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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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subject book bibliographic info
charity/works van 't Westeinde (2021), Roman Nobilitas in Jerome's Letters: Roman Values and Christian Asceticism for Socialites, 104, 143, 160, 191, 202
philosopher/works Johnson Dupertuis and Shea (2018), Reading and Teaching Ancient Fiction : Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman Narratives 35, 36, 163, 187, 217, 242, 243, 244, 245
treatise/text/work, hippocratic Motta and Petrucci (2022), Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity, 163, 164, 173
work Champion (2022), Dorotheus of Gaza and Ascetic Education, 72, 94, 95, 123
Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 4, 9, 13, 218, 337, 347
Ker and Wessels (2020), The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn, 6, 10, 12, 27, 29, 33, 143, 192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 200, 201, 202, 203, 204, 205
Langstaff, Stuckenbruck, and Tilly, (2022), The Lord’s Prayer, 181, 182
Thonemann (2020), An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams, 59, 82, 83, 84, 96, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 209
Wilson (2012), The Sentences of Sextus, 232, 309, 384
work, advocates, strategies for obtaining Humfress (2007), Oppian's Halieutica: Charting a Didactic Epic, 97, 98
work, against christians, celsus, author of a Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 497
work, against christians, hierokles, author of a Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 497, 523, 541
work, age, of setting to Brule (2003), Women of Ancient Greece, 158, 159, 178, 180
work, agency / agents, non-human, of written Castelli and Sluiter 92023), Agents of Change in the Greco-Roman and Early Modern Periods: Ten Case Studies in Agency in Innovation. 48, 49
work, agreements Ruffini (2018), Life in an Egyptian Village in Late Antiquity: Aphrodito Before and After the Islamic Conquest, 101, 103, 104
work, and lifestyle, systems of pastoralism Huebner (2013), The Family in Roman Egypt: A Comparative Approach to Intergenerational Solidarity and Conflict. 128, 129
work, and torah study, rashbi, r. shimon bar yoḥai, views on Bar Asher Siegal (2013), Early Christian Monastic Literature and the Babylonian Talmud, 143, 144, 159, 160, 161, 162, 163, 164
work, anonymus iamblichi, title of Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 271, 272
work, as women's, work, textile Brule (2003), Women of Ancient Greece, 37, 75, 105, 177, 178, 180
work, ascribed to caesar, de astris Rüpke (2011), The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti 116
work, at qumran, agricultural Taylor (2012), The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea, 255, 260
work, attributed to, ephrem the syrian, historical references in Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 263
work, bookseller Johnson and Parker (2009), ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome, 166, 279
work, by lucian, symposium, or the lapiths Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 487, 489
work, by lucian, toxaris Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 505, 506
work, catalogue of oracle questions Eidinow (2007), Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks, 97, 99
work, chaeremons Kraemer (2010), Unreliable Witnesses: Religion, Gender, and History in the Greco-Roman Mediterranean, 68
work, city of god, structure of O'Daly (2020), Augustine's City of God: A Reader's Guide (2nd edn), 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78
work, city of god, summary, breviculus, of O'Daly (2020), Augustine's City of God: A Reader's Guide (2nd edn), 311
work, cleodemus-malchus, title of his Feldman (2006), Judaism and Hellenism Reconsidered, 126
work, commercial, textile Brule (2003), Women of Ancient Greece, 178
work, dialog, gentile sabbath Simon-Shushan (2012), Stories of the Law: Narrative Discourse and the Construction of Authority in the Mishna, 70
work, elder, length of Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 156
work, emblematic nature, textile Brule (2003), Women of Ancient Greece, 72, 166, 168, 178
work, exegetical Erler et al. (2021), Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition, 164, 171, 176, 202
work, ezekiel, tragedian, extent of Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 156
work, for, actuality, actual, semen’s Trott (2019), Aristotle on the Matter of Form: ? Feminist Metaphysics of Generation, 110, 166, 168, 194, 200, 201, 216
work, gentile sabbath Simon-Shushan (2012), Stories of the Law: Narrative Discourse and the Construction of Authority in the Mishna, 70
work, germans, hate peace and serious Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 432
work, god, economic Graham (2022), The Church as Paradise and the Way Therein: Early Christian Appropriation of Genesis 3:22–24, 26, 49, 55, 63, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 128, 131, 132, 141, 142, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 164, 165, 172, 174
work, goddesses', textile Brule (2003), Women of Ancient Greece, 24, 35
work, goddesses, textile Brule (2003), Women of Ancient Greece, 24, 35
work, grammarians, alexandrian, their method of Honigman (2003), The Septuagint and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria: A Study in the Narrative of the Letter of Aristeas, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49
work, habituation, and Champion (2022), Dorotheus of Gaza and Ascetic Education, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209
work, heightens jewish pride, joseph and aseneth, pseudepigrapic Feldman (2006), Judaism and Hellenism Reconsidered, 105
work, hierocles, according to photius, divisions of his Schibli (2002), Hierocles of Alexandria, 336
work, in 'house', oikos Brule (2003), Women of Ancient Greece, 158, 159, 175, 176, 177, 178
work, in inheritance, form’s Trott (2019), Aristotle on the Matter of Form: ? Feminist Metaphysics of Generation, 65, 66, 188, 198, 199, 200, 201, 202
work, in oracular questions Eidinow (2007), Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks, 94
work, in oracular questions, ship-related Eidinow (2007), Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks, 97
work, jesus, recapitulative Graham (2022), The Church as Paradise and the Way Therein: Early Christian Appropriation of Genesis 3:22–24, 51, 120, 121, 129, 130, 138, 145, 146, 155, 156
work, john and johannine corpus, coherence as a Yates and Dupont (2023), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part II: Consolidation of the Canon to the Arab Conquest (ca. 393 to 650 CE).. 158, 159
work, labor, hard novoc Cairns (1989), Virgil's Augustan Epic. 31, 32, 33, 222, 226
work, libanius, on advocates strategies for obtaining Humfress (2007), Oppian's Halieutica: Charting a Didactic Epic, 97, 98
work, malalas, objectives of Bickerman and Tropper (2007), Studies in Jewish and Christian History, 471, 472
work, manual Oksanish (2019), Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction, 120, 121
work, military campaigns Eidinow (2007), Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks, 94, 97, 99
work, military inscriptions, road Bruun and Edmondson (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy, 660
work, missionary Tite (2009), Valentinian Ethics and Paraenetic Discourse: Determining the Social Function of Moral Exhortation in Valentinian Christianity, 212, 221, 234, 239, 242, 245, 246, 252, 253, 263, 264, 265, 266, 267, 269, 273, 277, 280, 282, 288, 289, 291, 295, 296, 305, 313
work, monasticism, attitudes toward physical Bar Asher Siegal (2013), Early Christian Monastic Literature and the Babylonian Talmud, 96, 97, 159, 160, 161, 162, 163, 164
work, non-judean women, adopting judean practices, brootens Kraemer (2010), Unreliable Witnesses: Religion, Gender, and History in the Greco-Roman Mediterranean, 184
work, of aeschylus, maenads in Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro, (2021), The Gods of the Greeks, 321
work, of aristarchus, method of Honigman (2003), The Septuagint and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria: A Study in the Narrative of the Letter of Aristeas, 47, 127, 131, 133, 134
work, of aristotle, method of Honigman (2003), The Septuagint and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria: A Study in the Narrative of the Letter of Aristeas, 46, 121, 122, 138
work, of blood in daily offering, tamid Balberg (2017), Blood for Thought: The Reinvention of Sacrifice in Early Rabbinic Literature, 199
work, of blood, avodat ha-dam Balberg (2017), Blood for Thought: The Reinvention of Sacrifice in Early Rabbinic Literature, 71, 72, 73, 101, 103, 171
work, of blood, avodat ha-dam, function of Balberg (2017), Blood for Thought: The Reinvention of Sacrifice in Early Rabbinic Literature, 89
work, of blood, avodat ha-dam, in daily offering Balberg (2017), Blood for Thought: The Reinvention of Sacrifice in Early Rabbinic Literature, 199
work, of blood, avodat ha-dam, versus nonblood Balberg (2017), Blood for Thought: The Reinvention of Sacrifice in Early Rabbinic Literature, 76, 82
work, of callimachus, poetic Honigman (2003), The Septuagint and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria: A Study in the Narrative of the Letter of Aristeas, 13, 15, 73
work, of contra christianos, anti-christian porphyry, and false Simmons(1995), Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian, 27
work, of contra christianos, anti-christian porphyry, argues scripture is contradictory Simmons(1995), Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian, 27
work, of contra christianos, anti-christian porphyry, attacks literary quality of the bible Simmons(1995), Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian, 27
work, of contra christianos, anti-christian porphyry, method of attack Simmons(1995), Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian, 22
work, of contra christianos, anti-christian porphyry, relationship with the great persecution Simmons(1995), Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian, 27
work, of contra christianos, anti-christian porphyry, use of the bible Simmons(1995), Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian, 27
work, of daimons, magic Janowitz (2002), Magic in the Roman World: Pagans, Jews and Christians, 17, 18, 19
work, of done by lesser deities, gods Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 151
work, of ecstatic love in dionysius, incarnation, not the Osborne (1996), Eros Unveiled: Plato and the God of Love. 192, 195, 196, 197, 198
work, of god Langstaff, Stuckenbruck, and Tilly, (2022), The Lord’s Prayer, 169, 191, 202
work, of heat hot, formal work, of versus material Trott (2019), Aristotle on the Matter of Form: ? Feminist Metaphysics of Generation, 173, 178
work, of intention, and blood Balberg (2017), Blood for Thought: The Reinvention of Sacrifice in Early Rabbinic Literature, 72, 73
work, of rabbis, creative Janowitz (2002b), Icons of Power: Ritual Practices in Late Antiquity, 57
work, of therapeutae, daily life and Taylor and Hay (2020), Philo of Alexandria: On the Contemplative Life: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 59, 60, 61, 62, 206, 207, 215
work, of word of god Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 321, 323
work, on Champion (2022), Dorotheus of Gaza and Ascetic Education, 204, 205, 206
work, on fortress alexandrium, pheroras, brother of herod, and Udoh (2006), To Caesar What Is Caesar's: Tribute, Taxes, and Imperial Administration in Early Roman Palestine 63 B.C.E to 70 B.C.E, 195
work, on novel religious teachings, kraemer, ross Ashbrook Harvey et al. (2015), A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer, 101
work, on shabbat melakhah Shemesh (2009), Halakhah in the Making: The Development of Jewish Law from Qumran to the Rabbis. 96, 97
work, on subjects of tragedy, asclepiades of tragilus, historian, author of Feldman (2006), Judaism and Hellenism Reconsidered, 414, 415
work, on the temple, agrippa ii, and Udoh (2006), To Caesar What Is Caesar's: Tribute, Taxes, and Imperial Administration in Early Roman Palestine 63 B.C.E to 70 B.C.E, 195
work, open Keith and Myers (2023), Vergil and Elegy. 160
work, paul and pauline epistles, in evodius’ Yates and Dupont (2023), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part II: Consolidation of the Canon to the Arab Conquest (ca. 393 to 650 CE).. 376, 377, 378
work, paul and pauline epistles, in possidius’ Yates and Dupont (2023), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part II: Consolidation of the Canon to the Arab Conquest (ca. 393 to 650 CE).. 379, 380
work, peri ioudaiōn, egypt, title of Potter Suh and Holladay (2021), Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays, 159
work, preservation, of sophocles’ Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 459, 460, 462, 463, 464, 662
work, prostitution, as Brule (2003), Women of Ancient Greece, 205, 206, 207
work, regarded as, psychological drama, euripidess Pucci (2016), Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay, 60, 61
work, regulation Rüpke (2011), The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti 48, 161
work, rest from Rüpke (2011), The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti 46, 48, 164, 165, 166, 167, 168
work, rural landscape, shaped by human Ferrándiz (2022), Shipwrecks, Legal Landscapes and Mediterranean Paradigms: Gone Under Sea, 3, 109, 110, 111, 113, 114, 115, 118
work, selected and edited by a christian, sextus, sentences of pagan spiritual Sorabji (2000), Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation, 396
work, socrates, own conception of his Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 174, 175, 176
work, son, the, creature Widdicombe (2000), The Fatherhood of God from Origen to Athanasius, 89, 90, 122, 123, 125, 127, 130, 191, 210, 211, 212, 214, 215, 217, 218, 219, 220, 224, 225
work, spartan attitude to, textile Brule (2003), Women of Ancient Greece, 140
work, tertullian, revises Sider (2001), Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian, 138, 140
work, textual, exegetical Erler et al. (2021), Authority and Authoritative Texts in the Platonist Tradition, 113, 212
work, through, material, matter, ὑλή, form’s Trott (2019), Aristotle on the Matter of Form: ? Feminist Metaphysics of Generation, 58, 147, 181
work, with, citation, beginning a literary Culík-Baird (2022), Cicero and the Early Latin Poets, 41
work, women’s Ashbrook Harvey et al. (2015), A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer, 268
work, ”, order, “order of Ker (2023), Quotidian Time and Forms of Life in Ancient Rome. 135, 136, 137
work/acts/miracles, of jesus Tellbe Wasserman and Nyman (2019), Healing and Exorcism in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 41, 42, 43, 44, 54, 58, 61, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 80, 85, 88, 89, 97, 100, 104, 113, 121, 125, 126, 129, 130, 134, 135, 143, 144, 153, 154, 155, 156, 174, 176, 177, 185, 189, 194, 198, 205, 209, 210, 211, 214, 216, 219, 222, 223, 224, 253
worked, for athena by parthenoi agoraios, wool Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 405
worked, for athena by parthenoi and agriculture, wool Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 196, 416, 417
worked, for athena by parthenoi and dionysus, wool Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 324, 325
worked, for athena by parthenoi and marriage, wool Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 393, 427, 441
worked, for athena by parthenoi and sacrifice, wool Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 165, 167, 168, 276
worked, for athena by parthenoi and wine, wool Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 311
worked, for athena by parthenoi as dedicators, wool Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 39, 48
worked, for athena by parthenoi astrapaios, wool Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 85
worked, for athena by parthenoi choral education?, wool Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 183
worked, for athena by parthenoi choruses of wool Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 182, 183
worked, for athena by parthenoi dead, wool Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 29, 30, 31
worked, for athena by parthenoi eleutherios, wool Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 55, 400
worked, for athena by parthenoi festivals of wool Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 165, 208, 270, 271, 272, 273, 274, 275, 276, 278, 279, 282, 283, 284, 286
worked, for athena by parthenoi herkeios, wool Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 16, 17, 18, 20, 21, 404, 425
worked, for athena by parthenoi in curses, wool Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 130, 131
worked, for athena by parthenoi ktesios, wool Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 15, 16, 20, 21, 425
worked, for athena by parthenoi meilichios, votive reliefs, wool, iconography Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 39, 421, 424
worked, for athena by parthenoi meilichios, wool Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 42, 424, 425
worked, for athena by parthenoi patroos, wool Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 22, 23
worked, for athena by parthenoi philios, wool Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 39, 421, 424, 425
worked, for athena by parthenoi phratrios, wool Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 22, 54, 55, 404, 460
worked, for athena by parthenoi private festivals of wool Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 13, 284, 325
worked, for athena by parthenoi rites?, wool Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 167, 168
worked, for athena by parthenoi teleios, wool Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 427, 441
worked, for athena by parthenoi tropaios, wool Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 400, 403
worked, for athena by parthenoi winnowing-basket, wool Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 282, 465
worked, for athena by parthenoi wooden walls debate, wool Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 109, 112
worked, for athena by parthenoi wool, olympios, in vow of Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 55, 56, 406
worked, for athena by parthenoi, wool Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 226, 227
worked, for athena by parthenoi, wool, worked, for athena by parthenoi wool Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 226, 227
working Binder (2012), Tertullian, on Idolatry and Mishnah Avodah Zarah: Questioning the Parting of the Ways Between Christians and Jews, 76, 79, 134, 147, 152, 155, 157, 159, 162, 164, 183
working, classes at sicca, le kef, city of roman north africa Simmons(1995), Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian, 100
working, dress Edmondson (2008), Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture, 12, 39, 46, 100, 103, 105, 186, 241, 252, 253
working, in overarching, frameworks, giving continuity to a broken history Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 399
working, in pauls body, pneuma, spirit, in paul, as Engberg-Pedersen (2010), Cosmology and Self in the Apostle Paul: The Material Spirit, 42, 47, 62, 63, 64, 203
working, in pompeii McGinn (2004), The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel. 67
working, people Poorthuis and Schwartz (2014), Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity, 156
working, through the faithful, spirit Morgan (2022), The New Testament and the Theology of Trust: 'This Rich Trust', 128, 129
working, through, love, faith Yates and Dupont (2023), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part II: Consolidation of the Canon to the Arab Conquest (ca. 393 to 650 CE).. 313, 314
working, through, tool, tools, soul Trott (2019), Aristotle on the Matter of Form: ? Feminist Metaphysics of Generation, 3, 4, 113, 181, 225, 226, 229
working, women Bruun and Edmondson (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy, 607
Kapparis (2021), Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens, 6, 7
works Despotis and Lohr (2022), Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions, 100, 101, 103, 123, 129, 197, 227, 228, 234, 326, 335, 348, 411, 431
Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 464
Mathews (2013), Riches, Poverty, and the Faithful: Perspectives on Wealth in the Second Temple Period and the Apocalypse of John, 160, 173
deSilva (2022), Ephesians, 26, 122, 125, 126, 127
works, abraham, faith and Kessler (2004), Bound by the Bible: Jews, Christians and the Sacrifice of Isaac, 61
works, acad., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 96, 97, 112, 283
works, addressed/dedicated to, maecenas Yona (2018), Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire, 51, 158, 159
works, adnot. job, augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 123, 146
works, adventures of chaereas and greek novels, callirhoe, the Toloni (2022), The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis, 213
works, affection, diocles, cause, treatment van der EIjk (2005), Medicine and Philosophy in Classical Antiquity: Doctors and Philosophers on Nature, Soul, Health and Disease, 90, 106, 115
works, affections, hippocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 42, 177, 182, 183
works, agamemnon, seneca Fertik (2019), The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome, 90, 92, 93, 96, 97, 100, 101, 187, 188, 190
works, agon., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 98, 122
works, airs waters places, hippocratic writings van der EIjk (2005), Medicine and Philosophy in Classical Antiquity: Doctors and Philosophers on Nature, Soul, Health and Disease, 56, 191
works, airs, hippocrates, waters, places Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 11, 42, 44, 56, 70, 78, 106, 107, 110, 134, 139, 143, 156, 157, 158, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 166, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 232, 233, 234, 279
works, ajax, sophocles Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 66, 73
works, alcibiades, philosophical Tsouni (2019), Antiochus and Peripatetic Ethics, 122
works, allegorical interpretation, in de abrahamo vs. other Birnbaum and Dillon (2020), Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 74
works, ambrosiaster, date of composition of Lunn-Rockliffe (2007), The Letter of Mara bar Sarapion in Context, 12, 13, 14
works, ancient medicine, hippocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 14, 41, 96, 141, 148
works, ancient near literary and sub-literary east, epic of atraḫasis Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 38, 39, 41, 64, 72, 73, 621
works, ancient near literary and sub-literary east, epic of gilgamesh Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 72, 73, 621
works, ancient near literary and sub-literary east, legend of aqht Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 20, 42, 43, 73, 607
works, ancient near literary and sub-literary east, legend of keret Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 14, 20, 42, 43
works, ancient near literary and sub-literary east, lugalbanda in the mountain cave Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 43, 44
works, ancient near literary and sub-literary east, song of the plowing oxen Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 44, 48, 72, 735
works, ancient near literary and sub-literary east, stele of the vultures Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 47, 48
works, ancient near literary and sub-literary east, underworld vision of an assyrian crown prince Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 55, 56, 73
works, and creation and the created world, new genres, late antique and early medieval production of Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 712, 713, 714, 715, 716, 717, 719, 720, 721, 722, 723, 724, 725, 726
works, and days, heroic age Finkelberg (2019), Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays, 137, 150, 155, 175, 236, 237, 239, 252, 254
works, and days, hesiod Blum and Biggs (2019), The Epic Journey in Greek and Roman Literature, 18, 24
Bosak-Schroeder (2020), Other Natures: Environmental Encounters with Ancient Greek Ethnography, 24, 26, 85
Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 305, 573, 866, 870
Bär et al (2022), Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome. 42, 224, 231
Cairns (1989), Virgil's Augustan Epic. 11
Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 87, 385, 537, 538, 539, 540, 541, 542, 544, 546, 547
Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 236
Greensmith (2021), The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation, 35
Ker and Wessels (2020), The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 36, 73, 74, 135
Miller and Clay (2019), Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury, 72
Neusner Green and Avery-Peck (2022), Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points, 22, 23
Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 5, 13, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 62, 102
Steiner (2001), Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought, 24, 71, 116, 117, 118, 126
Walter (2020), Time in Ancient Stories of Origin, 6, 68, 77
works, and days, hesiod theogony Braund and Most (2004), Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen, 78, 94, 95, 97
works, and days, hesiod, the proem to the Tor (2017), Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology, 95, 96, 97
works, and days, hesiod, theogony Konig (2022), The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture, 62
works, and days, on pandora Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 590
works, and days, parmenides’ poem, and hesiod’s Folit-Weinberg (2022), Homer, Parmenides, and the Road to Demonstration, 84
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works, and themes, antisthenes Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 325, 326, 338, 339, 340, 341, 353, 354, 355, 356
works, and, waterworks, diodorus siculus, on land Bosak-Schroeder (2020), Other Natures: Environmental Encounters with Ancient Greek Ethnography, 199
works, annales tacitus, annals Fertik (2019), The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome, 11, 38, 48, 49, 50, 51, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 69, 70, 72, 73, 75, 76, 77, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 162, 163, 165, 166, 179, 180, 181, 183, 185, 187, 190, 202, 203
works, anonymous Bickerman and Tropper (2007), Studies in Jewish and Christian History, 871, 872, 873
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works, apologetic Rupke (2016), Religious Deviance in the Roman World Superstition or Individuality?, 110
works, apology, philosophical Tsouni (2019), Antiochus and Peripatetic Ethics, 39, 42, 106
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works, aristotle, biology, biological Singer and van Eijk (2018), Galen: Works on Human Nature: Volume 1, Mixtures (De Temperamentis), 78, 80, 111, 123
works, aristotle, exoteric Frede and Laks (2001), Traditions of Theology: Studies in Hellenistic Theology, its Background and Aftermath, 12, 23
works, aristotle, medical van der EIjk (2005), Medicine and Philosophy in Classical Antiquity: Doctors and Philosophers on Nature, Soul, Health and Disease, 262, 263
works, aristotle, metaphysics, metaphysical Singer and van Eijk (2018), Galen: Works on Human Nature: Volume 1, Mixtures (De Temperamentis), 78, 80, 123
works, aristotle, zoological van der EIjk (2005), Medicine and Philosophy in Classical Antiquity: Doctors and Philosophers on Nature, Soul, Health and Disease, 231
works, art of medicine, hippocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 296
works, as philosophical Tsouni (2019), Antiochus and Peripatetic Ethics, 173
works, as, apologetic, josephus’ Westwood (2023), Moses among the Greek Lawgivers: Reading Josephus’ Antiquities through Plutarch’s Lives. 21, 22, 23, 192
works, ascribed to, josephus, spurious Feldman (2006), Judaism and Hellenism Reconsidered, 333
works, at samos, polycrates’ building Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 101
works, athenaeus, on sophocles’ Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 464
works, athens, and sophocles’ Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 460, 462, 463, 464
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works, augustus, in horace’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 8, 9, 76, 77, 99, 100, 101
works, augustus, in lucan’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 175, 178
works, augustus, in ovid’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 103, 104, 105, 107, 109, 111, 113, 115, 116, 117, 119, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125
works, augustus, in pseudo-senecan Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 203, 205, 206
works, augustus, in seneca’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 153, 161
works, augustus, in vergil’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 77
works, augustus, repatriates art Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 55
works, bacchae, euripides Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 72, 73
works, bapt., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 80, 119, 120, 121, 122, 128, 147, 172, 210
works, beat., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 96
works, bellerophon, euripides Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 78
works, bon. conj., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 118
works, breaths, hippocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 72, 100, 128, 129, 132, 134, 135, 136
works, brev. coll., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 133, 134
works, busiris, isocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 10, 11
works, by evagrius, nilus, st, abbot, credited with Sorabji (2000), Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation, 357
works, by, eusebius, arrangement of philos Taylor and Hay (2020), Philo of Alexandria: On the Contemplative Life: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38
works, by, josephus, proposed Feldman (2006), Judaism and Hellenism Reconsidered, 333
works, c. adim., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 101, 198
works, c. arian., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 169
works, c. cresc., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 119, 120, 268
works, c. don., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 120, 268
works, c. du. ep. pel., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 146, 170, 172, 173, 174, 188, 250, 251, 252, 254, 261, 265
works, c. ep. man. fund., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 113, 114, 115, 146, 147, 284
works, c. faust., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 1, 111, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 143, 233, 261, 269, 284
works, c. fel., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 114, 115, 134, 135, 143, 146
works, c. fort., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 36, 100, 101, 172, 262
works, c. jul. imp., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 146, 189, 207, 210, 211, 250, 251, 254, 261, 265
works, c. jul., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 4, 72, 146, 178, 179, 180, 181, 182, 183, 189, 195, 207, 250, 251, 252, 260, 261, 263, 264, 265
works, c. litt. petil., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 102, 113, 118, 119, 134, 147, 251, 268
works, c. mend., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 160, 249, 280, 281
works, c. secund., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 117
works, canon, in augustine’s Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 26, 323, 324, 325
works, canon, in cyprian’s Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 26, 120, 121, 184
works, canon, in lactantius’s Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 182, 183, 184
works, canon, in tertullian’s Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 26, 84, 85, 86, 87, 102, 103, 121
works, catachthonion, lucan, his other Joseph (2022), Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic, 4, 15, 16
works, catech. rud., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 107, 123, 124, 134, 147, 224, 274
works, chaos, in lucan’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 173
works, chaos, in ovid’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 102, 114, 115, 116, 125
works, chaos, in plato’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 28, 29
works, chaos, in pseudo-senecan Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 204, 211, 212
works, chaos, in seneca’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 129, 132, 147, 164
works, choephori, aeschylus Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 71
works, cicero, his corpus of oratorical Bua (2019), Roman Political Culture: Seven Studies of the Senate and City Councils of Italy from the First to the Sixth Century AD, 18
works, circulated under name of hilary of poitiers, ambrosiaster's Lunn-Rockliffe (2007), The Letter of Mara bar Sarapion in Context, 12, 18, 19, 34
works, circulation, of ambrosiaster's Lunn-Rockliffe (2007), The Letter of Mara bar Sarapion in Context, 12, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25
works, civ., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 146, 150, 151, 192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 199, 220, 263, 269
works, commentary on airs, galen and pseudo-galen, waters, places Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 275
works, commentary on epidemics, galen and pseudo-galen Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 265, 271, 290, 310
works, commentary on nature of man, galen and pseudo-galen Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 275, 287, 299, 318, 320, 324, 338, 339, 340
works, commentary on the aphorisms, galen and pseudo-galen Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 271, 288, 289, 290, 291, 292
works, compared to rabbinic literature, josephus, nature of Noam (2018), Shifting Images of the Hasmoneans: Second Temple Legends and Their Reception in Josephus and Rabbinic Literature, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 25
works, composed in palestine, languages, spoken by jews in judea, of Feldman (2006), Judaism and Hellenism Reconsidered, 96
works, conf., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 6, 113, 120, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 135, 143, 144, 254, 255, 264, 274, 277, 282, 283, 284, 285, 291, 293, 297
works, cons., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 125
works, constantine, roman emperor, 324-37, condemned porphyrys Simmons(1995), Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian, 221
works, corrept., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 146, 184, 185, 186, 189, 236, 237, 250, 252, 260, 262
works, creation narratives, in hesiod’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 15, 16, 17, 19, 21
works, creation narratives, in lucan’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 169
works, creation narratives, in lucretius’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 59, 62
works, creation narratives, in ovid’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 102, 103, 104, 107, 115
works, creation narratives, in plato’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 33
works, creation narratives, in seneca’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 131, 132
works, creation narratives, in vergil’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 87
works, crisis, hippocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 42
works, critical days, hippocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 42
works, cur., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 261
works, cyclicality, in aristotle’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 23, 24, 40, 41
works, cyclicality, in cicero’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 71
works, cyclicality, in hesiod’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 20
works, cyclicality, in lucretius’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 52
works, cyclicality, in plato’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 27, 29
works, cyclicality, in pseudosenecan Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 203
works, cyclicality, in seneca’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 129, 133, 141, 146
works, cyclicality, in vergil’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 81, 84, 87, 95
works, de abrahamo, place of in philo’s Birnbaum and Dillon (2020), Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 1, 2, 4, 5, 12, 68, 76
works, de anima, aristotle, biological works Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 226
works, de grammaticis, tiberius Fertik (2019), The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome, 183
works, de incendio urbis, lucan, his other Joseph (2022), Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic, 9
works, de mag., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 98, 101
works, de mend., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 249, 280
works, decorum, hippocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 280
works, deeds Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 27, 28, 35, 42, 46, 48, 51, 52, 53, 54, 56, 57, 61, 72, 74, 75, 76, 77, 86, 116, 117, 122, 200, 201, 202, 203, 206, 209, 231, 265, 272, 275, 279, 280, 281, 288, 294, 304, 311, 313, 315, 316, 321, 348, 349, 350
works, defence of palamedes, gorgias Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 40
works, deipnosophistae, on sophocles’ Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 464
works, deucalion, in aristotle’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 40, 41
works, deucalion, in ovid’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 103, 109, 110, 111, 126
works, deucalion, in plato’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 34
works, deucalion, in seneca’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 146, 153, 165
works, deucalion, in vergil’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 94, 95
works, dialectics, dialectical nature of aristotle’s van der EIjk (2005), Medicine and Philosophy in Classical Antiquity: Doctors and Philosophers on Nature, Soul, Health and Disease, 203
works, diodorus siculus, admiration of for engineered Bosak-Schroeder (2020), Other Natures: Environmental Encounters with Ancient Greek Ethnography, 36, 37, 38
works, dionysius of halicarnassus, rhetorical Kirkland (2022), Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception, 35, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71
works, diseases of girls, hippocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 100
works, diseases of women, hippocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 42, 65, 99, 189
works, diseases, hippocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 42, 44, 182, 191, 336
works, dissections, aristotle van der EIjk (2005), Medicine and Philosophy in Classical Antiquity: Doctors and Philosophers on Nature, Soul, Health and Disease, 263
works, div. quaest., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 98, 109, 110, 111, 112, 120, 132, 143, 144, 146, 153, 198, 199, 291
works, divin., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 132
works, divine law, in cicero’s Westwood (2023), Moses among the Greek Lawgivers: Reading Josephus’ Antiquities through Plutarch’s Lives. 63, 64, 65
works, doctr. chr., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 4, 107, 112, 122, 129, 147, 187, 199, 212, 254
works, domitian, and date and audience of josephus’ Edwards (2023), In the Court of the Gentiles: Narrative, Exemplarity, and Scriptural Adaptation in the Court-Tales of Flavius Josephus, 4, 10, 11, 12
works, duab. an., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 197, 288
works, earthquakes, in aristotle’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 41
works, earthquakes, in lucan’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 173
works, earthquakes, in lucretius’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 57
works, earthquakes, in plato’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 28, 33, 34, 38
works, earthquakes, in pseudo-senecan Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 196
works, earthquakes, in seneca’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 135, 140, 141, 147, 149, 152
works, earthquakes, in vergil’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 86, 95
works, egypt, demotic, hieratic, hieroglyphic, life of imhotep literary and sub-literary, unpublished Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 89, 423, 424, 516, 609, 720, 721, 741
works, egypt, demotic, hieratic, hieroglyphic, literary and sub-literary also, p.carlsberg Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 459
works, egypt, demotic, hieratic, literary and sub-literary hieroglyphic, book of thoth Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 443, 502, 503, 723
works, egypt, demotic, hieratic, literary and sub-literary hieroglyphic, castration story Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 85
works, egypt, demotic, hieratic, literary and sub-literary hieroglyphic, demotic chronicle Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 597
works, egypt, demotic, hieratic, literary and sub-literary hieroglyphic, dodgson papyrus Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 548, 549, 550
works, egypt, demotic, hieratic, literary and sub-literary hieroglyphic, doomed prodigy son Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 43, 610
works, egypt, demotic, hieratic, literary and sub-literary hieroglyphic, insinger papyrus Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 424
works, egypt, demotic, hieratic, literary and sub-literary hieroglyphic, königsnovellen Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 85
works, egypt, demotic, hieratic, literary and sub-literary hieroglyphic, setna khaemwaset cycle Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 79
works, egypt, demotic, hieratic, literary and sub-literary hieroglyphic, teachings for merikare Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 77
works, egypt, greek, precepts of amenothes, aphorisms literary and sub-literary collection Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 470, 471
works, egypt, literary and sub-literary greek, miracle of zeus helios great sarapis concerning the pilot syrion Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 342
works, egypt, literary and sub-literary greek, oxyrhynchus fragment set at thoeris sanctuary Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 740, 741
works, egypt, literary and sub-literary greek, oxyrhynchus fragment with asklepios epiphany Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 430
works, egypt, literary and sub-literary greek, possible narrative featuring incubation Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 99
works, eight months child, hippocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 42
works, ekpyrosis, in epictetus’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 220, 221
works, ekpyrosis, in lucan’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 170, 172, 186, 187
works, ekpyrosis, in pseudo-senecan Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 193
works, ekpyrosis, in seneca’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 140, 143, 144, 145, 164, 165, 166
works, ekpyrosis, in vergil’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 82
works, emer., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 169
works, enar. ps., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 92, 95, 99, 120, 146, 209, 241, 246, 247, 248, 249, 251, 256, 257, 260, 264, 269
works, enchir., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 95, 96, 146, 176, 177, 178, 189, 250, 255, 260, 261, 265, 269
works, ep., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 201
works, epicureanism, in cicero’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 64, 65, 66
works, epicureanism, in lucan’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 172, 177, 187
works, epicureanism, in lucretius’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 52, 53, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63
works, epicureanism, in pseudo-senecan Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 218
works, epicureanism, in seneca’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 131, 141, 144, 145
works, epicurus’ surviving Gee (2013), Aratus and the Astronomical Tradition, 49, 244
works, epidemics, hippocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 29, 42, 64, 95, 265, 267, 268, 289, 320, 321
works, erga, engineered Bosak-Schroeder (2020), Other Natures: Environmental Encounters with Ancient Greek Ethnography, 41
works, eroticism, in plato’s Steiner (2001), Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought, 131, 132, 133
works, eschatology, in lucan’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 169, 182, 185, 187, 188
works, eschatology, in lucretius’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 53, 59, 63
works, eschatology, in pseudo-senecan Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 200, 201
works, eschatology, in seneca’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 167
works, ethiopian story of theagenes and cariclea, the greek novels, heliodorus Toloni (2022), The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis, 215
works, evil deSilva (2022), Ephesians, 253, 259, 261, 264, 318
works, exp. gal., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 102, 103, 104, 144
works, exp. quaest. rom., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 103, 107, 108, 109, 135, 144, 145, 198, 200, 249, 252, 257, 260
works, exp. rom. inch., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 107, 108
works, exposition of the law, relation of to other philonic Birnbaum and Dillon (2020), Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 3, 4, 13, 14, 75
works, faith and O'Daly (2020), Augustine's City of God: A Reader's Guide (2nd edn), 255, 256
works, faith, and Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová (2016), Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria , 326, 327
works, fake inscriptions, manuscripts, printed Bruun and Edmondson (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48
works, false titles, literary Bickerman and Tropper (2007), Studies in Jewish and Christian History, 1013, 1014
works, fid. op., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 164, 250, 254
works, fid. symb., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 254, 261
works, fid., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 101, 122, 134
works, fire narratives, in cicero’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 68, 69, 73
works, fire narratives, in epictetus’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 220, 221
works, fire narratives, in heraclitus’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 24, 25
works, fire narratives, in lucan’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 170, 172, 178, 179, 182, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189
works, fire narratives, in lucretius’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 53, 60, 61, 62, 63, 102, 187
works, fire narratives, in ovid’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 102, 104, 105, 106, 107, 111, 112, 114, 118, 119, 120, 121, 126
works, fire narratives, in plato’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 32
works, fire narratives, in pseudo-senecan Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 192, 193, 196, 199, 200, 203, 210
works, fire narratives, in seneca’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 133, 135, 139, 140, 141, 142, 143, 144, 145, 146, 148, 150, 151, 164, 165, 166
works, fire narratives, in vergil’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 82
works, flood narratives, in aristotle’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 40, 41
works, flood narratives, in cicero’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 68, 69, 70, 73
works, flood narratives, in hesiod’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 21
works, flood narratives, in horace’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 98, 99, 100
works, flood narratives, in lucan’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 173, 177, 182, 183, 184, 185
works, flood narratives, in lucretius’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 63
works, flood narratives, in ovid’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 9, 77, 102, 103, 104, 106, 107, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 126
works, flood narratives, in plato’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 31, 32, 33, 37, 38, 39, 221
works, flood narratives, in pseudo-senecan Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 192, 199, 200, 218
works, flood narratives, in seneca’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 45, 133, 135, 140, 141, 142, 143, 144, 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 158, 161, 167
works, flood narratives, in vergil’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 85, 87, 88
works, forgeries, epigraphic, manuscripts, printed Bruun and Edmondson (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48
works, form of o’s Joosse (2021), Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher, 1, 16, 18, 21
works, fractures, hippocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 42, 190, 304
works, fragments, of sophocles’ Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 547, 548, 549, 550, 551, 552, 553, 554, 555, 556, 557, 558, 559, 560, 561, 562, 563, 564, 565, 566, 567, 568, 569, 570, 571, 572, 573, 574, 575, 576, 577, 578, 579, 580, 581, 582, 583, 584, 585, 586, 587, 588, 589, 590, 591, 592, 593, 594, 595, 596, 597, 598, 599, 600, 601, 602, 603, 604, 605, 606, 607, 608, 609, 610, 611, 612, 613, 649
works, from babylonia, hellenism, in rabbinic Schick (2021), Intention in Talmudic Law: Between Thought and Deed, 108
works, fund., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 113, 114, 115, 147, 284
works, gen. imp., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 101
works, gen. litt., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 95, 147, 148, 149, 150, 166, 167, 168, 196, 212, 225, 227, 228, 250, 251, 254, 261, 265, 290
works, gen. man., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 95, 98, 99, 100, 111, 112, 144, 197, 278, 291
works, general dates, of sophocles’ Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 480, 491, 501, 502, 526, 535, 545
works, generation/nature of the child, hippocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 42, 44
works, genre, generically unique Verhelst and Scheijnens (2022), Greek and Latin Poetry of Late Antiquity: Form, Tradition, and Context, 106
works, gest. pelag., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 168
works, glands, hippocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 42
works, gods, origin of “causative, ” Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 183
works, good Poorthuis and Schwartz (2014), Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity, 74, 75, 76, 257, 318, 324, 325, 327, 328
deSilva (2022), Ephesians, 1, 110, 122, 126, 127, 128, 130, 144, 222
works, grace, and Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová (2016), Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria , 36, 328, 329, 330
works, grat. chr., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 146, 169, 250, 251, 261, 265
works, grat., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 184, 189, 252, 254
works, greek novels, habakkuk, book of Toloni (2022), The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis, 93
works, hellenistic-roman age Toloni (2022), The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis, 207
works, heraclitus, evidence of Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 216, 223
works, hercules furens, euripides Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 66, 71
works, hero of alexandria, metrological Amsler (2023), Knowledge Construction in Late Antiquity, 176
works, herodotus, admiration of for engineered Bosak-Schroeder (2020), Other Natures: Environmental Encounters with Ancient Greek Ethnography, 36, 37, 38
works, hesychius, on sophocles’ Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 464, 766
works, hippocrates, galen and pseudo-galen Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 318, 329
works, hippolytus, euripides Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 62, 63, 76, 104
works, history of animals, aristotle, biological Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 323
works, iliacon, lucan, his other Joseph (2022), Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic, 4, 15, 16
works, immort. an., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 97, 101
works, in alexandria, sophocles’ Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 462
works, in atrium libertatis, cephisodotus Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 224
works, in chronological augustine, literary order, de pulchro et apto Pollmann and Vessey (2007), Augustine and the Disciplines: From Cassiciacum to Confessions, 151
works, in cities, public Bruun and Edmondson (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy, 256, 257, 518, 519, 520, 521, 522, 523, 524, 525, 526, 528, 529, 530
works, in portico of octavia, artemon Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 259
works, in rome, forum of peace, boëthius’ Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 275
works, in rome, forum of peace, lysippus’ Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 274
works, in rome, forum of peace, phidias’ Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 274
works, in rome, forum of peace, polyclitus’ Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 274
works, in rome, forum of peace, protogenes’ Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 275
works, in rome, portico of octavia, praxiteles’ Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 259
works, in syracuse, verres, c., appropriates art Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 49, 118
works, in temple of apollo palatinus, cephisodotus Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 238
works, in temple of apollo palatinus, scopas Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 238
works, in temple of apollo sosianus, timarchides Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 244
works, in temple of concordia, sthennis Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 268
works, incomp. nupt., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 174
works, incomprehensible, gods, origin/beginning of Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 181, 182
works, internal affections, hippocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 42, 192
works, introduction or doctor, galen and pseudo-galen Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 15, 16, 18, 19, 246
works, iphigenia in tauris, euripides Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 72, 73, 76
works, job, good Toloni (2022), The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis, 99
works, joints, hippocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 42, 304
works, julius caesar, in horace’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 98, 99
works, julius caesar, in lucan’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 179
works, julius caesar, in ovid’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 120, 121, 122, 123
works, julius caesar, in seneca’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 134, 155
works, julius caesar, in vergil’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 83, 84, 93, 96
works, jupiter, in horace’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 89, 90, 99, 101
works, jupiter, in lucan’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 173, 184
works, jupiter, in ovid’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 110, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 192
works, jupiter, in pseudo-senecan Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 195, 196, 197, 213, 214
works, jupiter, in seneca’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 145, 155, 221
works, jupiter, in vergil’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 86, 95
works, known in west, theodore of mopsuestia Hillier (1993), Arator on the Acts of the Apostles: A Baptismal Commentary, 67
works, law and legal knowledge in justinianic era, epitomes of justinianic legal Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 619
works, laws, philosophical Tsouni (2019), Antiochus and Peripatetic Ethics, 117
works, leaves africa for nicomedia, pope damasus describes his Simmons(1995), Arnobius of Sicca: Religious Conflict and Competition in the Age of Diocletian, 53
works, leg. adv., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 146, 174, 188
works, lexicon, hesychius, on sophocles’ Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 464
works, lib. arb., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 98, 110, 111, 112, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 144, 146, 147, 152, 153, 154, 155, 165, 166, 192, 197, 199, 200, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 229, 237, 279, 292, 297
works, lives, hippocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 112
works, locut. hept., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 169, 250
works, lucretius’ paean of epicurus, epicurus’ surviving Gee (2013), Aratus and the Astronomical Tradition, 135
works, manuscripts, of sophocles’ Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 87, 88, 566
works, medea, euripides Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 71, 73
works, menexenos, philosophical Tsouni (2019), Antiochus and Peripatetic Ethics, 173
works, meno, philosophical Tsouni (2019), Antiochus and Peripatetic Ethics, 106, 137, 138
works, metamorphosis literature, list of Fletcher (2023), The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature, 35
works, methodius of olympus, chronology of Mcglothlin (2018), Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism, 212, 213
works, metrological Amsler (2023), Knowledge Construction in Late Antiquity, 155, 157, 158, 159, 176
works, mixtures of the body, galen and pseudo-galen Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 340
works, mixtures, galen and pseudo-galen Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 288, 292, 338, 339
works, mochlicon, hippocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 42
works, mor. eccl., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 78, 98, 99, 197, 261
works, mor. man., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 98, 99
works, mus., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 98, 111, 112, 132, 133, 147, 212
works, nat. bon., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 118, 134
works, nat. grat., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 134, 146, 164, 165, 188, 251, 252, 253, 254, 261, 264
works, nat. orig., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 160, 174, 175, 176, 188, 220, 246, 250, 269
works, nature of man, hippocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 41, 132, 134, 143, 149, 151, 230, 231, 232, 233, 240, 241, 247, 258, 282, 288, 296, 298, 316, 318, 320, 321, 322, 323, 324, 327, 329, 332, 333, 335, 336, 337, 339, 340, 358
works, nature of women, hippocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 42, 65
works, negative aspects of erga, engineered Bosak-Schroeder (2020), Other Natures: Environmental Encounters with Ancient Greek Ethnography, 40
works, nero, in lucan’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 170, 171, 173, 174, 175, 176, 190
works, nero, in pseudo-senecan Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 200, 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 210
works, nero, in seneca’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 127, 129, 137, 150, 151, 157, 158, 161
works, nupt. et conc., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 169, 170, 171, 188, 250, 251, 261, 265
works, nutriment, hippocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 305
works, oath, hippocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 68, 116
works, octavian, in horace’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 92, 100
works, octavian, in lucan’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 175
works, octavian, in pseudo-senecan Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 205
works, octavian, in vergil’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 79, 80, 83, 84, 93, 94, 95
works, oedipus at colonus, sophocles Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 55
works, oedipus rex, sophocles Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 57, 58, 60, 102, 124
works, of [p.] nigidius figulus Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 47
works, of aeschylus Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 460, 462, 463, 464
works, of ambrosiaster, recensions of Lunn-Rockliffe (2007), The Letter of Mara bar Sarapion in Context, 16
works, of apuleius Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 10
works, of aristotle Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 653
works, of art, artist Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 62, 136, 137, 140, 142, 179, 426
works, of augustine, city of god, its themes in other O'Daly (2020), Augustine's City of God: A Reader's Guide (2nd edn), 299, 300, 301, 302, 303, 304
works, of christ, mighty McDonough (2009), Christ as Creator: Origins of a New Testament Doctrine, 22, 25, 35, 36, 43, 44, 46, 47, 63, 67, 89, 93
works, of critias, ethnography Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 248
works, of dio chrysostom, lost Taylor (2012), The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea, 162, 163, 165
works, of euripides Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 460, 462, 463, 464, 667, 764
works, of hellenistic and roman periods, dreams, in hebrew bible and jewish literature, in Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 66, 67
works, of hellenistic and roman periods, incubation, israelite/jewish, in Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 66
works, of homer, performances of Johnson and Parker (2009), ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome, 214
works, of in aristotle, nature Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 309
works, of in galen, nature Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 300
works, of iniquity, love, of Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 194, 368, 369
works, of jurisprudence in egypt Humfress (2007), Oppian's Halieutica: Charting a Didactic Epic, 83
works, of justinian, emperor, epitomes of legal Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 619
works, of language, law Lieu (2004), Christian Identity in the Jewish and Graeco-Roman World, 127, 128
works, of leontius, presbyter of constantinople, narrative knowledge formation in Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 553, 554, 555, 556, 557
works, of literature on trophonios, trophonios, and trophonion, lost Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 568
works, of love Nisula (2012), Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence, 297, 301, 317
works, of nature Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 288
works, of quintilian, unauthorized Johnson and Parker (2009), ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome, 278, 279
works, of rejecting distinction with parables, important Strong (2021), The Fables of Jesus in the Gospel of Luke: A New Foundation for the Study of Parables 44, 55, 56
works, of romanos the melodist, narrative knowledge formation in Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 553, 554, 555, 556, 557
works, of sophocles Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 666, 766
works, on anatomy, anatomy Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 322
works, on antecedent causes, galen and pseudo-galen Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 131
works, on athenian theatrical history, aristotle Liapis and Petrides (2019), Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca, 327
works, on capitoline, myron Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 235
works, on cyrus and john, sophronios, patriarch of jerusalem Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 372, 762, 763
works, on differences between fevers, galen and pseudo-galen Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 136
works, on habits, galen and pseudo-galen Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 149
works, on medical names, galen and pseudo-galen Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 287
works, on my own books, galen and pseudo-galen Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 316
works, on palatine, myron Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 238
works, on seismology, kant, immanuel Williams (2012), The Cosmic Viewpoint: A Study of Seneca's 'Natural Questions', 225
works, on the humours, galen and pseudo-galen Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 357
works, on the pythagoreans, wehrli, f., edition of aristoxenus Huffman (2019), A History of Pythagoreanism, 42, 43, 44, 45, 336
works, on the therapeutic method, galen and pseudo-galen Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 327
works, on, oikonomia Brule (2003), Women of Ancient Greece, 154
works, ord., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 96, 97, 111, 112, 133, 192, 293
works, orestes, euripides Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 76, 77
works, parm., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 4, 261
works, parts of animals, aristotle, biological Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 309
works, pat., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 169
works, pecc. merit., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 95, 144, 147, 148, 149, 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 162, 165, 166, 187, 188, 212, 213, 225, 227, 228, 231, 249, 250, 251, 252, 254, 260, 261, 262, 263, 264, 268, 275, 277, 285, 294, 295
works, perf., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 164, 250, 251, 254, 261
works, performance, of sophocles’ Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 458, 459, 460, 526
works, persev., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 8, 95, 112, 143, 146, 152, 200, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 236, 250, 257, 277, 280
works, phaethon, in lucan’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 173, 176
works, phaethon, in lucretius’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 62, 63
works, phaethon, in ovid’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 107, 112, 113, 116, 119, 122, 123, 126
works, phaethon, in plato’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 32
works, phaethon, in pseudosenecan Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 192
works, phaethon, in seneca’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 164, 165
works, phaethon, in vergil’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 88
works, philoctetes, euripides Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 74
works, philoctetes, sophocles Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 67
works, physician, hippocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 42
works, places in man, hippocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 42
works, plato, galen and pseudo-galen Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 292, 295, 339
works, plato, on authors selling Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 185
works, praed., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 8, 95, 132, 147, 152, 200, 201, 202, 207, 208, 211, 212, 236, 250, 252, 256, 257, 260, 270, 271, 276, 280, 285, 290, 294
works, prior to time, gods, and Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 182
works, problemata, aristotle, biological Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 170
works, prognostic, hippocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 42, 109, 110, 111, 296, 302
works, prophecies, in cicero’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 74
works, prophecies, in horace’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 91
works, prophecies, in lucan’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 170
works, prophecies, in lucretius’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 59, 60
works, prophecies, in ovid’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 106, 107, 113, 120, 121, 124, 126
works, prophecies, in pseudosenecan Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 194, 200
works, prophecies, in seneca’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 133, 142
works, prophecies, in vergil’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 80, 81, 93
works, prorrhetic, hippocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 42
works, pseudonymity, of ambrosiaster's Lunn-Rockliffe (2007), The Letter of Mara bar Sarapion in Context, 29
works, psychoanalysis, and sophocles’ Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 744, 745
works, quaest. c. pag., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 134
works, quaest. ev., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 123, 134, 251
works, quaest. matt., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 117, 125, 134
works, quant. an., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 96, 97, 112, 265
works, rabbinic accounts, relationship to josephus Cohen (2010), The Significance of Yavneh and other Essays in Jewish Hellenism, 155, 156
works, races, in hesiod’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 25, 27, 62, 84
works, races, in ovid’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 102, 103
works, races, in pseudo-senecan Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 204, 208
works, races, in seneca’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 195
works, rebirth and renewal narratives, in cicero’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 69, 73, 74
works, rebirth and renewal narratives, in hesiod’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 15, 18
works, rebirth and renewal narratives, in horace’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 89
works, rebirth and renewal narratives, in lucan’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 172, 186, 187
works, rebirth and renewal narratives, in lucretius’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 51, 55, 56, 58
works, rebirth and renewal narratives, in ovid’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 110
works, rebirth and renewal narratives, in plato’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 38
works, rebirth and renewal narratives, in pseudo-senecan Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 194, 195, 198, 199, 201, 202, 204, 208, 210
works, rebirth and renewal narratives, in seneca’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 133, 140, 142, 146, 154, 161, 166, 168
works, rebirth and renewal narratives, in vergil’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 81, 84, 87
works, reception, of sophocles’ Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 470
works, recitation, for living authors of own Johnson and Parker (2009), ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome, 210, 225
works, recitation, of enniuss Johnson and Parker (2009), ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome, 210, 211
works, regimen in acute diseases, hippocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 42, 149, 179
works, regimen in health, hippocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 321, 322, 323, 324
works, regimen, hippocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 42, 110, 111, 112, 138, 151, 177, 195, 200, 201, 203, 209, 210, 211, 217, 219, 222, 223, 226, 336
works, retract. vii, augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 96, 97, 109, 121, 131, 132, 141, 147, 148, 150, 151, 152, 166, 168, 187, 195, 197, 198, 199, 200, 207, 211, 212, 225, 252, 295, 298
works, rhetorical Motta and Petrucci (2022), Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity, 156
works, rome, and sophocles’ Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 462, 463, 464
works, s. dom. m., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 95, 100, 101, 111
works, s., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 144, 146, 160, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 234, 249, 250, 251, 255, 260, 261, 264, 269
works, sacred disease, hippocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 42, 44, 62, 63, 102, 103, 105, 106, 107, 108, 110, 112, 122, 210, 241
works, second temple literature, allusions in rabbinic Hayes (2022), The Literature of the Sages: A Re-Visioning, 284, 285, 286, 287, 288, 289, 290, 291, 292, 293, 294, 295, 296
works, second temple literature, mentioned in rabbinic Hayes (2022), The Literature of the Sages: A Re-Visioning, 280, 281, 282, 283, 284
works, seven months child, hippocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 42
works, simpl., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 1, 4, 5, 8, 9, 95, 113, 114, 115, 118, 120, 121, 122, 124, 128, 132, 135, 138, 139, 140, 141, 142, 143, 144, 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 152, 153, 154, 155, 159, 166, 168, 183, 185, 197, 198, 199, 200, 206, 207, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 224, 228, 238, 241, 242, 249, 256, 262, 268, 271, 274, 275, 276, 279, 280, 281, 286, 290, 291, 292, 294, 297
works, solil., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 96, 97, 134
works, spir. et litt., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 147, 163, 164, 186, 188, 209, 225, 228, 231, 250, 252, 254, 256, 260, 262, 264, 294
works, stars, in cicero’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 67
works, stars, in lucan’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 171, 172, 177, 181, 184, 185
works, stars, in lucretius’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 61
works, stars, in ovid’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 123
works, stars, in pseudo-senecan Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 196, 211, 212, 213
works, stars, in seneca’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 135, 139, 140, 145, 150, 164, 165, 166, 167, 168
works, stars, in vergil’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 82
works, sterile women, hippocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 65
works, stobaeus, and sophocles’ Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 464, 766
works, stoicism, good Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 554
works, stoicism, in lucan’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 170, 172, 177, 181, 182, 187
works, stoicism, in pseudo-senecan Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 200
works, stoicism, in seneca’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 130, 141, 143, 144, 145, 147, 154, 155
works, stoicism, in vergil’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 82
works, sun, in cicero’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 72
works, sun, in horace’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 90
works, sun, in lucan’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 176, 182
works, sun, in ovid’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 112, 114, 116, 119
works, sun, in plato’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 26
works, sun, in pseudo-senecan Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 212
works, sun, in seneca’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 139, 146, 150, 161, 163, 164
works, sun, in vergil’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 88, 96, 222
works, symb., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 183, 184, 189
works, tertullian, knowledge of irenaeus' Mcglothlin (2018), Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism, 99
works, the best doctor is also a philosopher, galen and pseudo-galen Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 280, 281, 282, 284, 300
works, the natural faculties, galen and pseudo-galen Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 287, 300, 304, 307
works, the order of my own books, galen and pseudo-galen Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 316
works, the usefulness of the parts, galen and pseudo-galen Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 302, 303, 304
works, theopompus, historian, disciple of isocrates, favored the sensational in his Feldman (2006), Judaism and Hellenism Reconsidered, 415
works, thrasybulus, galen and pseudo-galen Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 17
works, title, of ekenberg’s Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer (2022), Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity, 35
works, title, of tayyä’s Berglund Crostini and Kelhoffer (2022), Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity, 512, 525
works, to sicily, cornelius scipio aemilianus, p., repatriates art Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 53, 54, 55
works, tobit, good Toloni (2022), The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis, 70, 71, 73, 75, 99, 144, 147
works, trachinians, sophocles Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 71, 73, 232
works, tract. ep. jo., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 95, 241, 242, 248, 249, 261, 269
works, tract. ev. jo., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 88, 146, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 249, 255, 269
works, translations, of sophocles’ Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 470
works, trin., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 95, 147, 151, 191, 208, 212, 225, 227, 250, 254, 257
works, truth, found in plato’s Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 107
works, unic. bapt., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 133
works, unit. eccl., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 130, 131, 134
works, use of liquids, hippocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 190
works, util. cred., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 99, 284
works, ver. rel., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 96, 99, 100, 144, 197, 254, 261, 291
works, via bodily change, philoponus, christian neoplatonist, power of the lecturer to affect emotional character, however Sorabji (2000), Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation, 269, 270
works, virginit., augustine’s Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 124, 125, 250, 274
works, vision, as mode of knowing, artistic Ayres Champion and Crawford (2023), The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions. 481
works, vs. faith Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 259, 260
works, without approval of cicero, circulation of Johnson and Parker (2009), ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome, 173, 279
works, wounds in the head, hippocrates Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 42
works, writings of hippocrates, galen and pseudo-galen Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 320, 321, 322, 324
works, xenophon, overview of Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 412, 413, 414
works, zeus, in epictetus’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 220, 221
works, zeus, in hesiod’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 5, 15, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 46
works, zeus, in plato’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 26, 27, 29, 33, 38
works, zeus, in pseudo-senecan Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 195, 197, 208
works, zeus, in seneca’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 131
works, zeus, in vergil’s Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 79, 82, 84, 85, 95
works, zoological, investigation Singer and van Eijk (2018), Galen: Works on Human Nature: Volume 1, Mixtures (De Temperamentis), 32
work’s, title, city of god, the O'Daly (2020), Augustine's City of God: A Reader's Guide (2nd edn), 307
work”, literary genre, fasti as the “greater Erker (2023), Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family, 24
work”, virtues, philoponia, “hard Henderson (2020), The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus, 67, 71, 72, 223, 224, 282
‘works’, of law Tomson (2019), Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries. 24, 352, 353, 363, 364, 367, 368, 369, 374, 375, 382, 594, 600
“works, of the law”, erga jewish practices/torah observance, nomou Wilson (2022), Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency, 7, 111, 112, 113, 210

