grazing through the field, ,each white as snow. Father Anchises cried: ,“Is war thy gift, O new and alien land? ,Horses make war; of war these creatures bode. ,Yet oft before the chariot of peace ,their swift hoofs go, and on their necks they bear ,th' obedient yoke and rein. Therefore a hope ,of peace is also ours.” Then we implored ,Minerva's mercy, at her sacred shrine, ,the mail-clad goddess who gave welcome there; ,and at an altar, mantling well our brows ,the Phrygian way, as Helenus ordained, ,we paid the honors his chief counsel urged, ,No tarrying now, but after sacrifice ,we twirled the sailyards and shook out all sail, ,leaving the cities of the sons of Greece ,and that distrusted land. Tarentum 's bay ,soon smiled before us, town of Hercules, ,if fame be true; opposing it uptowers ,Lacinia's headland unto Juno dear, ,the heights of Caulon, and that sailors' bane, ,ship-shattering Scylaceum. Thence half seen, ,trinacrian Aetna cleaves th' horizon line; ,we hear from far the crash of shouting seas, ,where lifted billows leap the tide-swept sand. ,Father Anchises cried: “'T is none but she— ,Charybdis! Helenus this reef foretold, ,and rocks of dreadful name. O, fly, my men! ,Rise like one man with long, strong sweep of oars!” ,Not unobedient they! First Palinure ,veered to the leftward wave the willing keel, ,and sails and oars together leftward strove. ,We shot to skyward on the arching surge, ,then, as she sank, dropped deeper than the grave; ,thrice bellowed the vast cliffs from vaulted wall; ,thrice saw we spouted foam and showers of stars. ,After these things both wind and sun did fail; ,and weary, worn, not witting of our way, ,A spreading bay is there, impregnable ,to all invading storms; and Aetna 's throat ,with roar of frightful ruin thunders nigh. ,Now to the realm of light it lifts a cloud ,of pitch-black, whirling smoke, and fiery dust, ,shooting out globes of flame, with monster tongues ,that lick the stars; now huge crags of itself, ,out of the bowels of the mountain torn, ,its maw disgorges, while the molten rock ,rolls screaming skyward; from the nether deep ,the fathomless abyss makes ebb and flow. ,Enceladus, his body lightning-scarred, ,lies prisoned under all, so runs the tale: ,o'er him gigantic Aetna breathes in fire ,from crack and seam; and if he haply turn ,to change his wearied side, Trinacria 's isle ,trembles and moans, and thick fumes mantle heaven. ,That night in screen and covert of a grove ,we bore the dire convulsion, unaware ,whence the loud horror came. For not a star ,its lamp allowed, nor burned in upper sky ,the constellated fires, but all was gloom, ,When from the eastern waves the light of morn ,began to peer, and from the upper sky ,Aurora flamed away the dark and dew, ,out of the forest sprang a startling shape ,of hunger-wasted misery; a man ,in wretched guise, who shoreward came with hands ,outstretched in supplication. We turned back ,and scanned him well. All grime and foulness he, ,with long and tangled beard, his savage garb ,fastened with thorns; but in all else he seemed ,a Greek, and in his country's league of arms ,sent to the seige of Troy . Then he beheld ,the Dardan habit, and our Trojan steel, ,he somewhat paused, as if in dread dismay ,such sight to see, and falteringly moved; ,but soon with headlong steps he sought the shore, ,ejaculating broken sobs and prayers: ,“By stars above! By gods on high! O, hear! ,By this bright heavenly air we mortals breathe, ,save me, sweet Trojans! Carry me away ,unto what land ye will! I ask no more. ,I came, I know it, in the ships of Greece ; ,and I did war, 't is true, with Ilium 's gods. ,O, if the crime deserve it, fling my corse ,on yonder waves, and in the boundless brine ,sink me forever! Give me in my death ,the comfort that by human hands I die.” ,He clasped our knees, and writhing on his own ,clung fast. We bid him tell his race and name, ,and by what fate pursued. Anchises gave ,his own right hand in swift and generous aid, ,and by prompt token cheered the exile's heart, ,“My home was Ithaca, and I partook ,the fortunes of Ulysses evil-starred. ,My name is Achemenides, my sire ,was Adamastus, and I sailed for Troy, ,being so poor,—O, that I ne'er had change ,the lot I bore! In yon vast Cyclops' cave ,my comrades, flying from its gruesome door, ,left me behind, forgotten. 