Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

   Search:  
validated results only / all results

and or

Filtering options: (leave empty for all results)
By author:     
By work:        
By subject:
By additional keyword:       



Results for
Please note: the results are produced through a computerized process which may frequently lead to errors, both in incorrect tagging and in other issues. Please use with caution.
Due to load times, full text fetching is currently attempted for validated results only.
Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

For a list of book indices included, see here.





5 results for "zeno"
1. Aristotle, Physics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •zeno, on elements •compared to cleanthes and zeno, on elements Found in books: Marmodoro and Prince (2015), Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity, 13
2. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 7.135-7.136 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •zeno, on elements •compared to cleanthes and zeno, on elements Found in books: Marmodoro and Prince (2015), Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity, 13
7.135. Body is defined by Apollodorus in his Physics as that which is extended in three dimensions, length, breadth, and depth. This is also called solid body. But surface is the extremity of a solid body, or that which has length and breadth only without depth. That surface exists not only in our thought but also in reality is maintained by Posidonius in the third book of his Celestial Phenomena. A line is the extremity of a surface or length without breadth, or that which has length alone. A point is the extremity of a line, the smallest possible mark or dot.God is one and the same with Reason, Fate, and Zeus; he is also called by many other names. 7.136. In the beginning he was by himself; he transformed the whole of substance through air into water, and just as in animal generation the seed has a moist vehicle, so in cosmic moisture God, who is the seminal reason of the universe, remains behind in the moisture as such an agent, adapting matter to himself with a view to the next stage of creation. Thereupon he created first of all the four elements, fire, water, air, earth. They are discussed by Zeno in his treatise On the Whole, by Chrysippus in the first book of his Physics, and by Archedemus in a work On Elements. An element is defined as that from which particular things first come to be at their birth and into which they are finally resolved.
3. Damaskios, De Principiis, 2.117 (5th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •zeno, on elements •compared to cleanthes and zeno, on elements Found in books: Marmodoro and Prince (2015), Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity, 13
4. Proclus, In Platonis Timaeum Commentarii, None (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •zeno, on elements •compared to cleanthes and zeno, on elements Found in books: Marmodoro and Prince (2015), Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity, 13
5. Alexander of Aphrodisias, De Providentia, None  Tagged with subjects: •zeno, on elements •compared to cleanthes and zeno, on elements Found in books: Marmodoro and Prince (2015), Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity, 13