List of validated texts:
92 validated results for "works"
1. Hebrew Bible, Exodus, 12 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Jesus, work/acts/miracles of • work of blood (avodat ha-dam)

 Found in books: Balberg (2017), Blood for Thought: The Reinvention of Sacrifice in Early Rabbinic Literature, 171; Tellbe Wasserman and Nyman (2019), Healing and Exorcism in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity, 15

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12 And it shall come to pass, when ye be come to the land which the LORD will give you, according as He hath promised, that ye shall keep this service.,And the LORD said unto Moses and Aaron: ‘This is the ordice of the passover: there shall no alien eat thereof;,One law shall be to him that is homeborn, and unto the stranger that sojourneth among you.’,And ye shall let nothing of it remain until the morning; but that which remaineth of it until the morning ye shall burn with fire.,And this day shall be unto you for a memorial, and ye shall keep it a feast to the LORD; throughout your generations ye shall keep it a feast by an ordice for ever.,Eat not of it raw, nor sodden at all with water, but roast with fire; its head with its legs and with the inwards thereof.,In the first month, on the fourteenth day of the month at even, ye shall eat unleavened bread, until the one and twentieth day of the month at even.,Now the time that the children of Israel dwelt in Egypt was four hundred and thirty years.,And ye shall observe the feast of unleavened bread; for in this selfsame day have I brought your hosts out of the land of Egypt; therefore shall ye observe this day throughout your generations by an ordice for ever.,And Pharaoh rose up in the night, he, and all his servants, and all the Egyptians; and there was a great cry in Egypt; for there was not a house where there was not one dead.,but every man’s servant that is bought for money, when thou hast circumcised him, then shall he eat thereof.,Take both your flocks and your herds, as ye have said, and be gone; and bless me also.’,And a mixed multitude went up also with them; and flocks, and herds, even very much cattle.,And they shall eat the flesh in that night, roast with fire, and unleavened bread; with bitter herbs they shall eat it.,Thus did all the children of Israel; as the LORD commanded Moses and Aaron, so did they.,And the children of Israel went and did so; as the LORD had commanded Moses and Aaron, so did they.,and ye shall keep it unto the fourteenth day of the same month; and the whole assembly of the congregation of Israel shall kill it at dusk.,And they shall take of the blood, and put it on the two side-posts and on the lintel, upon the houses wherein they shall eat it.,Seven days shall there be no leaven found in your houses; for whosoever eateth that which is leavened, that soul shall be cut off from the congregation of Israel, whether he be a sojourner, or one that is born in the land.,And ye shall take a bunch of hyssop, and dip it in the blood that is in the basin, and strike the lintel and the two side-posts with the blood that is in the basin; and none of you shall go out of the door of his house until the morning.,Seven days shall ye eat unleavened bread; howbeit the first day ye shall put away leaven out of your houses; for whosoever eateth leavened bread from the first day until the seventh day, that soul shall be cut off from Israel.,And the Egyptians were urgent upon the people, to send them out of the land in haste; for they said: ‘We are all dead men.’,All the congregation of Israel shall keep it.,And ye shall observe this thing for an ordice to thee and to thy sons for ever.,Ye shall eat nothing leavened; in all your habitations shall ye eat unleavened bread.’,And thus shall ye eat it: with your loins girded, your shoes on your feet, and your staff in your hand; and ye shall eat it in haste—it is the LORD’s passover.,And the blood shall be to you for a token upon the houses where ye are; and when I see the blood, I will pass over you, and there shall no plague be upon you to destroy you, when I smite the land of Egypt.,that ye shall say: It is the sacrifice of the LORD’s passover, for that He passed over the houses of the children of Israel in Egypt, when He smote the Egyptians, and delivered our houses.’ And the people bowed the head and worshipped.,And the children of Israel did according to the word of Moses; and they asked of the Egyptians jewels of silver, and jewels of gold, and raiment.,And the people took their dough before it was leavened, their kneading-troughs being bound up in their clothes upon their shoulders.,And they baked unleavened cakes of the dough which they brought forth out of Egypt, for it was not leavened; because they were thrust out of Egypt, and could not tarry, neither had they prepared for themselves any victual.,Speak ye unto all the congregation of Israel, saying: In the tenth day of this month they shall take to them every man a lamb, according to their fathers’houses, a lamb for a household;,And the LORD gave the people favour in the sight of the Egyptians, so that they let them have what they asked. And they despoiled the Egyptians.,And he called for Moses and Aaron by night and said: ‘Rise up, get you forth from among my people, both ye and the children of Israel; and go, serve the LORD, as ye have said.,For I will go through the land of Egypt in that night, and will smite all the first-born in the land of Egypt, both man and beast; and against all the gods of Egypt I will execute judgments: I am the LORD.,Then Moses called for all the elders of Israel, and said unto them: ‘Draw out, and take you lambs according to your families, and kill the passover lamb.,and if the household be too little for a lamb, then shall he and his neighbour next unto his house take one according to the number of the souls; according to every man’s eating ye shall make your count for the lamb.,And it shall come to pass, when your children shall say unto you: What mean ye by this service?,A sojourner and a hired servant shall not eat thereof.,It was a night of watching unto the LORD for bringing them out from the land of Egypt; this same night is a night of watching unto the LORD for all the children of Israel throughout their generations.,And the LORD spoke unto Moses and Aaron in the land of Egypt, saying:,Your lamb shall be without blemish, a male of the first year; ye shall take it from the sheep, or from the goats;,And it came to pass at the end of four hundred and thirty years, even the selfsame day it came to pass, that all the host of the LORD went out from the land of Egypt.,’This month shall be unto you the beginning of months; it shall be the first month of the year to you.,For the LORD will pass through to smite the Egyptians; and when He seeth the blood upon the lintel, and on the two side-posts, the LORD will pass over the door, and will not suffer the destroyer to come in unto your houses to smite you.,And the children of Israel journeyed from Rameses to Succoth, about six hundred thousand men on foot, beside children.,And it came to pass at midnight, that the LORD smote all the firstborn in the land of Egypt, from the first-born of Pharaoh that sat on his throne unto the first-born of the captive that was in the dungeon; and all the first-born of cattle.,In one house shall it be eaten; thou shalt not carry forth aught of the flesh abroad out of the house; neither shall ye break a bone thereof.,And in the first day there shall be to you a holy convocation, and in the seventh day a holy convocation; no manner of work shall be done in them, save that which every man must eat, that only may be done by you.,And when a stranger shall sojourn with thee, and will keep the passover to the LORD, let all his males be circumcised, and then let him come near and keep it; and he shall be as one that is born in the land; but no uncircumcised person shall eat thereof.,And it came to pass the selfsame day that the LORD did bring the children of Israel out of the land of Egypt by their hosts."'' None
2. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 2.17, 3.17-3.19 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Augustine’s Works, Bapt. • Augustine’s Works, Civ. • Augustine’s Works, Tract. Ev. Jo. • Christ, Mighty works of • God, Economic work • deeds, works

 Found in books: Graham (2022), The Church as Paradise and the Way Therein: Early Christian Appropriation of Genesis 3:22–24, 114, 115, 131, 164; Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 321; McDonough (2009), Christ as Creator: Origins of a New Testament Doctrine, 35; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 80, 193, 243

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2.17 וּמֵעֵץ הַדַּעַת טוֹב וָרָע לֹא תֹאכַל מִמֶּנּוּ כִּי בְּיוֹם אֲכָלְךָ מִמֶּנּוּ מוֹת תָּמוּת׃
3.17
וּלְאָדָם אָמַר כִּי־שָׁמַעְתָּ לְקוֹל אִשְׁתֶּךָ וַתֹּאכַל מִן־הָעֵץ אֲשֶׁר צִוִּיתִיךָ לֵאמֹר לֹא תֹאכַל מִמֶּנּוּ אֲרוּרָה הָאֲדָמָה בַּעֲבוּרֶךָ בְּעִצָּבוֹן תֹּאכֲלֶנָּה כֹּל יְמֵי חַיֶּיךָ׃ 3.18 וְקוֹץ וְדַרְדַּר תַּצְמִיחַ לָךְ וְאָכַלְתָּ אֶת־עֵשֶׂב הַשָּׂדֶה׃ 3.19 בְּזֵעַת אַפֶּיךָ תֹּאכַל לֶחֶם עַד שׁוּבְךָ אֶל־הָאֲדָמָה כִּי מִמֶּנָּה לֻקָּחְתָּ כִּי־עָפָר אַתָּה וְאֶל־עָפָר תָּשׁוּב׃' ' None
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2.17 but of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt not eat of it; for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die.’ 2 And the LORD God took the man, and put him into the garden of Eden to dress it and to keep it.,and the gold of that land is good; there is bdellium and the onyx stone.,The name of the first is Pishon; that is it which compasseth the whole land of Havilah, where there is gold;,No shrub of the field was yet in the earth, and no herb of the field had yet sprung up; for the LORD God had not caused it to rain upon the earth, and there was not a man to till the ground;,And out of the ground made the LORD God to grow every tree that is pleasant to the sight, and good for food; the tree of life also in the midst of the garden, and the tree of the knowledge of good and evil.,And on the seventh day God finished His work which He had made; and He rested on the seventh day from all His work which He had made.,And a river went out of Eden to water the garden; and from thence it was parted, and became four heads.,And the name of the third river is Tigris; that is it which goeth toward the east of Asshur. And the fourth river is the Euphrates.,And the LORD God caused a deep sleep to fall upon the man, and he slept; and He took one of his ribs, and closed up the place with flesh instead thereof.,And God blessed the seventh day, and hallowed it; because that in it He rested from all His work which God in creating had made.,These are the generations of the heaven and of the earth when they were created, in the day that the LORD God made earth and heaven.,Then the LORD God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul.,And the man said: ‘This is now bone of my bones, and flesh of my flesh; she shall be called Woman, because she was taken out of Man.’,And the man gave names to all cattle, and to the fowl of the air, and to every beast of the field; but for Adam there was not found a help meet for him.,And the LORD God planted a garden eastward, in Eden; and there He put the man whom He had formed.,but there went up a mist from the earth, and watered the whole face of the ground.,And the name of the second river is Gihon; the same is it that compasseth the whole land of Cush.,And out of the ground the LORD God formed every beast of the field, and every fowl of the air; and brought them unto the man to see what he would call them; and whatsoever the man would call every living creature, that was to be the name thereof.,And they were both naked, the man and his wife, and were not ashamed.,Therefore shall a man leave his father and his mother, and shall cleave unto his wife, and they shall be one flesh.,but of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt not eat of it; for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die.’,And the LORD God commanded the man, saying: ‘of every tree of the garden thou mayest freely eat;,And the heaven and the earth were finished, and all the host of them.,And the LORD God said: ‘It is not good that the man should be alone; I will make him a help meet for him.’,And the rib, which the LORD God had taken from the man, made He a woman, and brought her unto the man.3.17 And unto Adam He said: ‘Because thou hast hearkened unto the voice of thy wife, and hast eaten of the tree, of which I commanded thee, saying: Thou shalt not eat of it; cursed is the ground for thy sake; in toil shalt thou eat of it all the days of thy life. 3.18 Thorns also and thistles shall it bring forth to thee; and thou shalt eat the herb of the field. 3.19 In the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat bread, till thou return unto the ground; for out of it wast thou taken; for dust thou art, and unto dust shalt thou return.’ ' None
3. Hebrew Bible, Job, 2.7-2.9 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Jesus, work/acts/miracles of • good works, Job • good works, Tobit

 Found in books: Tellbe Wasserman and Nyman (2019), Healing and Exorcism in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity, 44; Toloni (2022), The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis, 99

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2.7 וַיֵּצֵא הַשָּׂטָן מֵאֵת פְּנֵי יְהוָה וַיַּךְ אֶת־אִיּוֹב בִּשְׁחִין רָע מִכַּף רַגְלוֹ עד וְעַד קָדְקֳדוֹ׃ 2.8 וַיִּקַּח־לוֹ חֶרֶשׂ לְהִתְגָּרֵד בּוֹ וְהוּא יֹשֵׁב בְּתוֹךְ־הָאֵפֶר׃ 2.9 וַתֹּאמֶר לוֹ אִשְׁתּוֹ עֹדְךָ מַחֲזִיק בְּתֻמָּתֶךָ בָּרֵךְ אֱלֹהִים וָמֻת׃'' None
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2.7 So Satan went forth from the presence of the LORD, and smote Job with sore boils from the sole of his foot even unto his crown. 2.8 And he took him a potsherd to scrape himself therewith; and he sat among the ashes. 2.9 Then said his wife unto him: ‘Dost thou still hold fast thine integrity? blaspheme God, and die.’'' None
4. Hebrew Bible, Numbers, 22.22 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Anonymous Works • Jesus, work/acts/miracles of

 Found in books: Bickerman and Tropper (2007), Studies in Jewish and Christian History, 872; Tellbe Wasserman and Nyman (2019), Healing and Exorcism in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity, 44

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22.22 וַיִּחַר־אַף אֱלֹהִים כִּי־הוֹלֵךְ הוּא וַיִּתְיַצֵּב מַלְאַךְ יְהוָה בַּדֶּרֶךְ לְשָׂטָן לוֹ וְהוּא רֹכֵב עַל־אֲתֹנוֹ וּשְׁנֵי נְעָרָיו עִמּוֹ׃'' None
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22.22 And God’s anger was kindled because he went; and the angel of the LORD placed himself in the way for an adversary against him.—Now he was riding upon his ass, and his two servants were with him.—'' None
5. Hebrew Bible, Proverbs, 8.35 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Augustine’s Works, Acad. • Augustine’s Works, C. Jul. • Augustine’s Works, C. Jul. imp. • Augustine’s Works, C. du. ep. Pel. • Augustine’s Works, C. litt. Petil. • Augustine’s Works, C. mend. • Augustine’s Works, Civ. • Augustine’s Works, Conf. • Augustine’s Works, Corrept. • Augustine’s Works, Div. quaest. • Augustine’s Works, Doctr. chr. • Augustine’s Works, Duab. an. • Augustine’s Works, Enar. Ps. • Augustine’s Works, Enchir. • Augustine’s Works, Exp. quaest. Rom. • Augustine’s Works, Fid. op. • Augustine’s Works, Fid. symb. • Augustine’s Works, Gen. Man. • Augustine’s Works, Gen. litt. • Augustine’s Works, Grat. • Augustine’s Works, Grat. Chr. • Augustine’s Works, Lib. arb. • Augustine’s Works, Mor. eccl. • Augustine’s Works, Nat. grat. • Augustine’s Works, Nat. orig. • Augustine’s Works, Nupt. et conc. • Augustine’s Works, Pecc. merit. • Augustine’s Works, Perf. • Augustine’s Works, Persev. • Augustine’s Works, Praed. • Augustine’s Works, Quaest. ev. • Augustine’s Works, Quant. an. • Augustine’s Works, Retract. VII • Augustine’s Works, S. • Augustine’s Works, Simpl. • Augustine’s Works, Spir. et litt. • Augustine’s Works, Symb. • Augustine’s Works, Trin. • Augustine’s Works, Ver. rel. • Augustine’s Works, c. Adim. • deeds, works

 Found in books: Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 279; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 160, 161, 181, 184, 187, 197, 198, 199, 200, 251, 252, 253, 254, 265, 270, 271, 283, 285, 295, 297

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8.35 כִּי מֹצְאִי מצאי מָצָא חַיִּים וַיָּפֶק רָצוֹן מֵיְהוָה׃'' None
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8.35 For whoso findeth me findeth life, And obtaineth favour of the LORD.'' None
6. Hebrew Bible, 1 Kings, 19 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Josephus, nature of works, compared to rabbinic literature • good works, Tobit

 Found in books: Noam (2018), Shifting Images of the Hasmoneans: Second Temple Legends and Their Reception in Josephus and Rabbinic Literature, 25; Toloni (2022), The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis, 73

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19 And he returned from following him, and took the yoke of oxen, and slew them, and boiled their flesh with the instruments of the oxen, and gave unto the people, and they did eat. Then he arose, and went after Elijah, and ministered unto him.,And it was so, when Elijah heard it, that he wrapped his face in his mantle, and went out, and stood in the entrance of the cave. And, behold, there came a voice unto him, and said: ‘What doest thou here, Elijah?’,And the LORD said unto him: ‘Go, return on thy way to the wilderness of Damascus; and when thou comest, thou shalt anoint Hazael to be king over Aram;,And he came thither unto a cave, and lodged there; and, behold, the word of the LORD came to him, and He said unto him: ‘What doest thou here, Elijah?’,But he himself went a day’s journey into the wilderness, and came and sat down under a broom-tree; and he requested for himself that he might die; and said: ‘It is enough; now, O LORD, take away my life; for I am not better than my fathers.’,And Ahab told Jezebel all that Elijah had done, and withal how he had slain all the prophets with the sword.,And the angel of the LORD came again the second time, and touched him, and said: ‘Arise and eat; because the journey is too great for thee.’,And he looked, and, behold, there was at his head a cake baked on the hot stones, and a cruse of water. And he did eat and drink, and laid him down again.,and Jehu the son of Nimshi shalt thou anoint to be king over Israel; and Elisha the son of Shaphat of Abel-meholah shalt thou anoint to be prophet in thy room.,Yet will I leave seven thousand in Israel, all the knees which have not bowed unto Baal, and every mouth which hath not kissed him.’,And he said: ‘I have been very jealous for the LORD, the God of hosts; for the children of Israel have forsaken Thy covet, thrown down Thine altars, and slain Thy prophets with the sword; and I, even I only, am left; and they seek my life, to take it away.’,And he said: ‘I have been very jealous for the LORD, the God of hosts; for the children of Israel have forsaken Thy covet, thrown down Thine altars, and slain Thy prophets with the sword; and I, even I only, am left; and they seek my life, to take it away.’,And he lay down and slept under a broom-tree; and, behold, an angel touched him, and said unto him: ‘Arise and eat.’,And when he saw that, he arose, and went for his life, and came to Beer-sheba, which belongeth to Judah, and left his servant there.,And he left the oxen, and ran after Elijah, and said: ‘Let me, I pray thee, kiss my father and my mother, and then I will follow thee.’ And he said unto him: ‘Go back; for what have I done to thee?’,Then Jezebel sent a messenger unto Elijah, saying: ‘So let the gods do to me, and more also, if I make not thy life as the life of one of them by to-morrow about this time.’,and after the earthquake a fire; but the LORD was not in the fire; and after the fire a still small voice.,And he arose, and did eat and drink, and went in the strength of that meal forty days and forty nights unto Horeb the mount of God.,And it shall come to pass, that him that escapeth from the sword of Hazael shall Jehu slay; and him that escapeth from the sword of Jehu shall Elisha slay.,So he departed thence, and found Elisha the son of Shaphat, who was plowing, with twelve yoke of oxen before him, and he with the twelfth; and Elijah passed over unto him, and cast his mantle upon him.,And He said: ‘Go forth, and stand upon the mount before the LORD.’ And, behold, the LORD passed by, and a great and strong wind rent the mountains, and broke in pieces the rocks before the LORD; but the LORD was not in the wind; and after the wind an earthquake; but the LORD was not in the earthquake;'' None
7. Hebrew Bible, 1 Samuel, 16.14 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Jesus, work/acts/miracles of • Wonders/wonder-working • deeds, works

 Found in books: Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 72; Tellbe Wasserman and Nyman (2019), Healing and Exorcism in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity, 54, 102

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16.14 וְרוּחַ יְהוָה סָרָה מֵעִם שָׁאוּל וּבִעֲתַתּוּ רוּחַ־רָעָה מֵאֵת יְהוָה׃'' None
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16.14 But the spirit of the Lord departed from Sha᾽ul, and an evil spirit from the Lord tormented him.'' None
8. Hebrew Bible, Judges, 13.15-13.20 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • good works, Tobit • work of blood (avodat ha-dam), versus nonblood

 Found in books: Balberg (2017), Blood for Thought: The Reinvention of Sacrifice in Early Rabbinic Literature, 82; Toloni (2022), The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis, 75

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13.15 וַיֹּאמֶר מָנוֹחַ אֶל־מַלְאַךְ יְהוָה נַעְצְרָה־נָּא אוֹתָךְ וְנַעֲשֶׂה לְפָנֶיךָ גְּדִי עִזִּים׃ 13.16 וַיֹּאמֶר מַלְאַךְ יְהוָה אֶל־מָנוֹחַ אִם־תַּעְצְרֵנִי לֹא־אֹכַל בְּלַחְמֶךָ וְאִם־תַּעֲשֶׂה עֹלָה לַיהוָה תַּעֲלֶנָּה כִּי לֹא־יָדַע מָנוֹחַ כִּי־מַלְאַךְ יְהוָה הוּא׃ 13.17 וַיֹּאמֶר מָנוֹחַ אֶל־מַלְאַךְ יְהוָה מִי שְׁמֶךָ כִּי־יָבֹא דבריך דְבָרְךָ וְכִבַּדְנוּךָ׃ 13.18 וַיֹּאמֶר לּוֹ מַלְאַךְ יְהוָה לָמָּה זֶּה תִּשְׁאַל לִשְׁמִי וְהוּא־פֶלִאי׃ 13.19 וַיִּקַּח מָנוֹחַ אֶת־גְּדִי הָעִזִּים וְאֶת־הַמִּנְחָה וַיַּעַל עַל־הַצּוּר לַיהוָה וּמַפְלִא לַעֲשׂוֹת וּמָנוֹחַ וְאִשְׁתּוֹ רֹאִים׃' ' None
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13.15 And Manoaĥ said to the angel of the Lord, I pray thee, let us detain thee, until we shall have made ready a kid for thee. 13.16 And the angel of the Lord said to Manoaĥ, Though thou detain me, I will not eat of thy bread: and if thou wilt offer a burnt offering, thou must offer it to the Lord. For Manoaĥ knew not that he was an angel of the Lord. 13.17 And Manoaĥ said to the angel of the Lord, What is thy name, that when thy sayings come to pass we may do thee honour? 13.18 And the angel of the Lord said to him, Why askest thou thus after my name, seeing it is hidden? 13.19 So Manoaĥ took the kid with the meal offering, and offered it upon the rock to the Lord: and the angel did wondrously, and Manoaĥ and his wife looked on. 13.20 For it came to pass, when the flame went up toward heaven from off the altar, that the angel of the Lord ascended in the flame of the altar. And Manoaĥ and his wife looked on it, and fell on their faces to the ground.'' None
9. Hesiod, Works And Days, 1-10, 42-106, 136, 139-142, 154-155, 157-179, 184, 197-212, 383-387, 483-484, 549, 559-563, 566, 574-596, 604-605, 612-614, 618-632, 640-693, 702, 704-706, 718, 724-736, 738-741, 757-759 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Heroic Age, Works and Days • Hesiod, Works and Days • Hesiod, Works and Days, • Hesiod, Works and days • Hesiod, the proem to the Works and Days • Hesiod,, Works and Days • Hippocrates, works,, Diseases of Women • Works and Days (Hesiod) • Works and Days , as model of Georgics • Works and Days, on Pandora • Zeus, in Hesiod’s works • creation narratives, in Hesiod’s works • fragments, of Sophocles’ works • goddesses, textile work • nightingale, in Works and Days • races, in Hesiod’s works • rebirth and renewal narratives, in Hesiod’s works • textile work, as women's work • textile work, goddesses' • work

 Found in books: Bosak-Schroeder (2020), Other Natures: Environmental Encounters with Ancient Greek Ethnography, 24, 85; Bowie (2021), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, 250, 299; Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 305, 573, 870; Brule (2003), Women of Ancient Greece, 35, 37; Bär et al (2022), Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome. 42; Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 87, 385, 537; Finkelberg (2019), Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays, 150, 155; Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 189; Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 590, 601; Ker and Wessels (2020), The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 73, 74; Neusner Green and Avery-Peck (2022), Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points, 23; Perkell (1989), The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics, 9, 57; Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 16, 17, 18, 19; Steiner (2001), Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought, 24, 71, 116, 117, 126; Tor (2017), Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology, 95, 96, 97

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1 μοῦσαι Πιερίηθεν ἀοιδῇσιν κλείουσαι'2 δεῦτε, Δίʼ ἐννέπετε, σφέτερον πατέρʼ ὑμνείουσαι· 3 ὅντε διὰ βροτοὶ ἄνδρες ὁμῶς ἄφατοί τε φατοί τε, 4 ῥητοί τʼ ἄρρητοί τε Διὸς μεγάλοιο ἕκητι. 5 ῥέα μὲν γὰρ βριάει, ῥέα δὲ βριάοντα χαλέπτει, 6 ῥεῖα δʼ ἀρίζηλον μινύθει καὶ ἄδηλον ἀέξει, 7 ῥεῖα δέ τʼ ἰθύνει σκολιὸν καὶ ἀγήνορα κάρφει 8 Ζεὺς ὑψιβρεμέτης, ὃς ὑπέρτατα δώματα ναίει. 9 κλῦθι ἰδὼν ἀίων τε, δίκῃ δʼ ἴθυνε θέμιστας
10
τύνη· ἐγὼ δέ κε, Πέρση, ἐτήτυμα μυθησαίμην.
42
κρύψαντες γὰρ ἔχουσι θεοὶ βίον ἀνθρώποισιν· 43 ῥηιδίως γάρ κεν καὶ ἐπʼ ἤματι ἐργάσσαιο, 44 ὥστε σε κεἰς ἐνιαυτὸν ἔχειν καὶ ἀεργὸν ἐόντα· 45 αἶψά κε πηδάλιον μὲν ὑπὲρ καπνοῦ καταθεῖο, 46 ἔργα βοῶν δʼ ἀπόλοιτο καὶ ἡμιόνων ταλαεργῶν. 47 ἀλλὰ Ζεὺς ἔκρυψε χολωσάμενος φρεσὶν ᾗσιν, 48 ὅττι μιν ἐξαπάτησε Προμηθεὺς ἀγκυλομήτης· 49 τοὔνεκʼ ἄρʼ ἀνθρώποισιν ἐμήσατο κήδεα λυγρά. 50 κρύψε δὲ πῦρ· τὸ μὲν αὖτις ἐὺς πάις Ἰαπετοῖο 5
1
ἔκλεψʼ ἀνθρώποισι Διὸς πάρα μητιόεντος 52 ἐν κοῒλῳ νάρθηκι λαθὼν Δία τερπικέραυνον. 53 τὸν δὲ χολωσάμενος προσέφη νεφεληγερέτα Ζευς· 54 Ἰαπετιονίδη, πάντων πέρι μήδεα εἰδώς, 54 ὣς ἔφατʼ· ἐκ δʼ ἐγέλασσε πατὴρ ἀνδρῶν τε θεῶν τε. 55 χαίρεις πῦρ κλέψας καὶ ἐμὰς φρένας ἠπεροπεύσας, 56 σοί τʼ αὐτῷ μέγα πῆμα καὶ ἀνδράσιν ἐσσομένοισιν. 57 τοῖς δʼ ἐγὼ ἀντὶ πυρὸς δώσω κακόν, ᾧ κεν ἅπαντες 58 τέρπωνται κατὰ θυμὸν ἑὸν κακὸν ἀμφαγαπῶντες. 60 Ἥφαιστον δʼ ἐκέλευσε περικλυτὸν ὅττι τάχιστα 6
1
γαῖαν ὕδει φύρειν, ἐν δʼ ἀνθρώπου θέμεν αὐδὴν 62 καὶ σθένος, ἀθανάτῃς δὲ θεῇς εἰς ὦπα ἐίσκειν 63 παρθενικῆς καλὸν εἶδος ἐπήρατον· αὐτὰρ Ἀθήνην 64 ἔργα διδασκῆσαι, πολυδαίδαλον ἱστὸν ὑφαίνειν· 65 καὶ χάριν ἀμφιχέαι κεφαλῇ χρυσέην Ἀφροδίτην 66 καὶ πόθον ἀργαλέον καὶ γυιοβόρους μελεδώνας· 67 ἐν δὲ θέμεν κύνεόν τε νόον καὶ ἐπίκλοπον ἦθος 68 Ἑρμείην ἤνωγε, διάκτορον Ἀργεϊφόντην. 69 ὣς ἔφαθʼ· οἳ δʼ ἐπίθοντο Διὶ Κρονίωνι ἄνακτι. 70 αὐτίκα δʼ ἐκ γαίης πλάσσεν κλυτὸς Ἀμφιγυήεις 7
1
παρθένῳ αἰδοίῃ ἴκελον Κρονίδεω διὰ βουλάς· 72 ζῶσε δὲ καὶ κόσμησε θεὰ γλαυκῶπις Ἀθήνη· 73 ἀμφὶ δέ οἱ Χάριτές τε θεαὶ καὶ πότνια Πειθὼ 74 ὅρμους χρυσείους ἔθεσαν χροΐ· ἀμφὶ δὲ τήν γε 75 Ὧραι καλλίκομοι στέφον ἄνθεσιν εἰαρινοῖσιν· 76 πάντα δέ οἱ χροῒ κόσμον ἐφήρμοσε Παλλὰς Ἀθήνη. 77 ἐν δʼ ἄρα οἱ στήθεσσι διάκτορος Ἀργεϊφόντης 78 ψεύδεά θʼ αἱμυλίους τε λόγους καὶ ἐπίκλοπον ἦθος 79 τεῦξε Διὸς βουλῇσι βαρυκτύπου· ἐν δʼ ἄρα φωνὴν 80 θῆκε θεῶν κῆρυξ, ὀνόμηνε δὲ τήνδε γυναῖκα 8
1
Πανδώρην, ὅτι πάντες Ὀλύμπια δώματʼ ἔχοντες 82 δῶρον ἐδώρησαν, πῆμʼ ἀνδράσιν ἀλφηστῇσιν. 83 αὐτὰρ ἐπεὶ δόλον αἰπὺν ἀμήχανον ἐξετέλεσσεν, 84 εἰς Ἐπιμηθέα πέμπε πατὴρ κλυτὸν Ἀργεϊφόντην 85 δῶρον ἄγοντα, θεῶν ταχὺν ἄγγελον· οὐδʼ Ἐπιμηθεὺς 86 ἐφράσαθʼ, ὥς οἱ ἔειπε Προμηθεὺς μή ποτε δῶρον 87 δέξασθαι πὰρ Ζηνὸς Ὀλυμπίου, ἀλλʼ ἀποπέμπειν 88 ἐξοπίσω, μή πού τι κακὸν θνητοῖσι γένηται. 89 αὐτὰρ ὃ δεξάμενος, ὅτε δὴ κακὸν εἶχʼ, ἐνόησεν. 90 Πρὶν μὲν γὰρ ζώεσκον ἐπὶ χθονὶ φῦλʼ ἀνθρώπων 9
1
νόσφιν ἄτερ τε κακῶν καὶ ἄτερ χαλεποῖο πόνοιο 92 νούσων τʼ ἀργαλέων, αἵ τʼ ἀνδράσι Κῆρας ἔδωκαν. 93 αἶψα γὰρ ἐν κακότητι βροτοὶ καταγηράσκουσιν. 94 ἀλλὰ γυνὴ χείρεσσι πίθου μέγα πῶμʼ ἀφελοῦσα 95 ἐσκέδασʼ· ἀνθρώποισι δʼ ἐμήσατο κήδεα λυγρά. 96 μούνη δʼ αὐτόθι Ἐλπὶς ἐν ἀρρήκτοισι δόμοισιν 97 ἔνδον ἔμιμνε πίθου ὑπὸ χείλεσιν, οὐδὲ θύραζε 98 ἐξέπτη· πρόσθεν γὰρ ἐπέλλαβε πῶμα πίθοιο 99 αἰγιόχου βουλῇσι Διὸς νεφεληγερέταο.
100
ἄλλα δὲ μυρία λυγρὰ κατʼ ἀνθρώπους ἀλάληται·
10
1
πλείη μὲν γὰρ γαῖα κακῶν, πλείη δὲ θάλασσα·
102
νοῦσοι δʼ ἀνθρώποισιν ἐφʼ ἡμέρῃ, αἳ δʼ ἐπὶ νυκτὶ
103
αὐτόματοι φοιτῶσι κακὰ θνητοῖσι φέρουσαι
104
σιγῇ, ἐπεὶ φωνὴν ἐξείλετο μητίετα Ζεύς.
105
οὕτως οὔτι πη ἔστι Διὸς νόον ἐξαλέασθαι.
106
εἰ δʼ ἐθέλεις, ἕτερόν τοι ἐγὼ λόγον ἐκκορυφώσω

136
ἤθελον οὐδʼ ἔρδειν μακάρων ἱεροῖς ἐπὶ βωμοῖς,

139
οὐκ ἔδιδον μακάρεσσι θεοῖς, οἳ Ὄλυμπον ἔχουσιν.
140
αὐτὰρ ἐπεὶ καὶ τοῦτο γένος κατὰ γαῖʼ ἐκάλυψε,—
14
1
τοὶ μὲν ὑποχθόνιοι μάκαρες θνητοῖς καλέονται,
1
42
δεύτεροι, ἀλλʼ ἔμπης τιμὴ καὶ τοῖσιν ὀπηδεῖ—,

154
νώνυμνοι· θάνατος δὲ καὶ ἐκπάγλους περ ἐόντας
155
εἷλε μέλας, λαμπρὸν δʼ ἔλιπον φάος ἠελίοιο.

157
αὖτις ἔτʼ ἄλλο τέταρτον ἐπὶ χθονὶ πουλυβοτείρῃ
158
Ζεὺς Κρονίδης ποίησε, δικαιότερον καὶ ἄρειον,
159
ἀνδρῶν ἡρώων θεῖον γένος, οἳ καλέονται
160
ἡμίθεοι, προτέρη γενεὴ κατʼ ἀπείρονα γαῖαν.
16
1
καὶ τοὺς μὲν πόλεμός τε κακὸς καὶ φύλοπις αἰνή,
162
τοὺς μὲν ὑφʼ ἑπταπύλῳ Θήβῃ, Καδμηίδι γαίῃ,
163
ὤλεσε μαρναμένους μήλων ἕνεκʼ Οἰδιπόδαο,
164
τοὺς δὲ καὶ ἐν νήεσσιν ὑπὲρ μέγα λαῖτμα θαλάσσης
165
ἐς Τροίην ἀγαγὼν Ἑλένης ἕνεκʼ ἠυκόμοιο.
166
ἔνθʼ ἤτοι τοὺς μὲν θανάτου τέλος ἀμφεκάλυψε,
167
τοῖς δὲ δίχʼ ἀνθρώπων βίοτον καὶ ἤθεʼ ὀπάσσας
168
Ζεὺς Κρονίδης κατένασσε πατὴρ ἐς πείρατα γαίης.
169
Πέμπτον δʼ αὖτις ἔτʼ ἄ λλο γένος θῆκʼ εὐρύοπα Ζεὺς
169
ἀνδρῶν, οἳ γεγάασιν ἐπὶ χθονὶ πουλυβοτείρῃ.
169
τοῖσι δʼ ὁμῶς ν εάτοις τιμὴ καὶ κῦδος ὀπηδεῖ.
169
τοῦ γὰρ δεσμὸ ν ἔλυσε πα τὴρ ἀνδρῶν τε θεῶν τε.
169
τηλοῦ ἀπʼ ἀθανάτων· τοῖσιν Κρόνος ἐμβασιλεύει.
170
καὶ τοὶ μὲν ναίουσιν ἀκηδέα θυμὸν ἔχοντες
17
1
ἐν μακάρων νήσοισι παρʼ Ὠκεανὸν βαθυδίνην,
172
ὄλβιοι ἥρωες, τοῖσιν μελιηδέα καρπὸν
173
τρὶς ἔτεος θάλλοντα φέρει ζείδωρος ἄρουρα.
174
μηκέτʼ ἔπειτʼ ὤφελλον ἐγὼ πέμπτοισι μετεῖναι
175
ἀνδράσιν, ἀλλʼ ἢ πρόσθε θανεῖν ἢ ἔπειτα γενέσθαι.
176
νῦν γὰρ δὴ γένος ἐστὶ σιδήρεον· οὐδέ ποτʼ ἦμαρ
177
παύονται καμάτου καὶ ὀιζύος, οὐδέ τι νύκτωρ
178
φθειρόμενοι. χαλεπὰς δὲ θεοὶ δώσουσι μερίμνας·
179
ἀλλʼ ἔμπης καὶ τοῖσι μεμείξεται ἐσθλὰ κακοῖσιν.

184
οὐδὲ κασίγνητος φίλος ἔσσεται, ὡς τὸ πάρος περ.