'T is a house ,of gory feasts of flesh, 't is deep and dark, ,and vaulted high. He looms as high as heaven; ,I pray the blessed gods to rid the earth ,of the vile monster! None can look on him, ,none speak with him. He feeds on clotted gore ,of disembowelled men. These very eyes ,saw him seize two of our own company, ,and, as he lolled back in the cave, he clutched ,and dashed them on the stones, fouling the floor ,with torrent of their blood; myself I saw him ,crunch with his teeth the dripping, bloody limbs ,still hot and pulsing on his hungry jaw. ,But not without reward! For such a sight ,Ulysses would not brook, and Ithaca ,forgot not in such strait the name he bore. ,For soon as, gorged with feasting and o'ercome ,with drunken slumber, the foul giant lay ,sprawled through the cave, his head dropped helpless down, ,disgorging as he slept thick drool of gore ,and gobbets drenched with bloody wine; then we, ,calling on Heaven and taking place by lot, ,drew round him like one man, and with a beam ,sharpened at end bored out that monster eye, ,which, huge and sole, lay under the grim brow, ,round as an Argive shield or Phoebus' star. ,Thus took we joyful vengeance for the shades ,of our lost mates. But, O ill-fated men! ,Fly, I implore, and cut the cables free ,along the beach! For in the land abide, ,like Polyphemus, who in hollow cave ,kept fleecy sheep, and milked his fruitful ewes, ,a hundred other, huge as he, who rove ,wide o'er this winding shore and mountains fair: ,Cyclops accursed, bestial! Thrice the moon ,has filled her horns with light, while here I dwell ,in lonely woods and lairs of creatures wild; ,or from tall cliffs out-peering I discern ,the Cyclops, and shrink shuddering from the sound ,of their vast step and cry. My sorry fare ,is berries and hard corners dropped from trees, ,or herb-roots torn out from the niggard ground. ,Though watching the whole sea, only today , Have I had sight of ships. To you I fled. ,Whate'er ye be, it was my only prayer ,to 'scape that monster brood. I ask no more. ,He scarce had said, when moving o'er the crest ,of a high hill a giant shape we saw: ,that shepherd Polyphemus, with his flocks ,down-wending to the well-known water-side; ,huge, shapeless, horrible, with blinded eye, ,bearing a lopped pine for a staff, he made ,his footing sure, while the white, fleecy sheep, ,sole pleasure now, and solace of his woes, ,ran huddling at his side. ,Soon to the vast flood of the level brine ,he came, and washed the flowing gore away ,from that out-hollowed eye; he gnashed his teeth, ,groaning, and deep into the watery way ,stalked on, his tall bulk wet by scarce a wave. ,We fled in haste, though far, and with us bore ,the truthful suppliant; cut silently ,the anchor-ropes, and, bending to the oar, ,swept on with eager strokes clean out to sea. ,Aware he was, and toward our loud halloo ,whirled sudden round; but when no power had he ,to seize or harm, nor could his fierce pursuit ,o'ertake the Ionian surges as they rolled, ,he raised a cry incredible; the sea ,with all its billows trembled; the wide shore ,of Italy from glens and gorges moaned, ,Then rallied from the grove-clad, Iofty isle ,the Cyclops' clan, and lined the beach and bay. ,We saw each lonely eyeball glare in vain, ,as side by side those brothers Aetna-born ,stood towering high, a conclave dark and dire: ,as when, far up some mountain's famous crest, ,wind-fronting oaks or cone-clad cypresses ,have made assembling in the solemn hills, ,Jove's giant wood or Dian's sacred grove. ,We, terror-struck, would fly we knew not where, ,with loosened sheet and canvas swelling strong ,before a welcome wind; but Helenus ,bade us both Scylla and Charybdis fear, ,where 'twixt the twain death straitly hems the way; ,and so the counsel was to veer our bark ,the course it came. But lo! a northern gale ,burst o'er us from Pelorus' narrowed side, ,and on we rode far past Pantagia's bay ,of unhewn rock, and past the haven strong ,of Megara, and Thapsus Iying low. ,Such were the names retold, and such the shores ,shown us by Achemenides, whose fate ,made him familiar there, for