197
καὶ τότε δὴ πρὸς Ὄλυμπον ἀπὸ χθονὸς εὐρυοδείης
198
λευκοῖσιν φάρεσσι καλυψαμένα χρόα καλὸν
199
ἀθανάτων μετὰ φῦλον ἴτον προλιπόντʼ ἀνθρώπους 200 Αἰδὼς καὶ Νέμεσις· τὰ δὲ λείψεται ἄλγεα λυγρὰ 20
1
θνητοῖς ἀνθρώποισι· κακοῦ δʼ οὐκ ἔσσεται ἀλκή. 202 νῦν δʼ αἶνον βασιλεῦσιν ἐρέω φρονέουσι καὶ αὐτοῖς· 203 ὧδʼ ἴρηξ προσέειπεν ἀηδόνα ποικιλόδειρον 204 ὕψι μάλʼ ἐν νεφέεσσι φέρων ὀνύχεσσι μεμαρπώς· 205 ἣ δʼ ἐλεόν, γναμπτοῖσι πεπαρμένη ἀμφʼ ὀνύχεσσι, 206 μύρετο· τὴν ὅγʼ ἐπικρατέως πρὸς μῦθον ἔειπεν· 207 δαιμονίη, τί λέληκας; ἔχει νύ σε πολλὸν ἀρείων· 208 τῇ δʼ εἶς, ᾗ σʼ ἂν ἐγώ περ ἄγω καὶ ἀοιδὸν ἐοῦσαν· 209 δεῖπνον δʼ, αἴ κʼ ἐθέλω, ποιήσομαι ἠὲ μεθήσω. 2
10
ἄφρων δʼ, ὅς κʼ ἐθέλῃ πρὸς κρείσσονας ἀντιφερίζειν· 2
1
1
νίκης τε στέρεται πρός τʼ αἴσχεσιν ἄλγεα πάσχει. 2
12
ὣς ἔφατʼ ὠκυπέτης ἴρηξ, τανυσίπτερος ὄρνις.
383
πληιάδων Ἀτλαγενέων ἐπιτελλομενάων 384 ἄρχεσθʼ ἀμήτου, ἀρότοιο δὲ δυσομενάων. 385 αἳ δή τοι νύκτας τε καὶ ἤματα τεσσαράκοντα 386 κεκρύφαται, αὖτις δὲ περιπλομένου ἐνιαυτοῦ 387 φαίνονται τὰ πρῶτα χαρασσομένοιο σιδήρου.
483
ἄλλοτε δʼ ἀλλοῖος Ζηνὸς νόος αἰγιόχοιο, 484 ἀργαλέος δʼ ἄνδρεσσι καταθνητοῖσι νοῆσαι.
549
ἀὴρ πυροφόρος τέταται μακάρων ἐπὶ ἔργοις·
559
τῆμος τὤμισυ βουσίν, ἐπʼ ἀνέρι δὲ πλέον εἴη 560 ἁρμαλιῆς· μακραὶ γὰρ ἐπίρροθοι εὐφρόναι εἰσίν. 56
1
ταῦτα φυλασσόμενος τετελεσμένον εἰς ἐνιαυτὸν 562 ἰσοῦσθαι νύκτας τε καὶ ἤματα, εἰσόκεν αὖτις 563 γῆ πάντων μήτηρ καρπὸν σύμμικτον ἐνείκῃ.
566
Ἀρκτοῦρος προλιπὼν ἱερὸν ῥόον Ὠκεανοῖο
574
φεύγειν δὲ σκιεροὺς θώκους καὶ ἐπʼ ἠόα κοῖτον 575 ὥρῃ ἐν ἀμήτου, ὅτε τʼ ἠέλιος χρόα κάρφει. 576 τημοῦτος σπεύδειν καὶ οἴκαδε καρπὸν ἀγινεῖν 577 ὄρθρου ἀνιστάμενος, ἵνα τοι βίος ἄρκιος εἴη. 578 ἠὼς γὰρ ἔργοιο τρίτην ἀπομείρεται αἶσαν, 579 ἠώς τοι προφέρει μὲν ὁδοῦ, προφέρει δὲ καὶ ἔργου, 580 ἠώς, ἥτε φανεῖσα πολέας ἐπέβησε κελεύθου 58
1
ἀνθρώπους πολλοῖσί τʼ ἐπὶ ζυγὰ βουσὶ τίθησιν. 582 ἦμος δὲ σκόλυμός τʼ ἀνθεῖ καὶ ἠχέτα τέττιξ 583 δενδρέῳ ἐφεζόμενος λιγυρὴν καταχεύετʼ ἀοιδὴν 584 πυκνὸν ὑπὸ πτερύγων, θέρεος καματώδεος ὥρῃ, 585 τῆμος πιόταταί τʼ αἶγες καὶ οἶνος ἄριστος, 586 μαχλόταται δὲ γυναῖκες, ἀφαυρότατοι δέ τοι ἄνδρες 587 εἰσίν, ἐπεὶ κεφαλὴν καὶ γούνατα Σείριος ἄζει, 588 αὐαλέος δέ τε χρὼς ὑπὸ καύματος· ἀλλὰ τότʼ ἤδη 589 εἴη πετραίη τε σκιὴ καὶ βίβλινος οἶνος,' '590 μάζα τʼ ἀμολγαίη γάλα τʼ αἰγῶν σβεννυμενάων, 59
1
καὶ βοὸς ὑλοφάγοιο κρέας μή πω τετοκυίης 592 πρωτογόνων τʼ ἐρίφων· ἐπὶ δʼ αἴθοπα πινέμεν οἶνον, 593 ἐν σκιῇ ἑζόμενον, κεκορημένον ἦτορ ἐδωδῆς, 594 ἀντίον ἀκραέος Ζεφύρου τρέψαντα πρόσωπα, 595 κρήνης τʼ αἰενάου καὶ ἀπορρύτου, ἥτʼ ἀθόλωτος, 596 τρὶς ὕδατος προχέειν, τὸ δὲ τέτρατον ἱέμεν οἴνου.
604
καὶ κύνα καρχαρόδοντα κομεῖν, μὴ φείδεο σίτου, 605 μή ποτέ σʼ ἡμερόκοιτος ἀνὴρ ἀπὸ χρήμαθʼ ἕληται. 6
12
δεῖξαι δʼ ἠελίῳ δέκα τʼ ἤματα καὶ δέκα νύκτας, 6
13
πέντε δὲ συσκιάσαι, ἕκτῳ δʼ εἰς ἄγγεʼ ἀφύσσαι 6
14
δῶρα Διωνύσου πολυγηθέος. αὐτὰρ ἐπὴν δὴ 6
18
εἰ δέ σε ναυτιλίης δυσπεμφέλου ἵμερος αἱρεῖ, 6
19
εὖτʼ ἂν Πληιάδες σθένος ὄβριμον Ὠαρίωνος 620 φεύγουσαι πίπτωσιν ἐς ἠεροειδέα πόντον, 62
1
δὴ τότε παντοίων ἀνέμων θυίουσιν ἀῆται· 622 καὶ τότε μηκέτι νῆας ἔχειν ἐνὶ οἴνοπι πόντῳ, 623 γῆν ἐργάζεσθαι μεμνημένος, ὥς σε κελεύω. 624 νῆα δʼ ἐπʼ ἠπείρου ἐρύσαι πυκάσαι τε λίθοισι 625 πάντοθεν, ὄφρʼ ἴσχωσʼ ἀνέμων μένος ὑγρὸν ἀέντων, 626 χείμαρον ἐξερύσας, ἵνα μὴ πύθῃ Διὸς ὄμβρος. 627 ὅπλα δʼ ἐπάρμενα πάντα τεῷ ἐγκάτθεο οἴκῳ 628 εὐκόσμως στολίσας νηὸς πτερὰ ποντοπόροιο· 629 πηδάλιον δʼ ἐυεργὲς ὑπὲρ καπνοῦ κρεμάσασθαι. 630 αὐτὸς δʼ ὡραῖον μίμνειν πλόον, εἰσόκεν ἔλθῃ· 63
1
καὶ τότε νῆα θοὴν ἅλαδʼ ἑλκέμεν, ἐν δέ τε φόρτον 632 ἄρμενον ἐντύνασθαι, ἵνʼ οἴκαδε κέρδος ἄρηαι,
640
Ἄσκρῃ, χεῖμα κακῇ, θέρει ἀργαλέῃ, οὐδέ ποτʼ ἐσθλῇ. 64
1
τύνη δʼ, ὦ Πέρση, ἔργων μεμνημένος εἶναι 6
42
ὡραίων πάντων, περὶ ναυτιλίης δὲ μάλιστα. 643 νῆʼ ὀλίγην αἰνεῖν, μεγάλῃ δʼ ἐνὶ φορτία θέσθαι. 644 μείζων μὲν φόρτος, μεῖζον δʼ ἐπὶ κέρδεϊ κέρδος 645 ἔσσεται, εἴ κʼ ἄνεμοί γε κακὰς ἀπέχωσιν ἀήτας. 646 εὖτʼ ἂν ἐπʼ ἐμπορίην τρέψας ἀεσίφρονα θυμὸν 647 βούληαι χρέα τε προφυγεῖν καὶ λιμὸν ἀτερπέα, 648 δείξω δή τοι μέτρα πολυφλοίσβοιο θαλάσσης, 649 οὔτε τι ναυτιλίης σεσοφισμένος οὔτε τι νηῶν. 650 οὐ γάρ πώ ποτε νηί γʼ ἐπέπλων εὐρέα πόντον, 65
1
εἰ μὴ ἐς Εὔβοιαν ἐξ Αὐλίδος, ᾗ ποτʼ Ἀχαιοὶ 652 μείναντες χειμῶνα πολὺν σὺν λαὸν ἄγειραν 653 Ἑλλάδος ἐξ ἱερῆς Τροίην ἐς καλλιγύναικα. 654 ἔνθα δʼ ἐγὼν ἐπʼ ἄεθλα δαΐφρονος Ἀμφιδάμαντος 655 Χαλκίδα τʼ εἲς ἐπέρησα· τὰ δὲ προπεφραδμένα πολλὰ 656 ἄεθλʼ ἔθεσαν παῖδες μεγαλήτορος· ἔνθα μέ φημι 657 ὕμνῳ νικήσαντα φέρειν τρίποδʼ ὠτώεντα. 658 τὸν μὲν ἐγὼ Μούσῃς Ἑλικωνιάδεσσʼ ἀνέθηκα, 659 ἔνθα με τὸ πρῶτον λιγυρῆς ἐπέβησαν ἀοιδῆς. 660 τόσσον τοι νηῶν γε πεπείρημαι πολυγόμφων· 66
1
ἀλλὰ καὶ ὣς ἐρέω Ζηνὸς νόον αἰγιόχοιο· 662 Μοῦσαι γάρ μʼ ἐδίδαξαν ἀθέσφατον ὕμνον ἀείδειν. 663 ἤματα πεντήκοντα μετὰ τροπὰς ἠελίοιο, 664 ἐς τέλος ἐλθόντος θέρεος καματώδεος ὥρης, 665 ὡραῖος πέλεται θνητοῖς πλόος· οὔτε κε νῆα 666 καυάξαις οὔτʼ ἄνδρας ἀποφθείσειε θάλασσα, 667 εἰ δὴ μὴ πρόφρων γε Ποσειδάων ἐνοσίχθων 668 ἢ Ζεὺς ἀθανάτων βασιλεὺς ἐθέλῃσιν ὀλέσσαι· 669 ἐν τοῖς γὰρ τέλος ἐστὶν ὁμῶς ἀγαθῶν τε κακῶν τε. 670 τῆμος δʼ εὐκρινέες τʼ αὖραι καὶ πόντος ἀπήμων· 67
1
εὔκηλος τότε νῆα θοὴν ἀνέμοισι πιθήσας 672 ἑλκέμεν ἐς πόντον φόρτον τʼ ἐς πάντα τίθεσθαι, 673 σπεύδειν δʼ ὅττι τάχιστα πάλιν οἶκόνδε νέεσθαι· 674 μηδὲ μένειν οἶνόν τε νέον καὶ ὀπωρινὸν ὄμβρον 675 καὶ χειμῶνʼ ἐπιόντα Νότοιό τε δεινὰς ἀήτας, 676 ὅστʼ ὤρινε θάλασσαν ὁμαρτήσας Διὸς ὄμβρῳ 677 πολλῷ ὀπωρινῷ, χαλεπὸν δέ τε πόντον ἔθηκεν. 678 ἄλλος δʼ εἰαρινὸς πέλεται πλόος ἀνθρώποισιν· 679 ἦμος δὴ τὸ πρῶτον, ὅσον τʼ ἐπιβᾶσα κορώνη 680 ἴχνος ἐποίησεν, τόσσον πέταλʼ ἀνδρὶ φανείῃ 68
1
ἐν κράδῃ ἀκροτάτῃ, τότε δʼ ἄμβατός ἐστι θάλασσα· 682 εἰαρινὸς δʼ οὗτος πέλεται πλόος. οὔ μιν ἔγωγε 683 αἴνημʼ· οὐ γὰρ ἐμῷ θυμῷ κεχαρισμένος ἐστίν· 684 ἁρπακτός· χαλεπῶς κε φύγοις κακόν· ἀλλά νυ καὶ τὰ 685 ἄνθρωποι ῥέζουσιν ἀιδρείῃσι νόοιο· 686 χρήματα γὰρ ψυχὴ πέλεται δειλοῖσι βροτοῖσιν. 687 δεινὸν δʼ ἐστὶ θανεῖν μετὰ κύμασιν. ἀλλά σʼ ἄνωγα 688 φράζεσθαι τάδε πάντα μετὰ φρεσίν, ὡς ἀγορεύω. 689 μηδʼ ἐν νηυσὶν ἅπαντα βίον κοΐλῃσι τίθεσθαι· 690 ἀλλὰ πλέω λείπειν, τὰ δὲ μείονα φορτίζεσθαι. 69
1
δεινὸν γὰρ πόντου μετὰ κύμασι πήματι κύρσαι. 692 δεινὸν δʼ, εἴ κʼ ἐπʼ ἄμαξαν ὑπέρβιον ἄχθος ἀείρας 693 ἄξονα. καυάξαις καὶ φορτία μαυρωθείη.
702
οὐ μὲν γάρ τι γυναικὸς ἀνὴρ ληίζετʼ ἄμεινον
704
δειπνολόχης· ἥτʼ ἄνδρα καὶ ἴφθιμόν περ ἐόντα 705 εὕει ἄτερ δαλοῖο καὶ ὠμῷ γήραϊ δῶκεν. 706 εὖ δʼ ὄπιν ἀθανάτων μακάρων πεφυλαγμένος εἶναι. 7
18
τέτλαθʼ ὀνειδίζειν, μακάρων δόσιν αἰὲν ἐόντων.
724
μηδέ ποτʼ ἐξ ἠοῦς Διὶ λειβέμεν αἴθοπα οἶνον 725 χερσὶν ἀνίπτοισιν μηδʼ ἄλλοις ἀθανάτοισιν· 726 οὐ γὰρ τοί γε κλύουσιν, ἀποπτύουσι δέ τʼ ἀράς. 727 μηδʼ ἄντʼ ἠελίου τετραμμένος ὀρθὸς ὀμιχεῖν· 728 αὐτὰρ ἐπεί κε δύῃ, μεμνημένος, ἔς τʼ ἀνιόντα· 729 μήτʼ ἐν ὁδῷ μήτʼ ἐκτὸς ὁδοῦ προβάδην οὐρήσῃς 730 μηδʼ ἀπογυμνωθείς· μακάρων τοι νύκτες ἔασιν· 73
1
ἑζόμενος δʼ ὅ γε θεῖος ἀνήρ, πεπνυμένα εἰδώς, 732 ἢ ὅ γε πρὸς τοῖχον πελάσας ἐυερκέος αὐλῆς. 733 μηδʼ αἰδοῖα γονῇ πεπαλαγμένος ἔνδοθι οἴκου 734 ἱστίῃ ἐμπελαδὸν παραφαινέμεν, ἀλλʼ ἀλέασθαι. 735 μηδʼ ἀπὸ δυσφήμοιο τάφου ἀπονοστήσαντα 736 σπερμαίνειν γενεήν, ἀλλʼ ἀθανάτων ἀπὸ δαιτός.
738
ποσσὶ περᾶν, πρίν γʼ εὔξῃ ἰδὼν ἐς καλὰ ῥέεθρα, 739 χεῖρας νιψάμενος πολυηράτῳ ὕδατι λευκῷ. 740 ὃς ποταμὸν διαβῇ κακότητʼ ἰδὲ χεῖρας ἄνιπτος, 74
1
τῷ δὲ θεοὶ νεμεσῶσι καὶ ἄλγεα δῶκαν ὀπίσσω.
757
μηδέ ποτʼ ἐν προχοῇς ποταμῶν ἅλαδε προρεόντων 758 μηδʼ ἐπὶ κρηνάων οὐρεῖν, μάλα δʼ ἐξαλέασθαι· 759 μηδʼ ἐναποψύχειν· τὸ γὰρ οὔ τοι λώιόν ἐστιν. ' None
sup>
1 Pierian Muses, with your songs of praise,'2 Come hither and of Zeus, your father, tell, 3 Through whom all mortal men throughout their day 4 Acclaimed or not, talked of or nameless dwell, 5 So great is he. He strengthens easily 6 The weak, makes weak the strong and the well-known 7 Obscure, makes great the low; the crooked he 8 Makes straight, high-thundering Zeus upon his throne. 9 See me and hear me, make straight our decrees,
10
For, Perses, I would tell the truth to you.
42
To judge such cases. Fools! They do not know 43 That half may well transcend the total store 44 Or how the asphodel and the mallow 45 Will benefit them much. The means of life 46 The gods keep from us or else easily 47 Could one work for one day, then, free from strife, 48 One’s rudder packed away, live lazily, 49 Each ox and hard-worked mule sent off. In spleen 50 That fraudulent Prometheus duped him, Zeu 5
1
Kept safe this thing, devising labours keen 52 For men. He hid the fire: for human use 53 The honourable son of Iapetu 54 Stole it from counsellor Zeus and in his guile 55 He hid it in a fennel stalk and thu 56 Hoodwinked the Thunderer, who aired his bile, 57 Cloud-Gatherer that he was, and said: “O son 58 of Iapetus, the craftiest god of all, 59 You stole the fire, content with what you’d done, 60 And duped me. So great anguish shall befall 6
1
Both you and future mortal men. A thing 62 of ill in lieu of fire I’ll afford 63 Them all to take delight in, cherishing 64 The evil”. Thus he spoke and then the lord 65 of men and gods laughed. Famed Hephaistus he 66 Enjoined to mingle water with some clay 67 And put a human voice and energy 68 Within it and a goddess’ features lay 69 On it and, like a maiden, sweet and pure, 70 The body, though Athene was to show 7
1
Her how to weave; upon her head allure 72 The golden Aphrodite would let flow, 73 With painful passions and bone-shattering stress. 74 Then Argus-slayer Hermes had to add 75 A wily nature and shamefacedness. 76 Those were his orders and what Lord Zeus bade 77 They did. The famed lame god immediately 78 Formed out of clay, at Cronus’ son’s behest, 79 The likeness of a maid of modesty. 80 By grey-eyed Queen Athene was she dressed 8
1
And cinctured, while the Graces and Seduction 82 Placed necklaces about her; then the Hours, 83 With lovely tresses, heightened this production 84 By garlanding this maid with springtime flowers. 85 Athene trimmed her up, while in her breast 86 Hermes put lies and wiles and qualitie 87 of trickery at thundering Zeus’ behest: 88 Since all Olympian divinitie 89 Bestowed this gift, Pandora was her name, 90 A bane to all mankind. When they had hatched 9
1
This perfect trap, Hermes, that man of fame, 92 The gods’ swift messenger, was then dispatched 93 To Epimetheus. Epimetheus, though, 94 Ignored Prometheus’ words not to receive 95 A gift from Zeus but, since it would cause woe 96 To me, so send it back; he would perceive 97 This truth when he already held the thing. 98 Before this time men lived quite separately, 99 Grief-free, disease-free, free of suffering,
100
Which brought the Death-Gods. Now in misery
10
1
Men age. Pandora took out of the jar
102
Grievous calamity, bringing to men
103
Dreadful distress by scattering it afar.
104
Within its firm sides, Hope alone was then
105
Still safe within its lip, not leaping out
106
(The lid already stopped her, by the will

136
And mind, the golden, for a young child stayed,

139
But when they all reached their maturity,
140
They lived a vapid life, replete with tears,
14
1
Through foolishness, unable to forbear
1
42
To brawl, spurning the gods, refusing, too,

154
Were bronze, their houses, too, their tools; they knew
155
of no black iron. Later, when they died

157
Chill Hades’ mouldy house, without a name.
158
Yes, black death took them off, although they’d been
159
Impetuous, and they the sun’s bright flame
160
Would see no more, nor would this race be seen
16
1
Themselves, screened by the earth. Cronus’ son then
162
Fashioned upon the lavish land one more,
163
The fourth, more just and brave – of righteous men,
164
Called demigods. It was the race before
165
Our own upon the boundless earth. Foul war
166
And dreadful battles vanquished some of these,
167
While some in Cadmus’ Thebes, while looking for
168
The flocks of Oedipus, found death. The sea
169
Took others as they crossed to Troy fight
170
For fair-tressed Helen. They were screened as well
17
1
In death. Lord Zeus arranged it that they might
172
Live far from others. Thus they came to dwell,
173
Carefree, among the blessed isles, content
174
And affluent, by the deep-swirling sea.
175
Sweet grain, blooming three times a year, was sent
176
To them by the earth, that gives vitality
177
To all mankind, and Cronus was their lord,
178
Far from the other gods, for Zeus, who reign
179
Over gods and men, had cut away the cord

184
Among them, but instead that I’d been fated

197
Find fault with them in their irreverence
198
And not repay their bringing up. We’ll find
199
Cities brought down. There’ll be no deference 200 That’s given to the honest, just and kind. 20
1
The evil and the proud will get acclaim, 202 Might will be right and shame shall cease to be, 203 The bad will harm the good whom they shall maim 204 With crooked words, swearing false oaths. We’ll see 205 Envy among the wretched, foul of face 206 And voice, adoring villainy, and then 207 Into Olympus from the endless space 208 Mankind inhabits, leaving mortal men, 209 Fair flesh veiled by white robes, shall Probity 2
10
And Shame depart, and there’ll be grievous pain 2
1
1
For men: against all evil there shall be 2
12
No safeguard. Now I’ll tell, for lords who know
383
And leave ferocious famine far behind; 384 If to a little you a little more 385 Should add and do this often, with great speed 386 It will expand. A man has little care 387 For what he has at home: there’s greater need
483
A friend and say “They have their work to do, 484 My oxen.” Merely mind-rich men expect
549
And fecund earth, the vast woods bellowing.
559
They stay indoors, who as yet do not know 560 Gold Aphrodite’s work, a comfort to 56
1
Their darling mothers, and their tender skin 562 They wash and smear with oil in winter’s space 563 And slumber in a bedroom far within
566
Him pastures but rotate around the land
574
To hold him up, they wander as they try 575 To circumvent the snow. As I ordain, 576 Shelter your body, too, when snow is nigh – 577 A fleecy coat and, reaching to the floor, 578 A tunic. Both the warp and woof must you 579 Entwine but of the woof there must be more 580 Than of the warp. Don this, for, if you do, 58
1
Your hair stays still, not shaking everywhere. 582 Be stoutly shod with ox-hide boots which you 583 Must line with felt. In winter have a care 584 To sew two young kids’ hides to the sinew 585 of an ox to keep the downpour from your back, 586 A knit cap for your head to keep your ear 587 From getting wet. It’s freezing at the crack 588 of dawn, which from the starry sky appear 589 When Boreas drops down: then is there spread 590 A fruitful mist upon the land which fall 59
1
Upon the blessed fields and which is fed 592 By endless rivers, raised on high by squalls. 593 Sometimes it rains at evening, then again, 594 When the thickly-compressed clouds are animated 595 By Thracian Boreas, it blows hard. Then 596 It is the time, having anticipated
604
The helpful nights are long, and so take care. 605 Keep at this till the year’s end when the day 6
12
of spring. Before then, the best strategy 6
13
Is pruning of your vines. But when the snail 6
14
Climbs up the stems to flee the Pleiades, 6
18
At harvest-season when the sun makes dry 6
19
One’s skin. Bring in your crops and don’t be slow. 620 Rise early to secure your food supply. 62
1
For Dawn will cut your labour by a third, 622 Who aids your journey and you toil, through whom 623 Men find the road and put on many a herd 624 of oxen many a yoke. When thistles bloom 625 And shrill cicadas chirp up in the tree 626 Nonstop beneath their wings, into our view 627 Comes summer, harbinger of drudgery, 628 Goats at their fattest, wine its choicest, too, 629 The women at their lustiest, though men 630 Are at their very weakest, head and knee 63
1
Being dried up by Sirius, for then 632 Their skin is parched. It is at times like these
640
A spring untroubled that will never fade, 64
1
Then urge your men to sift the holy corn 6
42
of Demeter, when Orion first we see 643 In all his strength, upon the windy, worn 644 Threshing-floor. Then measure well the quantity 645 And take it home in urns. Now I urge you 646 To stockpile all your year’s supplies inside. 647 Dismiss your hired man and then in lieu 648 Seek out a childless maid (you won’t abide 649 One who is nursing). You must take good care 650 of your sharp-toothed dog; do not scant his meat 65
1
In case The One Who Sleeps by Day should dare 652 To steal your goods. Let there be lots to eat 653 For both oxen and mules, and litter, too. 654 Unyoke your team and grant a holiday. 655 When rosy-fingered Dawn first gets a view 656 of Arcturus and across the sky halfway 657 Come Sirius and Orion, pluck your store 658 of grapes and bring them home; then to the sun 659 Expose them for ten days, then for five more 660 Conceal them in the dark; when this is done, 66
1
Upon the sixth begin to pour in jar 662 Glad Bacchus’ gift. When strong Orion’s set 663 And back into the sea decline the star 664 Pleiades and Hyades, it’s time to get 665 Your plough out, Perses. Then, as it should be, 666 The year is finished. If on stormy sea 667 You long to sail, when into the dark, 668 To flee Orion’s rain, the Pleiade 669 Descend, abundant winds will blow: forbear 670 To keep at that time on the wine-dark sea 67
1
Your ships, but work your land with earnest care, 672 As I ordain. So that the potency 673 of the wet winds may not affect your craft, 674 You must protect it on dry land, and tamp 675 It tight with stones on both sides, fore and aft. 676 Take out the plug that Zeus’s rain won’t damp 677 And rot the wood. The tackle store inside 678 And neatly fold the sails and then suspend 679 The well-made rudder over smoke, then bide 680 Your time until the season’s at an end 68
1
And you may sail. Then take down to the sea 682 Your speedy ship and then prepare the freight 683 To guarantee a gain, as formerly 684 Our father would his vessels navigate. 685 In earnest, foolish Perses, to posse 686 Great riches, once he journeyed to this place 687 From Cyme, fleeing not wealth or succe 688 But grinding poverty, which many face 689 At Zeus’s hands. Near Helicon he dwelt 690 In a wretched village, Ascra, most severe 69
1
In winter, though an equal woe one felt 692 In summer, goods at no time. Perses, hear 693 My words – of every season’s toil take care,
702
I’ll teach you, though of everything marine
704
Upon the spacious ocean have I been – 705 Just to Euboea from Aulis (the great host 706 of Greeks here waited out the stormy gale, 7
18
With ships for me to this has been confined.
724
Seafarers slaughter, nor will any man 725 Shatter his ship, unless such is the will 726 of earth-shaking Poseidon or our king, 727 Lord Zeus, who always judge both good and ill. 728 The sea is tranquil then, unwavering 729 The winds. Trust these and drag down to the sea 730 Your ship with confidence and place all freight 73
1
On board and then as swiftly as may be 732 Sail home and for the autumn rain don’t wait 733 Or fast-approaching blizzards, new-made wine, 734 The South Wind’s dreadful blasts – he stirs the sea 735 And brings downpours in spring and makes the brine 736 Inclement. Spring, too, grants humanity
738
On fig-tree-tops, as tiny as the mark 739 A raven leaves, the sea becomes serene 740 For sailing. Though spring bids you to embark, 74
1
I’ll not praise it – it does not gladden me.
757
Marry a maid. The best would be one who 758 Lives near you, but you must with care look round 759 Lest neighbours make a laughingstock of you. ' None
10. Hesiod, Theogony, 26-28, 33, 101, 214, 570-571, 581-584, 586, 590, 594, 763 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Hesiod Theogony, Works and Days • Hesiod, Works and Days • Hesiod, the proem to the Works and Days • Parmenides’ poem, and Hesiod’s Works and Days • Plato, works, Laws • Plautus, death mirrors work • Works and Days, on Pandora • exile (relegation), as context for creation of works • fragments, of Sophocles’ works • goddesses, textile work • textile work, goddesses' • work

 Found in books: Braund and Most (2004), Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen, 94; Brule (2003), Women of Ancient Greece, 35; Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 87; Folit-Weinberg (2022), Homer, Parmenides, and the Road to Demonstration, 84; Goldschmidt (2019), Biofiction and the Reception of Latin Poetry, 7; Hesk (2000), Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens, 161; Johnson (2008), Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses, 72; Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 584, 590; Ker and Wessels (2020), The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn, 24, 27, 31, 73; Steiner (2001), Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought, 24, 117; Tor (2017), Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology, 95, 96, 97

sup>
26 ποιμένες ἄγραυλοι, κάκʼ ἐλέγχεα, γαστέρες οἶον, 27 ἴδμεν ψεύδεα πολλὰ λέγειν ἐτύμοισιν ὁμοῖα, 28 ἴδμεν δʼ, εὖτʼ ἐθέλωμεν, ἀληθέα γηρύσασθαι.
33
καί μʼ ἐκέλονθʼ ὑμνεῖν μακάρων γένος αἰὲν ἐόντων,
101
ὑμνήσῃ μάκαράς τε θεούς, οἳ Ὄλυμπον ἔχουσιν,214 δεύτερον αὖ Μῶμον καὶ Ὀιζὺν ἀλγινόεσσαν
570
αὐτίκα δʼ ἀντὶ πυρὸς τεῦξεν κακὸν ἀνθρώποισιν· 571 γαίης γὰρ σύμπλασσε περικλυτὸς Ἀμφιγυήεις
581
τῇ δʼ ἐνὶ δαίδαλα πολλὰ τετεύχατο, θαῦμα ἰδέσθαι, 582 κνώδαλʼ, ὅσʼ ἤπειρος πολλὰ τρέφει ἠδὲ θάλασσα, 583 τῶν ὅ γε πόλλʼ ἐνέθηκε,—χάρις δʼ ἀπελάμπετο πολλή,— 584 θαυμάσια, ζῴοισιν ἐοικότα φωνήεσσιν.
586
ἐξάγαγʼ, ἔνθα περ ἄλλοι ἔσαν θεοὶ ἠδʼ ἄνθρωποι,
590
ἐκ τῆς γὰρ γένος ἐστὶ γυναικῶν θηλυτεράων,
594
ὡς δʼ ὁπότʼ ἐν σμήνεσσι κατηρεφέεσσι μέλισσαι
763
ἥσυχος ἀνστρέφεται καὶ μείλιχος ἀνθρώποισι, ' None
sup>
26 of Helicon, and in those early day 27 Those daughters of Lord Zeus proclaimed to me: 28 “You who tend sheep, full of iniquity,
33
A sturdy laurel shoot, plucked from the ground,
101
And he stood out among them. Thus were they214 Beneath her feet, and men and gods all knew
570
The child of Ocean, and their progeny 571 Were mighty Atlas, fine Menoetiu
581
In holding up wide Heaven, forced to stand 582 Upon the borders of this earthly land 583 Before the clear-voiced daughters of the West, 584 A task assigned at wise Zeus’s behest.
586
With bonds he could not break apart, then he
590
So that the bird could once more take away
594
Released Prometheus – thus his wretchedne
763
To clashing, for that would have been the sound ' None
11. Homer, Iliad, 1.5, 2.485, 9.537 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Anonymous Works • Heroic Age, Works and Days • Hesiod, Works and Days • fragments, of Sophocles’ works

 Found in books: Bickerman and Tropper (2007), Studies in Jewish and Christian History, 873; Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 87; Finkelberg (2019), Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays, 175, 237; Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 580, 584

sup>
1.5 οἰωνοῖσί τε πᾶσι, Διὸς δʼ ἐτελείετο βουλή,
2.485
ὑμεῖς γὰρ θεαί ἐστε πάρεστέ τε ἴστέ τε πάντα,
9.537
ἢ λάθετʼ ἢ οὐκ ἐνόησεν· ἀάσατο δὲ μέγα θυμῷ.'' None
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1.5 The wrath sing, goddess, of Peleus' son, Achilles, that destructive wrath which brought countless woes upon the Achaeans, and sent forth to Hades many valiant souls of heroes, and made them themselves spoil for dogs and every bird; thus the plan of Zeus came to fulfillment, " "
1.5
from the time when first they parted in strife Atreus' son, king of men, and brilliant Achilles.Who then of the gods was it that brought these two together to contend? The son of Leto and Zeus; for he in anger against the king roused throughout the host an evil pestilence, and the people began to perish, " 2.485 for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths
9.537
whereas the other gods feasted on hecatombs, and it was to the daughter of great Zeus alone that he offered not, whether haply he forgat, or marked it not; and he was greatly blinded in heart. '" None
12. None, None, nan (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Hesiod, Works and Days • fragments, of Sophocles’ works • work

 Found in books: Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 9, 13; Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 604; Ker and Wessels (2020), The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn, 194, 204; Miller and Clay (2019), Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury, 72

13. Hebrew Bible, Ezekiel, 37 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Christ, Mighty works of • Tertullian, knowledge of Irenaeus' works

 Found in books: McDonough (2009), Christ as Creator: Origins of a New Testament Doctrine, 35, 43; Mcglothlin (2018), Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism, 99

sup>
37 ’And thou, son of man, take thee one stick, and write upon it: For Judah, and for the children of Israel his companions; then take another stick, and write upon it: For Joseph, the stick of Ephraim, and of all the house of Israel his companions;,And they shall dwell in the land that I have given unto Jacob My servant, wherein your fathers dwelt; and they shall dwell therein, they, and their children, and their children’s children, for ever; and David My servant shall be their prince for ever.,And the sticks whereon thou writest shall be in thy hand before their eyes.,And I beheld, and, lo, there were sinews upon them, and flesh came up, and skin covered them above; but there was no breath in them.,and I will make them one nation in the land, upon the mountains of Israel, and one king shall be king to them all; and they shall be no more two nations, neither shall they be divided into two kingdoms any more at all;,So I prophesied as He commanded me, and the breath came into them, and they lived, and stood up upon their feet, an exceeding great host.,Then said He unto me: ‘Prophesy unto the breath, prophesy, son of man, and say to the breath: Thus saith the Lord GOD: Come from the four winds, O breath, and breathe upon these slain, that they may live.’,And I will lay sinews upon you, and will bring up flesh upon you, and cover you with skin, and put breath in you, and ye shall live; and ye shall know that I am the LORD.’,And when the children of thy people shall speak unto thee, saying: Wilt thou not tell us what thou meanest by these?,and He caused me to pass by them round about, and, behold, there were very many in the open valley; and, lo, they were very dry.,Moreover I will make a covet of peace with them—it shall be an everlasting covet with them; and I will establish them, and multiply them, and will set My sanctuary in the midst of them for ever.,And My servant David shall be king over them, and they all shall have one shepherd; they shall also walk in Mine ordices, and observe My statutes, and do them.,Thus saith the Lord GOD unto these bones: Behold, I will cause breath to enter into you, and ye shall live.,And He said unto me: ‘Son of man, can these bones live?’ And I answered: ‘O Lord GOD, Thou knowest.’,Then He said unto me: ‘Prophesy over these bones, and say unto them: O ye dry bones, hear the word of the LORD:,And the nations shall know that I am the LORD that sanctify Israel, when My sanctuary shall be in the midst of them for ever.’,The hand of the LORD was upon me, and the LORD carried me out in a spirit, and set me down in the midst of the valley, and it was full of bones;,Then He said unto me: ‘Son of man, these bones are the whole house of Israel; behold, they say: Our bones are dried up, and our hope is lost; we are clean cut off.,neither shall they defile themselves any more with their idols, nor with their detestable things, nor with any of their transgressions; but I will save them out of all their dwelling-places, wherein they have sinned, and will cleanse them; so shall they be My people, and I will be their God.,So I prophesied as I was commanded; and as I prophesied, there was a noise, and behold a commotion, and the bones came together, bone to its bone.,And ye shall know that I am the LORD, when I have opened your graves, and caused you to come up out of your graves, O My people.,And the word of the LORD came unto me, saying:,and join them for thee one to another into one stick, that they may become one in thy hand.,And I will put My spirit in you, and ye shall live, and I will place you in your own land; and ye shall know that I the LORD have spoken, and performed it, saith the LORD.’,Therefore prophesy, and say unto them: Thus saith the Lord GOD: Behold, I will open your graves, and cause you to come up out of your graves, O My people; and I will bring you into the land of Israel.,say into them: Thus saith the Lord GOD: Behold, I will take the stick of Joseph, which is in the hand of Ephraim, and the tribes of Israel his companions; and I will put them unto him together with the stick of Judah, and make them one stick, and they shall be one in My hand.,My dwelling-place also shall be over them; and I will be their God, and they shall be My people.,And say unto them: Thus saith the Lord GOD: Behold, I will take the children of Israel from among the nations, whither they are gone, and will gather them on every side, and bring them into their own land;'' None
14. None, None, nan (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Demosthenes, works, Against Leptines • Hesiod, Works and days

 Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 305; Hesk (2000), Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens, 42

15. None, None, nan (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Hesiod, Works and Days • wool, worked for Athena by parthenoi Ktesios

 Found in books: Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 15; Steiner (2001), Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought, 118

16. Euripides, Medea, 1187, 1200 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Hippocrates, works,, Epidemics • work

 Found in books: Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 95; Ker and Wessels (2020), The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn, 195

sup>
1187 θαυμαστὸν ἵει νᾶμα παμφάγου πυρός,1200 σάρκες δ' ἀπ' ὀστέων ὥστε πεύκινον δάκρυ" '" None
sup>
1187 for against her a twofold anguish was warring. The chaplet of gold about her head was sending forth a wondrous stream of ravening flame, while the fine raiment, thy children’s gift, was preying on the hapless maiden’s fair white flesh;1200 and from her bones the flesh kept peeling off beneath the gnawing of those secret drugs, e’en as when the pine-tree weeps its tears of pitch, a fearsome sight to see. And all were afraid to touch the corpse, for we were warned by what had chanced. Anon came her hapless father ' None
17. Herodotus, Histories, 1.14, 7.171 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Diodorus Siculus,, admiration of for engineered works • Dionysius of Halicarnassus, rhetorical works • Herodotus,, admiration of for engineered works • Samos, Polycrates’ building works at • Sophocles, works,, Oedipus Rex

 Found in books: Bosak-Schroeder (2020), Other Natures: Environmental Encounters with Ancient Greek Ethnography, 36; Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 101; Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 58; Kirkland (2022), Herodotus and Imperial Greek Literature: Criticism, Imitation, Reception, 68

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1.14 τὴν μὲν δὴ τυραννίδα οὕτω ἔσχον οἱ Μερμνάδαι τοὺς Ἡρακλείδας ἀπελόμενοι, Γύγης δὲ τυραννεύσας ἀπέπεμψε ἀναθήματα ἐς Δελφοὺς οὐκ ὀλίγα, ἀλλʼ ὅσα μὲν ἀργύρου ἀναθήματα, ἔστι οἱ πλεῖστα ἐν Δελφοῖσι, πάρεξ δὲ τοῦ ἀργύρου χρυσὸν ἄπλετον ἀνέθηκε ἄλλον τε καὶ τοῦ μάλιστα μνήμην ἄξιον ἔχειν ἐστί, κρητῆρες οἱ ἀριθμὸν ἓξ χρύσεοι ἀνακέαται. ἑστᾶσι δὲ οὗτοι ἐν τῷ Κορινθίων θησαυρῷ, σταθμὸν ἔχοντες τριήκοντα τάλαντα· ἀληθέι δὲ λόγῳ χρεωμένῳ οὐ Κορινθίων τοῦ δημοσίου ἐστὶ ὁ θησαυρός, ἀλλὰ Κυψέλου τοῦ Ἠετίωνος. οὗτος δὲ ὁ Γύγης πρῶτος βαρβάρων τῶν ἡμεῖς ἴδμεν ἐς Δελφοὺς ἀνέθηκε ἀναθήματα μετὰ Μίδην τὸν Γορδίεω Φρυγίης βασιλέα. ἀνέθηκε γὰρ δὴ καὶ Μίδης τὸν βασιλήιον θρόνον ἐς τὸν προκατίζων ἐδίκαζε, ἐόντα ἀξιοθέητον· κεῖται δὲ ὁ θρόνος οὗτος ἔνθα περ οἱ τοῦ Γύγεω κρητῆρες. ὁ δὲ χρυσός οὗτος καὶ ὁ ἄργυρος τὸν ὁ Γύγης ἀνέθηκε, ὑπὸ Δελφῶν καλέεται Γυγάδας ἐπὶ τοῦ ἀναθέντος ἐπωνυμίην.
7.171
ἀλλὰ τὰ μὲν κατὰ Ῥηγίνους τε καὶ Ταραντίνους τοῦ λόγου μοι παρενθήκη γέγονε· ἐς δὲ τὴν Κρήτην ἐρημωθεῖσαν, ὡς λέγουσι Πραίσιοι, ἐσοικίζεσθαι ἄλλους τε ἀνθρώπους καὶ μάλιστα Ἕλληνας, τρίτῃ δὲ γενεῇ μετὰ Μίνων τελευτήσαντα γενέσθαι τὰ Τρωικά, ἐν τοῖσι οὐ φλαυροτάτους φαίνεσθαι ἐόντας Κρῆτας τιμωροὺς Μενέλεῳ. ἀπὸ τούτων δέ σφι ἀπονοστήσασι ἐκ Τροίης λιμόν τε καὶ λοιμὸν γενέσθαι καὶ αὐτοῖσι καὶ τοῖσι προβάτοισι, ἔστε τὸ δεύτερον ἐρημωθείσης Κρήτης μετὰ τῶν ὑπολοίπων τρίτους αὐτὴν νῦν νέμεσθαι Κρῆτας. ἡ μὲν δὴ Πυθίη ὑπομνήσασα ταῦτα ἔσχε βουλομένους τιμωρέειν τοῖσι Ἕλλησι.'' None
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1.14 Thus the Mermnadae robbed the Heraclidae of the sovereignty and took it for themselves. Having gotten it, Gyges sent many offerings to Delphi : there are very many silver offerings of his there; and besides the silver, he dedicated a hoard of gold, among which six golden bowls are the offerings especially worthy of mention. ,These weigh thirty talents and stand in the treasury of the Corinthians; although in truth it is not the treasury of the Corinthian people but of Cypselus son of Eetion. This Gyges then was the first foreigner whom we know who placed offerings at Delphi after the king of Phrygia, Midas son of Gordias. ,For Midas too made an offering: namely, the royal seat on which he sat to give judgment, and a marvellous seat it is. It is set in the same place as the bowls of Gyges. This gold and the silver offered by Gyges is called by the Delphians “Gygian” after its dedicator.
1.14
Thus the Mermnadae robbed the Heraclidae of the sovereignty and took it for themselves. Having gotten it, Gyges sent many offerings to Delphi : there are very many silver offerings of his there; and besides the silver, he dedicated a hoard of gold, among which six golden bowls are the offerings especially worthy of mention. ,These weigh thirty talents and stand in the treasury of the Corinthians; although in truth it is not the treasury of the Corinthian people but of Cypselus son of Eetion. This Gyges then was the first foreigner whom we know who placed offerings at Delphi after the king of Phrygia, Midas son of Gordias. ,For Midas too made an offering: namely, the royal seat on which he sat to give judgment, and a marvellous seat it is. It is set in the same place as the bowls of Gyges. This gold and the silver offered by Gyges is called by the Delphians “Gygian” after its dedicator.
7.171
In relating the matter of the Rhegians and Tarentines, however, I digress from the main thread of my history. The Praesians say that when Crete was left desolate, it was populated especially by Greeks, among other peoples. Then, in the third generation after Minos, the events surrounding the Trojan War, in which the Cretans bore themselves as bravely as any in the cause of Menelaus, took place. ,After this, when they returned from Troy, they and their flocks and herds were afflicted by famine and pestilence, until Crete was once more left desolate. Then came a third influx of Cretans, and it is they who, with those that were left, now dwell there. It was this that the priestess bade them remember, and so prevented them from aiding the Greeks as they were previously inclined.
7.171
In relating the matter of the Rhegians and Tarentines, however, I digress from the main thread of my history. The Praesians say that when Crete was left desolate, it was populated especially by Greeks, among other peoples. Then, in the third generation after Minos, the events surrounding the Trojan War, in which the Cretans bore themselves as bravely as any in the cause of Menelaus, took place. ,After this, when they returned from Troy, they and their flocks and herds were afflicted by famine and pestilence, until Crete was once more left desolate. Then came a third influx of Cretans, and it is they who, with those that were left, now dwell there. It was this that the priestess bade them remember, and so prevented them from aiding the Greeks as they were previously inclined. '' None
18. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • virtues, philoponia (“hard work”) • wool, worked for Athena by parthenoi Herkeios

 Found in books: Henderson (2020), The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus, 71; Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 17

729c λέγοντά τι τῶν αἰσχρῶν, ὡς ὅπου ἀναισχυντοῦσι γέροντες, ἀνάγκη καὶ νέους ἐνταῦθα εἶναι ἀναιδεστάτους· παιδεία γὰρ νέων διαφέρουσά ἐστιν ἅμα καὶ αὐτῶν οὐ τὸ νουθετεῖν, ἀλλʼ ἅπερ ἂν ἄλλον νουθετῶν εἴποι τις, φαίνεσθαι ταῦτα αὐτὸν δρῶντα διὰ βίου. συγγένειαν δὲ καὶ ὁμογνίων θεῶν κοινωνίαν πᾶσαν ταὐτοῦ φύσιν αἵματος ἔχουσαν τιμῶν τις καὶ σεβόμενος, εὔνους ἂν γενεθλίους θεοὺς εἰς παίδων αὑτοῦ σπορὰν ἴσχοι κατὰ λόγον. καὶ μὴν τό γε φίλων καὶ ἑταίρων'' None729c for where the old are shameless, there inevitably will also the young be very impudent. The most effective way of training the young—as well as the older people themselves—is not by admonition, but by plainly practising throughout one’s own life the admonitions which one gives to others. By paying honor and reverence to his kinsfolk, and all who share in the worship of the tribal gods and are sprung from the same blood, a man will, in proportion to his piety, secure the goodwill of the gods of Birth to bless his own begetting of children. Moreover,'' None
19. Sophocles, Philoctetes, 72, 1326-1334, 1423-1433, 1437-1438 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Hippocrates, works,, Oath • Lysias, works, Funeral Speech • Sophocles, works, Philoctetes • Sophocles, works,, Philoctetes • fragments, of Sophocles’ works

 Found in books: Hesk (2000), Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens, 171, 192; Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 67, 68; Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 558, 588, 608

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72 And learn why your intercourse with him may be free from mistrust and danger, while mine cannot. You have sailed to Troy under no oath to any man, nor under any constraint. Neither did you have any part in the earlier expedition. I, however, can deny none of these things. Accordingly, if he
1326
And you remember these words and write them in your heart: you suffer this plague’s affliction in accordance with god-sent fate, because you came near to Chryse ’s guardian, the serpent who secretly watches over her home and guards her roofless sanctuary. Know also that you will never gain relief from this grave sickness,'1327 And you remember these words and write them in your heart: you suffer this plague’s affliction in accordance with god-sent fate, because you came near to Chryse ’s guardian, the serpent who secretly watches over her home and guards her roofless sanctuary. Know also that you will never gain relief from this grave sickness, 1330 as long as the sun still rises in the east and sets in the west, until of your own free will you come to the plains of Troy , find there the sons of Asclepius, our comrades, be relieved of this infection, and, with this bow’
1423
And for you, be sure, this fate is ordained, that through these toils of yours you will make your life far-famed. You shall go with this man to the Trojan city, where, first, you shall be healed of your cruel sickness, 1425 and then, chosen out as foremost among the warriors in prowess, with my bow you shall sever Paris , the author of these evils, from life. You shall sack Troy and shall receive from the army the spoils of supreme valor to carry home 1430 to the heights of your native Oeta for the delight of your father Poeas. And whatever spoils you receive from that army, from them carry to my pyre a thank-offering for my bow. And these counsels hold for you also, son of Achilles,
1437
for you have not the might to subdue the Trojan realm without him, nor he without you. Rather, like twin lions with the same quarry, each of you must guard the other’s life. For the healing of your sickness, I will send Asclepius to Troy , since it is doomed to fall a second time ' None
20. Sophocles, Women of Trachis, 770, 794 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Aeschylus, Works, Choephori • Euripides, works of • Euripides, works,, Bacchae • Euripides, works,, Hercules furens • Euripides, works,, Iphigenia in Tauris • Euripides, works,, Medea • Sophocles, works,, Ajax • Sophocles, works,, Trachinians

 Found in books: Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 71, 73; Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 764

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770 a convulsive, biting pain in his bones; and then the venom, like that of some deadly, cruel viper, began to devour him. At that he shouted for the ill-fated Lichas—who was in no way to blame for your crime—asking by what plots he had brought that robe. 794 throwing himself on the ground in his anguish and repeatedly shouting with howls of grief, as he dwelled on his ill-mated marriage with miserable you and his alliance with Oeneus, which, he said, he got for himself as the ruin of his life, then from out of the shrouding altar-smoke ' None
21. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • fragments, of Sophocles’ works • wool, worked for Athena by parthenoi Patroos • wool, worked for Athena by parthenoi Phratrios

 Found in books: Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 573; Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 22

22. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • goddesses, textile work • textile work, goddesses' • wool, worked for Athena by parthenoi and Dionysus • wool, worked for Athena by parthenoi festivals of • wool, worked for Athena by parthenoi private festivals of

 Found in books: Brule (2003), Women of Ancient Greece, 24; Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 284, 325

23. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Aristophanes, works, Acharnians • virtues, philoponia (“hard work”)

 Found in books: Henderson (2020), The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus, 67; Hesk (2000), Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens, 270

24. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Demosthenes, works, Against Leptines • wool, worked for Athena by parthenoi festivals of

 Found in books: Hesk (2000), Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens, 63; Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 275

25. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Hippocrates, works,, Prognostic • Hippocrates, works,, Regimen • Hippocrates, works,, Sacred Disease • Hippocratic writings, works Airs Waters Places

 Found in books: Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 108, 111; van der EIjk (2005), Medicine and Philosophy in Classical Antiquity: Doctors and Philosophers on Nature, Soul, Health and Disease, 56, 191

26. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Antisthenes, works and themes • Plato, works, Hippias Minor

 Found in books: Hesk (2000), Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens, 121; Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 326, 356

27. None, None, nan (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Epicurus’ surviving works • Hesiod, Works and Days • Julius Caesar, in Vergil’s works • Octavian, in Vergil’s works • Zeus, in Vergil’s works • cyclicality, in Vergil’s works • races, in Hesiod’s works • rebirth and renewal narratives, in Vergil’s works

 Found in books: Gee (2013), Aratus and the Astronomical Tradition, 49; Ker and Wessels (2020), The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn, 135; Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 84

28. None, None, nan (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • fragments, of Sophocles’ works • work

 Found in books: Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 575; Ker and Wessels (2020), The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn, 195

29. Anon., Jubilees, 23 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Jesus, work/acts/miracles of • authoritative works

 Found in books: Brooke et al. (2008), Past Renewals: Interpretative Authority, Renewed Revelation, and the Quest for Perfection in Jewish Antiquity, 113; Tellbe Wasserman and Nyman (2019), Healing and Exorcism in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity, 43

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23 And he placed two fingers of Jacob on his eyes, and he blessed the God of gods, and he covered his face ,and stretched out his feet and slept the sleep of eternity, and was gathered to his fathers.,And notwithstanding all this Jacob was lying in his bosom, and knew not that Abraham, his father\'s father, was dead.,And Jacob awoke from his sleep, and behold Abraham was cold as ice, and he said: "Father, father!"; but there was none that spake,,and he knew that he was dead. And he arose from his bosom and ran and told Rebecca, his mother;,and Rebecca went to Isaac in the night and told him;,and they went together, and Jacob with them, and a lamp was in his hand, and when they had gone in they found Abraham lying dead.,And Isaac fell on the face of his father, and wept and kissed him. And the voices were heard in the house of Abraham,and Ishmael his son arose, and went to Abraham his father, and wept over Abraham his father, he and all the house of Abraham, and they wept with a great weeping.,And his sons Isaac and Ishmael buried him in the double cave, near Sarah his wife,,and they wept for him forty days, all the men of his house, and Isaac and Ishmael, and all their sons, and all the sons of Keturah in their places, and the days of weeping for Abraham were ended.,And he lived three jubilees and four weeks of years, one hundred and seventy-five years, and completed the days of his life, being old and full of days.,For the days of the forefathers, of their life, were nineteen jubilees; and after the Flood they began to grow less than nineteen jubilees,,and to decrease in jubilees, and to grow old quickly, and to be full of their days by reason of manifold tribulation and the wickedness of their ways,,with the exception of Abraham.rFor Abraham was perfect in all his deeds with the Lord, and well-pleasing in righteousness all the days of his life;,and behold, he did not complete four jubilees in his life, when he had grown old by reason of the wickedness and was full of his days.,And all the generations which will arise from this time until the day of the great judgment will grow old quickly, before they complete two jubilees,,and their knowledge will forsake them by reason of their old age and all their knowledge will vanish away.,And in those days, if a man live a jubilee and a half of years, they will say regarding him: "He hath lived long,,and the greater part of his days are pain and sorrow and tribulation, and there is no peace:,For calamity followeth on calamity, and wound on wound, and tribulation on tribulation, and evil tidings on evil tidings, and illness on illness, and all evil judgments such as these, one with another,,illness and overthrow, and snow and frost and ice, and fever, and chills, and torpor, and famine, and death, and sword, and captivity, and all kinds of calamities and pains.",And all these will come on an evil generation, which transgresseth on the earth: their works are uncleanness and fornication, and pollution and abominations.,Then they will say: "The days of the forefathers were many (even), unto a thousand years, and were good; but, behold, the days of our life, if a man hath lived many, are three score years and ten, and, if he is strong, four score years, and those evil,and there is no peace in the days of this evil generation." ,And in that generation the sons will convict their fathers and their elders of sin and unrighteousness, and of the words of their mouth,and the great wickednesses which they perpetrate, and concerning their forsaking the covet which the Lord made between them and Him, that they should observe and do all His commandments and His ordices and all His laws, without departing either to the right hand or to the left.,For all have done evil, and every mouth speaketh iniquity and all their works are an uncleanness and an abomination, and all their ways are pollution, uncleanness and destruction.,Behold the earth will be destroyed on account of all their works, and there will be no seed of the vine, and no oil; for their works are altogether faithless,,and they will all perish together, beasts and cattle and birds, and all the fish of the sea, on account of the children of men.,And they will strive one with another, the young with the old, and the old with the young, the poor with the rich, and the lowly with the great, and the beggar with the prince,,on account of the law and the covet; for they have forgotten commandment, and covet, and feasts, and months, and Sabbaths, and jubilees, and all judgments. ,And they will stand (with bows and) swords and war to turn them back into the way; but they will not return until much blood hath been shed on the earth,,one by another.rAnd those who have escaped will not return from their wickedness to the way of righteousness,,but they will all exalt themselves to deceit and wealth, that they may each take all that is his neighbour\'s, and they will name the great name, but not in truth and not in righteousness,,and they will defile the holy of holies with their uncleanness and the corruption of their pollution.,And a great punishment will befall the deeds of this generation from the Lord, and He will give them over to the sword and to judgment and to captivity, and to be plundered and devoured.,And He will wake up against them the sinners of the Gentiles, who have neither mercy nor compassion, and who will respect the person of none, neither old nor young, nor any one, for they are more wicked and strong to do evil than all the children of men.,And they will use violence against Israel and transgression against Jacob, And much blood will be shed upon the earth, And there will be none to gather and none to bury.,In those days they will cry aloud, And call and pray that they may be saved from the hand of the sinners, the Gentiles; But none will be saved.,And the heads of the children will be white with grey hair, And a child of three weeks will appear old like a man of one hundred years, And their stature will be destroyed by tribulation and oppression.,And in those days the children will begin to study the laws, And to seek the commandments, And to return to the path of righteousness.,And the days will begin to grow many and increase amongst those children of men, Till their days draw nigh to one thousand years, And to a greater number of years than (before) was the number of the days.,And there will be no old man Nor one who is not satisfied with his days, For all will be (as) children and youths.rAnd all their days they will complete and live in peace and in joy,,And there will be no Satan nor any evil destroyer; For all their days will be days of blessing and healing,,And at that time the Lord will heal His servants, And they will rise up and see great peace, And drive out their adversaries.,And the righteous will see and be thankful, And rejoice with joy for ever and ever,,And will see all their judgments and all their curses on their enemies.,And their bones will rest in the earth, And their spirits will have much joy, And they will know that it is the Lord who executeth judgment, And showeth mercy to hundreds and thousands and to all that love Him.,And do thou, Moses, write down these words; for thus are they written, and they record (them) on the heavenly tables for a testimony for the generations for ever.'' None
30. Cicero, De Finibus, 5.87-5.88 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Heraclitus, evidence of works • [P.] Nigidius Figulus, works of • philosophical works, Apology

 Found in books: Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 47; Tsouni (2019), Antiochus and Peripatetic Ethics, 42; Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 216

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5.87 \xa0On this your cousin and\xa0I are agreed. Hence what we have to consider is this, can the systems of the philosophers give us happiness? They certainly profess to do so. Whether it not so, why did Plato travel through Egypt to learn arithmetic and astronomy from barbarian priests? Why did he later visit Archytas at Tarentum, or the other Pythagoreans, Echecrates, Timaeus and Arion, at Locri, intending to append to his picture of Socrates an account of the Pythagorean system and to extend his studies into those branches which Socrates repudiated? Why did Pythagoras himself scour Egypt and visit the Persian magi? why did he travel on foot through those vast barbarian lands and sail across those many seas? Why did Democritus do the same? It is related of Democritus (whether truly or falsely we are not concerned to inquire) that he deprived himself of eyesight; and it is certain that in order that his mind should be distracted as little as possible from reflection, he neglected his paternal estate and left his land uncultivated, engrossed in the search for what else but happiness? Even if he supposed happiness to consist in knowledge, still he designed that his study of natural philosophy should bring him cheerfulness of mind; since that is his conception of the Chief Good, which he entitles euthumia, or often athambia, that is freedom from alarm. <' "5.88 \xa0But what he said on this subject, however excellent, nevertheless lacks the finishing touches; for indeed about virtue he said very little, and that not clearly expressed. For it was later that these inquiries began to be pursued at Athens by Socrates, first in the city, and afterwards the study was transferred to the place where we now are; and no one doubted that all hope alike of right conduct and of happiness lay in virtue. Zeno having learnt this doctrine from our school proceeded to deal with 'the same matter in another manner,' as the common preamble to an indictment has it. You now approve of this procedure on his part. He, no doubt, can change the names of things and be acquitted of inconsistency, but we cannot! He denies that the life of Metellus was happier than that of Regulus, yet calls it 'preferable'; not more desirable, but 'more worthy of adoption'; and given the choice, that of Metellus is 'to be selected' and that of Regulus 'rejected.' Whereas the life he called 'preferable' and 'more worthy to be selected' I\xa0term happier, though I\xa0do not assign any the minutest fraction more value to that life than do the Stoics. <"' None
31. Cicero, On The Ends of Good And Evil, 5.87-5.88 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Heraclitus, evidence of works • [P.] Nigidius Figulus, works of • philosophical works, Apology

 Found in books: Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 47; Tsouni (2019), Antiochus and Peripatetic Ethics, 42; Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 216

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5.87 quare hoc hoc atque hoc Non. videndum est, possitne nobis hoc ratio philosophorum dare. pollicetur certe. nisi enim id faceret, cur Plato Aegyptum peragravit, ut a sacerdotibus barbaris numeros et caelestia acciperet? cur post Tarentum ad Archytam? cur ad reliquos Pythagoreos, Echecratem, Timaeum, Arionem, Locros, ut, cum Socratem expressisset, adiungeret Pythagoreorum disciplinam eaque, quae Socrates repudiabat, addisceret? cur ipse Pythagoras et Aegyptum lustravit et Persarum magos adiit? cur tantas regiones barbarorum pedibus obiit, tot maria transmisit? cur haec eadem Democritus? qui —vere falsone, quaerere mittimus quaerere mittimus Se. quereremus BER queremus V quae- rere nolumus C.F.W. Mue. —dicitur oculis se se oculis BE privasse; privavisse R certe, ut quam minime animus a cogitationibus abduceretur, patrimonium neglexit, agros deseruit incultos, quid quaerens aliud nisi vitam beatam? beatam vitam R quam si etiam in rerum cognitione ponebat, tamen ex illa investigatione naturae consequi volebat, bono ut esset animo. id enim ille id enim ille R ideo enim ille BE id ille V id est enim illi summum bonum; eu)qumi/an cet. coni. Mdv. summum bonum eu)qumi/an et saepe a)qambi/an appellat, id est animum terrore liberum.' "5.88 sed haec etsi praeclare, nondum tamen perpolita. pauca enim, neque ea ipsa enucleate, ab hoc ab hoc enucleate BE de virtute quidem dicta. post enim haec in hac urbe primum a Socrate quaeri coepta, deinde in hunc locum delata sunt, nec dubitatum, dubium R quin in virtute omnis ut bene, sic etiam beate vivendi spes poneretur. quae cum Zeno didicisset a nostris, ut in actionibus praescribi solet, ' de eadem re fecit alio modo '. hoc tu del. P. Man. nunc in illo probas. scilicet vocabulis rerum mutatis inconstantiae crimen ille effugit, nos effugere non possumus! ille Metelli vitam negat beatiorem quam Reguli, praeponendam tamen, nec magis expetendam, sed magis sumendam et, si optio esset, eligendam Metelli, Reguli reiciendam; ego, quam ille praeponendam et magis eligendam, beatiorem hanc appello nec ullo minimo minimo RV omnino BE momento plus ei vitae tribuo quam Stoici."' None
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5.87 \xa0On this your cousin and\xa0I are agreed. Hence what we have to consider is this, can the systems of the philosophers give us happiness? They certainly profess to do so. Whether it not so, why did Plato travel through Egypt to learn arithmetic and astronomy from barbarian priests? Why did he later visit Archytas at Tarentum, or the other Pythagoreans, Echecrates, Timaeus and Arion, at Locri, intending to append to his picture of Socrates an account of the Pythagorean system and to extend his studies into those branches which Socrates repudiated? Why did Pythagoras himself scour Egypt and visit the Persian magi? why did he travel on foot through those vast barbarian lands and sail across those many seas? Why did Democritus do the same? It is related of Democritus (whether truly or falsely we are not concerned to inquire) that he deprived himself of eyesight; and it is certain that in order that his mind should be distracted as little as possible from reflection, he neglected his paternal estate and left his land uncultivated, engrossed in the search for what else but happiness? Even if he supposed happiness to consist in knowledge, still he designed that his study of natural philosophy should bring him cheerfulness of mind; since that is his conception of the Chief Good, which he entitles euthumia, or often athambia, that is freedom from alarm. <' "5.88 \xa0But what he said on this subject, however excellent, nevertheless lacks the finishing touches; for indeed about virtue he said very little, and that not clearly expressed. For it was later that these inquiries began to be pursued at Athens by Socrates, first in the city, and afterwards the study was transferred to the place where we now are; and no one doubted that all hope alike of right conduct and of happiness lay in virtue. Zeno having learnt this doctrine from our school proceeded to deal with 'the same matter in another manner,' as the common preamble to an indictment has it. You now approve of this procedure on his part. He, no doubt, can change the names of things and be acquitted of inconsistency, but we cannot! He denies that the life of Metellus was happier than that of Regulus, yet calls it 'preferable'; not more desirable, but 'more worthy of adoption'; and given the choice, that of Metellus is 'to be selected' and that of Regulus 'rejected.' Whereas the life he called 'preferable' and 'more worthy to be selected' I\xa0term happier, though I\xa0do not assign any the minutest fraction more value to that life than do the Stoics. <"' None
32. Polybius, Histories, 6.53 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Augustus, building works • Hesiod, Works and Days

 Found in books: Bär et al (2022), Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome. 42; Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 49

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6.53 1. \xa0Whenever any illustrious man dies, he is carried at his funeral into the forum to the soâ\x80\x91called rostra, sometimes conspicuous in an upright posture and more rarely reclined.,2. \xa0Here with all the people standing round, a grown-up son, if he has left one who happens to be present, or if not some other relative mounts the rostra and discourses on the virtues and success­ful achievements of the dead.,3. \xa0As a consequence the multitude and not only those who had a part in these achievements, but those also who had none, when the facts are recalled to their minds and brought before their eyes, are moved to such sympathy that the loss seems to be not confined to the mourners, but a public one affecting the whole people.,4. \xa0Next after the interment and the performance of the usual ceremonies, they place the image of the departed in the most conspicuous position in the house, enclosed in a wooden shrine.,5. \xa0This image is a mask reproducing with remarkable fidelity both the features and complexion of the deceased.,6. \xa0On the occasion of public sacrifices they display these images, and decorate them with much care, and when any distinguished member of the family dies they take them to the funeral, putting them on men who seem to them to bear the closest resemblance to the original in stature and carriage.,7. \xa0These representatives wear togas, with a purple border if the deceased was a consul or praetor, whole purple if he was a censor, and embroidered with gold if he had celebrated a triumph or achieved anything similar.,8. \xa0They all ride in chariots preceded by the fasces, axes, and other insignia by which the different magistrates are wont to be accompanied according to the respective dignity of the offices of state held by each during his life;,9. \xa0and when they arrive at the rostra they all seat themselves in a row on ivory chairs. There could not easily be a more ennobling spectacle for a young man who aspires to fame and virtue.,10. \xa0For who would not be inspired by the sight of the images of men renowned for their excellence, all together and as if alive and breathing? What spectacle could be more glorious than this?6.53 \xa0Whenever any illustrious man dies, he is carried at his funeral into the forum to the soâ\x80\x91called rostra, sometimes conspicuous in an upright posture and more rarely reclined. <,\xa0Here with all the people standing round, a grown-up son, if he has left one who happens to be present, or if not some other relative mounts the rostra and discourses on the virtues and success­ful achievements of the dead. <,\xa0As a consequence the multitude and not only those who had a part in these achievements, but those also who had none, when the facts are recalled to their minds and brought before their eyes, are moved to such sympathy that the loss seems to be not confined to the mourners, but a public one affecting the whole people. <,\xa0Next after the interment and the performance of the usual ceremonies, they place the image of the departed in the most conspicuous position in the house, enclosed in a wooden shrine. <,\xa0This image is a mask reproducing with remarkable fidelity both the features and complexion of the deceased. <,\xa0On the occasion of public sacrifices they display these images, and decorate them with much care, and when any distinguished member of the family dies they take them to the funeral, putting them on men who seem to them to bear the closest resemblance to the original in stature and carriage. <,\xa0These representatives wear togas, with a purple border if the deceased was a consul or praetor, whole purple if he was a censor, and embroidered with gold if he had celebrated a triumph or achieved anything similar. <,\xa0They all ride in chariots preceded by the fasces, axes, and other insignia by which the different magistrates are wont to be accompanied according to the respective dignity of the offices of state held by each during his life; <,\xa0and when they arrive at the rostra they all seat themselves in a row on ivory chairs. There could not easily be a more ennobling spectacle for a young man who aspires to fame and virtue. <,\xa0For who would not be inspired by the sight of the images of men renowned for their excellence, all together and as if alive and breathing? What spectacle could be more glorious than this? < ' None
33. Septuagint, Wisdom of Solomon, 7.1-7.2 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Augustine’s Works, Persev. • Augustine’s Works, Praed. • Augustine’s Works, Simpl. • Methodius of Olympus, chronology of works

 Found in books: Mcglothlin (2018), Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism, 212; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 8

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7.1 I also am mortal, like all men,a descendant of the first-formed child of earth;and in the womb of a mother I was molded into flesh,
7.1
Make not Thy dwelling afar from us, O God; Lest they assail us that hate us without cause. 7.2 For Thou hast rejected them, O God; Let not their foot trample upon Thy holy inheritance. 7.2 within the period of ten months, compacted with blood,from the seed of a man and the pleasure of marriage.'' None
34. Ovid, Fasti, 5.23-5.24 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • allusion, to literary predecessors in Ovid’s works • exile (relegation), as context for creation of works • literary genre, Fasti as the “greater work”

 Found in books: Erker (2023), Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family, 24; Johnson (2008), Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses, 72, 135

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5.23 donec Honor placidoque decens Reverentia voltu 5.24 corpora legitimis inposuere toris.2'' None
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5.23 Until Honour, and proper Reverence, she 5.24 of the calm look, were united in a lawful bed.'' None
35. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.260-1.261 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Augustus, in Ovid’s works • Jupiter, in Ovid’s works • Seneca, oeuvre, poetic quotation in prose works • fire narratives, in Ovid’s works • flood narratives, in Ovid’s works • prophecies, in Ovid’s works

 Found in books: Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 105, 106; Volk and Williams (2006), Seeing Seneca Whole: Perspectives on Philosophy, Poetry and Politics, 3

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1.260 poena placet diversa, genus mortale sub undis 1.261 perdere et ex omni nimbos demittere caelo.'' None
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1.260 is safety theirs when I, your sovereign lord, 1.261 the Thunder-bolt Controller, am ensnared'' None
36. None, None, nan (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Augustus, building works • Myron, works on Capitoline

 Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 48, 95, 97; Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 235

37. None, None, nan (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Augustus, building works • hard work (labor, novoc,)

 Found in books: Cairns (1989), Virgil's Augustan Epic. 32; Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 329

38. None, None, nan (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Augustus, building works • Timarchides, works in Temple of Apollo Sosianus

 Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 48; Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 244

39. None, None, nan (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Augustus, building works • Epicureanism, in Cicero’s works • Epicureanism, in Lucretius’s works • fire narratives, in Lucretius’s works • prophecies, in Lucretius’s works

 Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 118, 264; Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 60, 64

40. None, None, nan (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Epicureanism, in Lucan’s works • Hesiod,, Works and Days • Lucan, his other works, Catachthonion • Lucan, his other works, Iliacon • Stoicism, in Lucan’s works • chaos, in Ovid’s works • creation narratives, in Ovid’s works • fire narratives, in Lucretius’s works • fire narratives, in Ovid’s works • flood narratives, in Lucan’s works • flood narratives, in Ovid’s works • races, in Ovid’s works • stars, in Lucan’s works

 Found in books: Joseph (2022), Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic, 16; Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 102, 177

41. Celsus, On Medicine, 8 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Diocles, works Affection, Cause, Treatment • Galen and Pseudo-Galen, works,, The Best Doctor is also a Philosopher • Hippocrates, works,, Nature of Man

 Found in books: Jouanna (2012), Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen, 282; van der EIjk (2005), Medicine and Philosophy in Classical Antiquity: Doctors and Philosophers on Nature, Soul, Health and Disease, 106

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8 <'' None
42. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 1.5, 18.12, 20.219-20.221, 20.267 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Agrippa II, and work on the temple • Domitian, and date and audience of Josephus’ works • Josephus, nature of works, compared to rabbinic literature • Pheroras (brother of Herod), and work on fortress Alexandrium • apologetic, Josephus’ works as • works • ‘works’ of Law

 Found in books: Despotis and Lohr (2022), Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions, 103; Edwards (2023), In the Court of the Gentiles: Narrative, Exemplarity, and Scriptural Adaptation in the Court-Tales of Flavius Josephus, 4; Noam (2018), Shifting Images of the Hasmoneans: Second Temple Legends and Their Reception in Josephus and Rabbinic Literature, 5, 8, 25; Tomson (2019), Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries. 24; Udoh (2006), To Caesar What Is Caesar's: Tribute, Taxes, and Imperial Administration in Early Roman Palestine 63 B.C.E to 70 B.C.E, 195; Westwood (2023), Moses among the Greek Lawgivers: Reading Josephus’ Antiquities through Plutarch’s Lives. 23

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1.5 ἀφείλετο δὲ καὶ τὸν ὄφιν τὴν φωνὴν ὀργισθεὶς ἐπὶ τῇ κακοηθείᾳ τῇ πρὸς τὸν ̓́Αδαμον καὶ ἰὸν ἐντίθησιν ὑπὸ τὴν γλῶτταν αὐτῷ πολέμιον ἀποδείξας ἀνθρώποις καὶ ὑποθέμενος κατὰ τῆς κεφαλῆς φέρειν τὰς πληγάς, ὡς ἐν ἐκείνῃ τοῦ τε κακοῦ τοῦ πρὸς ἀνθρώπους κειμένου καὶ τῆς τελευτῆς ῥᾴστης τοῖς ἀμυνομένοις ἐσομένης, ποδῶν τε αὐτὸν ἀποστερήσας σύρεσθαι κατὰ τῆς γῆς ἰλυσπώμενον ἐποίησε.' "
1.5
ταύτην δὲ τὴν ἐνεστῶσαν ἐγκεχείρισμαι πραγματείαν νομίζων ἅπασι φανεῖσθαι τοῖς ̔́Ελλησιν ἀξίαν σπουδῆς: μέλλει γὰρ περιέξειν ἅπασαν τὴν παρ' ἡμῖν ἀρχαιολογίαν καὶ διάταξιν τοῦ πολιτεύματος ἐκ τῶν ̔Εβραϊκῶν μεθηρμηνευμένην γραμμάτων." 18.12 Οἵ τε γὰρ Φαρισαῖοι τὴν δίαιταν ἐξευτελίζουσιν οὐδὲν ἐς τὸ μαλακώτερον ἐνδιδόντες, ὧν τε ὁ λόγος κρίνας παρέδωκεν ἀγαθῶν ἕπονται τῇ ἡγεμονίᾳ περιμάχητον ἡγούμενοι τὴν φυλακὴν ὧν ὑπαγορεύειν ἠθέλησεν. τιμῆς γε τοῖς ἡλικίᾳ προήκουσιν παραχωροῦσιν οὐδ' ἐπ' ἀντιλέξει τῶν εἰσηγηθέντων ταῦτα οἱ θράσει ἐπαιρόμενοι." 18.12 Οὐιτέλλιος δὲ παρασκευασάμενος ὡς εἰς πόλεμον τὸν πρὸς ̓Αρέταν δυσὶ τάγμασιν ὁπλιτῶν ὅσοι τε περὶ αὐτὰ ψιλοὶ καὶ ἱππεῖς συμμαχοῦντες ἐκ τῶν ὑπὸ ̔Ρωμαίοις βασιλειῶν ἀγόμενος, ἐπὶ τῆς Πέτρας ἠπείγετο καὶ ἔσχε Πτολεμαί̈δα.
20.219
̓́Ηδη δὲ τότε καὶ τὸ ἱερὸν ἐτετέλεστο. βλέπων οὖν ὁ δῆμος ἀργήσαντας τοὺς τεχνίτας ὑπὲρ μυρίους καὶ ὀκτακισχιλίους ὄντας καὶ μισθοφορίας ἐνδεεῖς ἐσομένους διὰ τὸ τὴν τροφὴν ἐκ τῆς κατὰ τὸ ἱερὸν ἐργασίας πορίζεσθαι,' "20.221 ἦν δὲ ἡ στοὰ τοῦ μὲν ἔξωθεν ἱεροῦ, κειμένη δ' ἐν φάραγγι βαθείᾳ τετρακοσίων πηχῶν τοὺς τοίχους ἔχουσα ἐκ λίθου τετραγώνου κατεσκεύαστο καὶ λευκοῦ πάνυ, τὸ μὲν μῆκος ἑκάστου λίθου πήχεις εἴκοσι, τὸ δὲ ὕψος ἕξ, ἔργον Σολόμωνος τοῦ βασιλέως πρώτου δειμαμένου τὸ σύμπαν ἱερόν." "
20.267
̓Επὶ τούτοις δὲ καταπαύσω τὴν ἀρχαιολογίαν βιβλίοις μὲν εἴκοσι περιειλημμένην, ἓξ δὲ μυριάσι στίχων, κἂν τὸ θεῖον ἐπιτρέπῃ κατὰ περιδρομὴν ὑπομνήσω πάλιν τοῦ τε πολέμου καὶ τῶν συμβεβηκότων ἡμῖν μέχρι τῆς νῦν ἐνεστώσης ἡμέρας, ἥτις ἐστὶν τρισκαιδεκάτου μὲν ἔτους τῆς Δομετιανοῦ Καίσαρος ἀρχῆς, ἐμοὶ δ' ἀπὸ γενέσεως πεντηκοστοῦ τε καὶ ἕκτου."" None
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1.5 2. Now I have undertaken the present work, as thinking it will appear to all the Greeks worthy of their study; for it will contain all our antiquities, and the constitution of our government, as interpreted out of the Hebrew Scriptures.
1.5
He also deprived the serpent of speech, out of indignation at his malicious disposition towards Adam. Besides this, he inserted poison under his tongue, and made him an enemy to men; and suggested to them, that they should direct their strokes against his head, that being the place wherein lay his mischievous designs towards men, and it being easiest to take vengeance on him, that way. And when he had deprived him of the use of his feet, he made him to go rolling all along, and dragging himself upon the ground.
18.12
3. Now, for the Pharisees, they live meanly, and despise delicacies in diet; and they follow the conduct of reason; and what that prescribes to them as good for them they do; and they think they ought earnestly to strive to observe reason’s dictates for practice. They also pay a respect to such as are in years; nor are they so bold as to contradict them in any thing which they have introduced;
18.12
3. So Vitellius prepared to make war with Aretas, having with him two legions of armed men; he also took with him all those of light armature, and of the horsemen which belonged to them, and were drawn out of those kingdoms which were under the Romans, and made haste for Petra, and came to Ptolemais.
20.219
7. And now it was that the temple was finished. So when the people saw that the workmen were unemployed, who were above eighteen thousand and that they, receiving no wages, were in want because they had earned their bread by their labors about the temple; 20.220 1. Upon the death of king Agrippa, which we have related in the foregoing book, Claudius Caesar sent Cassius Longinus as successor to Marcus, out of regard to the memory of king Agrippa, who had often desired of him by letters, while he was alive, that he would not suffer Marcus to be any longer president of Syria.,But Fadus, as soon as he was come procurator into Judea, found quarrelsome doings between the Jews that dwelt in Perea, and the people of Philadelphia, about their borders, at a village called Mia, that was filled with men of a warlike temper; for the Jews of Perea had taken up arms without the consent of their principal men, and had destroyed many of the Philadelphians.,When Fadus was informed of this procedure, it provoked him very much that they had not left the determination of the matter to him, if they thought that the Philadelphians had done them any wrong, but had rashly taken up arms against them.,So he seized upon three of their principal men, who were also the causes of this sedition, and ordered them to be bound, and afterwards had one of them slain, whose name was Hannibal; and he banished the other two, Areram and Eleazar.,Tholomy also, the arch robber, was, after some time, brought to him bound, and slain, but not till he had done a world of mischief to Idumea and the Arabians. And indeed, from that time, Judea was cleared of robberies by the care and providence of Fadus.,He also at this time sent for the high priests and the principal citizens of Jerusalem, and this at the command of the emperor, and admonished them that they should lay up the long garment and the sacred vestment, which it is customary for nobody but the high priest to wear, in the tower of Antonia, that it might be under the power of the Romans, as it had been formerly.,Now the Jews durst not contradict what he had said, but desired Fadus, however, and Longinus, (which last was come to Jerusalem, and had brought a great army with him, out of a fear that the rigid injunctions of Fadus should force the Jews to rebel,) that they might, in the first place, have leave to send ambassadors to Caesar, to petition him that they may have the holy vestments under their own power; and that, in the next place, they would tarry till they knew what answer Claudius would give to that their request.,So they replied, that they would give them leave to send their ambassadors, provided they would give them their sons as pledges for their peaceable behavior. And when they had agreed so to do, and had given them the pledges they desired, the ambassadors were sent accordingly.,But when, upon their coming to Rome, Agrippa, junior, the son of the deceased, understood the reason why they came, (for he dwelt with Claudius Caesar, as we said before,) he besought Caesar to grant the Jews their request about the holy vestments, and to send a message to Fadus accordingly.,2. Hereupon Claudius called for the ambassadors; and told them that he granted their request; and bade them to return their thanks to Agrippa for this favor, which had been bestowed on them upon his entreaty. And besides these answers of his, he sent the following letter by them:,“Claudius Caesar Germanicus, tribune of the people the fifth time, and designed consul the fourth time, and imperator the tenth time, the father of his country, to the magistrates, senate, and people, and the whole nation of the Jews, sendeth greeting.,Upon the presentation of your ambassadors to me by Agrippa, my friend, whom I have brought up, and have now with me, and who is a person of very great piety, who are come to give me thanks for the care I have taken of your nation, and to entreat me, in an earnest and obliging manner, that they may have the holy vestments, with the crown belonging to them, under their power,—I grant their request, as that excellent person Vitellius, who is very dear to me, had done before me.,And I have complied with your desire, in the first place, out of regard to that piety which I profess, and because I would have every one worship God according to the laws of their own country; and this I do also because I shall hereby highly gratify king Herod, and Agrippa, junior, whose sacred regards to me, and earnest good-will to you, I am well acquainted with, and with whom I have the greatest friendship, and whom I highly esteem, and look on as persons of the best character.,Now I have written about these affairs to Cuspius Fadus, my procurator. The names of those that brought me your letter are Cornelius, the son of Cero, Trypho, the son of Theudio, Dorotheus, the son of Nathaniel, and John, the son of Jotre. This letter is dated before the fourth of the calends of July, when Rufus and Pompeius Sylvanus are consuls.”,3. Herod also, the brother of the deceased Agrippa, who was then possessed of the royal authority over Chalcis, petitioned Claudius Caesar for the authority over the temple, and the money of the sacred treasure, and the choice of the high priests, and obtained all that he petitioned for.,So that after that time this authority continued among all his descendants till the end of the war. Accordingly, Herod removed the last high priest, called Cantheras, and bestowed that dignity on his successor Joseph, the son of Camus.,1. Now there arose a quarrel between the Samaritans and the Jews on the occasion following: It was the custom of the Galileans, when they came to the holy city at the festivals, to take their journeys through the country of the Samaritans; and at this time there lay, in the road they took, a village that was called Ginea, which was situated in the limits of Samaria and the great plain, where certain persons thereto belonging fought with the Galileans, and killed a great many of them.,But when the principal of the Galileans were informed of what had been done, they came to Cumanus, and desired him to avenge the murder of those that were killed; but he was induced by the Samaritans, with money, to do nothing in the matter;,upon which the Galileans were much displeased, and persuaded the multitude of the Jews to betake themselves to arms, and to regain their liberty, saying that slavery was in itself a bitter thing, but that when it was joined with direct injuries, it was perfectly intolerable,,And when their principal men endeavored to pacify them, and promised to endeavor to persuade Cureanus to avenge those that were killed, they would not hearken to them, but took their weapons, and entreated the assistance of Eleazar, the son of Dineus, a robber, who had many years made his abode in the mountains, with which assistance they plundered many villages of the Samaritans.,When Cumanus heard of this action of theirs, he took the band of Sebaste, with four regiments of footmen, and armed the Samaritans, and marched out against the Jews, and caught them, and slew many of them, and took a great number of them alive;,whereupon those that were the most eminent persons at Jerusalem, and that both in regard to the respect that was paid them, and the families they were of, as soon as they saw to what a height things were gone, put on sackcloth, and heaped ashes upon their heads, and by all possible means besought the seditious, and persuaded them that they would set before their eyes the utter subversion of their country, the conflagration of their temple, and the slavery of themselves, their wives, and children, which would be the consequences of what they were doing; and would alter their minds, would cast away their weapons, and for the future be quiet, and return to their own homes. These persuasions of theirs prevailed upon them.,So the people dispersed themselves, and the robbers went away again to their places of strength; and after this time all Judea was overrun with robberies.,2. But the principal of the Samaritans went to Ummidius Quadratus, the president of Syria, who at that time was at Tyre, and accused the Jews of setting their villages on fire, and plundering them;,and said withal, that they were not so much displeased at what they had suffered, as they were at the contempt thereby shown to the Romans; while if they had received any injury, they ought to have made them the judges of what had been done, and not presently to make such devastation, as if they had not the Romans for their governors;,on which account they came to him, in order to obtain that vengeance they wanted. This was the accusation which the Samaritans brought against the Jews. But the Jews affirmed that the Samaritans were the authors of this tumult and fighting, and that, in the first place, Cumanus had been corrupted by their gifts, and passed over the murder of those that were slain in silence;—,which allegations when Quadratus heard, he put off the hearing of the cause, and promised that he would give sentence when he should come into Judea, and should have a more exact knowledge of the truth of that matter.,So these men went away without success. Yet was it not long ere Quadratus came to Samaria, where, upon hearing the cause, he supposed that the Samaritans were the authors of that disturbance. But when he was informed that certain of the Jews were making innovations, he ordered those to be crucified whom Cumanus had taken captives.,From whence he came to a certain village called Lydda, which was not less than a city in largeness, and there heard the Samaritan cause a second time before his tribunal, and there learned from a certain Samaritan that one of the chief of the Jews, whose name was Dortus, and some other innovators with him, four in number, persuaded the multitude to a revolt from the Romans;,whom Quadratus ordered to be put to death: but still he sent away Aias the high priest, and Aus the commander of the temple, in bonds to Rome, to give an account of what they had done to Claudius Caesar.,He also ordered the principal men, both of the Samaritans and of the Jews, as also Cumanus the procurator, and Ceier the tribune, to go to Italy to the emperor, that he might hear their cause, and determine their differences one with another.,But he came again to the city of Jerusalem, out of his fear that the multitude of the Jews should attempt some innovations; but he found the city in a peaceable state, and celebrating one of the usual festivals of their country to God. So he believed that they would not attempt any innovations, and left them at the celebration of the festival, and returned to Antioch.,3. Now Cumanus, and the principal of the Samaritans, who were sent to Rome, had a day appointed them by the emperor whereon they were to have pleaded their cause about the quarrels they had one with another.,But now Caesar’s freed-men and his friends were very zealous on the behalf of Cumanus and the Samaritans; and they had prevailed over the Jews, unless Agrippa, junior, who was then at Rome, had seen the principal of the Jews hard set, and had earnestly entreated Agrippina, the emperor’s wife, to persuade her husband to hear the cause, so as was agreeable to his justice, and to condemn those to be punished who were really the authors of this revolt from the Roman government:—,whereupon Claudius was so well disposed beforehand, that when he had heard the cause, and found that the Samaritans had been the ringleaders in those mischievous doings, he gave order that those who came up to him should be slain, and that Cureanus should be banished. He also gave order that Celer the tribune should be carried back to Jerusalem, and should be drawn through the city in the sight of all the people, and then should be slain.,1. So Claudius sent Felix, the brother of Pallas, to take care of the affairs of Judea;,and when he had already completed the twelfth year of his reign, he bestowed upon Agrippa the tetrarchy of Philip and Batanea, and added thereto Trachonites, with Abila; which last had been the tetrarchy of Lysanias; but he took from him Chalcis, when he had been governor thereof four years.,And when Agrippa had received these countries as the gift of Caesar, he gave his sister Drusilla in marriage to Azizus, king of Emesa, upon his consent to be circumcised; for Epiphanes, the son of king Antiochus, had refused to marry her, because, after he had promised her father formerly to come over to the Jewish religion, he would not now perform that promise.,He also gave Mariamne in marriage to Archelaus, the son of Helcias, to whom she had formerly been betrothed by Agrippa her father; from which marriage was derived a daughter, whose name was Bernice.,2. But for the marriage of Drusilla with Azizus, it was in no long time afterward dissolved upon the following occasion:,While Felix was procurator of Judea, he saw this Drusilla, and fell in love with her; for she did indeed exceed all other women in beauty; and he sent to her a person whose name was Simon one of his friends; a Jew he was, and by birth a Cypriot, and one who pretended to be a magician, and endeavored to persuade her to forsake her present husband, and marry him; and promised, that if she would not refuse him, he would make her a happy woman.,Accordingly she acted ill, and because she was desirous to avoid her sister Bernice’s envy, for she was very ill treated by her on account of her beauty, was prevailed upon to transgress the laws of her forefathers, and to marry Felix; and when he had had a son by her, he named him Agrippa.,But after what manner that young man, with his wife, perished at the conflagration of the mountain Vesuvius, in the days of Titus Caesar, shall be related hereafter.,3. But as for Bernice, she lived a widow a long while after the death of Herod king of Chalcis, who was both her husband and her uncle; but when the report went that she had criminal conversation with her brother, Agrippa, junior, she persuaded Poleme, who was king of Cilicia, to be circumcised, and to marry her, as supposing that by this means she should prove those calumnies upon her to be false;,and Poleme was prevailed upon, and that chiefly on account of her riches. Yet did not this matrimony endure long; but Bernice left Poleme, and, as was said, with impure intentions. So he forsook at once this matrimony, and the Jewish religion;,and, at the same time, Mariamne put away Archelaus, and was married to Demetrius, the principal man among the Alexandrian Jews, both for his family and his wealth; and indeed he was then their alabarch. So she named her son whom she had by him Agrippinus. But of all these particulars we shall hereafter treat more exactly.,1. Now Claudius Caesar died when he had reigned thirteen years, eight months, and twenty days; and a report went about that he was poisoned by his wife Agrippina. Her father was Germanicus, the brother of Caesar. Her husband was Domitius Aenobarbus, one of the most illustrious persons that was in the city of Rome;,after whose death, and her long continuance in widowhood, Claudius took her to wife. She brought along with her a son, Domtitus, of the same name with his father. He had before this slain his wife Messalina, out of jealousy, by whom he had his children Britannicus and Octavia;,their eldest sister was Antonia, whom he had by Pelina his first wife. He also married Octavia to Nero; for that was the name that Caesar gave him afterward, upon his adopting him for his son.,2. But now Agrippina was afraid, lest, when Britannicus should come to man’s estate, he should succeed his father in the government, and desired to seize upon the principality beforehand for her own son Nero; upon which the report went that she thence compassed the death of Claudius.,Accordingly, she sent Burrhus, the general of the army, immediately, and with him the tribunes, and such also of the freed-men as were of the greatest authority, to bring Nero away into the camp, and to salute him emperor.,And when Nero had thus obtained the government, he got Britannicus to be so poisoned, that the multitude should not perceive it; although he publicly put his own mother to death not long afterward, making her this requital, not only for being born of her, but for bringing it so about by her contrivances that he obtained the Roman empire. He also slew Octavia his own wife, and many other illustrious persons, under this pretense, that they plotted against him.,3. But I omit any further discourse about these affairs; for there have been a great many who have composed the history of Nero; some of which have departed from the truth of facts out of favor, as having received benefits from him; while others, out of hatred to him, and the great ill-will which they bare him, have so impudently raved against him with their lies, that they justly deserve to be condemned.,Nor do I wonder at such as have told lies of Nero, since they have not in their writings preserved the truth of history as to those facts that were earlier than his time, even when the actors could have no way incurred their hatred, since those writers lived a long time after them.,But as to those that have no regard to truth, they may write as they please; for in that they take delight:,but as to ourselves, who have made truth our direct aim, we shall briefly touch upon what only belongs remotely to this undertaking, but shall relate what hath happened to us Jews with great accuracy, and shall not grudge our pains in giving an account both of the calamities we have suffered, and of the crimes we have been guilty of. I will now therefore return to the relation of our own affairs.,4. For in the first year of the reign of Nero, upon the death of Azizus, king of Emesa, Soemus, his brother, succeeded in his kingdom, and Aristobulus, the son of Herod, king of Chalcis, was intrusted by Nero with the government of the Lesser Armenia.,Caesar also bestowed on Agrippa a certain part of Galilee, Tiberias, and Tarichae, and ordered them to submit to his jurisdiction. He gave him also Julias, a city of Perea, with fourteen villages that lay about it.,5. Now as for the affairs of the Jews, they grew worse and worse continually, for the country was again filled with robbers and impostors, who deluded the multitude.,Yet did Felix catch and put to death many of those impostors every day, together with the robbers. He also caught Eleazar, the son of Dineas, who had gotten together a company of robbers; and this he did by treachery; for he gave him assurance that he should suffer no harm, and thereby persuaded him to come to him; but when he came, he bound him, and sent him to Rome.,Felix also bore an ill-will to Jonathan, the high priest, because he frequently gave him admonitions about governing the Jewish affairs better than he did, lest he should himself have complaints made of him by the multitude, since he it was who had desired Caesar to send him as procurator of Judea. So Felix contrived a method whereby he might get rid of him, now he was become so continually troublesome to him; for such continual admonitions are grievous to those who are disposed to act unjustly.,Wherefore Felix persuaded one of Jonathan’s most faithful friends, a citizen of Jerusalem, whose name was Doras, to bring the robbers upon Jonathan, in order to kill him; and this he did by promising to give him a great deal of money for so doing. Doras complied with the proposal, and contrived matters so, that the robbers might murder him after the following manner:,Certain of those robbers went up to the city, as if they were going to worship God, while they had daggers under their garments, and by thus mingling themselves among the multitude they slew Jonathan,,and as this murder was never avenged, the robbers went up with the greatest security at the festivals after this time; and having weapons concealed in like manner as before, and mingling themselves among the multitude, they slew certain of their own enemies, and were subservient to other men for money; and slew others, not only in remote parts of the city, but in the temple itself also; for they had the boldness to murder men there, without thinking of the impiety of which they were guilty.,And this seems to me to have been the reason why God, out of his hatred of these men’s wickedness, rejected our city; and as for the temple, he no longer esteemed it sufficiently pure for him to inhabit therein, but brought the Romans upon us, and threw a fire upon the city to purge it; and brought upon us, our wives, and children, slavery, as desirous to make us wiser by our calamities.,6. These works, that were done by the robbers, filled the city with all sorts of impiety. And now these impostors and deceivers persuaded the multitude to follow them into the wilderness,,and pretended that they would exhibit manifest wonders and signs, that should be performed by the providence of God. And many that were prevailed on by them suffered the punishments of their folly; for Felix brought them back, and then punished them.,Moreover, there came out of Egypt about this time to Jerusalem one that said he was a prophet, and advised the multitude of the common people to go along with him to the Mount of Olives, as it was called, which lay over against the city, and at the distance of five furlongs.,He said further, that he would show them from hence how, at his command, the walls of Jerusalem would fall down; and he promised them that he would procure them an entrance into the city through those walls, when they were fallen down.,Now when Felix was informed of these things, he ordered his soldiers to take their weapons, and came against them with a great number of horsemen and footmen from Jerusalem, and attacked the Egyptian and the people that were with him. He also slew four hundred of them, and took two hundred alive.,But the Egyptian himself escaped out of the fight, but did not appear any more. And again the robbers stirred up the people to make war with the Romans, and said they ought not to obey them at all; and when any persons would not comply with them, they set fire to their villages, and plundered them.,7. And now it was that a great sedition arose between the Jews that inhabited Caesarea, and the Syrians who dwelt there also, concerning their equal right to the privileges belonging to citizens; for the Jews claimed the pre-eminence, because Herod their king was the builder of Caesarea, and because he was by birth a Jew. Now the Syrians did not deny what was alleged about Herod; but they said that Caesarea was formerly called Strato’s Tower, and that then there was not one Jewish inhabitant.,When the presidents of that country heard of these disorders, they caught the authors of them on both sides, and tormented them with stripes, and by that means put a stop to the disturbance for a time.,But the Jewish citizens depending on their wealth, and on that account despising the Syrians, reproached them again, and hoped to provoke them by such reproaches.,However, the Syrians, though they were inferior in wealth, yet valuing themselves highly on this account, that the greatest part of the Roman soldiers that were there were either of Caesarea or Sebaste, they also for some time used reproachful language to the Jews also; and thus it was, till at length they came to throwing stones at one another, and several were wounded, and fell on both sides, though still the Jews were the conquerors.,But when Felix saw that this quarrel was become a kind of war, he came upon them on the sudden, and desired the Jews to desist; and when they refused so to do, he armed his soldiers, and sent them out upon them, and slew many of them, and took more of them alive, and permitted his soldiers to plunder some of the houses of the citizens, which were full of riches.,Now those Jews that were more moderate, and of principal dignity among them, were afraid of themselves, and desired of Felix that he would sound a retreat to his soldiers, and spare them for the future, and afford them room for repentance for what they had done; and Felix was prevailed upon to do so.,8. About this time king Agrippa gave the high priesthood to Ismael, who was the son of Fabi.,And now arose a sedition between the high priests and the principal men of the multitude of Jerusalem; each of which got them a company of the boldest sort of men, and of those that loved innovations about them, and became leaders to them; and when they struggled together, they did it by casting reproachful words against one another, and by throwing stones also. And there was nobody to reprove them; but these disorders were done after a licentious manner in the city, as if it had no government over it.,And such was the impudence and boldness that had seized on the high priests, that they had the hardiness to send their servants into the threshing-floors, to take away those tithes that were due to the priests, insomuch that it so fell out that the poorest sort of the priests died for want. To this degree did the violence of the seditious prevail over all right and justice.,9. Now when Porcius Festus was sent as successor to Felix by Nero, the principal of the Jewish inhabitants of Caesarea went up to Rome to accuse Felix; and he had certainly been brought to punishment, unless Nero had yielded to the importunate solicitations of his brother Pallas, who was at that time had in the greatest honor by him.,Two of the principal Syrians in Caesarea persuaded Burrhus, who was Nero’s tutor, and secretary for his Greek epistles, by giving him a great sum of money, to disannul that equality of the Jewish privileges of citizens which they hitherto enjoyed.,So Burrhus, by his solicitations, obtained leave of the emperor that an epistle should be written to that purpose. This epistle became the occasion of the following miseries that befell our nation; for when the Jews of Caesarea were informed of the contents of this epistle to the Syrians, they were more disorderly than before, till a war was kindled.,10. Upon Festus’s coming into Judea, it happened that Judea was afflicted by the robbers, while all the villages were set on fire, and plundered by them.,And then it was that the sicarii, as they were called, who were robbers, grew numerous. They made use of small swords, not much different in length from the Persian acinacae, but somewhat crooked, and like the Roman sicae, or sickles, as they were called; and from these weapons these robbers got their denomination; and with these weapons they slew a great many;,for they mingled themselves among the multitude at their festivals, when they were come up in crowds from all parts to the city to worship God, as we said before, and easily slew those that they had a mind to slay. They also came frequently upon the villages belonging to their enemies, with their weapons, and plundered them, and set them on fire.,So Festus sent forces, both horsemen and footmen, to fall upon those that had been seduced by a certain impostor, who promised them deliverance and freedom from the miseries they were under, if they would but follow him as far as the wilderness. Accordingly, those forces that were sent destroyed both him that had deluded them, and those that were his followers also.,11. About the same time king Agrippa built himself a very large dining-room in the royal palace at Jerusalem, near to the portico.,Now this palace had been erected of old by the children of Asamoneus and was situate upon an elevation, and afforded a most delightful prospect to those that had a mind to take a view of the city, which prospect was desired by the king; and there he could lie down, and eat, and thence observe what was done in the temple;,which thing, when the chief men of Jerusalem saw they were very much displeased at it; for it was not agreeable to the institutions of our country or law that what was done in the temple should be viewed by others, especially what belonged to the sacrifices. They therefore erected a wall upon the uppermost building which belonged to the inner court of the temple towards the west,,which wall when it was built, did not only intercept the prospect of the dining-room in the palace, but also of the western cloisters that belonged to the outer court of the temple also, where it was that the Romans kept guards for the temple at the festivals.,At these doings both king Agrippa, and principally Festus the procurator, were much displeased; and Festus ordered them to pull the wall down again: but the Jews petitioned him to give them leave to send an embassage about this matter to Nero; for they said they could not endure to live if any part of the temple should be demolished;,and when Festus had given them leave so to do, they sent ten of their principal men to Nero, as also Ismael the high priest, and Helcias, the keeper of the sacred treasure.,And when Nero had heard what they had to say, he not only forgave them what they had already done, but also gave them leave to let the wall they had built stand. This was granted them in order to gratify Poppea, Nero’s wife, who was a religious woman, and had requested these favors of Nero, and who gave order to the ten ambassadors to go their way home; but retained Helcias and Ismael as hostages with herself.,As soon as the king heard this news, he gave the high priesthood to Joseph, who was called Cabi, the son of Simon, formerly high priest.,1. About this time it was that Helena, queen of Adiabene, and her son Izates, changed their course of life, and embraced the Jewish customs, and this on the occasion following:,Monobazus, the king of Adiabene, who had also the name of Bazeus, fell in love with his sister Helena, and took her to be his wife, and begat her with child. But as he was in bed with her one night, he laid his hand upon his wife’s belly, and fell asleep, and seemed to hear a voice, which bid him take his hand off his wife’s belly, and not hurt the infant that was therein, which, by God’s providence, would be safely born, and have a happy end.,This voice put him into disorder; so he awaked immediately, and told the story to his wife; and when his son was born, he called him Izates.,He had indeed Monobazus, his elder brother, by Helena also, as he had other sons by other wives besides. Yet did he openly place all his affections on this his only begotten son Izates,,which was the origin of that envy which his other brethren, by the same father, bore to him; while on this account they hated him more and more, and were all under great affliction that their father should prefer Izates before them.,Now although their father was very sensible of these their passions, yet did he forgive them, as not indulging those passions out of an ill disposition, but out of a desire each of them had to be beloved by their father. However, he sent Izates, with many presents, to Abennerig, the king of Charax-Spasini, and that out of the great dread he was in about him, lest he should come to some misfortune by the hatred his brethren bore him; and he committed his son’s preservation to him.,Upon which Abennerig gladly received the young man, and had a great affection for him, and married him to his own daughter, whose name was Samacha: he also bestowed a country upon him, from which he received large revenues.,2. But when Monobazus was grown old, and saw that he had but a little time to live, he had a mind to come to the sight of his son before he died. So he sent for him, and embraced him after the most affectionate manner, and bestowed on him the country called Carra;,it was a soil that bare amomum in great plenty: there are also in it the remains of that ark, wherein it is related that Noah escaped the deluge, and where they are still shown to such as are desirous to see them.,Accordingly, Izates abode in that country until his father’s death. But the very day that Monobazus died, queen Helena sent for all the grandees, and governors of the kingdom, and for those that had the armies committed to their command;,and when they were come, she made the following speech to them: “I believe you are not unacquainted that my husband was desirous Izates should succeed him in the government, and thought him worthy so to do. However, I wait your determination; for happy is he who receives a kingdom, not from a single person only, but from the willing suffrages of a great many.”,This she said, in order to try those that were invited, and to discover their sentiments. Upon the hearing of which, they first of all paid their homage to the queen, as their custom was, and then they said that they confirmed the king’s determination, and would submit to it; and they rejoiced that Izates’s father had preferred him before the rest of his brethren, as being agreeable to all their wishes:,but that they were desirous first of all to slay his brethren and kinsmen, that so the government might come securely to Izates; because if they were once destroyed, all that fear would be over which might arise from their hatred and envy to him.,Helena replied to this, that she returned them her thanks for their kindness to herself and to Izates; but desired that they would however defer the execution of this slaughter of Izates’s brethren till he should be there himself, and give his approbation to it.,So since these men had not prevailed with her, when they advised her to slay them, they exhorted her at least to keep them in bonds till he should come, and that for their own security; they also gave her counsel to set up some one whom she could put the greatest trust in, as a governor of the kingdom in the mean time.,So queen Helena complied with this counsel of theirs, and set up Monobazus, the eldest son, to be king, and put the diadem upon his head, and gave him his father’s ring, with its signet; as also the ornament which they call Sampser, and exhorted him to administer the affairs of the kingdom till his brother should come;,who came suddenly upon hearing that his father was dead, and succeeded his brother Monobazus, who resigned up the government to him.,3. Now, during the time Izates abode at Charax-Spasini, a certain Jewish merchant, whose name was Aias, got among the women that belonged to the king, and taught them to worship God according to the Jewish religion.,He, moreover, by their means, became known to Izates, and persuaded him, in like manner, to embrace that religion; he also, at the earnest entreaty of Izates, accompanied him when he was sent for by his father to come to Adiabene; it also happened that Helena, about the same time, was instructed by a certain other Jew and went over to them.,But when Izates had taken the kingdom, and was come to Adiabene, and there saw his brethren and other kinsmen in bonds, he was displeased at it;,and as he thought it an instance of impiety either to slay or imprison them, but still thought it a hazardous thing for to let them have their liberty, with the remembrance of the injuries that had been offered them, he sent some of them and their children for hostages to Rome, to Claudius Caesar, and sent the others to Artabanus, the king of Parthia, with the like intentions.,4. And when he perceived that his mother was highly pleased with the Jewish customs, he made haste to change, and to embrace them entirely; and as he supposed that he could not be thoroughly a Jew unless he were circumcised, he was ready to have it done.,But when his mother understood what he was about, she endeavored to hinder him from doing it, and said to him that this thing would bring him into danger; and that, as he was a king, he would thereby bring himself into great odium among his subjects, when they should understand that he was so fond of rites that were to them strange and foreign; and that they would never bear to be ruled over by a Jew.,This it was that she said to him, and for the present persuaded him to forbear. And when he had related what she had said to Aias, he confirmed what his mother had said; and when he had also threatened to leave him, unless he complied with him, he went away from him,,and said that he was afraid lest such an action being once become public to all, he should himself be in danger of punishment for having been the occasion of it, and having been the king’s instructor in actions that were of ill reputation; and he said that he might worship God without being circumcised, even though he did resolve to follow the Jewish law entirely, which worship of God was of a superior nature to circumcision.,He added, that God would forgive him, though he did not perform the operation, while it was omitted out of necessity, and for fear of his subjects. So the king at that time complied with these persuasions of Aias.,But afterwards, as he had not quite left off his desire of doing this thing, a certain other Jew that came out of Galilee, whose name was Eleazar, and who was esteemed very skillful in the learning of his country, persuaded him to do the thing;,for as he entered into his palace to salute him, and found him reading the law of Moses, he said to him, “Thou dost not consider, O king! that thou unjustly breakest the principal of those laws, and art injurious to God himself, by omitting to be circumcised; for thou oughtest not only to read them, but chiefly to practice what they enjoin thee.,How long wilt thou continue uncircumcised? But if thou hast not yet read the law about circumcision, and dost not know how great impiety thou art guilty of by neglecting it, read it now.”,When the king had heard what he said, he delayed the thing no longer, but retired to another room, and sent for a surgeon, and did what he was commanded to do. He then sent for his mother, and Aias his tutor, and informed them that he had done the thing;,upon which they were presently struck with astonishment and fear, and that to a great degree, lest the thing should be openly discovered and censured, and the king should hazard the loss of his kingdom, while his subjects would not bear to be governed by a man who was so zealous in another religion; and lest they should themselves run some hazard, because they would be supposed the occasion of his so doing.,But it was God himself who hindered what they feared from taking effect; for he preserved both Izates himself and his sons when they fell into many dangers, and procured their deliverance when it seemed to be impossible, and demonstrated thereby that the fruit of piety does not perish as to those that have regard to him, and fix their faith upon him only. But these events we shall relate hereafter.,5. But as to Helena, the king’s mother, when she saw that the affairs of Izates’s kingdom were in peace, and that her son was a happy man, and admired among all men, and even among foreigners, by the means of God’s providence over him, she had a mind to go to the city of Jerusalem, in order to worship at that temple of God which was so very famous among all men, and to offer her thank-offerings there. So she desired her son to give her leave to go thither;,upon which he gave his consent to what she desired very willingly, and made great preparations for her dismission, and gave her a great deal of money, and she went down to the city Jerusalem, her son conducting her on her journey a great way.,Now her coming was of very great advantage to the people of Jerusalem; for whereas a famine did oppress them at that time, and many people died for want of what was necessary to procure food withal, queen Helena sent some of her servants to Alexandria with money to buy a great quantity of corn, and others of them to Cyprus, to bring a cargo of dried figs.,And as soon as they were come back, and had brought those provisions, which was done very quickly, she distributed food to those that were in want of it, and left a most excellent memorial behind her of this benefaction, which she bestowed on our whole nation.,And when her son Izates was informed of this famine, he sent great sums of money to the principal men in Jerusalem. However, what favors this queen and king conferred upon our city Jerusalem shall be further related hereafter.,1. And now Caesar, upon hearing the death of Festus, sent Albinus into Judea, as procurator. But the king deprived Joseph of the high priesthood, and bestowed the succession to that dignity on the son of Aus, who was also himself called Aus.,Now the report goes that this eldest Aus proved a most fortunate man; for he had five sons who had all performed the office of a high priest to God, and who had himself enjoyed that dignity a long time formerly, which had never happened to any other of our high priests.,But this younger Aus, who, as we have told you already, took the high priesthood, was a bold man in his temper, and very insolent; he was also of the sect of the Sadducees, who are very rigid in judging offenders, above all the rest of the Jews, as we have already observed;,when, therefore, Aus was of this disposition, he thought he had now a proper opportunity to exercise his authority. Festus was now dead, and Albinus was but upon the road; so he assembled the sanhedrim of judges, and brought before them the brother of Jesus, who was called Christ, whose name was James, and some others, or, some of his companions; and when he had formed an accusation against them as breakers of the law, he delivered them to be stoned:,but as for those who seemed the most equitable of the citizens, and such as were the most uneasy at the breach of the laws, they disliked what was done; they also sent to the king Agrippa, desiring him to send to Aus that he should act so no more, for that what he had already done was not to be justified;,nay, some of them went also to meet Albinus, as he was upon his journey from Alexandria, and informed him that it was not lawful for Aus to assemble a sanhedrim without his consent.,Whereupon Albinus complied with what they said, and wrote in anger to Aus, and threatened that he would bring him to punishment for what he had done; on which king Agrippa took the high priesthood from him, when he had ruled but three months, and made Jesus, the son of Damneus, high priest.,2. Now as soon as Albinus was come to the city of Jerusalem, he used all his endeavors and care that the country might be kept in peace, and this by destroying many of the Sicarii.,But as for the high priest, Aias he increased in glory every day, and this to a great degree, and had obtained the favor and esteem of the citizens in a signal manner; for he was a great hoarder up of money: he therefore cultivated the friendship of Albinus, and of the high priest Jesus, by making them presents;,he also had servants who were very wicked, who joined themselves to the boldest sort of the people, and went to the thrashing-floors, and took away the tithes that belonged to the priests by violence, and did not refrain from beating such as would not give these tithes to them.,So the other high priests acted in the like manner, as did those his servants, without any one being able to prohibit them; so that some of the priests, that of old were wont to be supported with those tithes, died for want of food.,3. But now the Sicarii went into the city by night, just before the festival, which was now at hand, and took the scribe belonging to the governor of the temple, whose name was Eleazar, who was the son of Aus Aias the high priest, and bound him, and carried him away with them;,after which they sent to Aias, and said that they would send the scribe to him, if he would persuade Albinus to release ten of those prisoners which he had caught of their party; so Aias was plainly forced to persuade Albinus, and gained his request of him.,This was the beginning of greater calamities; for the robbers perpetually contrived to catch some of Aias’s servants; and when they had taken them alive, they would not let them go, till they thereby recovered some of their own Sicarii. And as they were again become no small number, they grew bold, and were a great affliction to the whole country.,4. About this time it was that king Agrippa built Caesarea Philippi larger than it was before, and, in honor of Nero, named it Neronias. And when he had built a theater at Berytus, with vast expenses, he bestowed on them shows, to be exhibited every year, and spent therein many ten thousand drachmae;,he also gave the people a largess of corn, and distributed oil among them, and adorned the entire city with statues of his own donation, and with original images made by ancient hands; nay, he almost transferred all that was most ornamental in his own kingdom thither. This made him more than ordinarily hated by his subjects, because he took those things away that belonged to them to adorn a foreign city.,And now Jesus, the son of Gamaliel, became the successor of Jesus, the son of Damneus, in the high priesthood, which the king had taken from the other; on which account a sedition arose between the high priests, with regard to one another; for they got together bodies of the boldest sort of the people, and frequently came, from reproaches, to throwing of stones at each other. But Aias was too hard for the rest, by his riches, which enabled him to gain those that were most ready to receive.,Costobarus also, and Saulus, did themselves get together a multitude of wicked wretches, and this because they were of the royal family; and so they obtained favor among them, because of their kindred to Agrippa; but still they used violence with the people, and were very ready to plunder those that were weaker than themselves. And from that time it principally came to pass that our city was greatly disordered, and that all things grew worse and worse among us.,5. But when Albinus heard that Gessius Florus was coming to succeed him, he was desirous to appear to do somewhat that might be grateful to the people of Jerusalem; so he brought out all those prisoners who seemed to him to be the most plainly worthy of death, and ordered them to be put to death accordingly. But as to those who had been put into prison on some trifling occasions, he took money of them, and dismissed them; by which means the prisons were indeed emptied, but the country was filled with robbers.,6. Now as many of the Levites, which is a tribe of ours, as were singers of hymns, persuaded the king to assemble a sanhedrim, and to give them leave to wear linen garments, as well as the priests for they said that this would be a work worthy the times of his government, that he might have a memorial of such a novelty, as being his doing.,Nor did they fail of obtaining their desire; for the king, with the suffrages of those that came into the sanhedrim, granted the singers of hymns this privilege, that they might lay aside their former garments, and wear such a linen one as they desired;,and as a part of this tribe ministered in the temple, he also permitted them to learn those hymns as they had besought him for. Now all this was contrary to the laws of our country, which, whenever they have been transgressed, we have never been able to avoid the punishment of such transgressions.,7. And now it was that the temple was finished. So when the people saw that the workmen were unemployed, who were above eighteen thousand and that they, receiving no wages, were in want because they had earned their bread by their labors about the temple;,and while they were unwilling to keep by them the treasures that were there deposited, out of fear of their being carried away by the Romans; and while they had a regard to the making provision for the workmen; they had a mind to expend these treasures upon them; for if any one of them did but labor for a single hour, he received his pay immediately; so they persuaded him to rebuild the eastern cloisters.,These cloisters belonged to the outer court, and were situated in a deep valley, and had walls that reached four hundred cubits in length, and were built of square and very white stones, the length of each of which stones was twenty cubits, and their height six cubits. This was the work of king Solomon, who first of all built the entire temple.,But king Agrippa, who had the care of the temple committed to him by Claudius Caesar, considering that it is easy to demolish any building, but hard to build it up again, and that it was particularly hard to do it to these cloisters, which would require a considerable time, and great sums of money, he denied the petitioners their request about that matter; but he did not obstruct them when they desired the city might be paved with white stone.,He also deprived Jesus, the son of Gamaliel, of the high priesthood, and gave it to Matthias, the son of Theophilus, under whom the Jews’ war with the Romans took its beginning.,1. And now I think it proper and agreeable to this history to give an account of our high priests; how they began, who those are which are capable of that dignity, and how many of them there had been at the end of the war.,In the first place, therefore, history informs us that Aaron, the brother of Moses, officiated to God as a high priest, and that, after his death, his sons succeeded him immediately; and that this dignity hath been continued down from them all to their posterity.,Whence it is a custom of our country, that no one should take the high priesthood of God but he who is of the blood of Aaron, while every one that is of another stock, though he were a king, can never obtain that high priesthood.,Accordingly, the number of all the high priests from Aaron, of whom we have spoken already, as of the first of them, until Phanas, who was made high priest during the war by the seditious, was eighty-three;,of whom thirteen officiated as high priests in the wilderness, from the days of Moses, while the tabernacle was standing, until the people came into Judea, when king Solomon erected the temple to God;,for at the first they held the high priesthood till the end of their life, although afterward they had successors while they were alive. Now these thirteen, who were the descendants of two of the sons of Aaron, received this dignity by succession, one after another; for their form of government was an aristocracy, and after that a monarchy, and in the third place the government was regal.,Now the number of years during the rule of these thirteen, from the day when our fathers departed out of Egypt, under Moses their leader, until the building of that temple which king Solomon erected at Jerusalem, were six hundred and twelve.,After those thirteen high priests, eighteen took the high priesthood at Jerusalem, one in succession to another, from the days of king Solomon, until Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, made an expedition against that city, and burnt the temple, and removed our nation into Babylon, and then took Josadek, the high priest, captive;,the times of these high priests were four hundred and sixty-six years, six months, and ten days, while the Jews were still under the regal government.,But after the term of seventy years’ captivity under the Babylonians, Cyrus, king of Persia, sent the Jews from Babylon to their own land again, and gave them leave to rebuild their temple;,at which time Jesus, the son of Josadek, took the high priesthood over the captives when they were returned home. Now he and his posterity, who were in all fifteen, until king Antiochus Eupator, were under a democratical government for four hundred and fourteen years;,and then the forementioned Antiochus, and Lysias the general of his army, deprived Onias, who was also called Menelaus, of the high priesthood, and slew him at Berea; and driving away the son of Onias the third, put Jacimus into the place of the high priest, one that was indeed of the stock of Aaron, but not of the family of Onias.,On which account Onias, who was the nephew of Onias that was dead, and bore the same name with his father, came into Egypt, and got into the friendship of Ptolemy Philometor, and Cleopatra his wife, and persuaded them to make him the high priest of that temple which he built to God in the prefecture of Heliopolis, and this in imitation of that at Jerusalem;,but as for that temple which was built in Egypt, we have spoken of it frequently already. Now when Jacimus had retained the priesthood three years, he died, and there was no one that succeeded him, but the city continued seven years without a high priest.,But then the posterity of the sons of Asamoneus, who had the government of the nation conferred upon them, when they had beaten the Macedonians in war, appointed Jonathan to be their high priest, who ruled over them seven years.,And when he had been slain by the treacherous contrivance of Trypho, as we have related some where, Simon his brother took the high priesthood;,and when he was destroyed at a feast by the treachery of his son-in-law, his own son, whose name was Hyrcanus, succeeded him, after he had held the high priesthood one year longer than his brother. This Hyrcanus enjoyed that dignity thirty years, and died an old man, leaving the succession to Judas, who was also called Aristobulus,,whose brother Alexander was his heir; which Judas died of a sore distemper, after he had kept the priesthood, together with the royal authority; for this Judas was the first that put on his head a diadem for one year.,And when Alexander had been both king and high priest twenty-seven years, he departed this life, and permitted his wife Alexandra to appoint him that should be high priest; so she gave the high priesthood to Hyrcanus, but retained the kingdom herself nine years, and then departed this life. The like duration and no longer did her son Hyrcanus enjoy the high priesthood;,for after her death his brother Aristobulus fought against him, and beat him, and deprived him of his principality; and he did himself both reign, and perform the office of high priest to God.,But when he had reigned three years, and as many months, Pompey came upon him, and not only took the city of Jerusalem by force, but put him and his children in bonds, and sent them to Rome. He also restored the high priesthood to Hyrcanus, and made him governor of the nation, but forbade him to wear a diadem.,This Hyrcanus ruled, besides his first nine years, twenty-four years more, when Barzapharnes and Pacorus, the generals of the Parthians, passed over Euphrates, and fought with Hyrcanus, and took him alive, and made Antigonus, the son of Aristobulus, king;,and when he had reigned three years and three months, Sosius and Herod besieged him, and took him, when Antony had him brought to Antioch, and slain there.,Herod was then made king by the Romans, but did no longer appoint high priests out of the family of Asamoneus; but made certain men to be so that were of no eminent families, but barely of those that were priests, excepting that he gave that dignity to Aristobulus;,for when he had made this Aristobulus, the grandson of that Hyrcanus who was then taken by the Parthians, and had taken his sister Mariarmne to wife, he thereby aimed to win the good-will of the people, who had a kind remembrance of Hyrcanus his grandfather. Yet did he afterward, out of his fear lest they should all bend their inclinations to Aristobulus, put him to death, and that by contriving how to have him suffocated as he was swimming at Jericho, as we have already related that matter;,but after this man he never intrusted the priesthood to the posterity of the sons of Asamoneus. Archelaus also, Herod’s son, did like his father in the appointment of the high priests, as did the Romans also, who took the government over the Jews into their hands afterward.,Accordingly, the number of the high priests, from the days of Herod until the day when Titus took the temple and the City, and burnt them, were in all twenty-eight; the time also that belonged to them was a hundred and seven years.,Some of these were the political governors of the people under the reign of Herod, and under the reign of Archelaus his son, although, after their death, the government became an aristocracy, and the high priests were intrusted with a dominion over the nation. And thus much may suffice to be said concerning our high priests.,1. Now Gessius Florus, who was sent as successor to Albinus by Nero, filled Judea with abundance of miseries. He was by birth of the city of Clazomenae, and brought along with him his wife Cleopatra, (by whose friendship with Poppea, Nero’s wife, he obtained this government,) who was no way different from him in wickedness.,This Florus was so wicked, and so violent in the use of his authority, that the Jews took Albinus to have been comparatively their benefactor; so excessive were the mischiefs that he brought upon them.,For Albinus concealed his wickedness, and was careful that it might not be discovered to all men; but Gessius Florus, as though he had been sent on purpose to show his crimes to every body, made a pompous ostentation of them to our nation, as never omitting any sort of violence, nor any unjust sort of punishment;,for he was not to be moved by pity, and never was satisfied with any degree of gain that came in his way; nor had he any more regard to great than to small acquisitions, but became a partner with the robbers themselves. For a great many fell then into that practice without fear, as having him for their security, and depending on him, that he would save them harmless in their particular robberies; so that there were no bounds set to the nation’s miseries;,but the unhappy Jews, when they were not able to bear the devastations which the robbers made among them, were all under a necessity of leaving their own habitations, and of flying away, as hoping to dwell more easily any where else in the world among foreigners than in their own country. And what need I say any more upon this head?,since it was this Florus who necessitated us to take up arms against the Romans, while we thought it better to be destroyed at once, than by little and little. Now this war began in the second year of the government of Florus, and the twelfth year of the reign of Nero.,But then what actions we were forced to do, or what miseries we were enabled to suffer, may be accurately known by such as will peruse those books which I have written about the Jewish war.,2. I shall now, therefore, make an end here of my Antiquities; after the conclusion of which events, I began to write that account of the war; and these Antiquities contain what hath been delivered down to us from the original creation of man, until the twelfth year of the reign of Nero, as to what hath befallen the Jews, as well in Egypt as in Syria and in Palestine,,and what we have suffered from the Assyrians and Babylonians, and what afflictions the Persians and Macedonians, and after them the Romans, have brought upon us; for I think I may say that I have composed this history with sufficient accuracy in all things.,I have attempted to enumerate those high priests that we have had during the interval of two thousand years; I have also carried down the succession of our kings, and related their actions, and political administration, without considerable errors, as also the power of our monarchs; and all according to what is written in our sacred books; for this it was that I promised to do in the beginning of this history.,And I am so bold as to say, now I have so completely perfected the work I proposed to myself to do, that no other person, whether he were a Jew or foreigner, had he ever so great an inclination to it, could so accurately deliver these accounts to the Greeks as is done in these books.,For those of my own nation freely acknowledge that I far exceed them in the learning belonging to the Jews; I have also taken a great deal of pains to obtain the learning of the Greeks, and understand the elements of the Greek language, although I have so long accustomed myself to speak our own tongue, that I cannot pronounce Greek with sufficient exactness;,for our nation does not encourage those that learn the languages of many nations, and so adorn their discourses with the smoothness of their periods; because they look upon this sort of accomplishment as common, not only to all sorts of free-men, but to as many of the servants as please to learn them. But they give him the testimony of being a wise man who is fully acquainted with our laws, and is able to interpret their meaning;,on which account, as there have been many who have done their endeavors with great patience to obtain this learning, there have yet hardly been so many as two or three that have succeeded therein, who were immediately well rewarded for their pains.,3. And now it will not be perhaps an invidious thing, if I treat briefly of my own family, and of the actions of my own life while there are still living such as can either prove what I say to be false, or can attest that it is true;,with which accounts I shall put an end to these Antiquities, which are contained in twenty books, and sixty thousand verses. And if God permit me, I will briefly run over this war again, with what befell us therein to this very day, which is the thirteenth year of the reign of Caesar Domitian, and the fifty-sixth year of my own life.,I have also an intention to write three books concerning our Jewish opinions about God and his essence, and about our laws; why, according to them, some things are permitted us to do, and others are prohibited.,1. But now Artabanus, king of the Parthians perceiving that the governors of the provinces had framed a plot against him, did not think it safe for him to continue among them; but resolved to go to Izates, in hopes of finding some way for his preservation by his means, and, if possible, for his return to his own dominions.,So he came to Izates, and brought a thousand of his kindred and servants with him, and met him upon the road,,while he well knew Izates, but Izates did not know him. When Artabanus stood near him, and, in the first place, worshipped him, according to the custom, he then said to him, “O king! do not thou overlook me thy servant, nor do thou proudly reject the suit I make thee; for as I am reduced to a low estate, by the change of fortune, and of a king am become a private man, I stand in need of thy assistance.,Have regard, therefore, unto the uncertainty of fortune, and esteem the care thou shalt take of me to be taken of thyself also; for if I be neglected, and my subjects go off unpunished, many other subjects will become the more insolent towards other kings also.”,And this speech Artabanus made with tears in his eyes, and with a dejected countece. Now as soon as Izates heard Artabanus’s name, and saw him stand as a supplicant before him, he leaped down from his horse immediately,,and said to him, “Take courage, O king! nor be disturbed at thy present calamity, as if it were incurable; for the change of thy sad condition shall be sudden; for thou shalt find me to be more thy friend and thy assistant than thy hopes can promise thee; for I will either re-establish thee in the kingdom of Parthia, or lose my own.”,2. When he had said this, he set Artabanus upon his horse, and followed him on foot, in honor of a king whom he owned as greater than himself; which, when Artabanus saw, he was very uneasy at it, and sware by his present fortune and honor that he would get down from his horse, unless Izates would get upon his horse again, and go before him.,So he complied with his desire, and leaped upon his horse; and when he had brought him to his royal palace, he showed him all sorts of respect when they sat together, and he gave him the upper place at festivals also, as regarding not his present fortune, but his former dignity, and that upon this consideration also, that the changes of fortune are common to all men.,He also wrote to the Parthians, to persuade them to receive Artabanus again; and gave them his right hand and his faith, that he should forget what was past and done, and that he would undertake for this as a mediator between them.,Now the Parthians did not themselves refuse to receive him again, but pleaded that it was not now in their power so to do, because they had committed the government to another person, who had accepted of it, and whose name was Cinnamus; and that they were afraid lest a civil war should arise on this account.,When Cinnamus understood their intentions, he wrote to Artabanus himself, for he had been brought up by him, and was of a nature good and gentle also, and desired him to put confidence in him, and to come and take his own dominions again.,Accordingly, Artabanus trusted him, and returned home; when Cinnamus met him, worshipped him, and saluted him as a king, and took the diadem off his own head, and put it on the head of Artabanus.,3. And thus was Artahanus restored to his kingdom again by the means of Izates, when he had lost it by the means of the grandees of the kingdom. Nor was he unmindful of the benefits he had conferred upon him, but rewarded him with such honors as were of the greatest esteem among them;,for he gave him leave to wear his tiara upright, and to sleep upon a golden bed, which are privileges and marks of honor peculiar to the kings of Parthia.,He also cut off a large and fruitful country from the king of Armenia, and bestowed it upon him. The name of the country is Nisibis, wherein the Macedonians had formerly built that city which they called Antioch of Mygodonla. And these were the honors that were paid Izates by the king of the Parthians.,4. But in no long time Artabanus died, and left his kingdom to his son Bardanes. Now this Bardanes came to Izates, and would have persuaded him to join him with his army, and to assist him in the war he was preparing to make with the Romans;,but he could not prevail with him. For Izates so well knew the strength and good fortune of the Romans, that he took Bardanes to attempt what was impossible to be done;,and having besides sent his sons, five in number, and they but young also, to learn accurately the language of our nation, together with our learning, as well as he had sent his mother to worship at our temple, as I have said already, was the more backward to a compliance; and restrained Bardanes, telling him perpetually of the great armies and famous actions of the Romans, and thought thereby to terrify him, and desired thereby to hinder him from that expedition.,But the Parthian king was provoked at this his behavior, and denounced war immediately against Izates. Yet did he gain no advantage by this war, because God cut off all his hopes therein;,for the Parthians perceiving Bardanes’s intentions, and how he had determined to make war with the Romans, slew him, and gave his kingdom to his brother Gotarzes.,He also, in no long time, perished by a plot made against him, and Vologases, his brother, succeeded him, who committed two of his provinces to two of his brothers by the same father; that of the Medes to the elder, Pacorus; and Armenia to the younger, Tiridates.,1. Now when the king’s brother, Monobazus, and his other kindred, saw how Izates, by his piety to God, was become greatly esteemed by all men, they also had a desire to leave the religion of their country, and to embrace the customs of the Jews;,but that act of theirs was discovered by Izates’s subjects. Whereupon the grandees were much displeased, and could not contain their anger at them; but had an intention, when they should find a proper opportunity, to inflict a punishment upon them.,Accordingly, they wrote to Abia, king of the Arabians, and promised him great sums of money, if he would make an expedition against their king; and they further promised him, that, on the first onset, they would desert their king, because they were desirous to punish him, by reason of the hatred he had to their religious worship; then they obliged themselves, by oaths, to be faithful to each other, and desired that he would make haste in this design.,The king of Arabia complied with their desires, and brought a great army into the field, and marched against Izates; and, in the beginning of the first onset, and before they came to a close fight, those Handees, as if they had a panic terror upon them, all deserted Izates, as they had agreed to do, and, turning their backs upon their enemies, ran away.,Yet was not Izates dismayed at this; but when he understood that the grandees had betrayed him, he also retired into his camp, and made inquiry into the matter; and as soon as he knew who they were that had made this conspiracy with the king of Arabia, he cut off those that were found guilty; and renewing the fight on the next day, he slew the greatest part of his enemies,,and forced all the rest to betake themselves to flight. He also pursued their king, and drove him into a fortress called Arsamus, and following on the siege vigorously, he took that fortress. And when he had plundered it of all the prey that was in it, which was not small, he returned to Adiabene; yet did not he take Abia alive, because, when he found himself encompassed on every side, he slew himself.,2. But although the grandees of Adiabene had failed in their first attempt, as being delivered up by God into their king’s hands, yet would they not even then be quiet, but wrote again to Vologases, who was then king of Parthia, and desired that he would kill Izates, and set over them some other potentate, who should be of a Parthian family; for they said that they hated their own king for abrogating the laws of their forefathers, and embracing foreign customs.,When the king of Parthia heard this, he boldly made war upon Izates; and as he had no just pretense for this war, he sent to him, and demanded back those honorable privileges which had been bestowed on him by his father, and threatened, on his refusal, to make war upon him.,Upon hearing of this, Izates was under no small trouble of mind, as thinking it would be a reproach upon him to appear to resign those privileges that had been bestowed upon him out of cowardice;,yet because he knew, that though the king of Parthia should receive back those honors, yet would he not be quiet, he resolved to commit himself to God, his Protector, in the present danger he was in of his life;,and as he esteemed him to be his principal assistant, he intrusted his children and his wives to a very strong fortress, and laid up his corn in his citadels, and set the hay and the grass on fire. And when he had thus put things in order, as well as he could, he awaited the coming of the enemy.,And when the king of Parthia was come, with a great army of footmen and horsemen, which he did sooner than was expected, (for he marched in great haste,) and had cast up a bank at the river that parted Adiabene from Media,—Izates also pitched his camp not far off, having with him six thousand horsemen.,But there came a messenger to Izates, sent by the king of Parthia, who told him how large his dominions were, as reaching from the river Euphrates to Bactria, and enumerated that king’s subjects;,he also threatened him that he should be punished, as a person ungrateful to his lords; and said that the God whom he worshipped could not deliver him out of the king’s hands.,When the messenger had delivered this his message, Izates replied that he knew the king of Parthia’s power was much greater than his own; but that he knew also that God was much more powerful than all men. And when he had returned him this answer, he betook himself to make supplication to God, and threw himself upon the ground, and put ashes upon his head, in testimony of his confusion, and fasted, together with his wives and children. Then he called upon God, and said,,“O Lord and Governor, if I have not in vain committed myself to thy goodness, but have justly determined that thou only art the Lord and principal of all beings, come now to my assistance, and defend me from my enemies, not only on my own account, but on account of their insolent behavior with regard to thy power, while they have not feared to lift up their proud and arrogant tongue against thee.”,Thus did he lament and bemoan himself, with tears in his eyes; whereupon God heard his prayer. And immediately that very night Vologases received letters, the contents of which were these, that a great band of Dahe and Sacse, despising him, now he was gone so long a journey from home, had made an expedition, and laid Parthia waste; so that he was forced to retire back, without doing any thing. And thus it was that Izates escaped the threatenings of the Parthians, by the providence of God.,3. It was not long ere Izates died, when he had completed fifty-five years of his life, and had ruled his kingdom twenty-four years. He left behind him twenty-four sons and twenty-four daughters.,However, he gave order that his brother Monobazus should succeed in the government, thereby requiting him, because, while he was himself absent after their father’s death, he had faithfully preserved the government for him.,But when Helena, his mother, heard of her son’s death, she was in great heaviness, as was but natural, upon her loss of such a most dutiful son; yet was it a comfort to her that she heard the succession came to her eldest son. Accordingly, she went to him in haste; and when she was come into Adiabene, she did not long outlive her son Izates.,But Monobazus sent her bones, as well as those of Izates, his brother, to Jerusalem, and gave order that they should be buried at the pyramids which their mother had erected; they were three in number, and distant no more than three furlongs from the city Jerusalem.,But for the actions of Monobazus the king, which he did during the rest of his life, we will relate them hereafter.,1. Now it came to pass, while Fadus was procurator of Judea, that a certain magician, whose name was Theudas, persuaded a great part of the people to take their effects with them, and follow him to the river Jordan; for he told them he was a prophet, and that he would, by his own command, divide the river, and afford them an easy passage over it;,and many were deluded by his words. However, Fadus did not permit them to make any advantage of his wild attempt, but sent a troop of horsemen out against them; who, falling upon them unexpectedly, slew many of them, and took many of them alive. They also took Theudas alive, and cut off his head, and carried it to Jerusalem.,This was what befell the Jews in the time of Cuspius Fadus’s government.,2. Then came Tiberius Alexander as successor to Fadus; he was the son of Alexander the alabarch of Alexandria, which Alexander was a principal person among all his contemporaries, both for his family and wealth: he was also more eminent for his piety than this his son Alexander, for he did not continue in the religion of his country.,Under these procurators that great famine happened in Judea, in which queen Helena bought corn in Egypt at a great expense, and distributed it to those that were in want, as I have related already.,And besides this, the sons of Judas of Galilee were now slain; I mean of that Judas who caused the people to revolt, when Cyrenius came to take an account of the estates of the Jews, as we have showed in a foregoing book. The names of those sons were James and Simon, whom Alexander commanded to be crucified.,But now Herod, king of Chalcis, removed Joseph, the son of Camydus, from the high priesthood, and made Aias, the son of Nebedeu, his successor. And now it was that Cumanus came as successor to Tiberius Alexander;,as also that Herod, brother of Agrippa the great king, departed this life, in the eighth year of the reign of Claudius Caesar. He left behind him three sons; Aristobulus, whom he had by his first wife, with Bernicianus, and Hyrcanus, both whom he had by Bernice his brother’s daughter. But Claudius Caesar bestowed his dominions on Agrippa, junior.,3. Now while the Jewish affairs were under the administration of Cureanus, there happened a great tumult at the city of Jerusalem, and many of the Jews perished therein. But I shall first explain the occasion whence it was derived.,When that feast which is called the passover was at hand, at which time our custom is to use unleavened bread, and a great multitude was gathered together from all parts to that feast, Cumanus was afraid lest some attempt of innovation should then be made by them; so he ordered that one regiment of the army should take their arms, and stand in the temple cloisters, to repress any attempts of innovation, if perchance any such should begin;,and this was no more than what the former procurators of Judea did at such festivals.,But on the fourth day of the feast, a certain soldier let down his breeches, and exposed his privy members to the multitude, which put those that saw him into a furious rage, and made them cry out that this impious action was not done to reproach them, but God himself; nay, some of them reproached Cumanus, and pretended that the soldier was set on by him,,which, when Cumanus heard, he was also himself not a little provoked at such reproaches laid upon him; yet did he exhort them to leave off such seditious attempts, and not to raise a tumult at the festival.,But when he could not induce them to be quiet for they still went on in their reproaches to him, he gave order that the whole army should take their entire armor, and come to Antonia, which was a fortress, as we have said already, which overlooked the temple;,but when the multitude saw the soldiers there, they were affrighted at them, and ran away hastily; but as the passages out were but narrow, and as they thought their enemies followed them, they were crowded together in their flight, and a great number were pressed to death in those narrow passages;,nor indeed was the number fewer than twenty thousand that perished in this tumult. So instead of a festival, they had at last a mournful day of it; and they all of them forgot their prayers and sacrifices, and betook themselves to lamentation and weeping; so great an affliction did the impudent obsceneness of a single soldier bring upon them.,4. Now before this their first mourning was over, another mischief befell them also; for some of those that raised the foregoing tumult, when they were traveling along the public road, about a hundred furlongs from the city, robbed Stephanus, a servant of Caesar, as he was journeying, and plundered him of all that he had with him;,which things when Cureanus heard of, he sent soldiers immediately, and ordered them to plunder the neighboring villages, and to bring the most eminent persons among them in bonds to him.,Now as this devastation was making, one of the soldiers seized the laws of Moses that lay in one of those villages, and brought them out before the eyes of all present, and tore them to pieces; and this was done with reproachful language, and much scurrility;,which things when the Jews heard of, they ran together, and that in great numbers, and came down to Caesarea, where Cumanus then was, and besought him that he would avenge, not themselves, but God himself, whose laws had been affronted; for that they could not bear to live any longer, if the laws of their forefathers must be affronted after this manner.,Accordingly Cumanus, out of fear lest the multitude should go into a sedition, and by the advice of his friends also, took care that the soldier who had offered the affront to the laws should be beheaded, and thereby put a stop to the sedition which was ready to be kindled a second time. 20.221 These cloisters belonged to the outer court, and were situated in a deep valley, and had walls that reached four hundred cubits in length, and were built of square and very white stones, the length of each of which stones was twenty cubits, and their height six cubits. This was the work of king Solomon, who first of all built the entire temple.
20.267
with which accounts I shall put an end to these Antiquities, which are contained in twenty books, and sixty thousand verses. And if God permit me, I will briefly run over this war again, with what befell us therein to this very day, which is the thirteenth year of the reign of Caesar Domitian, and the fifty-sixth year of my own life.'' None
43. Josephus Flavius, Jewish War, 1.3, 1.15, 1.18, 2.129, 2.143-2.145, 2.162-2.166, 4.616-4.618 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • De Abrahamo, place of, in Philo’s works • Dio Chrysostom, lost works of • Domitian, and date and audience of Josephus’ works • Josephus, nature of works, compared to rabbinic literature • Kraemer, Ross, work on novel religious teachings • Qumran, agricultural work at • authoritative works • works • ‘works’ of Law