he had sailed ,off the Sicilian shore an island lies, ,wave-washed Plemmyrium, called in olden days ,Ortygia; here Alpheus, river-god, ,from Elis flowed by secret sluice, they say, ,beneath the sea, and mingles at thy mouth, ,fair Arethusa! with Sicilian waves. ,Our voices hailed the great gods of the land ,with reverent prayer; then skirted we the shore, ,where smooth Helorus floods the fruitful plain. ,Under Pachynus' beetling precipice ,we kept our course; then Camarina rose ,in distant view, firm-seated evermore ,by Fate's decree; and that far-spreading vale ,of Gela, with the name of power it takes ,from its wide river; and, uptowering far, ,the ramparts of proud Acragas appeared, ,where fiery steeds were bred in days of old. ,Borne by the winds, along thy coast I fled, , Selinus, green with palm! and past the shore ,of Lilybaeum with its treacherous reef; ,till at the last the port of Drepanum ,received me to its melancholy strand. ,Here, woe is me I outworn by stormful seas, ,my sire, sole comfort of my grievous doom, ,Anchises ceased to be. O best of sires! ,Here didst thou leave me in the weary way; ,through all our perils—O the bitter loss! — ,borne safely, but in vain. King Helenus, ,whose prophet-tongue of dark events foretold, ,spoke not this woe; nor did Celeno's curse ,of this forebode. Such my last loss and pain; ,such, of my weary way, the destined goal. ,From thence departing, the divine behest ,Such was, while all gave ear, the tale sublime ,father Aeneas, none but he, set forth ,of wanderings and of dark decrees divine: ,silent at last, he ceased, and took repose. " '3.644 So spake the prophet with benigt voice. 3.645 Then gifts he bade be brought of heavy gold 3.646 and graven ivory, which to our ships 3.647 he bade us bear; each bark was Ioaded full ' "3.648 with messy silver and Dodona 's pride " '3.649 of brazen cauldrons; a cuirass he gave 3.650 of linked gold enwrought and triple chain; 3.651 a noble helmet, too, with flaming crest ' "3.652 and lofty cone, th' accoutrement erewhile " '3.653 of Neoptolemus. My father too 3.654 had fit gifts from the King; whose bounty then 3.655 gave steeds and riders; and new gear was sent 3.656 to every sea-worn ship, while he supplied ' "3.658 Anchises bade us speedily set sail, 3.659 nor lose a wind so fair; and answering him, ' "3.660 Apollo's priest made reverent adieu: " '3.661 “Anchises, honored by the love sublime 3.662 of Venus, self and twice in safety borne 3.663 from falling Troy, chief care of kindly Heaven, ' "3.664 th' Ausonian shore is thine. Sail thitherward! " '3.665 For thou art pre-ordained to travel far ' "3.666 o'er yonder seas; far in the distance lies " "3.667 that region of Ausonia, Phoebus' voice " '3.668 to thee made promise of. Onward, I say, 3.669 o blest in the exceeding loyal love 3.670 of thy dear son! Why keep thee longer now? 3.671 Why should my words yon gathering winds detain?” 3.672 Likewise Andromache in mournful guise 3.673 took last farewell, bringing embroidered robes 3.674 of golden woof; a princely Phrygian cloak 3.675 he gave Ascanius, vying with the King ' "3.676 in gifts of honor; and threw o'er the boy " '3.677 the labors of her loom, with words like these: 3.678 “Accept these gifts, sweet youth, memorials 3.679 of me and my poor handicraft, to prove ' "3.680 th' undying friendship of Andromache, " "3.681 once Hector's wife. Take these last offerings " '3.682 of those who are thy kin—O thou that art 3.683 of my Astyanax in all this world 3.684 the only image! His thy lovely eyes! 3.685 Thy hands, thy lips, are even what he bore, 3.686 and like thy own his youthful bloom would be.” 3.687 Thus I made answer, turning to depart 3.688 with rising tears: “Live on, and be ye blessed, 3.689 whose greatness is accomplished! As for me, 3.690 from change to change Fate summons, and I go; 3.691 but ye have won repose. No leagues of sea
6.788
Here slain adulterers be; and men who dared
6.836
Or smites with ivory point his golden lyre. 6.837 Here Trojans be of eldest, noblest race, 6.838 Great-hearted heroes, born in happier times, 6.839 Ilus, Assaracus, and Dardanus, 6.840 Illustrious builders of the Trojan town. '" None



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