 Found in books: Ashbrook Harvey et al. (2015), A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer, 101; Birnbaum and Dillon (2020), Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 1; Brooke et al. (2008), Past Renewals: Interpretative Authority, Renewed Revelation, and the Quest for Perfection in Jewish Antiquity, 139; Despotis and Lohr (2022), Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions, 100, 101; Edwards (2023), In the Court of the Gentiles: Narrative, Exemplarity, and Scriptural Adaptation in the Court-Tales of Flavius Josephus, 4, 11; Noam (2018), Shifting Images of the Hasmoneans: Second Temple Legends and Their Reception in Josephus and Rabbinic Literature, 5, 8; Taylor (2012), The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea, 165, 255; Tomson (2019), Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries. 24

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1.3 Ταῦτα πάντα περιλαβὼν ἐν ἑπτὰ βιβλίοις καὶ μηδεμίαν τοῖς ἐπισταμένοις τὰ πράγματα καὶ παρατυχοῦσι τῷ πολέμῳ καταλιπὼν ἢ μέμψεως ἀφορμὴν ἢ κατηγορίας, τοῖς γε τὴν ἀλήθειαν ἀγαπῶσιν, ἀλλὰ μὴ πρὸς ἡδονὴν ἀνέγραψα. ποιήσομαι δὲ ταύτην τῆς ἐξηγήσεως ἀρχήν, ἣν καὶ τῶν κεφαλαίων ἐποιησάμην.' "
1.3
προυθέμην ἐγὼ τοῖς κατὰ τὴν ̔Ρωμαίων ἡγεμονίαν ̔Ελλάδι γλώσσῃ μεταβαλὼν ἃ τοῖς ἄνω βαρβάροις τῇ πατρίῳ συντάξας ἀνέπεμψα πρότερον ἀφηγήσασθαι ̓Ιώσηπος Ματθίου παῖς ἐξ ̔Ιεροσολύμων ἱερεύς, αὐτός τε ̔Ρωμαίους πολεμήσας τὰ πρῶτα καὶ τοῖς ὕστερον παρατυχὼν ἐξ ἀνάγκης:
1.3
ταῦτ' ἀκούσας ̓Αντίγονος διέπεμψεν περὶ τὴν χώραν εἴργειν καὶ λοχᾶν τοὺς σιτηγοὺς κελεύων. οἱ δ' ὑπήκουον, καὶ πολὺ πλῆθος ὁπλιτῶν ὑπὲρ τὴν ̔Ιεριχοῦντα συνηθροίσθη: διεκαθέζοντο δὲ ἐπὶ τῶν ὀρῶν παραφυλάσσοντες τοὺς τὰ ἐπιτήδεια ἐκκομίζοντας." "
1.15
̓́Ενθα πολλοὶ τῶν ἱερέων ξιφήρεις τοὺς πολεμίους ἐπιόντας βλέποντες ἀθορύβως ἐπὶ τῆς θρησκείας ἔμειναν, σπένδοντες δὲ ἀπεσφάττοντο καὶ θυμιῶντες καὶ τῆς πρὸς τὸ θεῖον θεραπείας ἐν δευτέρῳ τὴν σωτηρίαν τιθέμενοι. πλεῖστοι δ' ὑπὸ τῶν ὁμοφύλων ἀντιστασιαστῶν ἀνῃροῦντο καὶ κατὰ τῶν κρημνῶν ἔρριπτον ἑαυτοὺς ἄπειροι: καὶ τὰ περὶ τὸ τεῖχος δ' ἔνιοι μανιῶντες ἐν ταῖς ἀμηχανίαις ὑπέπρησαν καὶ συγκατεφλέγοντο." "
1.15
τό γε μὴν μνήμῃ τὰ προϊστορηθέντα διδόναι καὶ τὰ τῶν ἰδίων χρόνων τοῖς μετ' αὐτὸν συνιστάνειν ἐπαίνου καὶ μαρτυρίας ἄξιον: φιλόπονος δὲ οὐχ ὁ μεταποιῶν οἰκονομίαν καὶ τάξιν ἀλλοτρίαν, ἀλλ' ὁ μετὰ τοῦ καινὰ λέγειν καὶ τὸ σῶμα τῆς ἱστορίας κατασκευάζων ἴδιον." "
1.18
Πάρθους δὲ μετὰ τὸν Κράσσον ἐπιδιαβαίνειν εἰς Συρίαν ὡρμημένους ἀνέκοπτεν Κάσσιος εἰς τὴν ἐπαρχίαν διαφυγών. περιποιησάμενος δὲ αὐτὴν ἐπὶ ̓Ιουδαίους ἠπείγετο, καὶ Ταριχέας μὲν ἑλὼν εἰς τρεῖς μυριάδας ̓Ιουδαίων ἀνδραποδίζεται, κτείνει δὲ καὶ Πειθόλαον τοὺς ̓Αριστοβούλου στασιαστὰς ἐπισυνιστάντα: τοῦ φόνου δὲ ἦν σύμβουλος ̓Αντίπατρος.
1.18
ὅπου δ' οἵ τε τούτων συγγραφεῖς ἐπαύσαντο καὶ οἱ ἡμέτεροι προφῆται, τὴν ἀρχὴν ἐκεῖθεν ποιήσομαι τῆς συντάξεως: τούτων δὲ τὰ μὲν τοῦ κατ' ἐμαυτὸν πολέμου διεξοδικώτερον καὶ μεθ' ὅσης ἂν ἐξεργασίας δύνωμαι δίειμι, τὰ δὲ προγενέστερα τῆς ἐμῆς ἡλικίας ἐπιδραμῶ συντόμως," 2.129 καὶ μετὰ ταῦτα πρὸς ἃς ἕκαστοι τέχνας ἴσασιν ὑπὸ τῶν ἐπιμελητῶν διαφίενται, καὶ μέχρι πέμπτης ὥρας ἐργασάμενοι συντόνως πάλιν εἰς ἓν συναθροίζονται χωρίον, ζωσάμενοί τε σκεπάσμασιν λινοῖς οὕτως ἀπολούονται τὸ σῶμα ψυχροῖς ὕδασιν, καὶ μετὰ ταύτην τὴν ἁγνείαν εἰς ἴδιον οἴκημα συνίασιν, ἔνθα μηδενὶ τῶν ἑτεροδόξων ἐπιτέτραπται παρελθεῖν: αὐτοί τε καθαροὶ καθάπερ εἰς ἅγιόν τι τέμενος παραγίνονται τὸ δειπνητήριον.' "
2.143
Τοὺς δ' ἐπ' ἀξιοχρέοις ἁμαρτήμασιν ἁλόντας ἐκβάλλουσι τοῦ τάγματος. ὁ δ' ἐκκριθεὶς οἰκτίστῳ πολλάκις μόρῳ διαφθείρεται: τοῖς γὰρ ὅρκοις καὶ τοῖς ἔθεσιν ἐνδεδεμένος οὐδὲ τῆς παρὰ τοῖς ἄλλοις τροφῆς δύναται μεταλαμβάνειν, ποηφαγῶν δὲ καὶ λιμῷ τὸ σῶμα τηκόμενος διαφθείρεται." '2.144 διὸ δὴ πολλοὺς ἐλεήσαντες ἐν ταῖς ἐσχάταις ἀναπνοαῖς ἀνέλαβον, ἱκανὴν ἐπὶ τοῖς ἁμαρτήμασιν αὐτῶν τὴν μέχρι θανάτου βάσανον ἡγούμενοι.' "2.145 Περὶ δὲ τὰς κρίσεις ἀκριβέστατοι καὶ δίκαιοι, καὶ δικάζουσι μὲν οὐκ ἐλάττους τῶν ἑκατὸν συνελθόντες, τὸ δ' ὁρισθὲν ὑπ' αὐτῶν ἀκίνητον. σέβας δὲ μέγα παρ' αὐτοῖς μετὰ τὸν θεὸν τοὔνομα τοῦ νομοθέτου, κἂν βλασφημήσῃ τις εἰς τοῦτον κολάζεται θανάτῳ." 2.162 Δύο δὲ τῶν προτέρων Φαρισαῖοι μὲν οἱ μετὰ ἀκριβείας δοκοῦντες ἐξηγεῖσθαι τὰ νόμιμα καὶ τὴν πρώτην ἀπάγοντες αἵρεσιν εἱμαρμένῃ τε καὶ θεῷ προσάπτουσι πάντα, 2.163 καὶ τὸ μὲν πράττειν τὰ δίκαια καὶ μὴ κατὰ τὸ πλεῖστον ἐπὶ τοῖς ἀνθρώποις κεῖσθαι, βοηθεῖν δὲ εἰς ἕκαστον καὶ τὴν εἱμαρμένην: ψυχήν τε πᾶσαν μὲν ἄφθαρτον, μεταβαίνειν δὲ εἰς ἕτερον σῶμα τὴν τῶν ἀγαθῶν μόνην, τὰς δὲ τῶν φαύλων ἀιδίῳ τιμωρίᾳ κολάζεσθαι. 2.164 Σαδδουκαῖοι δέ, τὸ δεύτερον τάγμα, τὴν μὲν εἱμαρμένην παντάπασιν ἀναιροῦσιν καὶ τὸν θεὸν ἔξω τοῦ δρᾶν τι κακὸν ἢ ἐφορᾶν τίθενται:' "2.165 φασὶν δ' ἐπ' ἀνθρώπων ἐκλογῇ τό τε καλὸν καὶ τὸ κακὸν προκεῖσθαι καὶ κατὰ γνώμην ἑκάστου τούτων ἑκατέρῳ προσιέναι. ψυχῆς τε τὴν διαμονὴν καὶ τὰς καθ' ᾅδου τιμωρίας καὶ τιμὰς ἀναιροῦσιν." '2.166 καὶ Φαρισαῖοι μὲν φιλάλληλοί τε καὶ τὴν εἰς τὸ κοινὸν ὁμόνοιαν ἀσκοῦντες, Σαδδουκαίων δὲ καὶ πρὸς ἀλλήλους τὸ ἦθος ἀγριώτερον αἵ τε ἐπιμιξίαι πρὸς τοὺς ὁμοίους ἀπηνεῖς ὡς πρὸς ἀλλοτρίους. τοιαῦτα μὲν περὶ τῶν ἐν ̓Ιουδαίοις φιλοσοφούντων εἶχον εἰπεῖν.' "
4.616
̓Εφίετο μὲν οὖν εἰκότως τῶν ταύτῃ πραγμάτων Οὐεσπασιανὸς εἰς βεβαίωσιν τῆς ὅλης ἡγεμονίας, ἐπιστέλλει δ' εὐθὺς τῷ διέποντι τὴν Αἴγυπτον καὶ τὴν ̓Αλεξάνδρειαν Τιβερίῳ ̓Αλεξάνδρῳ, δηλῶν τὸ τῆς στρατιᾶς πρόθυμον, καὶ ὡς αὐτὸς ὑποδὺς ἀναγκαίως τὸ βάρος τῆς ἡγεμονίας συνεργὸν αὐτὸν καὶ βοηθὸν προσλαμβάνοι." '4.617 παραναγνοὺς δὲ τὴν ἐπιστολὴν ̓Αλέξανδρος προθύμως τά τε τάγματα καὶ τὸ πλῆθος εἰς αὐτὸν ὥρκωσεν. ἑκάτεροι δὲ ἀσμένως ὑπήκουσαν τὴν ἀρετὴν τἀνδρὸς ἐκ τῆς ἐγγὺς στρατηγίας εἰδότες.' "4.618 καὶ ὁ μὲν πεπιστευμένος ἤδη τὰ περὶ τὴν ἀρχὴν προπαρεσκεύαζεν αὐτῷ καὶ τὰ πρὸς τὴν ἄφιξιν, τάχιον δ' ἐπινοίας διήγγελλον αἱ φῆμαι τὸν ἐπὶ τῆς ἀνατολῆς αὐτοκράτορα, καὶ πᾶσα μὲν πόλις ἑώρταζεν εὐαγγέλια δὲ καὶ θυσίας ὑπὲρ αὐτοῦ ἐπετέλει." ' None
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1.3 12. I have comprehended all these things in seven books, and have left no occasion for complaint or accusation to such as have been acquainted with this war; and I have written it down for the sake of those that love truth, but not for those that please themselves with fictitious relations. And I will begin my account of these things with what I call my First Chapter.
1.3
I have proposed to myself, for the sake of such as live under the government of the Romans, to translate those books into the Greek tongue, which I formerly composed in the language of our country, and sent to the Upper Barbarians; I, Joseph, the son of Matthias, by birth a Hebrew, a priest also, and one who at first fought against the Romans myself, and was forced to be present at what was done afterward am the author of this work.
1.3
When Antigonus heard of this, he sent some of his party with orders to hinder, and lay ambushes for these collectors of corn. This command was obeyed, and a great multitude of armed men were gathered together about Jericho, and lay upon the mountains, to watch those that brought the provisions.
1.15
5. And now did many of the priests, even when they saw their enemies assailing them with swords in their hands, without any disturbance, go on with their Divine worship, and were slain while they were offering their drink-offerings, and burning their incense, as preferring the duties about their worship to God before their own preservation. The greatest part of them were slain by their own countrymen, of the adverse faction, and an innumerable multitude threw themselves down precipices; nay, some there were who were so distracted among the insuperable difficulties they were under, that they set fire to the buildings that were near to the wall, and were burnt together with them.
1.15
But then, an undertaking to preserve the memory of what hath not been before recorded, and to represent the affairs of one’s own time to those that come afterward, is really worthy of praise and commendation. Now he is to be esteemed to have taken good pains in earnest, not who does no more than change the disposition and order of other men’s works, but he who not only relates what had not been related before, but composes an entire body of history of his own:
1.18
9. But now Cassius, after Crassus, put a stop to the Parthians, who were marching in order to enter Syria. Cassius had fled into that province, and when he had taken possession of the same, he made a hasty march into Judea; and, upon his taking Taricheae, he carried thirty thousand Jews into slavery. He also slew Pitholaus, who had supported the seditious followers of Aristobulus; and it was Antipater who advised him so to do.
1.18
But then, where the writers of these affairs and our prophets leave off, thence shall I take my rise and begin my history. Now, as to what concerns that war which happened in my own time, I will go over it very largely, and with all the diligence I am able; but for what preceded mine own age, that I shall run over briefly.
2.129
After this every one of them are sent away by their curators, to exercise some of those arts wherein they are skilled, in which they labor with great diligence till the fifth hour. After which they assemble themselves together again into one place; and when they have clothed themselves in white veils, they then bathe their bodies in cold water. And after this purification is over, they every one meet together in an apartment of their own, into which it is not permitted to any of another sect to enter; while they go, after a pure manner, into the dining-room, as into a certain holy temple,
2.143
8. But for those that are caught in any heinous sins, they cast them out of their society; and he who is thus separated from them does often die after a miserable manner; for as he is bound by the oath he hath taken, and by the customs he hath been engaged in, he is not at liberty to partake of that food that he meets with elsewhere, but is forced to eat grass, and to famish his body with hunger, till he perish; 2.144 for which reason they receive many of them again when they are at their last gasp, out of compassion to them, as thinking the miseries they have endured till they came to the very brink of death to be a sufficient punishment for the sins they had been guilty of. 2.145 9. But in the judgments they exercise they are most accurate and just, nor do they pass sentence by the votes of a court that is fewer than a hundred. And as to what is once determined by that number, it is unalterable. What they most of all honor, after God himself, is the name of their legislator Moses, whom, if anyone blaspheme, he is punished capitally.
2.162
14. But then as to the two other orders at first mentioned: the Pharisees are those who are esteemed most skillful in the exact explication of their laws, and introduce the first sect. These ascribe all to fate or providence, and to God, 2.163 and yet allow, that to act what is right, or the contrary, is principally in the power of men, although fate does cooperate in every action. They say that all souls are incorruptible, but that the souls of good men only are removed into other bodies,—but that the souls of bad men are subject to eternal punishment. 2.164 But the Sadducees are those that compose the second order, and take away fate entirely, and suppose that God is not concerned in our doing or not doing what is evil; 2.165 and they say, that to act what is good, or what is evil, is at men’s own choice, and that the one or the other belongs so to every one, that they may act as they please. They also take away the belief of the immortal duration of the soul, and the punishments and rewards in Hades. 2.166 Moreover, the Pharisees are friendly to one another, and are for the exercise of concord, and regard for the public; but the behavior of the Sadducees one towards another is in some degree wild, and their conversation with those that are of their own party is as barbarous as if they were strangers to them. And this is what I had to say concerning the philosophic sects among the Jews.
4.616
6. Justly, therefore, did Vespasian desire to obtain that government, in order to corroborate his attempts upon the whole empire; so he immediately sent to Tiberius Alexander, who was then governor of Egypt and of Alexandria, and informed him what the army had put upon him, and how he, being forced to accept of the burden of the government, was desirous to have him for his confederate and supporter. 4.617 Now as soon as ever Alexander had read this letter, he readily obliged the legions and the multitude to take the oath of fidelity to Vespasian, both which willingly complied with him, as already acquainted with the courage of the man, from that his conduct in their neighborhood. 4.618 Accordingly Vespasian, looking upon himself as already intrusted with the government, got all things ready for his journey to Rome. Now fame carried this news abroad more suddenly than one could have thought, that he was emperor over the east, upon which every city kept festivals, and celebrated sacrifices and oblations for such good news; 7 1. Now, as soon as the army had no more people to slay or to plunder, because there remained none to be the objects of their fury (for they would not have spared any, had there remained any other such work to be done) Caesar gave orders that they should now demolish the entire city and temple, but should leave as many of the towers standing as were of the greatest eminency; that is, Phasaelus, and Hippicus, and Mariamne; and so much of the wall as enclosed the city on the west side.,This wall was spared, in order to afford a camp for such as were to lie in garrison, as were the towers also spared, in order to demonstrate to posterity what kind of city it was, and how well fortified, which the Roman valor had subdued;,but for all the rest of the wall, it was so thoroughly laid even with the ground by those that dug it up to the foundation, that there was left nothing to make those that came thither believe it had ever been inhabited.,This was the end which Jerusalem came to by the madness of those that were for innovations; a city otherwise of great magnificence, and of mighty fame among all mankind.,2. But Caesar resolved to leave there, as a guard, the tenth legion, with certain troops of horsemen, and companies of footmen. So, having entirely completed this war, he was desirous to commend his whole army, on account of the great exploits they had performed, and to bestow proper rewards on such as had signalized themselves therein.,He had therefore a great tribunal made for him in the midst of the place where he had formerly encamped, and stood upon it with his principal commanders about him, and spake so as to be heard by the whole army in the manner following:—,That he returned them abundance of thanks for their goodwill which they had showed to him: he commended them for that ready obedience they had exhibited in this whole war, which obedience had appeared in the many and great dangers which they had courageously undergone; as also for that courage they had shown, and had thereby augmented of themselves their country’s power, and had made it evident to all men, that neither the multitude of their enemies, nor the strength of their places, nor the largeness of their cities, nor the rash boldness and brutish rage of their antagonists, were sufficient at any time to get clear of the Roman valor, although some of them may have fortune in many respects on their side.,He said further, that it was but reasonable for them to put an end to this war, now it had lasted so long, for that they had nothing better to wish for when they entered into it;,and that this happened more favorably for them, and more for their glory, that all the Romans had willingly accepted of those for their governors, and the curators of their dominions, whom they had chosen for them, and had sent into their own country for that purpose, which still continued under the management of those whom they had pitched on, and were thankful to them for pitching upon them.,That accordingly, although he did both admire and tenderly regard them all, because he knew that every one of them had gone as cheerfully about their work as their abilities and opportunities would give them leave;,yet, he said, that he would immediately bestow rewards and dignities on those that had fought the most bravely, and with greater force, and had signalized their conduct in the most glorious manner, and had made his army more famous by their noble exploits; and that no one who had been willing to take more pains than another should miss of a just retribution for the same;,for that he had been exceedingly careful about this matter, and that the more, because he had much rather reward the virtues of his fellow soldiers than punish such as had offended.,3. Hereupon Titus ordered those whose business it was to read the list of all that had performed great exploits in this war,,whom he called to him by their names, and commended them before the company, and rejoiced in them in the same manner as a man would have rejoiced in his own exploits. He also put on their heads crowns of gold, and golden ornaments about their necks, and gave them long spears of gold, and ensigns that were made of silver,,and removed every one of them to a higher rank; and besides this, he plentifully distributed among them, out of the spoils, and the other prey they had taken, silver, and gold, and garments.,So when they had all these honors bestowed on them, according to his own appointment made to every one, and he had wished all sorts of happiness to the whole army, he came down, among the great acclamations which were made to him, and then betook himself to offer thank-offerings to the gods, and at once sacrificed a vast number of oxen, that stood ready at the altars, and distributed them among the army to feast on.,And when he had staid three days among the principal commanders, and so long feasted with them, he sent away the rest of his army to the several places where they would be every one best situated; but permitted the tenth legion to stay, as a guard at Jerusalem, and did not send them away beyond Euphrates, where they had been before.,And as he remembered that the twelfth legion had given way to the Jews, under Cestius their general, he expelled them out of all Syria, for they had lain formerly at Raphanea, and sent them away to a place called Meletine, near Euphrates, which is in the limits of Armenia and Cappadocia;,he also thought fit that two of the legions should stay with him till he should go to Egypt.,He then went down with his army to that Caesarea which lay by the seaside, and there laid up the rest of his spoils in great quantities, and gave order that the captives should be kept there; for the winter season hindered him them from sailing into Italy.,1. Now Lucilius Bassus was sent as legate into Judea, and there he received the army from Cerealis Vitellius, and took that citadel which was in Herodium, together with the garrison that was in it;,after which he got together all the soldiery that was there (which was a large body, but dispersed into several parties), with the tenth legion, and resolved to make war upon Macherus; for it was highly necessary that this citadel should be demolished, lest it might be a means of drawing away many into a rebellion, by reason of its strength;,for the nature of the place was very capable of affording the surest hopes of safety to those that possessed it, as well as delay and fear to those that should attack it;,for what was walled in was itself a very rocky hill, elevated to a very great height; which circumstance alone made it very hard to be subdued. It was also so contrived by nature, that it could not be easily ascended;,for it is, as it were, ditched about with such valleys on all sides, and to such a depth, that the eye cannot reach their bottoms, and such as are not easily to be passed over, and even such as it is impossible to fill up with earth.,For that valley which cuts it on the west extends to threescore furlongs, and did not end till it came to the lake Asphaltitis; on the same side it was also that Macherus had the tallest top of its hill elevated above the rest.,But then for the valleys that lay on the north and south sides, although they be not so large as that already described, yet it is in like manner an impracticable thing to think of getting over them;,and for the valley that lies on the east side, its depth is found to be no less than a hundred cubits. It extends as far as a mountain that lies over against Macherus, with which it is bounded.,2. Now when Alexander Janneus, the king of the Jews, observed the nature of this place, he was the first who built a citadel here, which afterwards was demolished by Gabinius, when he made war against Aristobulus.,But when Herod came to be king, he thought the place to be worthy of the utmost regard, and of being built upon in the firmest manner, and this especially because it lay so near to Arabia; for it is seated in a convenient place on that account, and hath a prospect toward that country;,he therefore surrounded a large space of ground with walls and towers, and built a city there, out of which city there was a way that led up to the very citadel itself on the top of the mountain;,nay, more than this, he built a wall round that top of the hill, and erected towers at the corners, of a hundred and sixty cubits high;,in the middle of which place he built a palace, after a magnificent manner, wherein were large and beautiful edifices.,He also made a great many reservoirs for the reception of water, that there might be plenty of it ready for all uses, and those in the properest places that were afforded him there. Thus did he, as it were, contend with the nature of the place, that he might exceed its natural strength and security (which yet itself rendered it hard to be taken) by those fortifications which were made by the hands of men.,Moreover, he put a large quantity of darts and other machines of war into it, and contrived to get everything thither that might any way contribute to its inhabitants’ security, under the longest siege possible.,3. Now within this place there grew a sort of rue that deserves our wonder on account of its largeness, for it was no way inferior to any fig tree whatsoever, either in height or in thickness;,and the report is, that it had lasted ever since the times of Herod, and would probably have lasted much longer, had it not been cut down by those Jews who took possession of the place afterwards.,But still in that valley which encompasses the city on the north side there is a certain place called Baaras, which produces a root of the same name with itself;,its color is like to that of flame, and towards the evenings it sends out a certain ray like lightning. It is not easily taken by such as would do it, but recedes from their hands, nor will yield itself to be taken quietly, until either the urine of a woman, or her menstrual blood, be poured upon it;,nay, even then it is certain death to those that touch it, unless anyone take and hang the root itself down from his hand, and so carry it away.,It may also be taken another way, without danger, which is this: they dig a trench quite round about it, till the hidden part of the root be very small,,they then tie a dog to it, and when the dog tries hard to follow him that tied him, this root is easily plucked up, but the dog dies immediately, as if it were instead of the man that would take the plant away; nor after this need anyone be afraid of taking it into their hands.,Yet, after all this pains in getting, it is only valuable on account of one virtue it hath, that if it be only brought to sick persons, it quickly drives away those called demons, which are no other than the spirits of the wicked, that enter into men that are alive and kill them, unless they can obtain some help against them.,Here are also fountains of hot water, that flow out of this place, which have a very different taste one from the other; for some of them are bitter, and others of them are plainly sweet.,Here are also many eruptions of cold waters, and this not only in the places that lie lower, and have their fountains near one another,,but, what is still more wonderful, here is to be seen a certain cave hard by, whose cavity is not deep, but it is covered over by a rock that is prominent;,above this rock there stand up two hills or breasts, as it were, but a little distant one from another, the one of which sends out a fountain that is very cold, and the other sends out one that is very hot; which waters, when they are mingled together, compose a most pleasant bath; they are medicinal indeed for other maladies, but especially good for strengthening the nerves. This place has in it also mines of sulfur and alum.,4. Now when Bassus had taken a full view of this place, he resolved to besiege it, by filling up the valley that lay on the east side; so he fell hard to work, and took great pains to raise his banks as soon as possible, and by that means to render the siege easy.,As for the Jews that were caught in this place, they separated themselves from the strangers that were with them, and they forced those strangers, as an otherwise useless multitude, to stay in the lower part of the city, and undergo the principal dangers,,while they themselves seized on the upper citadel, and held it, and this both on account of its strength, and to provide for their own safety. They also supposed they might obtain their pardon, in case they should at last surrender the citadel.,However, they were willing to make trial, in the first place, whether the hopes they had of avoiding a siege would come to anything; with which intention they made sallies every day, and fought with those that met them; in which conflicts they were many of them slain, as they therein slew many of the Romans.,But still it was the opportunities that presented themselves which chiefly gained both sides their victories; these were gained by the Jews, when they fell upon the Romans as they were off their guard; but by the Romans, when, upon the others’ sallies against their banks, they foresaw their coming, and were upon their guard when they received them.,But the conclusion of this siege did not depend upon these bickerings; but a certain surprising accident, relating to what was done in this siege, forced the Jews to surrender the citadel.,There was a certain young man among the besieged, of great boldness, and very active of his hand, his name was Eleazar;,he greatly signalized himself in those sallies, and encouraged the Jews to go out in great numbers, in order to hinder the raising of the banks, and did the Romans a vast deal of mischief when they came to fighting; he so managed matters, that those who sallied out made their attacks easily, and returned back without danger, and this by still bringing up the rear himself.,Now it happened that on a certain time, when the fight was over, and both sides were parted, and retired home, he, in way of contempt of the enemy, and thinking that none of them would begin the fight again at that time, staid without the gates, and talked with those that were upon the wall, and his mind was wholly intent upon what they said.,Now a certain person belonging to the Roman camp, whose name was Rufus, by birth an Egyptian, ran upon him suddenly, when nobody expected such a thing, and carried him off, with his armor itself; while in the meantime, those that saw it from the wall were under such an amazement, that Rufus prevented their assistance, and carried Eleazar to the Roman camp.,So the general of the Romans ordered that he should be taken up naked, set before the city to be seen, and sorely whipped before their eyes. Upon this sad accident that befell the young man, the Jews were terribly confounded, and the city, with one voice, sorely lamented him, and the mourning proved greater than could well be supposed upon the calamity of a single person.,When Bassus perceived that, he began to think of using a stratagem against the enemy, and was desirous to aggravate their grief, in order to prevail with them to surrender the city for the preservation of that man. Nor did he fail of his hope;,for he commanded them to set up a cross, as if he were just going to hang Eleazar upon it immediately; the sight of this occasioned a sore grief among those that were in the citadel, and they groaned vehemently, and cried out that they could not bear to see him thus destroyed.,Whereupon Eleazar besought them not to disregard him, now he was going to suffer a most miserable death, and exhorted them to save themselves, by yielding to the Roman power and good fortune, since all other people were now conquered by them.,These men were greatly moved with what he said, there being also many within the city that interceded for him, because he was of an eminent and very numerous family;,so they now yielded to their passion of commiseration, contrary to their usual custom. Accordingly, they sent out immediately certain messengers, and treated with the Romans, in order to a surrender of the citadel to them, and desired that they might be permitted to go away, and take Eleazar along with them.,Then did the Romans and their general accept of these terms; while the multitude of strangers that were in the lower part of the city, hearing of the agreement that was made by the Jews for themselves alone, were resolved to fly away privately in the night time;,but as soon as they had opened their gates, those that had come to terms with Bassus told him of it; whether it were that they envied the others’ deliverance, or whether it were done out of fear, lest an occasion should be taken against them upon their escape, is uncertain.,The most courageous, therefore, of those men that went out prevented the enemy, and got away, and fled for it; but for those men that were caught within, they were slain, to the number of one thousand seven hundred, as were the women and the children made slaves;,but as Bassus thought he must perform the covet, he had made with those that had surrendered the citadel, he let them go, and restored Eleazar to them.,5. When Bassus had settled these affairs, he marched hastily to the forest of Jarden, as it is called; for he had heard that a great many of those that had fled from Jerusalem and Macherus formerly were there gotten together.,When he was therefore come to the place, and understood that the former news was no mistake, he, in the first place, surrounded the whole place with his horsemen, that such of the Jews as had boldness enough to try to break through might have no way possible for escaping, by reason of the situation of these horsemen; and for the footmen, he ordered them to cut down the trees that were in the wood whither they were fled.,So the Jews were under a necessity of performing some glorious exploit, and of greatly exposing themselves in a battle, since they might perhaps thereby escape. So they made a general attack, and with a great shout fell upon those that surrounded them,,who received them with great courage; and so while the one side fought desperately, and the others would not yield, the fight was prolonged on that account. But the event of the battle did not answer the expectation of the assailants;,for so it happened, that no more than twelve fell on the Roman side, with a few that were wounded; but not one of the Jews escaped out of this battle, but they were all killed, being in the whole not fewer in number than three thousand,,together with Judas, the son of Jairus, their general: concerning whom we have before spoken, that he had been a captain of a certain band at the siege of Jerusalem, and by going down into a certain vault underground, had privately made his escape.,6. About the same time it was that Caesar sent a letter to Bassus, and to Liberius Maximus, who was the procurator of Judea, and gave order that all Judea should be exposed to sale;,for he did not found any city there, but reserved the country for himself. However, he assigned a place for eight hundred men only, whom he had dismissed from his army, which he gave them for their habitation; it is called Emmaus, and is distant from Jerusalem threescore furlongs.,He also laid a tribute upon the Jews wheresoever they were, and enjoined every one of them to bring two drachmae every year into the Capitol, as they used to pay the same to the temple at Jerusalem. And this was the state of the Jewish affairs at this time.,1. Now, at the same time that Titus Caesar lay at the siege of Jerusalem, did Vespasian go on board a merchantship and sailed from Alexandria to Rhodes;,whence he sailed away in ships with three rows of oars; and as he touched at several cities that lay in his road, he was joyfully received by them all, and so passed over from Ionia into Greece; whence he set sail from Corcyra to the promontory of Iapyx, whence he took his journey by land.,But as for Titus, he marched from that Caesarea which lay by the seaside, and came to that which is named Caesarea Philippi, and staid there a considerable time, and exhibited all sorts of shows there.,And here a great number of the captives were destroyed, some being thrown to wild beasts, and others in multitudes forced to kill one another, as if they were their enemies.,And here it was that Titus was informed of the seizure of Simon the son of Gioras, which was made after the manner following:,This Simon, during the siege of Jerusalem, was in the upper city; but when the Roman army was gotten within the walls, and were laying the city waste, he then took the most faithful of his friends with him, and among them some that were stone-cutters, with those iron tools which belonged to their occupation, and as great a quantity of provisions as would suffice them for a long time, and let himself and all them down into a certain subterraneous cavern that was not visible above ground.,Now, so far as had been digged of old, they went onward along it without disturbance; but where they met with solid earth, they dug a mine under ground, and this in hopes that they should be able to proceed so far as to rise from under ground in a safe place, and by that means escape.,But when they came to make the experiment, they were disappointed of their hope; for the miners could make but small progress, and that with difficulty also; insomuch that their provisions, though they distributed them by measure, began to fail them.,And now Simon, thinking he might be able to astonish and delude the Romans, put on a white frock, and buttoned upon him a purple cloak, and appeared out of the ground in the place where the temple had formerly been.,At the first, indeed, those that saw him were greatly astonished, and stood still where they were; but afterward they came nearer to him, and asked him who he was.,Now Simon would not tell them, but bid them call for their captain; and when they ran to call him, Terentius Rufus, who was left to command the army there, came to Simon, and learned of him the whole truth, and kept him in bonds, and let Caesar know that he was taken.,Thus did God bring this man to be punished for what bitter and savage tyranny he had exercised against his countrymen by those who were his worst enemies;,and this while he was not subdued by violence, but voluntarily delivered himself up to them to be punished, and that on the very same account that he had laid false accusations against many Jews, as if they were falling away to the Romans, and had barbarously slain them;,for wicked actions do not escape the Divine anger, nor is justice too weak to punish offenders, but in time overtakes those that transgress its laws, and inflicts its punishments upon the wicked in a manner, so much more severe, as they expected to escape it on account of their not being punished immediately. Simon was made sensible of this by falling under the indignation of the Romans.,This rise of his out of the ground did also occasion the discovery of a great number of others of the seditious at that time, who had hidden themselves underground.,But for Simon, he was brought to Caesar in bonds, when he was come back to that Caesarea which was on the seaside, who gave orders that he should be kept against that triumph which he was to celebrate at Rome upon this occasion.,1. And now, in the fourth year of the reign of Vespasian, it came to pass that Antiochus, the king of Commagene, with all his family, fell into very great calamities. The occasion was this:,Cesennius Petus, who was president of Syria at this time, whether it were done out of regard to truth, or whether out of hatred to Antiochus (for which was the real motive was never thoroughly discovered), sent an epistle to Caesar,,and therein told him that Antiochus, with his son Epiphanes, had resolved to rebel against the Romans, and had made a league with the king of Parthia to that purpose;,that it was therefore fit to prevent them, lest they prevent us, and begin such a war as may cause a general disturbance in the Roman empire.,Now Caesar was disposed to take some care about the matter, since this discovery was made; for the neighborhood of the kingdoms made this affair worthy of greater regard;,for Samosata, the capital of Commagene, lies upon Euphrates, and upon any such design could afford an easy passage over it to the Parthians, and could also afford them a secure reception.,Petus was accordingly believed, and had authority given him of doing what he should think proper in the case; so he set about it without delay, and fell upon Commagene before Antiochus and his people had the least expectation of his coming: he had with him the tenth legion, as also some cohorts and troops of horsemen.,These kings also came to his assistance: Aristobulus, king of the country called Chalcidene, and Sohemus, who was called king of Emesa.,Nor was there any opposition made to his forces when they entered the kingdom; for no one of that country would so much as lift up his hand against them.,When Antiochus heard this unexpected news, he could not think in the least of making war with the Romans, but determined to leave his whole kingdom in the state wherein it now was, and to retire privately, with his wife and children, as thinking thereby to demonstrate himself to the Romans to be innocent as to the accusation laid against him.,So he went away from that city as far as a hundred and twenty furlongs, into a plain, and there pitched his tents.,2. Petus then sent some of his men to seize upon Samosata, and by their means took possession of that city, while he went himself to attack Antiochus with the rest of his army.,However, the king was not prevailed upon by the distress he was in to do anything in the way of war against the Romans, but bemoaned his own hard fate, and endured with patience what he was not able to prevent.,But his sons, who were young, and unexperienced in war, but of strong bodies, were not easily induced to bear this calamity without fighting. Epiphanes, therefore, and Callinicus, betook themselves to military force;,and as the battle was a sore one, and lasted all the day long, they showed their own valor in a remarkable manner, and nothing but the approach of night put a period thereto, and that without any diminution of their forces;,yet would not Antiochus, upon this conclusion of the fight, continue there by any means, but took his wife and his daughters, and fled away with them to Cilicia, and by so doing quite discouraged the minds of his own soldiers.,Accordingly, they revolted, and went over to the Romans, out of the despair they were in of his keeping the kingdom; and his case was looked upon by all as quite desperate.,It was therefore necessary that Epiphanes and his soldiers should get clear of their enemies before they became entirely destitute of any confederates; nor were there any more than ten horsemen with him, who passed with him over Euphrates,,whence they went undisturbed to Vologeses, the king of Parthia, where they were not disregarded as fugitives, but had the same respect paid them as if they had retained their ancient prosperity.,3. Now when Antiochus was come to Tarsus in Cilicia, Petus ordered a centurion to go to him, and send him in bonds to Rome.,However, Vespasian could not endure to have a king brought to him in that manner, but thought it fit rather to have a regard to the ancient friendship that had been between them, than to preserve an inexorable anger upon pretense of this war.,Accordingly, he gave orders that they should take off his bonds, while he was still upon the road, and that he should not come to Rome, but should now go and live at Lacedemon; he also gave him large revenues, that he might not only live in plenty, but like a king also.,When Epiphanes, who before was in great fear for his father, was informed of this, their minds were freed from that great and almost incurable concern they had been under.,He also hoped that Caesar would be reconciled to them, upon the intercession of Vologeses; for although he lived in plenty, he knew not how to bear living out of the Roman empire.,So Caesar gave him leave, after an obliging manner, and he came to Rome; and as his father came quickly to him from Lacedemon, he had all sorts of respect paid him there, and there he remained.,4. Now there was a nation of the Alans, which we have formerly mentioned somewhere as being Scythians and inhabiting at the lake Meotis.,This nation about this time laid a design of falling upon Media, and the parts beyond it, in order to plunder them; with which intention they treated with the king of Hyrcania; for he was master of that passage which king Alexander the Great shut up with iron gates.,This king gave them leave to come through them; so they came in great multitudes, and fell upon the Medes unexpectedly, and plundered their country, which they found full of people, and replenished with abundance of cattle, while nobody durst make any resistance against them;,for Pacorus, the king of the country, had fled away for fear into places where they could not easily come at him, and had yielded up everything he had to them, and had only saved his wife and his concubines from them, and that with difficulty also, after they had been made captives, by giving them a hundred talents for their ransom.,These Alans therefore plundered the country without opposition, and with great ease, and proceeded as far as Armenia, laying all waste before them.,Now Tiridates was king of that country, who met them, and fought them, but had like to have been taken alive in the battle;,for a certain man threw a net over him from a great distance, and had soon drawn him to him, unless he had immediately cut the cord with his sword, and ran away, and prevented it.,So the Alans, being still more provoked by this sight, laid waste the country, and drove a great multitude of the men, and a great quantity of the other prey they had gotten out of both kingdoms, along with them, and then retreated back to their own country.,1. When Bassus was dead in Judea, Flavius Silva succeeded him as procurator there; who, when he saw that all the rest of the country was subdued in this war, and that there was but one only stronghold that was still in rebellion, he got all his army together that lay in different places, and made an expedition against it. This fortress was called Masada.,It was one Eleazar, a potent man, and the commander of these Sicarii, that had seized upon it. He was a descendant from that Judas who had persuaded abundance of the Jews, as we have formerly related, not to submit to the taxation when Cyrenius was sent into Judea to make one;,for then it was that the Sicarii got together against those that were willing to submit to the Romans, and treated them in all respects as if they had been their enemies, both by plundering them of what they had, by driving away their cattle, and by setting fire to their houses;,for they said that they differed not at all from foreigners, by betraying, in so cowardly a manner, that freedom which Jews thought worthy to be contended for to the utmost, and by owning that they preferred slavery under the Romans before such a contention.,Now this was in reality no better than a pretense and a cloak for the barbarity which was made use of by them, and to color over their own avarice, which they afterwards made evident by their own actions;,for those that were partners with them in their rebellion joined also with them in the war against the Romans, and went further lengths with them in their impudent undertakings against them;,and when they were again convicted of dissembling in such their pretenses, they still more abused those that justly reproached them for their wickedness.,And indeed that was a time most fertile in all manner of wicked practices, insomuch that no kind of evil deeds were then left undone; nor could anyone so much as devise any bad thing that was new,,so deeply were they all infected, and strove with one another in their single capacity, and in their communities, who should run the greatest lengths in impiety towards God, and in unjust actions towards their neighbors; the men of power oppressing the multitude, and the multitude earnestly laboring to destroy the men of power.,The one part were desirous of tyrannizing over others, and the rest of offering violence to others, and of plundering such as were richer than themselves.,They were the Sicarii who first began these transgressions, and first became barbarous towards those allied to them, and left no words of reproach unsaid, and no works of perdition untried, in order to destroy those whom their contrivances affected.,Yet did John demonstrate by his actions that these Sicarii were more moderate than he was himself, for he not only slew all such as gave him good counsel to do what was right, but treated them worst of all, as the most bitter enemies that he had among all the Citizens; nay, he filled his entire country with ten thousand instances of wickedness, such as a man who was already hardened sufficiently in his impiety towards God would naturally do;,for the food was unlawful that was set upon his table, and he rejected those purifications that the law of his country had ordained; so that it was no longer a wonder if he, who was so mad in his impiety towards God, did not observe any rules of gentleness and common affection towards men.,Again, therefore, what mischief was there which Simon the son of Gioras did not do? or what kind of abuses did he abstain from as to those very free-men who had set him up for a tyrant?,What friendship or kindred were there that did not make him more bold in his daily murders? for they looked upon the doing of mischief to strangers only as a work beneath their courage, but thought their barbarity towards their nearest relations would be a glorious demonstration thereof.,The Idumeans also strove with these men who should be guilty of the greatest madness! for they all, vile wretches as they were, cut the throats of the high priests, that so no part of a religious regard to God might be preserved; they thence proceeded to destroy utterly the least remains of a political government,,and introduced the most complete scene of iniquity in all instances that were practicable; under which scene that sort of people that were called zealots grew up, and who indeed corresponded to the name;,for they imitated every wicked work; nor, if their memory suggested any evil thing that had formerly been done, did they avoid zealously to pursue the same;,and although they gave themselves that name from their zeal for what was good, yet did it agree to them only by way of irony, on account of those they had unjustly treated by their wild and brutish disposition, or as thinking the greatest mischiefs to be the greatest good.,Accordingly, they all met with such ends as God deservedly brought upon them in way of punishment;,for all such miseries have been sent upon them as man’s nature is capable of undergoing, till the utmost period of their lives, and till death came upon them in various ways of torment;,yet might one say justly that they suffered less than they had done, because it was impossible they could be punished according to their deserving.,But to make a lamentation according to the deserts of those who fell under these men’s barbarity, this is not a proper place for it;—I therefore now return again to the remaining part of the present narration.,2. For now it was that the Roman general came, and led his army against Eleazar and those Sicarii who held the fortress Masada together with him; and for the whole country adjoining, he presently gained it, and put garrisons into the most proper places of it;,he also built a wall quite round the entire fortress, that none of the besieged might easily escape; he also set his men to guard the several parts of it;,he also pitched his camp in such an agreeable place as he had chosen for the siege, and at which place the rock belonging to the fortress did make the nearest approach to the neighboring mountain, which yet was a place of difficulty for getting plenty of provisions;,for it was not only food that was to be brought from a great distance to the army, and this with a great deal of pain to those Jews who were appointed for that purpose, but water was also to be brought to the camp, because the place afforded no fountain that was near it.,When therefore Silva had ordered these affairs beforehand, he fell to besieging the place; which siege was likely to stand in need of a great deal of skill and pains, by reason of the strength of the fortress, the nature of which I will now describe.,3. There was a rock, not small in circumference, and very high. It was encompassed with valleys of such vast depth downward, that the eye could not reach their bottoms; they were abrupt, and such as no animal could walk upon, excepting at two places of the rock, where it subsides, in order to afford a passage for ascent, though not without difficulty.,Now, of the ways that lead to it, one is that from the lake Asphaltitis, towards the sunrising, and another on the west, where the ascent is easier:,the one of these ways is called the Serpent, as resembling that animal in its narrowness and its perpetual windings; for it is broken off at the prominent precipices of the rock, and returns frequently into itself, and lengthening again by little and little, hath much ado to proceed forward;,and he that would walk along it must first go on one leg, and then on the other; there is also nothing but destruction, in case your feet slip; for on each side there is a vastly deep chasm and precipice, sufficient to quell the courage of everybody by the terror it infuses into the mind.,When, therefore, a man hath gone along this way for thirty furlongs, the rest is the top of the hill—not ending at a small point, but is no other than a plain upon the highest part of the mountain.,Upon this top of the hill, Jonathan the high priest first of all built a fortress, and called it Masada: after which the rebuilding of this place employed the care of king Herod to a great degree;,he also built a wall round about the entire top of the hill, seven furlongs long; it was composed of white stone; its height was twelve, and its breadth eight cubits;,there were also erected upon that wall thirty-eight towers, each of them fifty cubits high; out of which you might pass into lesser edifices, which were built on the inside, round the entire wall;,for the king reserved the top of the hill, which was of a fat soil, and better mould than any valley for agriculture, that such as committed themselves to this fortress for their preservation might not even there be quite destitute of food, in case they should ever be in want of it from abroad.,Moreover, he built a palace therein at the western ascent; it was within and beneath the walls of the citadel, but inclined to its north side. Now the wall of this palace was very high and strong, and had at its four corners towers sixty cubits high.,The furniture also of the edifices, and of the cloisters, and of the baths, was of great variety, and very costly; and these buildings were supported by pillars of single stones on every side; the walls and also the floors of the edifices were paved with stones of several colors. He also had cut many and great pits, as reservoirs for water, out of the rocks,,at every one of the places that were inhabited, both above and round about the palace, and before the wall; and by this contrivance he endeavored to have water for several uses, as if there had been fountains there.,Here was also a road digged from the palace, and leading to the very top of the mountain, which yet could not be seen by such as were without the walls; nor indeed could enemies easily make use of the plain roads;,for the road on the east side, as we have already taken notice, could not be walked upon, by reason of its nature; and for the western road, he built a large tower at its narrowest place, at no less a distance from the top of the hill than a thousand cubits; which tower could not possibly be passed by, nor could it be easily taken; nor indeed could those that walked along it without any fear (such was its contrivance) easily get to the end of it;,and after such a manner was this citadel fortified, both by nature and by the hands of men, in order to frustrate the attacks of enemies.,4. As for the furniture that was within this fortress, it was still more wonderful on account of its splendor and long continuance;,for here was laid up corn in large quantities, and such as would subsist men for a long time; here was also wine and oil in abundance, with all kinds of pulse and dates heaped up together;,all which Eleazar found there, when he and his Sicarii got possession of the fortress by treachery. These fruits were also fresh and full ripe, and no way inferior to such fruits newly laid in, although they were little short of a hundred years from the laying in these provisions by Herod, till the place was taken by the Romans; nay, indeed, when the Romans got possession of those fruits that were left, they found them not corrupted all that while;,nor should we be mistaken, if we supposed that the air was here the cause of their enduring so long; this fortress being so high, and so free from the mixture of all terrene and muddy particles of matter.,There was also found here a large quantity of all sorts of weapons of war, which had been treasured up by that king, and were sufficient for ten thousand men; there was cast iron, and brass, and tin, which show that he had taken much pains to have all things here ready for the greatest occasions;,for the report goes how Herod thus prepared this fortress on his own account, as a refuge against two kinds of danger; the one for fear of the multitude of the Jews, lest they should depose him, and restore their former kings to the government; the other danger was greater and more terrible, which arose from Cleopatra queen of Egypt,,who did not conceal her intentions, but spoke often to Antony, and desired him to cut off Herod, and entreated him to bestow the kingdom of Judea upon her.,And certainly it is a great wonder that Antony did never comply with her commands in this point, as he was so miserably enslaved to his passion for her; nor should anyone have been surprised if she had been gratified in such her request.,So the fear of these dangers made Herod rebuild Masada, and thereby leave it for the finishing stroke of the Romans in this Jewish war.,5. Since therefore the Roman commander Silva had now built a wall on the outside, round about this whole place, as we have said already, and had thereby made a most accurate provision to prevent anyone of the besieged running away, he undertook the siege itself, though he found but one single place that would admit of the banks he was to raise;,for behind that tower which secured the road that led to the palace, and to the top of the hill from the west; there was a certain eminency of the rock, very broad and very prominent, but three hundred cubits beneath the highest part of Masada; it was called the White Promontory.,Accordingly, he got upon that part of the rock, and ordered the army to bring earth; and when they fell to that work with alacrity, and abundance of them together, the bank was raised, and became solid for two hundred cubits in height.,Yet was not this bank thought sufficiently high for the use of the engines that were to be set upon it; but still another elevated work of great stones compacted together was raised upon that bank; this was fifty cubits, both in breadth and height.,The other machines that were now got ready were like to those that had been first devised by Vespasian, and afterward by Titus, for sieges.,There was also a tower made of the height of sixty cubits, and all over plated with iron, out of which the Romans threw darts and stones from the engines, and soon made those that fought from the walls of the place to retire, and would not let them lift up their heads above the works.,At the same time Silva ordered that great battering-ram which he had made to be brought thither, and to be set against the wall, and to make frequent batteries against it, which with some difficulty broke down a part of the wall, and quite overthrew it.,However, the Sicarii made haste, and presently built another wall within that, which should not be liable to the same misfortune from the machines with the other; it was made soft and yielding, and so was capable of avoiding the terrible blows that affected the other. It was framed after the following manner:,They laid together great beams of wood lengthways, one close to the end of another, and the same way in which they were cut: there were two of these rows parallel to one another, and laid at such a distance from each other as the breadth of the wall required, and earth was put into the space between those rows.,Now, that the earth might not fall away upon the elevation of this bank to a greater height, they further laid other beams over across them, and thereby bound those beams together that lay lengthways.,This work of theirs was like a real edifice; and when the machines were applied, the blows were weakened by its yielding; and as the materials by such concussion were shaken closer together, the pile by that means became firmer than before.,When Silva saw this, he thought it best to endeavor the taking of this wall by setting fire to it; so he gave order that the soldiers should throw a great number of burning torches upon it:,accordingly, as it was chiefly made of wood, it soon took fire; and when it was once set on fire, its hollowness made that fire spread to a mighty flame.,Now, at the very beginning of this fire, a north wind that then blew proved terrible to the Romans; for by bringing the flame downward, it drove it upon them, and they were almost in despair of success, as fearing their machines would be burnt:,but after this, on a sudden the wind changed into the south, as if it were done by Divine Providence, and blew strongly the contrary way, and carried the flame, and drove it against the wall, which was now on fire through its entire thickness.,So the Romans, having now assistance from God, returned to their camp with joy, and resolved to attack their enemies the very next day; on which occasion they set their watch more carefully that night, lest any of the Jews should run away from them without being discovered.,6. However, neither did Eleazar once think of flying away, nor would he permit anyone else to do so;,but when he saw their wall burned down by the fire, and could devise no other way of escaping, or room for their further courage, and setting before their eyes what the Romans would do to them, their children, and their wives, if they got them into their power, he consulted about having them all slain.,Now, as he judged this to be the best thing they could do in their present circumstances, he gathered the most courageous of his companions together, and encouraged them to take that course by a speech which he made to them in the manner following:,“Since we, long ago, my generous friends, resolved never to be servants to the Romans, nor to any other than to God himself, who alone is the true and just Lord of mankind, the time is now come that obliges us to make that resolution true in practice.,And let us not at this time bring a reproach upon ourselves for self-contradiction, while we formerly would not undergo slavery, though it were then without danger, but must now, together with slavery, choose such punishments also as are intolerable; I mean this, upon the supposition that the Romans once reduce us under their power while we are alive. We were the very first that revolted from them, and we are the last that fight against them;,and I cannot but esteem it as a favor that God hath granted us, that it is still in our power to die bravely, and in a state of freedom, which hath not been the case of others, who were conquered unexpectedly.,It is very plain that we shall be taken within a day’s time; but it is still an eligible thing to die after a glorious manner, together with our dearest friends. This is what our enemies themselves cannot by any means hinder, although they be very desirous to take us alive. Nor can we propose to ourselves any more to fight them, and beat them.,It had been proper indeed for us to have conjectured at the purpose of God much sooner, and at the very first, when we were so desirous of defending our liberty, and when we received such sore treatment from one another, and worse treatment from our enemies, and to have been sensible that the same God, who had of old taken the Jewish nation into his favor, had now condemned them to destruction;,for had he either continued favorable, or been but in a lesser degree displeased with us, he had not overlooked the destruction of so many men, or delivered his most holy city to be burnt and demolished by our enemies.,To be sure we weakly hoped to have preserved ourselves, and ourselves alone, still in a state of freedom, as if we had been guilty of no sins ourselves against God, nor been partners with those of others; we also taught other men to preserve their liberty.,Wherefore, consider how God hath convinced us that our hopes were in vain, by bringing such distress upon us in the desperate state we are now in, and which is beyond all our expectations;,for the nature of this fortress which was in itself unconquerable, hath not proved a means of our deliverance; and even while we have still great abundance of food, and a great quantity of arms, and other necessaries more than we want, we are openly deprived by God himself of all hope of deliverance;,for that fire which was driven upon our enemies did not of its own accord turn back upon the wall which we had built; this was the effect of God’s anger against us for our manifold sins, which we have been guilty of in a most insolent and extravagant manner with regard to our own countrymen;,the punishments of which let us not receive from the Romans, but from God himself, as executed by our own hands; for these will be more moderate than the other.,Let our wives die before they are abused, and our children before they have tasted of slavery; and after we have slain them, let us bestow that glorious benefit upon one another mutually, and preserve ourselves in freedom, as an excellent funeral monument for us.,But first let us destroy our money and the fortress by fire; for I am well assured that this will be a great grief to the Romans, that they shall not be able to seize upon our bodies, and shall fail of our wealth also;,and let us spare nothing but our provisions; for they will be a testimonial when we are dead that we were not subdued for want of necessaries, but that, according to our original resolution, we have preferred death before slavery.”,7. This was Eleazar’s speech to them. Yet did not the opinions of all the auditors acquiesce therein; but although some of them were very zealous to put his advice in practice, and were in a manner filled with pleasure at it, and thought death to be a good thing,,yet had those that were most effeminate a commiseration for their wives and families; and when these men were especially moved by the prospect of their own certain death, they looked wistfully at one another, and by the tears that were in their eyes declared their dissent from his opinion.,When Eleazar saw these people in such fear, and that their souls were dejected at so prodigious a proposal, he was afraid lest perhaps these effeminate persons should, by their lamentations and tears, enfeeble those that heard what he had said courageously;,so he did not leave off exhorting them, but stirred up himself, and recollecting proper arguments for raising their courage, he undertook to speak more briskly and fully to them, and that concerning the immortality of the soul.,So he made a lamentable groan, and fixing his eyes intently on those that wept, he spake thus:—“Truly, I was greatly mistaken when I thought to be assisting to brave men who struggled hard for their liberty, and to such as were resolved either to live with honor, or else to die;,but I find that you are such people as are no better than others, either in virtue or in courage, and are afraid of dying, though you be delivered thereby from the greatest miseries, while you ought to make no delay in this matter, nor to await anyone to give you good advice;,for the laws of our country, and of God himself, have from ancient times, and as soon as ever we could use our reason, continually taught us, and our forefathers have corroborated the same doctrine by their actions, and by their bravery of mind, that it is life that is a calamity to men, and not death;,for this last affords our souls their liberty, and sends them by a removal into their own place of purity, where they are to be insensible of all sorts of misery; for while souls are tied down to a mortal body, they are partakers of its miseries; and really, to speak the truth, they are themselves dead; for the union of what is divine to what is mortal is disagreeable.,It is true, the power of the soul is great, even when it is imprisoned in a mortal body; for by moving it after a way that is invisible, it makes the body a sensible instrument, and causes it to advance further in its actions than mortal nature could otherwise do.,However, when it is freed from that weight which draws it down to the earth and is connected with it, it obtains its own proper place, and does then become a partaker of that blessed power, and those abilities, which are then every way incapable of being hindered in their operations. It continues invisible, indeed, to the eyes of men, as does God himself;,for certainly it is not itself seen while it is in the body; for it is there after an invisible manner, and when it is freed from it, it is still not seen. It is this soul which hath one nature, and that an incorruptible one also; but yet it is the cause of the change that is made in the body;,for whatsoever it be which the soul touches, that lives and flourishes; and from whatsoever it is removed, that withers away and dies; such a degree is there in it of immortality.,Let me produce the state of sleep as a most evident demonstration of the truth of what I say; wherein souls, when the body does not distract them, have the sweetest rest depending on themselves, and conversing with God, by their alliance to him; they then go everywhere, and foretell many futurities beforehand.,And why are we afraid of death, while we are pleased with the rest that we have in sleep? And how absurd a thing is it to pursue after liberty while we are alive, and yet to envy it to ourselves where it will be eternal!,We, therefore, who have been brought up in a discipline of our own, ought to become an example to others of our readiness to die; yet if we dostand in need of foreigners to support us in this matter, let us regard those Indians who profess the exercise of philosophy;,for these good men do but unwillingly undergo the time of life, and look upon it as a necessary servitude,,and make haste to let their souls loose from their bodies; nay, when no misfortune presses them to it, nor drives them upon it, these have such a desire of a life of immortality, that they tell other men beforehand that they are about to depart; and nobody hinders them, but everyone thinks them happy men, and gives them letters to be carried to their familiar friends that are dead;,so firmly and certainly do they believe that souls converse with one another in the other world.,So when these men have heard all such commands that were to be given them, they deliver their body to the fire; and, in order to their getting their soul a separation from the body in the greatest purity, they die in the midst of hymns of commendations made to them;,for their dearest friends conduct them to their death more readily than do any of the rest of mankind conduct their fellow-citizens when they are going a very long journey, who at the same time weep on their own account, but look upon the others as happy persons, as so soon to be made partakers of the immortal order of beings.,Are not we, therefore, ashamed to have lower notions than the Indians? and by our own cowardice to lay a base reproach upon the laws of our country, which are so much desired and imitated by all mankind?,But put the case that we had been brought up under another persuasion, and taught that life is the greatest good which men are capable of, and that death is a calamity; however, the circumstances we are now in ought to be an inducement to us to bear such calamity courageously, since it is by the will of God, and by necessity, that we are to die;,for it now appears that God hath made such a decree against the whole Jewish nation, that we are to be deprived of this life which he knew we would not make a due use of.,For do not you ascribe the occasion of our present condition to yourselves, nor think the Romans are the true occasion that this war we have had with them is become so destructive to us all: these things have not come to pass by their power, but a more powerful cause hath intervened, and made us afford them an occasion of their appearing to be conquerors over us.,What Roman weapons, I pray you, were those by which the Jews at Caesarea were slain?,On the contrary, when they were no way disposed to rebel, but were all the while keeping their seventh day festival, and did not so much as lift up their hands against the citizens of Caesarea, yet did those citizens run upon them in great crowds, and cut their throats, and the throats of their wives and children, and this without any regard to the Romans themselves, who never took us for their enemies till we revolted from them.,But some may be ready to say, that truly the people of Caesarea had always a quarrel against those that lived among them, and that when an opportunity offered itself, they only satisfied the old rancor they had against them.,What then shall we say to those of Scythopolis, who ventured to wage war with us on account of the Greeks? Nor did they do it by way of revenge upon the Romans, when they acted in concert with our countrymen.,Wherefore you see how little our goodwill and fidelity to them profited us, while they were slain, they and their whole families, after the most inhuman manner, which was all the requital that was made them for the assistance they had afforded the others;,for that very same destruction which they had prevented from falling upon the others did they suffer themselves from them, as if they had been ready to be the actors against them. It would be too long for me to speak at this time of every destruction brought upon us;,for you cannot but know that there was not anyone Syrian city which did not slay their Jewish inhabitants, and were not more bitter enemies to us than were the Romans themselves;,nay, even those of Damascus, when they were able to allege no tolerable pretense against us, filled their city with the most barbarous slaughters of our people, and cut the throats of eighteen thousand Jews, with their wives and children.,And as to the multitude of those that were slain in Egypt, and that with torments also, we have been informed they were more than sixty thousand; those, indeed, being in a foreign country, and so naturally meeting with nothing to oppose against their enemies, were killed in the manner forementioned. As for all those of us who have waged war against the Romans in our own country, had we not sufficient reason to have sure hopes of victory?,For we had arms, and walls, and fortresses so prepared as not to be easily taken, and courage not to be moved by any dangers in the cause of liberty, which encouraged us all to revolt from the Romans.,But then these advantages sufficed us but for a short time, and only raised our hopes, while they really appeared to be the origin of our miseries; for all we had hath been taken from us, and all hath fallen under our enemies, as if these advantages were only to render their victory over us the more glorious, and were not disposed for the preservation of those by whom these preparations were made.,And as for those that are already dead in the war, it is reasonable we should esteem them blessed, for they are dead in defending, and not in betraying their liberty; but as to the multitude of those that are now under the Romans, who would not pity their condition? and who would not make haste to die, before he would suffer the same miseries with them?,Some of them have been put upon the rack, and tortured with fire and whippings, and so died. Some have been halfdevoured by wild beasts, and yet have been reserved alive to be devoured by them a second time, in order to afford laughter and sport to our enemies;,and such of those as are alive still are to be looked on as the most miserable, who, being so desirous of death, could not come at it.,And where is now that great city, the metropolis of the Jewish nation, which was fortified by so many walls round about, which had so many fortresses and large towers to defend it, which could hardly contain the instruments prepared for the war, and which had so many ten thousands of men to fight for it?,Where is this city that was believed to have God himself inhabiting therein? It is now demolished to the very foundations, and hath nothing but that monument of it preserved, I mean the camp of those that hath destroyed it, which still dwells upon its ruins;,some unfortunate old men also lie upon the ashes of the temple, and a few women are there preserved alive by the enemy, for our bitter shame and reproach.,Now, who is there that revolves these things in his mind, and yet is able to bear the sight of the sun, though he might live out of danger? Who is there so much his country’s enemy, or so unmanly, and so desirous of living, as not to repent that he is still alive?,And I cannot but wish that we had all died before we had seen that holy city demolished by the hands of our enemies, or the foundations of our holy temple dug up after so profane a manner.,But since we had a generous hope that deluded us, as if we might perhaps have been able to avenge ourselves on our enemies on that account, though it be now become vanity, and hath left us alone in this distress, let us make haste to die bravely. Let us pity ourselves, our children, and our wives while it is in our own power to show pity to them;,for we were born to die, as well as those were whom we have begotten; nor is it in the power of the most happy of our race to avoid it.,But for abuses, and slavery, and the sight of our wives led away after an ignominious manner, with their children, these are not such evils as are natural and necessary among men; although such as do not prefer death before those miseries, when it is in their power so to do, must undergo even them, on account of their own cowardice.,We revolted from the Romans with great pretensions to courage; and when, at the very last, they invited us to preserve ourselves, we would not comply with them.,Who will not, therefore, believe that they will certainly be in a rage at us, in case they can take us alive? Miserable will then be the young men who will be strong enough in their bodies to sustain many torments! miserable also will be those of elder years, who will not be able to bear those calamities which young men might sustain.,One man will be obliged to hear the voice of his son implore help of his father, when his hands are bound.,But certainly our hands are still at liberty, and have a sword in them; let them then be subservient to us in our glorious design; let us die before we become slaves under our enemies, and let us go out of the world, together with our children and our wives, in a state of freedom.,This it is that our laws command us to do; this it is that our wives and children crave at our hands; nay, God himself hath brought this necessity upon us; while the Romans desire the contrary, and are afraid lest any of us should die before we are taken.,Let us therefore make haste, and instead of affording them so much pleasure, as they hope for in getting us under their power, let us leave them an example which shall at once cause their astonishment at our death, and their admiration of our hardiness therein.”,1. While Titus was at Caesarea, he solemnized the birthday of his brother Domitian after a splendid manner, and inflicted a great deal of the punishment intended for the Jews in honor of him;,for the number of those that were now slain in fighting with the beasts, and were burnt, and fought with one another, exceeded two thousand five hundred. Yet did all this seem to the Romans, when they were thus destroyed ten thousand several ways, to be a punishment beneath their deserts.,After this Caesar came to Berytus, which is a city of Phoenicia, and a Roman colony, and staid there a longer time, and exhibited a still more pompous solemnity about his father’s birthday, both in the magnificence of the shows, and in the other vast expenses he was at in his devices thereto belonging;,so that a great multitude of the captives were here destroyed after the same manner as before.,2. It happened also about this time, that the Jews who remained at Antioch were under accusations, and in danger of perishing, from the disturbances that were raised against them by the Antiochians; and this both on account of the slanders spread abroad at this time against them, and on account of what pranks they had played not long before;,which I am obliged to describe without fail, though briefly, that I may the better connect my narration of future actions with those that went before.,3. For as the Jewish nation is widely dispersed over all the habitable earth among its inhabitants, so it is very much intermingled with Syria by reason of its neighborhood, and had the greatest multitudes in Antioch by reason of the largeness of the city, wherein the kings, after Antiochus, had afforded them a habitation with the most undisturbed tranquillity;,for though Antiochus, who was called Epiphanes, laid Jerusalem waste, and spoiled the temple, yet did those that succeeded him in the kingdom restore all the donations that were made of brass to the Jews of Antioch, and dedicated them to their synagogue, and granted them the enjoyment of equal privileges of citizens with the Greeks themselves;,and as the succeeding kings treated them after the same manner, they both multiplied to a great number, and adorned their temple gloriously by fine ornaments, and with great magnificence, in the use of what had been given them. They also made proselytes of a great many of the Greeks perpetually, and thereby, after a sort, brought them to be a portion of their own body.,But about this time when the present war began, and Vespasian was newly sailed to Syria,,and all men had taken up a great hatred against the Jews, then it was that a certain person, whose name was Antiochus, being one of the Jewish nation, and greatly respected on account of his father, who was governor of the Jews at Antioch came upon the theater at a time when the people of Antioch were assembled together, and became an informer against his father, and accused both him and others that they had resolved to burn the whole city in one night;; he also delivered up to them some Jews that were foreigners, as partners in their resolutions.,When the people heard this, they could not refrain their passion, but commanded that those who were delivered up to them should have fire brought to burn them, who were accordingly all burnt upon the theater immediately.,They did also fall violently upon the multitude of the Jews, as supposing that by punishing them suddenly they should save their own city.,As for Antiochus, he aggravated the rage they were in, and thought to give them a demonstration of his own conversion, and of his hatred of the Jewish customs, by sacrificing after the manner of the Greeks;,he persuaded the rest also to compel them to do the same, because they would by that means discover who they were that had plotted against them, since they would not do so; and when the people of Antioch tried the experiment, some few complied, but those that would not do so were slain.,As for Antiochus himself, he obtained soldiers from the Roman commander, and became a severe master over his own citizens, not permitting them to rest on the seventh day, but forcing them to do all that they usually did on other days;,and to that degree of distress did he reduce them in this matter, that the rest of the seventh day was dissolved not only at Antioch, but the same thing which took thence its rise was done in other cities also, in like manner, for some small time.,4. Now, after these misfortunes had happened to the Jews at Antioch, a second calamity befell them, the description of which when we were going about we promised the account foregoing;,for upon this accident, whereby the foursquare marketplace was burnt down, as well as the archives, and the place where the public records were preserved, and the royal palaces (and it was not without difficulty that the fire was then put a stop to, which was likely, by the fury wherewith it was carried along, to have gone over the whole city), Antiochus accused the Jews as the occasion of all the mischief that was done.,Now this induced the people of Antioch, who were now under the immediate persuasion, by reason of the disorder they were in, that this calumny was true, and would have been under the same persuasion, even though they had not borne an ill will at the Jews before, to believe this man’s accusation, especially when they considered what had been done before, and this to such a degree, that they all fell violently upon those that were accused,,and this, like madmen, in a very furious rage also, even as if they had seen the Jews in a manner setting fire themselves to the city;,nor was it without difficulty that one Cneius Collegas, the legate, could prevail with them to permit the affairs to be laid before Caesar;,for as to Cesennius Petus, the president of Syria, Vespasian had already sent him away; and so it happened that he was not yet come back thither.,But when Collegas had made a careful inquiry into the matter, he found out the truth, and that not one of those Jews that were accused by Antiochus had any hand in it,,but that all was done by some vile persons greatly in debt, who supposed that if they could once set fire to the marketplace, and burn the public records, they should have no further demands made upon them.,So the Jews were under great disorder and terror, in the uncertain expectations of what would be the upshot of these accusations against them.,1. Now as Eleazar was proceeding on in this exhortation, they all cut him off short, and made haste to do the work, as full of an unconquerable ardor of mind, and moved with a demoniacal fury. So they went their ways, as one still endeavoring to be before another, and as thinking that this eagerness would be a demonstration of their courage and good conduct, if they could avoid appearing in the last class; so great was the zeal they were in to slay their wives and children, and themselves also!,Nor, indeed, when they came to the work itself, did their courage fail them, as one might imagine it would have done, but they then held fast the same resolution, without wavering, which they had upon the hearing of Eleazar’s speech, while yet every one of them still retained the natural passion of love to themselves and their families, because the reasoning they went upon appeared to them to be very just, even with regard to those that were dearest to them;,for the husbands tenderly embraced their wives, and took their children into their arms, and gave the longest parting kisses to them, with tears in their eyes.,Yet at the same time did they complete what they had resolved on, as if they had been executed by the hands of strangers; and they had nothing else for their comfort but the necessity they were in of doing this execution, to avoid that prospect they had of the miseries they were to suffer from their enemies.,Nor was there at length anyone of these men found that scrupled to act their part in this terrible execution, but every one of them dispatched his dearest relations. Miserable men indeed were they! whose distress forced them to slay their own wives and children with their own hands, as the lightest of those evils that were before them.,So they being not able to bear the grief they were under for what they had done any longer, and esteeming it an injury to those they had slain, to live even the shortest space of time after them,—they presently laid all they had upon a heap, and set fire to it.,They then chose ten men by lot out of them to slay all the rest; every one of whom laid himself down by his wife and children on the ground, and threw his arms about them, and they offered their necks to the stroke of those who by lot executed that melancholy office;,and when these ten had, without fear, slain them all, they made the same rule for casting lots for themselves, that he whose lot it was should first kill the other nine, and after all should kill himself. Accordingly, all these had courage sufficient to be no way behind one another in doing or suffering;,so, for a conclusion, the nine offered their necks to the executioner, and he who was the last of all took a view of all the other bodies, lest perchance some or other among so many that were slain should want his assistance to be quite dispatched; and when he perceived that they were all slain, he set fire to the palace, and with the great force of his hand ran his sword entirely through himself, and fell down dead near to his own relations.,So these people died with this intention, that they would not leave so much as one soul among them all alive to be subject to the Romans.,Yet was there an ancient woman, and another who was of kin to Eleazar, and superior to most women in prudence and learning, with five children, who had concealed themselves in caverns under ground, and had carried water thither for their drink, and were hidden there when the rest were intent upon the slaughter of one another.,Those others were nine hundred and sixty in number, the women and children being withal included in that computation.,This calamitous slaughter was made on the fifteenth day of the month Xanthicus Nisan.,2. Now for the Romans, they expected that they should be fought in the morning, when, accordingly, they put on their armor, and laid bridges of planks upon their ladders from their banks, to make an assault upon the fortress, which they did;,but saw nobody as an enemy, but a terrible solitude on every side, with a fire within the place, as well as a perfect silence. So they were at a loss to guess at what had happened. At length they made a shout, as if it had been at a blow given by the batteringram, to try whether they could bring anyone out that was within;,the women heard this noise, and came out of their underground cavern, and informed the Romans what had been done, as it was done; and the second of them clearly described all both what was said and what was done, and the manner of it;,yet did they not easily give their attention to such a desperate undertaking, and did not believe it could be as they said; they also attempted to put the fire out, and quickly cutting themselves a way through it, they came within the palace,,and so met with the multitude of the slain, but could take no pleasure in the fact, though it were done to their enemies. Nor could they do other than wonder at the courage of their resolution, and the immovable contempt of death which so great a number of them had shown, when they went through with such an action as that was.,1. When Masada was thus taken, the general left a garrison in the fortress to keep it, and he himself went away to Caesarea;,for there were now no enemies left in the country, but it was all overthrown by so long a war. Yet did this war afford disturbances and dangerous disorders even in places very far remote from Judea;,for still it came to pass that many Jews were slain at Alexandria in Egypt;,for as many of the Sicarii as were able to fly thither, out of the seditious wars in Judea, were not content to have saved themselves, but must needs be undertaking to make new disturbances, and persuaded many of those that entertained them to assert their liberty, to esteem the Romans to be no better than themselves, and to look upon God as their only Lord and Master.,But when part of the Jews of reputation opposed them, they slew some of them, and with the others they were very pressing in their exhortations to revolt from the Romans;,but when the principal men of the senate saw what madness they were come to, they thought it no longer safe for themselves to overlook them. So they got all the Jews together to an assembly, and accused the madness of the Sicarii, and demonstrated that they had been the authors of all the evils that had come upon them.,They said also that “these men, now they were run away from Judea, having no sure hope of escaping, because as soon as ever they shall be known, they will be soon destroyed by the Romans, they come hither and fill us full of those calamities which belong to them, while we have not been partakers with them in any of their sins.”,Accordingly, they exhorted the multitude to have a care, lest they should be brought to destruction by their means, and to make their apology to the Romans for what had been done, by delivering these men up to them;,who being thus apprised of the greatness of the danger they were in, complied with what was proposed, and ran with great violence upon the Sicarii, and seized upon them;,and indeed six hundred of them were caught immediately: but as to all those that fled into Egypt and to the Egyptian Thebes, it was not long ere they were caught also, and brought back,—,whose courage, or whether we ought to call it madness, or hardiness in their opinions, everybody was amazed at.,For when all sorts of torments and vexations of their bodies that could be devised were made use of to them, they could not get anyone of them to comply so far as to confess, or seem to confess, that Caesar was their lord; but they preserved their own opinion, in spite of all the distress they were brought to, as if they received these torments and the fire itself with bodies insensible of pain, and with a soul that in a manner rejoiced under them.,But what was most of all astonishing to the beholders was the courage of the children; for not one of these children was so far overcome by these torments, as to name Caesar for their lord. So far does the strength of the courage of the soul prevail over the weakness of the body.,2. Now Lupus did then govern Alexandria, who presently sent Caesar word of this commotion;,who having in suspicion the restless temper of the Jews for innovation, and being afraid lest they should get together again, and persuade some others to join with them, gave orders to Lupus to demolish that Jewish temple which was in the region called Onion,,and was in Egypt, which was built and had its denomination from the occasion following:,Onias, the son of Simon, one of the Jewish high priests, fled from Antiochus the king of Syria, when he made war with the Jews, and came to Alexandria; and as Ptolemy received him very kindly, on account of his hatred to Antiochus, he assured him, that if he would comply with his proposal, he would bring all the Jews to his assistance;,and when the king agreed to do it so far as he was able, he desired him to give him leave to build a temple somewhere in Egypt, and to worship God according to the customs of his own country;,for that the Jews would then be so much readier to fight against Antiochus who had laid waste the temple at Jerusalem, and that they would then come to him with greater goodwill; and that, by granting them liberty of conscience, very many of them would come over to him.,3. So Ptolemy complied with his proposals, and gave him a place one hundred and eighty furlongs distant from Memphis. That Nomos was called the Nomos of Heliopolis,where Onias built a fortress and a temple, not like to that at Jerusalem, but such as resembled a tower. He built it of large stones to the height of sixty cubits;,he made the structure of the altar in imitation of that in our own country, and in like manner adorned with gifts, excepting the make of the candlestick,,for he did not make a candlestick, but had a single lamp hammered out of a piece of gold, which illuminated the place with its rays, and which he hung by a chain of gold;,but the entire temple was encompassed with a wall of burnt brick, though it had gates of stone. The king also gave him a large country for a revenue in money, that both the priests might have a plentiful provision made for them, and that God might have great abundance of what things were necessary for his worship.,Yet did not Onias do this out of a sober disposition, but he had a mind to contend with the Jews at Jerusalem, and could not forget the indignation he had for being banished thence. Accordingly, he thought that by building this temple he should draw away a great number from them to himself.,There had been also a certain ancient prediction made by a prophet whose name was Isaiah, about six hundred years before, that this temple should be built by a man that was a Jew in Egypt. And this is the history of the building of that temple.,4. And now Lupus, the governor of Alexandria, upon the receipt of Caesar’s letter, came to the temple, and carried out of it some of the donations dedicated thereto, and shut up the temple itself.,And as Lupus died a little afterward, Paulinus succeeded him. This man left none of those donations there, and threatened the priests severely if they did not bring them all out; nor did he permit any who were desirous of worshipping God there so much as to come near the whole sacred place;,but when he had shut up the gates, he made it entirely inaccessible, insomuch that there remained no longer the least footsteps of any Divine worship that had been in that place.,Now the duration of the time from the building of this temple till it was shut up again was three hundred and forty-three years.,1. And now did the madness of the Sicarii, like a disease, reach as far as the cities of Cyrene;,for one Jonathan, a vile person, and by trade a weaver, came thither and prevailed with no small number of the poorer sort to give ear to him; he also led them into the desert, upon promising them that he would show them signs and apparitions.,And as for the other Jews of Cyrene, he concealed his knavery from them, and put tricks upon them; but those of the greatest dignity among them informed Catullus, the governor of the Libyan Pentapolis, of his march into the desert, and of the preparations he had made for it.,So he sent out after him both horsemen and footmen, and easily overcame them, because they were unarmed men; of these many were slain in the fight, but some were taken alive, and brought to Catullus.,As for Jonathan, the head of this plot, he fled away at that time; but upon a great and very diligent search, which was made all the country over for him, he was at last taken. And when he was brought to Catullus, he devised a way whereby he both escaped punishment himself, and afforded an occasion to Catullus of doing much mischief;,for he falsely accused the richest men among the Jews, and said that they had put him upon what he did.,2. Now Catullus easily admitted of these his calumnies, and aggravated matters greatly, and made tragical exclamations, that he might also be supposed to have had a hand in the finishing of the Jewish war.,But what was still harder, he did not only give a too easy belief to his stories, but he taught the Sicarii to accuse men falsely.,He bid this Jonathan, therefore, to name one Alexander, a Jew (with whom he had formerly had a quarrel, and openly professed that he hated him); he also got him to name his wife Bernice, as concerned with him. These two Catullus ordered to be slain in the first place; nay, after them he caused all the rich and wealthy Jews to be slain, being no fewer in all than three thousand.,This he thought he might do safely, because he confiscated their effects, and added them to Caesar’s revenues.,3. Nay, indeed, lest any Jews that lived elsewhere should convict him of his villainy, he extended his false accusations further, and persuaded Jonathan, and certain others that were caught with him, to bring an accusation of attempts for innovation against the Jews that were of the best character both at Alexandria and at Rome.,One of these, against whom this treacherous accusation was laid, was Josephus, the writer of these books.,However, this plot, thus contrived by Catullus, did not succeed according to his hopes; for though he came himself to Rome, and brought Jonathan and his companions along with him in bonds, and thought he should have had no further inquisition made as to those lies that were forged under his government, or by his means;,yet did Vespasian suspect the matter, and made an inquiry how far it was true. And when he understood that the accusation laid against the Jews was an unjust one, he cleared them of the crimes charged upon them, and this on account of Titus’s concern about the matter, and brought a deserved punishment upon Jonathan; for he was first tormented, and then burnt alive.,4. But as to Catullus, the emperors were so gentle to him, that he underwent no severe condemnation at this time; yet was it not long before he fell into a complicated and almost incurable distemper, and died miserably. He was not only afflicted in body, but the distemper in his mind was more heavy upon him than the other;,for he was terribly disturbed, and continually cried out that he saw the ghosts of those whom he had slain standing before him. Whereupon he was not able to contain himself, but leaped out of his bed, as if both torments and fire were brought to him.,This his distemper grew still a great deal worse and worse continually, and his very entrails were so corroded, that they fell out of his body, and in that condition he died. Thus he became as great an instance of Divine Providence as ever was, and demonstrated that God punishes wicked men.,5. And here we shall put an end to this our history; wherein we formerly promised to deliver the same with all accuracy, to such as should be desirous of understanding after what manner this war of the Romans with the Jews was managed.,of which history, how good the style is, must be left to the determination of the readers; but as for its agreement with the facts, I shall not scruple to say, and that boldly, that truth hath been what I have alone aimed at through its entire composition.,1. And now Titus Caesar, upon the news that was brought him concerning his father, that his coming was much desired by all the Italian cities, and that Rome especially received him with great alacrity and splendor, betook himself to rejoicing and pleasures to a great degree, as now freed from the solicitude he had been under, after the most agreeable manner.,For all men that were in Italy showed their respects to him in their minds before he came thither, as if he were already come, as esteeming the very expectation they had of him to be his real presence, on account of the great desires they had to see him, and because the goodwill they bore him was entirely free and unconstrained;,for it wasa desirable thing to the senate, who well remembered the calamities they had undergone in the late changes of their governors, to receive a governor who was adorned with the gravity of old age, and with the highest skill in the actions of war, whose advancement would be, as they knew, for nothing else but for the preservation of those that were to be governed.,Moreover, the people had been so harassed by their civil miseries, that they were still more earnest for his coming immediately, as supposing they should then be firmly delivered from their calamities, and believed they should then recover their secure tranquillity and prosperity;,and for the soldiery, they had the principal regard to him, for they were chiefly apprised of his great exploits in war; and since they had experienced the want of skill and want of courage in other commanders, they were very desirous to be freed from that great shame they had undergone by their means, and heartily wished to receive such a prince as might be a security and an ornament to them.,And as this goodwill to Vespasian was universal, those that enjoyed any remarkable dignities could not have patience enough to stay in Rome, but made haste to meet him at a very great distance from it;,nay, indeed, none of the rest could endure the delay of seeing him, but did all pour out of the city in such crowds, and were so universally possessed with the opinion that it was easier and better for them to go out than to stay there, that this was the very first time that the city joyfully perceived itself almost empty of its citizens; for those that staid within were fewer than those that went out.,But as soon as the news was come that he was hard by, and those that had met him at first related with what good humor he received everyone that came to him, then it was that the whole multitude that had remained in the city, with their wives and children, came into the road, and waited for him there;,and for those whom he passed by, they made all sorts of acclamations, on account of the joy they had to see him, and the pleasantness of his countece, and styled him their Benefactor and Savior, and the only person who was worthy to be ruler of the city of Rome.,And now the city was like a temple, full of garlands and sweet odors; nor was it easy for him to come to the royal palace, for the multitude of the people that stood about him, where yet at last he performed his sacrifices of thanksgiving to his household gods for his safe return to the city.,The multitude did also betake themselves to feasting; which feasts and drink-offerings they celebrated by their tribes, and their families, and their neighborhoods, and still prayed God to grant that Vespasian, his sons, and all their posterity, might continue in the Roman government for a very long time, and that his dominion might be preserved from all opposition.,And this was the manner in which Rome so joyfully received Vespasian, and thence grew immediately into a state of great prosperity.,2. But before this time, and while Vespasian was about Alexandria, and Titus was lying at the siege of Jerusalem,,a great multitude of the Germans were in commotion, and tended to rebellion; and as the Gauls in their neighborhood joined with them, they conspired together, and had thereby great hopes of success, and that they should free themselves from the dominion of the Romans.,The motives that induced the Germans to this attempt for a revolt, and for beginning the war, were these: In the first place, the nature of the people, which was destitute of just reasonings, and ready to throw themselves rashly into danger, upon small hopes;,in the next place, the hatred they bore to those that were their governors, while their nation had never been conscious of subjection to any but to the Romans, and that by compulsion only. Besides these motives, it was the opportunity that now afforded itself, which above all the rest prevailed with them so to do;,for when they saw the Roman government in a great internal disorder, by the continual changes of its rulers, and understood that every part of the habitable earth under them was in an unsettled and tottering condition, they thought this was the best opportunity that could afford itself for themselves to make a sedition, when the state of the Romans was so ill.,Classicus also, and Vitellius, two of their commanders, puffed them up with such hopes.,These had for a long time been openly desirous of such an innovation, and were induced by the present opportunity to venture upon the declaration of their sentiments; the multitude was also ready; and when these men told them of what they intended to attempt, that news was gladly received by them.,So when a great part of the Germans had agreed to rebel, and the rest were no better disposed, Vespasian, as guided by Divine Providence, sent letters to Petilius Cerealis, who had formerly had the command of Germany, whereby he declared him to have the dignity of consul, and commanded him to take upon him the government of Britain;,so he went whither he was ordered to go, and when he was informed of the revolt of the Germans, he fell upon them as soon as they were gotten together, and put his army in battle-array, and slew a great number of them in the fight, and forced them to leave off their madness, and to grow wiser;,nay, had he not fallen thus suddenly upon them on the place, it had not been long ere they would however have been brought to punishment;,for as soon as ever the news of their revolt was come to Rome, and Caesar Domitian was made acquainted with it, he made no delay, even at that his age, when he was exceeding young, but undertook this weighty affair.,He had a courageous mind from his father, and had made greater improvements than belonged to such an age: accordingly he marched against the barbarians immediately;,whereupon their hearts failed them at the very rumor of his approach, and they submitted themselves to him with fear, and thought it a happy thing that they were brought under their old yoke again without suffering any further mischiefs.,When therefore Domitian had settled all the affairs of Gaul in such good order, that it would not be easily put into disorder any more, he returned to Rome with honor and glory, as having performed such exploits as were above his own age, but worthy of so great a father.,3. At the very same time with the forementioned revolt of the Germans did the bold attempt of the Scythians against the Romans occur;,for those Scythians who are called Sarmatians, being a very numerous people, transported themselves over the Danube into Mysia, without being perceived; after which, by their violence, and entirely unexpected assault, they slew a great many of the Romans that guarded the frontiers;,and as the consular legate Fonteius Agrippa came to meet them, and fought courageously against them, he was slain by them. They then overran all the region that had been subject to him, tearing and rending everything that fell in their way.,But when Vespasian was informed of what had happened, and how Mysia was laid waste, he sent away Rubrius Gallus to punish these Sarmatians;,by whose means many of them perished in the battles he fought against them, and that part which escaped fled with fear to their own country.,So when this general had put an end to the war, he provided for the future security of the country also; for he placed more and more numerous garrisons in the place, till he made it altogether impossible for the barbarians to pass over the river any more.,And thus had this war in Mysia a sudden conclusion.,1. Now Titus Caesar tarried some time at Berytus, as we told you before. He thence removed, and exhibited magnificent shows in all those cities of Syria through which he went, and made use of the captive Jews as public instances of the destruction of that nation. He then saw a river as he went along, of such a nature as deserves to be recorded in history;,it runs in the middle between Arcea, belonging to Agrippa’s kingdom, and Raphanea. It hath somewhat very peculiar in it;,for when it runs, its current is strong, and has plenty of water;,after which its springs fail for six days together, and leave its channel dry, as anyone may see; after which days it runs on the seventh day as it did before, and as though it had undergone no change at all; it hath also been observed to keep this order perpetually and exactly; whence it is that they call it the Sabbatic River, that name being taken from the sacred seventh day among the Jews.,2. But when the people of Antioch were informed that Titus was approaching, they were so glad at it, that they could not keep within their walls, but hasted away to give him the meeting;,nay, they proceeded as far as thirty furlongs, and more, with that intention. These were not the men only, but a multitude of women also with their children did the same;,and when they saw him coming up to them, they stood on both sides of the way, and stretched out their right hands, saluting him, and making all sorts of acclamations to him, and turned back together with him.,They also, among all the acclamations they made to him, besought him all the way they went to eject the Jews out of their city;,yet did not Titus at all yield to this their petition, but gave them the bare hearing of it quietly. However, the Jews were in a great deal of terrible fear, under the uncertainty they were in what his opinion was, and what he would do to them.,For Titus did not stay at Antioch, but continued his progress immediately to Zeugma, which lies upon the Euphrates, whither came to him messengers from Vologeses king of Parthia, and brought him a crown of gold upon the victory he had gained over the Jews;,which he accepted of, and feasted the king’s messengers, and then came back to Antioch.,And when the senate and people of Antioch earnestly entreated him to come upon their theater, where their whole multitude was assembled, and expected him, he complied with great humanity;,but when they pressed him with much earnestness, and continually begged of him that he would eject the Jews out of their city, he gave them this very pertinent answer:,“How can this be done, since that country of theirs, whither the Jews must be obliged then to retire, is destroyed, and no place will receive them besides?”,Whereupon the people of Antioch, when they had failed of success in this their first request, made him a second; for they desired that he would order those tables of brass to be removed on which the Jews’ privileges were engraven.,However, Titus would not grant that either, but permitted the Jews of Antioch to continue to enjoy the very same privileges in that city which they had before, and then departed for Egypt;,and as he came to Jerusalem in his progress, and compared the melancholy condition he saw it then in, with the ancient glory of the city, and called to mind the greatness of its present ruins, as well as its ancient splendor, he could not but pity the destruction of the city,,so far was he from boasting that so great and goodly a city as that was had been by him taken by force; nay, he frequently cursed those that had been the authors of their revolt, and had brought such a punishment upon the city; insomuch that it openly appeared that he did not desire that such a calamity as this punishment of theirs amounted to should be a demonstration of his courage.,Yet was there no small quantity of the riches that had been in that city still found among its ruins,,a great deal of which the Romans dug up; but the greatest part was discovered by those who were captives, and so they carried it away,—I mean the gold and the silver, and the rest of that most precious furniture which the Jews had, and which the owners had treasured up underground, against the uncertain fortunes of war.,3. So Titus took the journey he intended into Egypt, and passed over the desert very suddenly, and came to Alexandria,,and took up a resolution to go to Rome by sea. And as he was accompanied by two legions, he sent each of them again to the places whence they had before come; the fifth he sent to Mysia, and the fifteenth to Pannonia:,as for the leaders of the captives, Simon and John, with the other seven hundred men, whom he had selected out of the rest as being eminently tall and handsome of body, he gave order that they should be soon carried to Italy, as resolving to produce them in his triumph.,So when he had had a prosperous voyage to his mind, the city of Rome behaved itself in his reception, and their meeting him at a distance, as it did in the case of his father. But what made the most splendid appearance in Titus’s opinion was, when his father met him, and received him;,but still the multitude of the citizens conceived the greatest joy when they saw them all three together, as they did at this time;,nor were many days overpast when they determined to have but one triumph, that should be common to both of them, on account of the glorious exploits they had performed, although the senate had decreed each of them a separate triumph by himself.,So when notice had been given beforehand of the day appointed for this pompous solemnity to be made, on account of their victories, not one of the immense multitude was left in the city, but everybody went out so far as to gain only a station where they might stand, and left only such a passage as was necessary for those that were to be seen to go along it.,4. Now all the soldiery marched out beforehand by companies, and in their several ranks, under their several commanders, in the nighttime, and were about the gates, not of the upper palaces, but those near the temple of Isis; for there it was that the emperors had rested the foregoing night.,And as soon as ever it was day, Vespasian and Titus came out crowned with laurel, and clothed in those ancient purple habits which were proper to their family, and then went as far as Octavian’s Walks;,for there it was that the senate, and the principal rulers, and those that had been recorded as of the equestrian order, waited for them.,Now a tribunal had been erected before the cloisters, and ivory chairs had been set upon it, when they came and sat down upon them. Whereupon the soldiery made an acclamation of joy to them immediately, and all gave them attestations of their valor; while they were themselves without their arms, and only in their silken garments, and crowned with laurel:,then Vespasian accepted of these shouts of theirs; but while they were still disposed to go on in such acclamations, he gave them a signal of silence.,And when everybody entirely held their peace, he stood up, and covering the greatest part of his head with his cloak, he put up the accustomed solemn prayers; the like prayers did Titus put up also;,after which prayers Vespasian made a short speech to all the people, and then sent away the soldiers to a dinner prepared for them by the emperors.,Then did he retire to that gate which was called the Gate of the Pomp, because pompous shows do always go through that gate;,there it was that they tasted some food, and when they had put on their triumphal garments, and had offered sacrifices to the gods that were placed at the gate, they sent the triumph forward, and marched through the theatres, that they might be the more easily seen by the multitudes.,5. Now it is impossible to describe the multitude of the shows as they deserve, and the magnificence of them all; such indeed as a man could not easily think of as performed, either by the labor of workmen, or the variety of riches, or the rarities of nature;,for almost all such curiosities as the most happy men ever get by piecemeal were here one heaped on another, and those both admirable and costly in their nature; and all brought together on that day demonstrated the vastness of the dominions of the Romans;,for there was here to be seen a mighty quantity of silver, and gold, and ivory, contrived into all sorts of things, and did not appear as carried along in pompous show only, but, as a man may say, running along like a river. Some parts were composed of the rarest purple hangings, and so carried along; and others accurately represented to the life what was embroidered by the arts of the Babylonians.,There were also precious stones that were transparent, some set in crowns of gold, and some in other ouches, as the workmen pleased; and of these such a vast number were brought, that we could not but thence learn how vainly we imagined any of them to be rarities.,The images of the gods were also carried, being as well wonderful for their largeness, as made very artificially, and with great skill of the workmen; nor were any of these images of any other than very costly materials; and many species of animals were brought, every one in their own natural ornaments.,The men also who brought every one of these shows were great multitudes, and adorned with purple garments, all over interwoven with gold; those that were chosen for carrying these pompous shows having also about them such magnificent ornaments as were both extraordinary and surprising.,Besides these, one might see that even the great number of the captives was not unadorned, while the variety that was in their garments, and their fine texture, concealed from the sight the deformity of their bodies.,But what afforded the greatest surprise of all was the structure of the pageants that were borne along; for indeed he that met them could not but be afraid that the bearers would not be able firmly enough to support them, such was their magnitude;,for many of them were so made, that they were on three or even four stories, one above another. The magnificence also of their structure afforded one both pleasure and surprise;,for upon many of them were laid carpets of gold. There was also wrought gold and ivory fastened about them all;,and many resemblances of the war, and those in several ways, and variety of contrivances, affording a most lively portraiture of itself.,For there was to be seen a happy country laid waste, and entire squadrons of enemies slain; while some of them ran away, and some were carried into captivity; with walls of great altitude and magnitude overthrown and ruined by machines; with the strongest fortifications taken, and the walls of most populous cities upon the tops of hills seized on,,and an army pouring itself within the walls; as also every place full of slaughter, and supplications of the enemies, when they were no longer able to lift up their hands in way of opposition. Fire also sent upon temples was here represented, and houses overthrown, and falling upon their owners:,rivers also, after they came out of a large and melancholy desert, ran down, not into a land cultivated, nor as drink for men, or for cattle, but through a land still on fire upon every side; for the Jews related that such a thing they had undergone during this war.,Now the workmanship of these representations was so magnificent and lively in the construction of the things, that it exhibited what had been done to such as did not see it, as if they had been there really present.,On the top of every one of these pageants was placed the commander of the city that was taken, and the manner wherein he was taken. Moreover, there followed those pageants a great number of ships;,and for the other spoils, they were carried in great plenty. But for those that were taken in the temple of Jerusalem, they made the greatest figure of them all; that is, the golden table, of the weight of many talents; the candlestick also, that was made of gold, though its construction were now changed from that which we made use of;,for its middle shaft was fixed upon a basis, and the small branches were produced out of it to a great length, having the likeness of a trident in their position, and had every one a socket made of brass for a lamp at the tops of them. These lamps were in number seven, and represented the dignity of the number seven among the Jews;,and the last of all the spoils, was carried the Law of the Jews.,After these spoils passed by a great many men, carrying the images of Victory, whose structure was entirely either of ivory or of gold.,After which Vespasian marched in the first place, and Titus followed him; Domitian also rode along with them, and made a glorious appearance, and rode on a horse that was worthy of admiration.,6. Now the last part of this pompous show was at the temple of Jupiter Capitolinus, whither when they were come, they stood still; for it was the Romans’ ancient custom to stay till somebody brought the news that the general of the enemy was slain.,This general was Simon, the son of Gioras, who had then been led in this triumph among the captives; a rope had also been put upon his head, and he had been drawn into a proper place in the forum, and had withal been tormented by those that drew him along; and the law of the Romans required that malefactors condemned to die should be slain there.,Accordingly, when it was related that there was an end of him, and all the people had sent up a shout for joy, they then began to offer those sacrifices which they had consecrated, in the prayers used in such solemnities; which when they had finished, they went away to the palace.,And as for some of the spectators, the emperors entertained them at their own feast; and for all the rest there were noble preparations made for their feasting at home;,for this was a festival day to the city of Rome, as celebrated for the victory obtained by their army over their enemies, for the end that was now put to their civil miseries, and for the commencement of their hopes of future prosperity and happiness.,7. After these triumphs were over, and after the affairs of the Romans were settled on the surest foundations, Vespasian resolved to build a temple to Peace, which was finished in so short a time, and in so glorious a manner, as was beyond all human expectation and opinion:,for he having now by Providence a vast quantity of wealth, besides what he had formerly gained in his other exploits, he had this temple adorned with pictures and statues;,for in this temple were collected and deposited all such rarities as men aforetime used to wander all over the habitable world to see, when they had a desire to see one of them after another;,he also laid up therein, as ensigns of his glory, those golden vessels and instruments that were taken out of the Jewish temple.,But still he gave order that they should lay up their Law, and the purple veils of the holy place, in the royal palace itself, and keep them there.'' None
44. Lucan, Pharsalia, 1.66 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Lucan, his other works, De Incendio Urbis • Nero, in Lucan’s works • stars, in Lucan’s works

 Found in books: Joseph (2022), Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic, 9; Star (2021), Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought 171, 174

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1.66 Whence thou shalt rule the world with power divine. And yet the Northern or the Southern Pole We pray thee, choose not; but in rays direct Vouchsafe thy radiance to thy city Rome. Press thou on either side, the universe Should lose its equipoise: take thou the midst, And weight the scales, and let that part of heaven Where Caesar sits, be evermore serene And smile upon us with unclouded blue. Then may all men lay down their arms, and peace '' None
45. Mishnah, Avot, 1.1 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Papias of Hieropolis, oral-traditional authority in work of • authoritative works

 Found in books: Ayres and Ward (2021), The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual, 169; Brooke et al. (2008), Past Renewals: Interpretative Authority, Renewed Revelation, and the Quest for Perfection in Jewish Antiquity, 72, 207

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1.1 משֶׁה קִבֵּל תּוֹרָה מִסִּינַי, וּמְסָרָהּ לִיהוֹשֻׁעַ, וִיהוֹשֻׁעַ לִזְקֵנִים, וּזְקֵנִים לִנְבִיאִים, וּנְבִיאִים מְסָרוּהָ לְאַנְשֵׁי כְנֶסֶת הַגְּדוֹלָה. הֵם אָמְרוּ שְׁלשָׁה דְבָרִים, הֱווּ מְתוּנִים בַּדִּין, וְהַעֲמִידוּ תַלְמִידִים הַרְבֵּה, וַעֲשׂוּ סְיָג לַתּוֹרָה:
1.1
שְׁמַעְיָה וְאַבְטַלְיוֹן קִבְּלוּ מֵהֶם. שְׁמַעְיָה אוֹמֵר, אֱהֹב אֶת הַמְּלָאכָה, וּשְׂנָא אֶת הָרַבָּנוּת, וְאַל תִּתְוַדַּע לָרָשׁוּת:'' None
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1.1 Moses received the torah at Sinai and transmitted it to Joshua, Joshua to the elders, and the elders to the prophets, and the prophets to the Men of the Great Assembly. They said three things: Be patient in the administration of justice, raise many disciples and make a fence round the Torah.'' None
46. New Testament, 1 Corinthians, 2.14, 3.1-3.3, 3.10-3.13, 4.7, 5.7, 10.16-10.20, 10.32, 12.13, 13.12 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Augustine’s Works, Agon. • Augustine’s Works, Bapt. • Augustine’s Works, C. Jul. • Augustine’s Works, C. Jul. imp. • Augustine’s Works, C. du. ep. Pel. • Augustine’s Works, C. mend. • Augustine’s Works, Catech. rud. • Augustine’s Works, Civ. • Augustine’s Works, Conf. • Augustine’s Works, Corrept. • Augustine’s Works, Div. quaest. • Augustine’s Works, Doctr. chr. • Augustine’s Works, Enar. Ps. • Augustine’s Works, Enchir. • Augustine’s Works, Exp. quaest. Rom. • Augustine’s Works, Fid. • Augustine’s Works, Gen. litt. • Augustine’s Works, Grat. • Augustine’s Works, Grat. Chr. • Augustine’s Works, Lib. arb. • Augustine’s Works, Nat. grat. • Augustine’s Works, Nat. orig. • Augustine’s Works, Nupt. et conc. • Augustine’s Works, Pecc. merit. • Augustine’s Works, Persev. • Augustine’s Works, Praed. • Augustine’s Works, Quant. an. • Augustine’s Works, Retract. VII • Augustine’s Works, S. • Augustine’s Works, Simpl. • Augustine’s Works, Spir. et litt. • Augustine’s Works, Symb. • Augustine’s Works, Tract. Ev. Jo. • Augustine’s Works, Tract. ep. Jo. • Augustine’s Works, Trin. • Augustine’s Works, Virginit. • Augustine’s Works, c. Fort. • Christ, Mighty works of • deeds, works • faith and works • faith, and works • grace, and works • language, law, works of • pneuma (spirit) in Paul, as working in Pauls body • spirit, working through the faithful • work of blood (avodat ha-dam), function of • works

 Found in books: Balberg (2017), Blood for Thought: The Reinvention of Sacrifice in Early Rabbinic Literature, 89; Despotis and Lohr (2022), Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions, 326; Engberg-Pedersen (2010), Cosmology and Self in the Apostle Paul: The Material Spirit, 42, 62, 63, 64; Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 46, 122, 288; Lieu (2004), Christian Identity in the Jewish and Graeco-Roman World, 127, 128; Mathews (2013), Riches, Poverty, and the Faithful: Perspectives on Wealth in the Second Temple Period and the Apocalypse of John, 173; McDonough (2009), Christ as Creator: Origins of a New Testament Doctrine, 63; Morgan (2022), The New Testament and the Theology of Trust: 'This Rich Trust', 128, 129; O'Daly (2020), Augustine's City of God: A Reader's Guide (2nd edn), 255; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 122, 124, 142, 145, 153, 160, 172, 185, 189, 199, 200, 208, 216, 221, 237, 244, 248, 252, 253, 260, 265, 270, 274, 279; deSilva (2022), Ephesians, 26; Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová (2016), Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria , 326, 328, 329

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2.14 ψυχικὸς δὲ ἄνθρωπος οὐ δέχεται τὰ τοῦ πνεύματος τοῦ θεοῦ, μωρία γὰρ αὐτῷ ἐστίν, καὶ οὐ δύναται γνῶναι, ὅτι πνευματικῶς ἀνακρίνεται·
3.1
Κἀγώ, ἀδελφοί, οὐκ ἠδυνήθην λαλῆσαι ὑμῖν ὡς πνευματικοῖς ἀλλʼ ὡς σαρκίνοις, ὡς νηπίοις ἐν Χριστῷ. 3.2 γάλα ὑμᾶς ἐπότισα, οὐ βρῶμα, οὔπω γὰρ ἐδύνασθε. 3.3 Ἀλλʼ οὐδὲ ἔτι νῦν δύνασθε, ἔτι γὰρ σαρκικοί ἐστε. ὅπου γὰρ ἐν ὑμῖν ζῆλος καὶ ἔρις, οὐχὶ σαρκικοί ἐστε καὶ κατὰ ἄνθρωπον περιπατεῖτε;

3.10
Κατὰ τὴν χάριν τοῦ θεοῦ τὴν δοθεῖσάν μοι ὡς σοφὸς ἀρχιτέκτων θεμέλιον ἔθηκα, ἄλλος δὲ ἐποικοδομεῖ. ἕκαστος δὲ βλεπέτω πῶς ἐποικοδομεῖ·
3.11
θεμέλιον γὰρ ἄλλον οὐδεὶς δύναται θεῖναι παρὰ τὸν κείμενον, ὅς ἐστιν Ἰησοῦς Χριστός·
3.12
εἰ δέ τις ἐποικοδομεῖ ἐπὶ τὸν θεμέλιον χρυσίον, ἀργύριον, λίθους τιμίους, ξύλα, χόρτον, καλάμην,
3.13
ἑκάστου τὸ ἔργον φανερὸν γενήσεται, ἡ γὰρ ἡμέρα δηλώσει· ὅτι ἐν πυρὶ ἀποκαλύπτεται, καὶ ἑκάστου τὸ ἔργον ὁποῖόν ἐστιν τὸ πῦρ αὐτὸ δοκιμάσει.
4.7
τίς γάρ σε διακρίνει; τί δὲ ἔχεις ὃ οὐκ ἔλαβες; εἰ δὲ καὶ ἔλαβες, τί καυχᾶσαι ὡς μὴ λαβών;
5.7
ἐκκαθάρατε τὴν παλαιὰν ζύμην, ἵνα ἦτε νέον φύραμα, καθώς ἐστε ἄζυμοι. καὶ γὰρτὸ πάσχαἡμῶνἐτύθηΧριστός·
10.16
Τὸ ποτήριον τῆς εὐλογίας ὃ εὐλογοῦμεν, οὐχὶ κοινωνία ἐστὶν τοῦ αἵματος τοῦ χριστοῦ; τὸν ἄρτον ὃν κλῶμεν, οὐχὶ κοινωνία τοῦ σώματος τοῦ χριστοῦ ἐστίν; 10.17 ὅτι εἷς ἄρτος, ἓν σῶμα οἱ πολλοί ἐσμεν, οἱ γὰρ πάντες ἐκ τοῦ ἑνὸς ἄρτου μετέχομεν. βλέπετε τὸν Ἰσραὴλ κατὰ σάρκα· 10.18 οὐχ οἱ ἐσθίοντες τὰς θυσίας κοινωνοὶ τοῦ θυσιαστηρίου εἰσίν; 10.19 τί οὖν φημί; ὅτι εἰδωλόθυτόν τί ἐστιν, ἢ ὅτι εἴδωλόν τί ἐστιν; 10.20 ἀλλʼ ὅτι ἃ θύουσιν τὰ ἔθνη,δαιμονίοις καὶ οὐ θεῷ θύουσιν,οὐ θέλω δὲ ὑμᾶς κοινωνοὺς τῶν δαιμονίων γίνεσθαι.
10.32
ἀπρόσκοποι καὶ Ἰουδαίοις γίνεσθε καὶ Ἕλλησιν καὶ τῇ ἐκκλησίᾳ τοῦ θεοῦ,
12.13
καὶ γὰρ ἐν ἑνὶ πνεύματι ἡμεῖς πάντες εἰς ἓν σῶμα ἐβαπτίσθημεν, εἴτε Ἰουδαῖοι εἴτε Ἕλληνες, εἴτε δοῦλοι εἴτε ἐλεύθεροι, καὶ πάντες ἓν πνεῦμα ἐποτίσθημεν.
1
3.12
βλέπομεν γὰρ ἄρτι διʼ ἐσόπτρου ἐν αἰνίγματι, τότε δὲ πρόσωπον πρὸς πρόσωπον· ἄρτι γινώσκω ἐκ μέρους, τότε δὲ ἐπιγνώσομαι καθὼς καὶ ἐπεγνώσθην.' ' None
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2.14 Now thenatural man doesn't receive the things of God's Spirit, for they arefoolishness to him, and he can't know them, because they arespiritually discerned." "2 When I came to you, brothers, I didn\'t come with excellence ofspeech or of wisdom, proclaiming to you the testimony of God.,ForI determined not to know anything among you, except Jesus Christ, andhim crucified.,I was with you in weakness, in fear, and in muchtrembling.,My speech and my preaching were not in persuasivewords of human wisdom, but in demonstration of the Spirit and of power,,that your faith wouldn\'t stand in the wisdom of men, but in thepower of God.,We speak wisdom, however, among those who are fullgrown; yet a wisdom not of this world, nor of the rulers of this world,who are coming to nothing.,But we speak God\'s wisdom in amystery, the wisdom that has been hidden, which God foreordained beforethe worlds to our glory,,which none of the rulers of this worldhas known. For had they known it, they wouldn\'t have crucified the Lordof glory.,But as it is written,"Things which an eye didn\'t see, and an ear didn\'t hear,Which didn\'t enter into the heart of man,These God has prepared for those who love him.",But to us, God revealed them through the Spirit. For theSpirit searches all things, yes, the deep things of God.,For whoamong men knows the things of a man, except the spirit of the man,which is in him? Even so, no one knows the things of God, except God\'sSpirit.,But we received, not the spirit of the world, but theSpirit which is from God, that we might know the things that werefreely given to us by God.,Which things also we speak, not inwords which man\'s wisdom teaches, but which the Holy Spirit teaches,comparing spiritual things with spiritual things.,Now thenatural man doesn\'t receive the things of God\'s Spirit, for they arefoolishness to him, and he can\'t know them, because they arespiritually discerned.,But he who is spiritual discerns allthings, and he himself is judged by no one.,"For who has knownthe mind of the Lord, that he should instruct him?" But we haveChrist\'s mind.3.1 Brothers, I couldn't speak to you as to spiritual, but as tofleshly, as to babies in Christ." "3.2 I fed you with milk, not withmeat; for you weren't yet ready. Indeed, not even now are you ready," "3.3 for you are still fleshly. For insofar as there is jealousy,strife, and factions among you, aren't you fleshly, and don't you walkin the ways of men?"
3.10
According to the grace of Godwhich was given to me, as a wise master builder I laid a foundation,and another builds on it. But let each man be careful how he builds onit.
3.11
For no one can lay any other foundation than that which hasbeen laid, which is Jesus Christ.
3.12
But if anyone builds on thefoundation with gold, silver, costly stones, wood, hay, or stubble;' "
3.13
each man's work will be revealed. For the Day will declare it,because it is revealed in fire; and the fire itself will test what sortof work each man's work is." "
4.7
For who makes you different? And what doyou have that you didn't receive? But if you did receive it, why do youboast as if you had not received it?" 5.7 Purge out the old yeast, that you may bea new lump, even as you are unleavened. For indeed Christ, ourPassover, has been sacrificed in our place.' "
10.16
Thecup of blessing which we bless, isn't it a communion of the blood ofChrist? The bread which we break, isn't it a communion of the body ofChrist?" '10.17 Because we, who are many, are one bread, one body; forwe all partake of the one bread.' "10.18 Consider Israel after theflesh. Don't those who eat the sacrifices have communion with the altar?" '10.19 What am I saying then? That a thing sacrificed to idols isanything, or that an idol is anything?' "10.20 But I say that thethings which the Gentiles sacrifice, they sacrifice to demons, and notto God, and I don't desire that you would have communion with demons." 10.32 Give no occasions for stumbling, either to Jews, or to Greeks,or to the assembly of God;
12.13
For in one Spirit we were all baptized into one body, whetherJews or Greeks, whether bond or free; and were all given to drink intoone Spirit.
1
3.12
For now we see in a mirror, dimly, butthen face to face. Now I know in part, but then I will know fully, evenas I was also fully known. 15 Now I declare to you, brothers, the gospel which I preachedto you, which also you received, in which you also stand,,bywhich also you are saved, if you hold firmly the word which I preachedto you -- unless you believed in vain.,For I delivered to youfirst of all that which I also received: that Christ died for our sinsaccording to the Scriptures,,that he was buried, that he wasraised on the third day according to the Scriptures,,and that heappeared to Cephas, then to the twelve.,Then he appeared to overfive hundred brothers at once, most of whom remain until now, but somehave also fallen asleep.,Then he appeared to James, then to allthe apostles,,and last of all, as to the child born at the wrongtime, he appeared to me also.,For I am the least of theapostles, who is not worthy to be called an apostle, because Ipersecuted the assembly of God.,But by the grace of God I amwhat I am. His grace which was bestowed on me was not futile, but Iworked more than all of them; yet not I, but the grace of God which waswith me.,Whether then it is I or they, so we preach, and so youbelieved.,Now if Christ is preached, that he has been raised from thedead, how do some among you say that there is no resurrection of thedead?,But if there is no resurrection of the dead, neither hasChrist been raised.,If Christ has not been raised, then ourpreaching is in vain, and your faith also is in vain.,Yes, weare found false witnesses of God, because we testified about God thathe raised up Christ, whom he didn\'t raise up, if it is so that the deadare not raised.,For if the dead aren\'t raised, neither hasChrist been raised.,If Christ has not been raised, your faithis vain; you are still in your sins.,Then they also who arefallen asleep in Christ have perished.,If we have only hoped inChrist in this life, we are of all men most pitiable.,But now Christ has been raised from the dead. He became thefirst fruits of those who are asleep.,For since death came byman, the resurrection of the dead also came by man.,For as inAdam all die, so also in Christ all will be made alive.,Buteach in his own order: Christ the first fruits, then those who areChrist\'s, at his coming.,Then the end comes, when he willdeliver up the Kingdom to God, even the Father; when he will haveabolished all rule and all authority and power.,For he mustreign until he has put all his enemies under his feet.,The lastenemy that will be abolished is death.,For, "He put all thingsin subjection under his feet." But when he says, "All things are put insubjection," it is evident that he is excepted who subjected all thingsto him.,When all things have been subjected to him, then theSon will also himself be subjected to him who subjected all things tohim, that God may be all in all.,Or else what will they do whoare baptized for the dead? If the dead aren\'t raised at all, why thenare they baptized for the dead?,Why do we also stand injeopardy every hour?,I affirm, by the boasting in you which Ihave in Christ Jesus our Lord, I die daily.,If I fought withanimals at Ephesus for human purposes, what does it profit me? If thedead are not raised, then "let us eat and drink, for tomorrow we die.",Don\'t be deceived! "Evil companionships corrupt good morals.",Wake up righteously, and don\'t sin, for some have no knowledgeof God. I say this to your shame.,But someone will say, "Howare the dead raised?" and, "With what kind of body do they come?",You foolish one, that which you yourself sow is not made aliveunless it dies.,That which you sow, you don\'t sow the body thatwill be, but a bare grain, maybe of wheat, or of some other kind.,But God gives it a body even as it pleased him, and to eachseed a body of its own.,All flesh is not the same flesh, butthere is one flesh of men, another flesh of animals, another of fish,and another of birds.,There are also celestial bodies, andterrestrial bodies; but the glory of the celestial differs from that ofthe terrestrial.,There is one glory of the sun, another gloryof the moon, and another glory of the stars; for one star differs fromanother star in glory.,So also is the resurrection of the dead.It is sown in corruption; it is raised in incorruption.,It issown in dishonor; it is raised in glory. It is sown in weakness; it israised in power.,It is sown a natural body; it is raised aspiritual body. There is a natural body and there is also a spiritualbody.,So also it is written, "The first man, Adam, became a livingsoul." The last Adam became a life-giving spirit.,However thatwhich is spiritual isn\'t first, but that which is natural, then thatwhich is spiritual.,The first man is of the earth, made ofdust. The second man is the Lord from heaven.,As is the onemade of dust, such are those who are also made of dust; and as is theheavenly, such are they also that are heavenly.,As we haveborne the image of those made of dust, let\'s also bear the image of theheavenly.,Now I say this, brothers, that flesh and blood can\'tinherit the Kingdom of God; neither does corruption inheritincorruption.,Behold, I tell you a mystery. We will not all sleep, but wewill all be changed,,in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye,at the last trumpet. For the trumpet will sound, and the dead will beraised incorruptible, and we will be changed.,For thiscorruptible must put on incorruption, and this mortal must put onimmortality.,But when this corruptible will have put onincorruption, and this mortal will have put on immortality, then whatis written will happen: "Death is swallowed up in victory.","Death, where is your sting?Hades, where is your victory?",The sting of death is sin, and the power of sin is the law.,But thanks be to God, who gives us the victory through our LordJesus Christ.,Therefore, my beloved brothers, be steadfast,immovable, always abounding in the Lord\'s work, because you know thatyour labor is not in vain in the Lord. " None
47. New Testament, 1 Thessalonians, 2.13, 3.12, 4.3-4.5 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Augustine’s Works, C. Jul. • Augustine’s Works, Persev. • Augustine’s Works, Praed. • Augustine’s Works, S. • Jesus, work/acts/miracles of • Wonders/wonder-working • spirit, working through the faithful • works, good

 Found in books: Morgan (2022), The New Testament and the Theology of Trust: 'This Rich Trust', 128, 129; Tellbe Wasserman and Nyman (2019), Healing and Exorcism in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity, 153; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 181, 202, 216; deSilva (2022), Ephesians, 222

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2.13 Καὶ διὰ τοῦτο καὶ ἡμεῖς εὐχαριστοῦμεν τῷ θεῷ ἀδιαλείπτως, ὅτι παραλαβόντες λόγον ἀκοῆς παρʼ ἡμῶν τοῦ θεοῦ ἐδέξασθε οὐ λόγον ἀνθρώπων ἀλλὰ καθὼς ἀληθῶς ἐστὶν λόγον θεοῦ, ὃς καὶ ἐνεργεῖται ἐν ὑμῖν τοῖς πιστεύουσιν.
3.12
ὑμᾶς δὲ ὁ κύριος πλεονάσαι καὶ περισσεύσαι τῇ ἀγάπῃ εἰς ἀλλήλους καὶ εἰς πάντας, καθάπερ καὶ ἡμεῖς εἰς ὑμᾶς,
4.3
Τοῦτο γάρ ἐστιν θέλημα τοῦ θεοῦ, ὁ ἁγιασμὸς ὑμῶν, ἀπέχεσθαι ὑμᾶς ἀπὸ τῆς πορνείας, 4.4 εἰδέναι ἕκαστον ὑμῶν τὸ ἑαυτοῦ σκεῦος κτᾶσθαι ἐν ἁγιασμῷ καὶ τιμῇ, 4.5 μὴ ἐν πάθει ἐπιθυμίας καθάπερ καὶτὰ ἔθνη τὰ μὴ εἰδότα τὸν θεόν,'' None
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2.13 For this cause we also thank God without ceasing, that, when you received from us the word of the message of God, you accepted it not as the word of men, but, as it is in truth, the word of God, which also works in you who believe.
3.12
and the Lord make you to increase and abound in love one toward another, and toward all men, even as we also do toward you,
4.3
For this is the will of God: your sanctification, that you abstain from sexual immorality, 4.4 that each one of you know how to possess himself of his own vessel in sanctification and honor, ' "4.5 not in the passion of lust, even as the Gentiles who don't know God; "' None
48. New Testament, 1 Timothy, 3.1, 5.10 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Augustine’s Works, Pecc. merit. • Augustine’s Works, Spir. et litt. • Jesus, work/acts/miracles of • Stoicism, good works • ‘works’ of Law

 Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 554; Tellbe Wasserman and Nyman (2019), Healing and Exorcism in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity, 130; Tomson (2019), Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries. 594; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 231

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3.1 πιστὸς ὁ λόγος. Εἴ τις ἐπισκοπῆς ὀρέγεται, καλοῦ ἔργου ἐπιθυμεῖ.
5.10
ἐν ἔργοις καλοῖς μαρτυρουμένη, εἰ ἐτεκνοτρόφησεν, εἰ ἐξενοδόχησεν, εἰ ἁγίων πόδας ἔνιψεν, εἰ θλιβομένοις ἐπήρκεσεν, εἰ παντὶ ἔργῳ ἀγαθῷ ἐπηκολούθησεν.'' None
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3.1 This is a faithful saying: if a man seeks the office of an overseer, he desires a good work. ' "
5.10
being approved by good works, if she has brought up children, if she has been hospitable to strangers, if she has washed the saints' feet, if she has relieved the afflicted, and if she has diligently followed every good work. "' None
49. New Testament, Acts, 2.4, 3.6, 3.16, 4.7, 4.10, 7.55, 8.9-8.12, 8.16, 9.3-9.7, 14.3, 16.16-16.18, 19.11-19.20 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Augustine’s Works, Gen. litt. • Augustine’s Works, Pecc. merit. • Augustine’s Works, Praed. • Augustine’s Works, Retract. VII • Augustine’s Works, Spir. et litt. • Augustine’s Works, Trin. • Augustine’s Works, ep. • God, Economic work • Jesus, work/acts/miracles of • Wonders/wonder-working • deeds, works • magic, work of daimons • spirit, working through the faithful • word of God, work of • works

 Found in books: Despotis and Lohr (2022), Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions, 431; Graham (2022), The Church as Paradise and the Way Therein: Early Christian Appropriation of Genesis 3:22–24, 142; Janowitz (2002), Magic in the Roman World: Pagans, Jews and Christians, 17; Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 72, 86; Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 323; Morgan (2022), The New Testament and the Theology of Trust: 'This Rich Trust', 129; Tellbe Wasserman and Nyman (2019), Healing and Exorcism in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity, 97, 113, 126, 129, 143, 144, 153; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 191, 201, 225

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2.4 καὶ ἐπλήσθησαν πάντες πνεύματος ἁγίου, καὶ ἤρξαντο λαλεῖν ἑτέραις γλώσσαις καθὼς τὸ πνεῦμα ἐδίδου ἀποφθέγγεσθαι αὐτοῖς.
3.6
εἶπεν δὲ Πέτρος Ἀργύριον καὶ χρυσίον οὐχ ὑπάρχει μοι, ὃ δὲ ἔχω τοῦτό σοι δίδωμι· ἐν τῷ ὀνόματι Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ τοῦ Ναζωραίου περιπάτει.
3.16
καὶ τῇ πίστει τοῦ ὀνόματος αὐτοῦ τοῦτον ὃν θεωρεῖτε καὶ οἴδατε ἐστερέωσεν τὸ ὄνομα αὐτοῦ, καὶ ἡ πίστις ἡ διʼ αὐτοῦ ἔδωκεν αὐτῷ τὴν ὁλοκληρίαν ταύτην ἀπέναντι πάντων ὑμῶν.
4.7
καὶ στήσαντες αὐτοὺς ἐν τῷ μέσῳ ἐπυνθάνοντο Ἐν ποίᾳ δυνάμει ἢ ἐν ποίῳ ὀνόματι ἐποιήσατε τοῦτο ὑμεῖς;
4.10
γνωστὸν ἔστω πᾶσιν ὑμῖν καὶ παντὶ τῷ λαῷ Ἰσραὴλ ὅτι ἐν τῷ ὀνόματι Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ τοῦ Ναζωραίου, ὃν ὑμεῖς ἐσταυρώσατε, ὃν ὁ θεὸς ἤγειρεν ἐκ νεκρῶν, ἐν τούτῳ οὗτος παρέστηκεν ἐνώπιον ὑμῶν ὑγιής.
7.55
ὑπάρχων δὲ πλήρης πνεύματος ἁγίου ἀτενίσας εἰς τὸν οὐρανὸν εἶδεν δόξαν θεοῦ καὶ Ἰησοῦν ἑστῶτα ἐκ δεξιῶν τοῦ θεοῦ,
8.9
Ἀνὴρ δέ τις ὀνόματι Σίμων προυπῆρχεν ἐν τῇ πόλει μαγεύων καὶ ἐξιστάνων τὸ ἔθνος τῆς Σαμαρίας, λέγων εἶναί τινα ἑαυτὸν μέγαν, 8.10 ᾧ προσεῖχον πάντες ἀπὸ μικροῦ ἕως μεγάλου λέγοντες Οὗτός ἐστιν ἡ Δύναμις τοῦ θεοῦ ἡ καλουμένη Μεγάλη. 8.11 προσεῖχον δὲ αὐτῷ διὰ τὸ ἱκανῷ χρόνῳ ταῖς μαγίαις ἐξεστακέναι αὐτούς. 8.12 ὅτε δὲ ἐπίστευσαν τῷ Φιλίππῳ εὐαγγελιζομένῳ περὶ τῆς βασιλείας τοῦ θεοῦ καὶ τοῦ ὀνόματος Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ, ἐβαπτίζοντο ἄνδρες τε καὶ γυναῖκες.
8.16
γὰρ ἦν ἐπʼ οὐδενὶ αὐτῶν ἐπιπεπτωκός, μόνον δὲ βεβαπτισμένοι ὑπῆρχον εἰς τὸ ὄνομα τοῦ κυρίου Ἰησοῦ.
9.3
Ἐν δὲ τῷ πορεύεσθαι ἐγένετο αὐτὸν ἐγγίζειν τῇ Δαμασκῷ, ἐξέφνης τε αὐτὸν περιήστραψεν φῶς ἐκ τοῦ οὐρανοῦ, 9.4 καὶ πεσὼν ἐπὶ τὴν γῆν ἤκουσεν φωνὴν λέγουσαν αὐτῷ Σαούλ Σαούλ, τί με διώκεις; 9.5 εἶπεν δέ Τίς εἶ, κύριε; ὁ δέ Ἐγώ εἰμι Ἰησοῦς ὃν σὺ διώκεις· 9.6 ἀλλὰ ἀνάστηθι καὶ εἴσελθε εἰς τὴν πόλιν, καὶ λαληθήσεταί σοι ὅτι σε δεῖ ποιεῖν. 9.7 οἱ δὲ ἄνδρες οἱ συνοδεύοντες αὐτῷ ἱστήκεισαν ἐνεοί, ἀκούοντες μὲν τῆς φωνῆς μηδένα δὲ θεωροῦντες.
14.3
ἱκανὸν μὲν οὖν χρόνον διέτριψαν παρρησιαζόμενοι ἐπὶ τῷ κυρίῳ τῷ μαρτυροῦντι τῷ λόγῳ τῆς χάριτος αὐτοῦ, διδόντι σημεῖα καὶ τέρατα γίνεσθαι διὰ τῶν χειρῶν αὐτῶν.
16.16
Ἐγένετο δὲ πορευομένων ἡμῶν εἰς τὴν προσευχὴν παιδίσκην τινὰ ἔχουσαν πνεῦμα πύθωνα ὑπαντῆσαι ἡμῖν, ἥτις ἐργασίαν πολλὴν παρεῖχεν τοῖς κυρίοις 16.17 αὐτῆς μαντευομένη· αὕτη κατακολουθοῦσα τῷ Παύλῳ καὶ ἡμῖν ἔκραζεν λέγουσα Οὗτοι οἱ ἄνθρωποι δοῦλοι τοῦ θεοῦ τοῦ ὑψίστου εἰσίν, οἵτινες καταγγέλλουσιν ὑμῖν ὁδὸν σωτηρίας. 16.18 τοῦτο δὲ ἐποίει ἐπὶ πολλὰς ἡμέρας. διαπονηθεὶς δὲ Παῦλος καὶ ἐπιστρέψας τῷ πνεύματι εἶπεν Παραγγέλλω σοι ἐν ὀνόματι Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ ἐξελθεῖν ἀπʼ αὐτῆς· καὶ ἐξῆλθεν αὐτῇ τῇ ὥρᾳ.
19.11
Δυνάμεις τε οὐ τὰς τυχούσας ὁ θεὸς ἐποίει διὰ τῶν χειρῶν Παύλου, 19.12 ὥστε καὶ ἐπὶ τοὺς ἀσθενοῦντας ἀποφέρεσθαι ἀπὸ τοῦ χρωτὸς αὐτοῦ σουδάρια ἢ σιμικίνθια καὶ ἀπαλλάσσεσθαι ἀπʼ αὐτῶν τὰς νόσους, τά τε πνεύματα τὰ πονηρὰ ἐκπορεύεσθαι. 19.13 Ἐπεχείρησαν δέ τινες καὶ τῶν περιερχομένων Ἰουδαίων ἐξορκισ̀τῶν ὀνομάζειν ἐπὶ τοὺς ἔχοντας τὰ πνεύματα τὰ πονηρὰ τὸ ὄνομα τοῦ κυρίου Ἰησοῦ λέγοντες Ὁρκίζω ὑμᾶς τὸν Ἰησοῦν ὃν Παῦλος κηρύσσει. 19.14 ἦσαν δέ τινος Σκευᾶ Ἰουδαίου ἀρχιερέως ἑπτὰ υἱοὶ τοῦτο ποιοῦντες. 19.15 ἀποκριθὲν δὲ τὸ πνεῦμα τὸ πονηρὸν εἶπεν αὐτοῖς Τὸν μὲν Ἰησοῦν γινώσκω καὶ τὸν Παῦλον ἐπίσταμαι, ὑμεῖς δὲ τίνες ἐστέ; 19.16 καὶ ἐφαλόμενος ὁ ἄνθρωπος ἐπʼ αὐτοὺς ἐν ᾧ ἦν τὸ πνεῦμα τὸ πονηρὸν κατακυριεύσας ἀμφοτέρων ἴσχυσεν κατʼ αὐτῶν, ὥστε γυμνοὺς καὶ τετραυματισμένους ἐκφυγεῖν ἐκ τοῦ οἴκου ἐκείνου. 19.17 τοῦτο δὲ ἐγένετο γνωστὸν πᾶσιν Ἰουδαίοις τε καὶ Ἕλλησιν τοῖς κατοικοῦσιν τὴν Ἔφεσον, καὶ ἐπέπεσεν φόβος ἐπὶ πάντας αὐτούς, καὶ ἐμεγαλύνετο τὸ ὄνομα τοῦ κυρίου Ἰησοῦ. 19.18 πολλοί τε τῶν πεπιστευκότων ἤρχοντο ἐξομολογούμενοι καὶ ἀναγγέλλοντες τὰς πράξεις αὐτῶν, 19.19 ἱκανοὶ δὲ τῶν τὰ περίεργα πραξάντων συνενέγκαντες τὰς βίβλους κατέκαιον ἐνώπιον πάντων· καὶ συνεψήφισαν τὰς τιμὰς αὐτῶν καὶ εὗρον ἀργυρίου μυριάδας πέντε. 19.20 Οὕτως κατὰ κράτος τοῦ κυρίου ὁ λόγος ηὔξανεν καὶ ἴσχυεν.'' None
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2.4 They were all filled with the Holy Spirit, and began to speak with other languages, as the Spirit gave them the ability to speak.
3.6
But Peter said, "Silver and gold have I none, but what I have, that I give you. In the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, rise and walk!"
3.16
By faith in his name has his name made this man strong, whom you see and know. Yes, the faith which is through him has given him this perfect soundness in the presence of you all.
4.7
When they had stood them in the midst, they inquired, "By what power, or in what name, have you done this?"
4.10
be it known to you all, and to all the people of Israel, that in the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, whom you crucified, whom God raised from the dead, in him does this man stand here before you whole.
7.55
But he, being full of the Holy Spirit, looked up steadfastly into heaven, and saw the glory of God, and Jesus standing on the right hand of God,
8.9
But there was a certain man, Simon by name, who had used sorcery in the city before, and amazed the people of Samaria, making himself out to be some great one, 8.10 to whom they all listened, from the least to the greatest, saying, "This man is that great power of God." 8.11 They listened to him, because for a long time he had amazed them with his sorceries. 8.12 But when they believed Philip preaching good news concerning the Kingdom of God and the name of Jesus Christ, they were baptized, both men and women.
8.16
for as yet he had fallen on none of them. They had only been baptized into the name of the Lord Jesus.
9.3
As he traveled, it happened that he got close to Damascus, and suddenly a light from the sky shone around him. 9.4 He fell on the earth, and heard a voice saying to him, "Saul, Saul, why do you persecute me?" 9.5 He said, "Who are you, Lord?"The Lord said, "I am Jesus, whom you are persecuting. 9.6 But rise up, and enter into the city, and you will be told what you must do." 9.7 The men who traveled with him stood speechless, hearing the voice, but seeing no one.
14.3
Therefore they stayed there a long time, speaking boldly in the Lord, who testified to the word of his grace, granting signs and wonders to be done by their hands.
16.16
It happened, as we were going to prayer, that a certain girl having a spirit of divination met us, who brought her masters much gain by fortune telling. 16.17 The same, following after Paul and us, cried out, "These men are servants of the Most High God, who proclaim to us the way of salvation!" 16.18 This she did for many days. But Paul, becoming greatly annoyed, turned and said to the spirit, "I charge you in the name of Jesus Christ to come out of her!" It came out that very hour.
19.11
God worked special miracles by the hands of Paul, 19.12 so that even handkerchiefs or aprons were carried away from his body to the sick, and the evil spirits went out. 19.13 But some of the itinerant Jews, exorcists, took on themselves to name over those who had the evil spirits the name of the Lord Jesus, saying, "We adjure you by Jesus whom Paul preaches." 19.14 There were seven sons of one Sceva, a Jewish chief priest, who did this. 19.15 The evil spirit answered, "Jesus I know, and Paul I know, but who are you?" 19.16 The man in whom the evil spirit was leaped on them, and overpowered them, and prevailed against them, so that they fled out of that house naked and wounded. 19.17 This became known to all, both Jews and Greeks, who lived at Ephesus. Fear fell on them all, and the name of the Lord Jesus was magnified. 19.18 Many also of those who had believed came, confessing, and declaring their deeds. 19.19 Many of those who practiced magical arts brought their books together and burned them in the sight of all. They counted the price of them, and found it fifty thousand pieces of silver. 19.20 So the word of the Lord was growing and becoming mighty. '' None
50. New Testament, Apocalypse, 2.10-2.11, 3.12 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • City of God, the work’s title • Irenaeus of Lyons, works • works

 Found in books: Esler (2000), The Early Christian World, 553; Mathews (2013), Riches, Poverty, and the Faithful: Perspectives on Wealth in the Second Temple Period and the Apocalypse of John, 160, 173; O'Daly (2020), Augustine's City of God: A Reader's Guide (2nd edn), 307

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2.10 μὴ φοβοῦ ἃ μέλλεις πάσχειν. ἰδοὺ μέλλει βάλλειν ὁ διάβολος ἐξ ὑμῶν εἰς φυλακὴν ἵναπειρασθῆτε,καὶ ἔχητε θλίψινἡμερῶν δέκα.γίνου πιστὸς ἄχρι θανάτου, καὶ δώσω σοι τὸν στέφανον τῆς ζωῆς. 2.11 Ὁ ἔχων οὖς ἀκουσάτω τί τὸ πνεῦμα λέγει ταῖς ἐκκλησίαις. Ὁ νικῶν οὐ μὴ ἀδικηθῇ ἐκ τοῦ θανάτου τοῦ δευτέρου.
3.12
Ὁ νικῶν ποιήσω αὐτὸν στύλον ἐν τῷ ναῷ τοῦ θεοῦ μου, καὶ ἔξω οὐ μὴ ἐξέλθῃ ἔτι, καὶ γράψω ἐπʼ αὐτὸν τὸ ὄνομα τοῦ θεοῦ μου καὶτὸ ὄνομα τῆς πὀλεωςτοῦ θεοῦ μου, τῆς καινῆς Ἰερουσαλήμ, ἡ καταβαίνουσα ἐκ τοῦ οὐρανοῦ ἀπὸ τοῦ θεοῦ μου, καὶτὸ ὄνομάμουτὸ καινόν.'' None
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2.10 Don't be afraid of the things which you are about to suffer. Behold, the devil is about to throw some of you into prison, that you may be tested; and you will have oppression for ten days. Be faithful to death, and I will give you the crown of life." "2.11 He who has an ear, let him hear what the Spirit says to the assemblies. He who overcomes won't be harmed by the second death." 3.12 He who overcomes, I will make him a pillar in the temple of my God, and he will go out from there no more. I will write on him the name of my God, and the name of the city of my God, the new Jerusalem, which comes down out of heaven from my God, and my own new name.'" None
51. New Testament, James, 2.22-2.24, 4.6, 5.7 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Abraham, faith and works • Augustine’s Works, De mag. • Augustine’s Works, Fid. • Augustine’s Works, Gen. imp. • Augustine’s Works, Immort. an. • Augustine’s Works, S. Dom. m. • Augustine’s Works, c. Adim. • Augustine’s Works, c. Fort. • Christ, Mighty works of • City of God, structure of work • ‘works’ of Law

 Found in books: Kessler (2004), Bound by the Bible: Jews, Christians and the Sacrifice of Isaac, 61; McDonough (2009), Christ as Creator: Origins of a New Testament Doctrine, 44; O'Daly (2020), Augustine's City of God: A Reader's Guide (2nd edn), 72, 73, 74; Tomson (2019), Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries. 368, 369; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 101

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2.22 βλέπεις ὅτι ἡ πίστις συνήργει τοῖς ἔργοις αὐτοῦ καὶ ἐκ τῶν ἔργων ἡ πίστις ἐτελειώθη, καὶ ἐπληρώθη ἡ γραφὴ ἡ λέγουσα 2.23 Ἐπίστευσεν δὲ Ἀβραὰμ τῷ θεῷ καὶ ἐλογίσθη αὐτῷ εἰς δικαιοσύνην, καὶ φίλος θεοῦ ἐκλήθη. 2.24 ὁρᾶτε ὅτι ἐξ ἔργων δικαιοῦται ἄνθρωπος καὶ οὐκ ἐκ πίστεως μόνον.
4.6
μείζονα δὲ δίδωσιν χάριν· διὸ λέγει Ὁ θεὸς ὑπερηφάνοις ἀντιτάσσεται ταπεινοῖς δὲ δίδωσιν χάριν.
5.7
Μακροθυμήσατε οὖν, ἀδελφοί, ἕως τῆς παρουσίας τοῦ κυρίου. ἰδοὺ ὁ γεωργὸς ἐκδέχεται τὸν τίμιον καρπὸν τῆς γῆς, μακροθυμῶν ἐπʼ αὐτῷ ἕως λάβῃ πρόϊμον καὶ ὄψιμον.'' None
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2.22 You see that faith worked with his works, and by works faith was perfected; 2.23 and the Scripture was fulfilled which says, "Abraham believed God, and it was accounted to him as righteousness;" and he was called the friend of God. 2.24 You see then that by works, a man is justified, and not only by faith.
4.6
But he gives more grace. Therefore it says, "God resists the proud, but gives grace to the humble."
5.7
Be patient therefore, brothers, until the coming of the Lord. Behold, the farmer waits for the precious fruit of the earth, being patient over it, until it receives the early and late rain. '' None
52. New Testament, Ephesians, 1.3-1.11, 1.13-1.16, 2.1-2.3, 2.8-2.9, 2.11, 2.18, 4.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Augustine’s Works, Bapt. • Augustine’s Works, C. Jul. • Augustine’s Works, C. Jul. imp. • Augustine’s Works, C. du. ep. Pel. • Augustine’s Works, C. mend. • Augustine’s Works, Conf. • Augustine’s Works, Cur. • Augustine’s Works, Enar. Ps. • Augustine’s Works, Enchir. • Augustine’s Works, Exp. quaest. Rom. • Augustine’s Works, Fid. symb. • Augustine’s Works, Gen. Man. • Augustine’s Works, Gen. litt. • Augustine’s Works, Grat. Chr. • Augustine’s Works, Lib. arb. • Augustine’s Works, Mor. eccl. • Augustine’s Works, Nat. grat. • Augustine’s Works, Nat. orig. • Augustine’s Works, Nupt. et conc. • Augustine’s Works, Ord. • Augustine’s Works, Parm. • Augustine’s Works, Pecc. merit. • Augustine’s Works, Perf. • Augustine’s Works, Persev. • Augustine’s Works, Praed. • Augustine’s Works, S. • Augustine’s Works, S. Dom. m. • Augustine’s Works, Tract. Ev. Jo. • Augustine’s Works, Tract. ep. Jo. • Augustine’s Works, Trin. • Augustine’s Works, Ver. rel. • Augustine’s Works, c. Faust. • Augustine’s Works, c. Fort. • Christ, Mighty works of • Jesus, work/acts/miracles of • grace, and works • language, law, works of • works • works, evil • works, good

 Found in books: Lieu (2004), Christian Identity in the Jewish and Graeco-Roman World, 128; McDonough (2009), Christ as Creator: Origins of a New Testament Doctrine, 47; Tellbe Wasserman and Nyman (2019), Healing and Exorcism in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity, 224; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 100, 136, 160, 172, 178, 202, 203, 217, 243, 257, 261, 270, 293; deSilva (2022), Ephesians, 1, 110, 122, 125, 126, 127, 128, 130, 144, 222, 253; Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová (2016), Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria , 328

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1.3 Εὐλογητὸς ὁ θεὸς καὶ πατὴρ τοῦ κυρίου ἡμῶν Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ, ὁ εὐλογήσας ἡμᾶς ἐν πάσῃ εὐλογίᾳ πνευματικῇ ἐν τοῖς ἐπουρανίοις ἐν Χριστῷ, 1.4 καθὼς ἐξελέξατο ἡμᾶς ἐν αὐτῷ πρὸ καταβολῆς κόσμου, εἶναι ἡμᾶς ἁγίους καὶ ἀμώμους κατενώπιον αὐτοῦ ἐν ἀγάπῃ, 1.5 προορίσας ἡμᾶς εἰς υἱοθεσίαν διὰ Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ εἰς αὐτόν, κατὰ τὴν εὐδοκίαν τοῦ θελήματος αὐτοῦ, 1.6 εἰς ἔπαινον δόξης τῆς χάριτος αὐτοῦ ἧς ἐχαρίτωσεν ἡμᾶς ἐν τῷ ἠγαπημένῳ, 1.7 ἐν ᾧ ἔχομεν τὴν ἀπολύτρωσιν διὰ τοῦ αἵματος αὐτοῦ, τὴν ἄφεσιν τῶν παραπτωμάτων, 1.8 κατὰ τὸ πλοῦτος τῆς χάριτος αὐτοῦ 1.9 ἧς ἐπερίσσευσεν εἰς ἡμᾶς ἐν πάσῃ σοφίᾳ καὶ φρονήσει γνωρίσας ἡμῖν τὸ μυστήριον τοῦ θελήματος αὐτοῦ, κατὰ τὴν εὐδοκίαν αὐτοῦ ἣν προέθετο ἐν αὐτῷ 1.10 εἰς οἰκονομίαν τοῦ πληρώματος τῶν καιρῶν, ἀνακεφαλαιώσασθαι τὰ πάντα ἐν τῷ χριστῷ, τὰ ἐπὶ τοῖς οὐρανοῖς καὶ τὰ ἐπὶ τῆς γῆς· ἐν αὐτῷ, 1.11 ἐν ᾧ καὶ ἐκληρώθημεν προορισθέντες κατὰ πρόθεσιν τοῦ τὰ πάντα ἐνεργοῦντος κατὰ τὴν βουλὴν τοῦ θελήματος αὐτοῦ,
1.13
ἐν ᾧ καὶ ὑμεῖς ἀκούσαντες τὸν λόγον τῆς ἀληθείας, τὸ εὐαγγέλιον τῆς σωτηρίας ὑμῶν, ἐν ᾧ καὶ πιστεύσαντες, ἐσφραγίσθητε τῷ πνεύματι τῆς ἐπαγγελίας τῷ ἁγίῳ, 1.14 ὅ ἐστιν ἀρραβὼν τῆς κληρονομίας ἡμῶν, εἰς ἀπολύτρωσιν τῆς περιποιήσεως, εἰς ἔπαινον τῆς δόξης αὐτοῦ. 1.15 Διὰ τοῦτο κἀγώ, ἀκούσας τὴν καθʼ ὑμᾶς πίστιν ἐν τῷ κυρίῳ Ἰησοῦ καὶ τὴν εἰς πάντας τοὺς ἁγίους, 1.16 οὐ παύομαι εὐχαριστῶν ὑπὲρ ὑμῶν μνείαν ποιούμενος ἐπὶ τῶν προσευχῶν μου,
2.1
καὶ ὑμᾶς ὄντας νεκροὺς τοῖς παραπτώμασιν καὶ ταῖς ἁμαρτίαις ὑμῶν, 2.2 ἐν αἷς ποτὲ περιεπατήσατε κατὰ τὸν αἰῶνα τοῦ κόσμου τούτου, κατὰ τὸν ἄρχοντα τῆς ἐξουσίας τοῦ ἀέρος, τοῦ πνεύματος τοῦ νῦν ἐνεργοῦντος ἐν τοῖς υἱοῖς τῆς ἀπειθίας· 2.3 ἐν οἷς καὶ ἡμεῖς πάντες ἀνεστράφημέν ποτε ἐν ταῖς ἐπιθυμίαις τῆς σαρκὸς ἡμῶν, ποιοῦντες τὰ θελήματα τῆς σαρκὸς καὶ τῶν διανοιῶν, καὶ ἤμεθα τέκνα φύσει ὀργῆς ὡς καὶ οἱ λοιποί·—
2.8
καὶ τοῦτο 2.9 οὐκ ἐξ ὑμῶν, θεοῦ τὸ δῶρον· οὐκ ἐξ ἔργων, ἵνα μή τις καυχήσηται.

2.11
Διὸ μνημονεύετε ὅτι ποτὲ ὑμεῖς τὰ ἔθνη ἐν σαρκί, οἱ λεγόμενοι ἀκροβυστία ὑπὸ τῆς λεγομένης περιτομῆς ἐν σαρκὶ χειροποιήτου,

2.18
ὅτι διʼ αὐτοῦ ἔχομεν τὴν προσαγωγὴν οἱ ἀμφότεροι ἐν ἑνὶ πνεύματι πρὸς τὸν πατέρα.
4.4
ἓν σῶμα καὶ ἓν πνεῦμα, καθὼς καὶ ἐκλήθητε ἐν μιᾷ ἐλπίδι τῆς κλήσεως ὑμῶν·'' None
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1.3 Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who has blessed us with every spiritual blessing in the heavenly places in Christ; 1.4 even as he chose us in him before the foundation of the world, that we would be holy and without blemish before him in love; 1.5 having predestined us for adoption as sons through Jesus Christ to himself, according to the good pleasure of his desire, 1.6 to the praise of the glory of his grace, by which he freely bestowed favor on us in the Beloved, 1.7 in whom we have our redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of our trespasses, according to the riches of his grace, 1.8 which he made to abound toward us in all wisdom and prudence, 1.9 making known to us the mystery of his will, according to his good pleasure which he purposed in him 1.10 to an administration of the fullness of the times, to sum up all things in Christ, the things in the heavens, and the things on the earth, in him; 1.11 in whom also we were assigned an inheritance, having been foreordained according to the purpose of him who works all things after the counsel of his will;
1.13
in whom you also, having heard the word of the truth, the gospel of your salvation, -- in whom, having also believed, you were sealed with the Holy Spirit of promise, ' "1.14 who is a pledge of our inheritance, to the redemption of God's own possession, to the praise of his glory. " '1.15 For this cause I also, having heard of the faith in the Lord Jesus which is among you, and the love which you have toward all the saints, ' "1.16 don't cease to give thanks for you, making mention of you in my prayers, " 2.1 You were made alive when you were dead in transgressions and sins, 2.2 in which you once walked according to the course of this world, according to the prince of the powers of the air, the spirit who now works in the sons of disobedience; 2.3 among whom we also all once lived in the lust of our flesh, doing the desires of the flesh and of the mind, and were by nature children of wrath, even as the rest.
2.8
for by grace you have been saved through faith, and that not of yourselves; it is the gift of God, 2.9 not of works, that no one would boast.

2.11
Therefore remember that once you, the Gentiles in the flesh, who are called "uncircumcision" by that which is called "circumcision," (in the flesh, made by hands);

2.18
For through him we both have our access in one Spirit to the Father.
4.4
There is one body, and one Spirit, even as you also were called in one hope of your calling; '' None
53. New Testament, Galatians, 2.9, 2.11-2.21, 3.5, 3.26-3.28, 4.6, 5.1, 5.6, 5.13, 5.17, 6.7-6.8 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Augustine’s Works, C. Jul. • Augustine’s Works, Catech. rud. • Augustine’s Works, Conf. • Augustine’s Works, Enar. Ps. • Augustine’s Works, Exp. Gal. • Augustine’s Works, Exp. quaest. Rom. • Augustine’s Works, Persev. • Augustine’s Works, Praed. • Augustine’s Works, S. • Augustine’s Works, Simpl. • Augustine’s Works, Tract. Ev. Jo. • Augustine’s Works, Tract. ep. Jo. • Christ, Mighty works of • Hilary of Poitiers, Ambrosiaster's works circulated under name of • Jesus, work/acts/miracles of • Jewish practices/Torah observance, “works of the law” (erga nomou) • circulation, of Ambrosiaster's works • deeds, works • grace, and works • language, law, works of • pneuma (spirit) in Paul, as working in Pauls body • works • works, evil • works, good • ‘works’ of Law

 Found in books: Engberg-Pedersen (2010), Cosmology and Self in the Apostle Paul: The Material Spirit, 64; Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 61, 72, 316; Lieu (2004), Christian Identity in the Jewish and Graeco-Roman World, 127, 128; Lunn-Rockliffe (2007), The Letter of Mara bar Sarapion in Context, 18; McDonough (2009), Christ as Creator: Origins of a New Testament Doctrine, 44; Tellbe Wasserman and Nyman (2019), Healing and Exorcism in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity, 129; Tomson (2019), Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries. 352, 363, 375; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 6, 103, 182, 202, 217, 224, 245, 248; Wilson (2022), Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency, 7, 111, 112, 113, 210; deSilva (2022), Ephesians, 26, 125, 126, 127, 253, 318; Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová (2016), Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria , 329, 330

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2.9 καὶ γνόντες τὴν χάριν τὴν δοθεῖσάν μοι, Ἰάκωβος καὶ Κηφᾶς καὶ Ἰωάνης, οἱ δοκοῦντες στύλοι εἶναι, δεξιὰς ἔδωκαν ἐμοὶ καὶ Βαρνάβᾳ κοινωνίας, ἵνα ἡμεῖς εἰς τὰ ἔθνη, αὐτοὶ δὲ εἰς τὴν περιτομήν·
2.11
Ὅτε δὲ ἦλθεν Κηφᾶς εἰς Ἀντιόχειαν, κατὰ πρόσωπον αὐτῷ ἀντέστην, ὅτι κατεγνωσμένος ἦν· 2.12 πρὸ τοῦ γὰρ ἐλθεῖν τινὰς ἀπὸ Ἰακώβου μετὰ τῶν ἐθνῶν συνήσθιεν· ὅτε δὲ ἦλθον, ὑπέστελλεν καὶ ἀφώριζεν ἑαυτόν, φοβούμενος τοὺς ἐκ περιτομῆς. 2.13 καὶ συνυπεκρίθησαν αὐτῷ καὶ οἱ λοιποὶ Ἰουδαῖοι, ὥστε καὶ Βαρνάβας συναπήχθη αὐτῶν τῇ ὑποκρίσει. 2.14 ἀλλʼ ὅτε εἶδον ὅτι οὐκ ὀρθοποδοῦσιν πρὸς τὴν ἀλήθειαν τοῦ εὐαγγελίου, εἶπον τῷ Κηφᾷ ἔμπροσθεν πάντων Εἰ σὺ Ἰουδαῖος ὑπάρχων ἐθνικῶς καὶ οὐκ Ἰουδαϊκῶς ζῇς, πῶς τὰ ἔθνη ἀναγκάζεις Ἰουδαΐζειν; 2.15 Ἡμεῖς φύσει Ἰουδαῖοι καὶ οὐκ ἐξ ἐθνῶν ἁμαρτωλοί, 2.16 εἰδότες δὲ ὅτι οὐ δικαιοῦται ἄνθρωπος ἐξ ἔργων νόμου ἐὰν μὴ διὰ πίστεως Χριστοῦ Ἰησοῦ, καὶ ἡμεῖς εἰς Χριστὸν Ἰησοῦν ἐπιστεύσαμεν, ἵνα δικαιωθῶμεν ἐκ πίστεως Χριστοῦ καὶ οὐκ ἐξ ἔργων νόμου, ὅτι ἐξ ἔργων νόμουοὐ δικαιωθήσεται πᾶσα σάρξ. 2.17 εἰ δὲ ζητοῦντες δικαιωθῆναι ἐν Χριστῷ εὑρέθημεν καὶ αὐτοὶ ἁμαρτωλοί, ἆρα Χριστὸς ἁμαρτίας διάκονος; μὴ γένοιτο· 2.18 εἰ γὰρ ἃ κατέλυσα ταῦτα πάλιν οἰκοδομῶ, παραβάτην ἐμαυτὸν συνιστάνω. 2.19 ἐγὼ γὰρ διὰ νόμου νόμῳ ἀπέθανον ἵνα θεῷ ζήσω· Χριστῷ συνεσταύρωμαι· 2.20 ζῶ δὲ οὐκέτι ἐγώ, ζῇ δὲ ἐν ἐμοὶ Χριστός· ὃ δὲ νῦν ζῶ ἐν σαρκί, ἐν πίστει ζῶ τῇ τοῦ υἱοῦ τοῦ θεοῦ τοῦ ἀγαπήσαντός με καὶ παραδόντος ἑαυτὸν ὑπὲρ ἐμοῦ. 2.21 Οὐκ ἀθετῶ τὴν χάριν τοῦ θεοῦ· εἰ γὰρ διὰ νόμου δικαιοσύνη, ἄρα Χριστὸς δωρεὰν ἀπέθανεν.
3.5
ὁ οὖν ἐπιχορηγῶν ὑμῖν τὸ πνεῦμα καὶ ἐνεργῶν δυνάμεις ἐν ὑμῖν ἐξ ἔργων νόμου ἢ ἐξ ἀκοῆς πίστεως;
3.26
Πάντες γὰρ υἱοὶ θεοῦ ἐστὲ διὰ τῆς πίστεως ἐν Χριστῷ Ἰησοῦ. 3.27 ὅσοι γὰρ εἰς Χριστὸν ἐβαπτίσθητε, Χριστὸν ἐνεδύσασθε· 3.28 οὐκ ἔνι Ἰουδαῖος οὐδὲ Ἕλλην, οὐκ ἔνι δοῦλος οὐδὲ ἐλεύθερος, οὐκ ἔνι ἄρσεν καὶ θῆλυ· πάντες γὰρ ὑμεῖς εἷς ἐστὲ ἐν Χριστῷ Ἰησοῦ.
4.6
Ὅτι δέ ἐστε υἱοί, ἐξαπέστειλεν ὁ θεὸς τὸ πνεῦμα τοῦ υἱοῦ αὐτοῦ εἰς τὰς καρδίας ἡμῶν, κρᾶζον Ἀββά ὁ πατήρ.
5.1
Τῇ ἐλευθερίᾳ ἡμᾶς Χριστὸς ἠλευθέρωσεν· στήκετε οὖν καὶ μὴ πάλιν ζυγῷ δουλείας ἐνέχεσθε.—
5.6
ἐν γὰρ Χριστῷ Ἰησοῦ οὔτε περιτομή τι ἰσχύει οὔτε ἀκροβυστία, ἀλλὰ πίστις διʼ ἀγάπης ἐνεργουμένη.

5.13
μόνον μὴ τὴν ἐλευθερίαν εἰς ἀφορμὴν τῇ σαρκί, ἀλλὰ διὰ τῆς ἀγάπης δουλεύετε ἀλλήλοις·

5.17
ἡ γὰρ σὰρξ ἐπιθυμεῖ κατὰ τοῦ πνεύματος, τὸ δὲ πνεῦμα κατὰ τῆς σαρκός, ταῦτα γὰρ ἀλλήλοις ἀντίκειται, ἵνα μὴ ἃ ἐὰν θέλητε ταῦτα ποιῆτε.
6.7
Μὴ πλανᾶσθε, θεὸς οὐ μυκτηρίζεται· ὃ γὰρ ἐὰν σπείρῃ ἄνθρωπος, τοῦτο καὶ θερίσει· 6.8 ὅτι ὁ σπείρων εἰς τὴν σάρκα ἑαυτοῦ ἐκ τῆς σαρκὸς θερίσει φθοράν, ὁ δὲ σπείρων εἰς τὸ πνεῦμα ἐκ τοῦ πνεύματος θερίσει ζωὴν αἰώνιον.'' None
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2.9 and when they perceived the grace that was given tome, James and Cephas and John, they who were reputed to be pillars,gave to me and Barnabas the right hand of fellowship, that we should goto the Gentiles, and they to the circumcision.
2.11
But when Peter came to Antioch, I resisted him to the face,because he stood condemned. 2.12 For before some people came fromJames, he ate with the Gentiles. But when they came, he drew back andseparated himself, fearing those who were of the circumcision. 2.13 And the rest of the Jews joined him in his hypocrisy; so that evenBarnabas was carried away with their hypocrisy. 2.14 But when I sawthat they didn\'t walk uprightly according to the truth of the gospel, Isaid to Peter before them all, "If you, being a Jew, live as theGentiles do, and not as the Jews do, why do you compel the Gentiles tolive as the Jews do? 2.15 "We, being Jews by nature, and not Gentile sinners, 2.16 yet knowing that a man is not justified by the works of the law butthrough the faith of Jesus Christ, even we believed in Christ Jesus,that we might be justified by faith in Christ, and not by the works ofthe law, because no flesh will be justified by the works of the law. 2.17 But if, while we sought to be justified in Christ, we ourselvesalso were found sinners, is Christ a servant of sin? Certainly not! 2.18 For if I build up again those things which I destroyed, I provemyself a law-breaker. 2.19 For I, through the law, died to the law,that I might live to God. 2.20 I have been crucified with Christ, andit is no longer I that live, but Christ living in me. That life which Inow live in the flesh, I live by faith in the Son of God, who loved me,and gave himself up for me. ' "2.21 I don't make void the grace of God.For if righteousness is through the law, then Christ died for nothing!" 3.5 He therefore who supplies the Spirit to you, and worksmiracles among you, does he do it by the works of the law, or byhearing of faith?
3.26
For you are all sons ofGod, through faith in Christ Jesus. 3.27 For as many of you as werebaptized into Christ have put on Christ. 3.28 There is neither Jewnor Greek, there is neither slave nor free man, there is neither malenor female; for you are all one in Christ Jesus.
4.6
And because you are sons, God sent out theSpirit of his Son into your hearts, crying, "Abba, Father!" ' "
5.1
Stand firm therefore in the liberty by which Christ has madeus free, and don't be entangled again with a yoke of bondage. " 5.6 For in Christ Jesusneither circumcision amounts to anything, nor uncircumcision, but faithworking through love. ' "

5.13
For you, brothers, were called for freedom. Only don't useyour freedom for gain to the flesh, but through love be servants to oneanother. "
5.17
For the flesh lusts against the Spirit, and theSpirit against the flesh; and these are contrary to one other, that youmay not do the things that you desire. ' "
6.7
Don't be deceived. God is notmocked, for whatever a man sows, that will he also reap. " '6.8 For hewho sows to his own flesh will from the flesh reap corruption. But hewho sows to the Spirit will from the Spirit reap eternal life. '' None
54. New Testament, Hebrews, 1.2-1.3 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Christ, Mighty works of • Son, the, creature, work • works

 Found in books: Despotis and Lohr (2022), Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions, 326; McDonough (2009), Christ as Creator: Origins of a New Testament Doctrine, 47; Widdicombe (2000), The Fatherhood of God from Origen to Athanasius, 90, 217

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1.2 ἐπʼ ἐσχάτου τῶν ἡμερῶν τούτων ἐλάλησεν ἡμῖν ἐν υἱῷ, ὃν ἔθηκεν κληρονόμον πάντων, διʼ οὗ καὶ ἐποίησεν τοὺς αἰῶνας· 1.3 ὃς ὢν ἀπαύγασμα τῆς δόξης καὶ χαρακτὴρ τῆς ὑποστάσεως αὐτοῦ, φέρων τε τὰ πάντα τῷ ῥήματι τῆς δυνάμεως αὐτοῦ, καθαρισμὸν τῶν ἁμαρτιῶν ποιησάμενοςἐκάθισεν ἐν δεξιᾷτῆς μεγαλωσύνης ἐν ὑψηλοῖς,'' None
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1.2 has at the end of these days spoken to us by his Son, whom he appointed heir of all things, through whom also he made the worlds. 1.3 His Son is the radiance of his glory, the very image of his substance, and upholding all things by the word of his power, when he had by himself made purification for our sins, sat down on the right hand of the Majesty on high; '' None
55. New Testament, Philippians, 1.20, 2.6-2.10, 2.13, 4.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Augustine’s Works, Conf. • Augustine’s Works, Ord. • Augustine’s Works, Praed. • Augustine’s Works, Simpl. • Hilary of Poitiers, works • Son, the, creature, work • deeds, works • pneuma (spirit) in Paul, as working in Pauls body • spirit, working through the faithful • works, evil

 Found in books: Engberg-Pedersen (2010), Cosmology and Self in the Apostle Paul: The Material Spirit, 42; Esler (2000), The Early Christian World, 611; Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 116, 201, 275; Morgan (2022), The New Testament and the Theology of Trust: 'This Rich Trust', 128, 129; Widdicombe (2000), The Fatherhood of God from Origen to Athanasius, 210; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 271, 293; deSilva (2022), Ephesians, 318

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1.20 κατὰ τὴν ἀποκαραδοκίαν καὶ ἐλπίδα μου ὅτι ἐν οὐδενὶ αἰσχυνθήσομαι, ἀλλʼ ἐν πάσῃ παρρησίᾳ ὡς πάντοτε καὶ νῦν μεγαλυνθήσεται Χριστὸς ἐν τῷ σώματί μου, εἴτε διὰ ζωῆς εἴτε διὰ θανάτου.
2.6
ὃς ἐν μορφῇ θεοῦ ὑπάρχων οὐχ ἁρπαγμὸν ἡγήσατο τὸ εἶναι ἴσα θεῷ, 2.7 ἀλλὰ ἑαυτὸν ἐκένωσεν μορφὴν δούλου λαβών, ἐν ὁμοιώματι ἀνθρώπων γενόμενος· καὶ σχήματι εὑρεθεὶς ὡς ἄνθρωπος 2.8 ἐταπείνωσεν ἑαυτὸν γενόμενος ὑπήκοος μέχρι θανάτου, θανάτου δὲ σταυροῦ· 2.9 διὸ καὶ ὁ θεὸς αὐτὸν ὑπερύψωσεν, καὶ ἐχαρίσατο αὐτῷ τὸ ὄνομα τὸ ὑπὲρ πᾶν ὄνομα, 2.10 ἵνα ἐν τῷ ὀνόματι Ἰησοῦπᾶν γόνυ κάμψῃἐπουρανίων καὶ ἐπιγείων καὶ καταχθονίων,
2.13
θεὸς γάρ ἐστιν ὁ ἐνεργῶν ἐν ὑμῖν καὶ τὸ θέλειν καὶ τὸ ἐνεργεῖν ὑπὲρ τῆς εὐδοκίας·
4.1
Ὥστε, ἀδελφοί μου ἀγαπητοὶ καὶ ἐπιπόθητοι, χαρὰ καὶ στέφανός μου, οὕτως στήκετε ἐν κυρίῳ, ἀγαπητοί.'' None
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1.20 according to my earnest expectation and hope, that I will in no way be put to shame, but with all boldness, as always, now also Christ will be magnified in my body, whether by life, or by death. ' "
2.6
who, existing in the form of God, didn't consider it robbery to be equal with God, " '2.7 but emptied himself, taking the form of a servant, being made in the likeness of men. 2.8 And being found in human form, he humbled himself, becoming obedient to death, yes, the death of the cross. 2.9 Therefore God also highly exalted him, and gave to him the name which is above every name; 2.10 that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, of those in heaven, those on earth, and those under the earth,
2.13
For it is God who works in you both to will and to work, for his good pleasure.
4.1
Therefore, my brothers, beloved and longed for, my joy and crown, so stand firm in the Lord, my beloved. '' None
56. New Testament, Romans, 2.9, 2.15, 2.29, 3.1, 3.9-3.10, 3.20-3.24, 3.27-3.29, 4.6, 4.12, 5.5, 5.11-5.12, 5.21, 6.1-6.2, 6.4, 6.23, 7.4, 7.14, 7.25, 8.15, 9.3, 9.16, 9.18-9.23, 11.6, 11.11, 11.23, 11.26, 11.36, 13.12, 15.7 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Augustine’s Works, Adnot. Job • Augustine’s Works, Bapt. • Augustine’s Works, C. Jul. • Augustine’s Works, C. Jul. imp. • Augustine’s Works, C. du. ep. Pel. • Augustine’s Works, C. litt. Petil. • Augustine’s Works, C. mend. • Augustine’s Works, Catech. rud. • Augustine’s Works, Civ. • Augustine’s Works, Conf. • Augustine’s Works, Corrept. • Augustine’s Works, De mend. • Augustine’s Works, Div. quaest. • Augustine’s Works, Doctr. chr. • Augustine’s Works, Duab. an. • Augustine’s Works, Emer. • Augustine’s Works, Enar. Ps. • Augustine’s Works, Enchir. • Augustine’s Works, Exp. Gal. • Augustine’s Works, Exp. Rom. inch. • Augustine’s Works, Exp. quaest. Rom. • Augustine’s Works, Fid. op. • Augustine’s Works, Fid. symb. • Augustine’s Works, Gen. Man. • Augustine’s Works, Gen. litt. • Augustine’s Works, Grat. • Augustine’s Works, Grat. Chr. • Augustine’s Works, Leg. adv. • Augustine’s Works, Lib. arb. • Augustine’s Works, Locut. Hept. • Augustine’s Works, Mor. eccl. • Augustine’s Works, Nat. grat. • Augustine’s Works, Nat. orig. • Augustine’s Works, Nupt. et conc. • Augustine’s Works, Ord. • Augustine’s Works, Pat. • Augustine’s Works, Pecc. merit. • Augustine’s Works, Perf. • Augustine’s Works, Persev. • Augustine’s Works, Praed. • Augustine’s Works, Quant. an. • Augustine’s Works, Retract. VII • Augustine’s Works, S. • Augustine’s Works, S. Dom. m. • Augustine’s Works, Simpl. • Augustine’s Works, Spir. et litt. • Augustine’s Works, Symb. • Augustine’s Works, Tract. Ev. Jo. • Augustine’s Works, Tract. ep. Jo. • Augustine’s Works, Trin. • Augustine’s Works, Unit. eccl. • Augustine’s Works, Ver. rel. • Augustine’s Works, Virginit. • Augustine’s Works, c. Arian. • Augustine’s Works, c. Cresc. • Augustine’s Works, c. Faust. • Augustine’s Works, c. Fel. • Augustine’s Works, c. Fort. • Augustine’s Works, c. ep. Man. Fund. • Christ, Mighty works of • Good works • Hilary of Poitiers, Ambrosiaster's works circulated under name of • Jesus, work/acts/miracles of • Jewish practices/Torah observance, “works of the law” (erga nomou) • Son, the, creature, work • Wonders/wonder-working • circulation, of Ambrosiaster's works • deeds, works • grace, and works • language, law, works of • spirit, working through the faithful • works • works, evil • works, good • ‘works’ of Law

 Found in books: Despotis and Lohr (2022), Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions, 348; Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 35, 52, 57, 72, 74, 75, 77, 116, 122, 206, 265, 280, 304, 350; Lieu (2004), Christian Identity in the Jewish and Graeco-Roman World, 127, 128; Lunn-Rockliffe (2007), The Letter of Mara bar Sarapion in Context, 18, 19; McDonough (2009), Christ as Creator: Origins of a New Testament Doctrine, 35, 47; Morgan (2022), The New Testament and the Theology of Trust: 'This Rich Trust', 128, 129; Poorthuis and Schwartz (2014), Saints and role models in Judaism and Christianity, 325; Tellbe Wasserman and Nyman (2019), Healing and Exorcism in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity, 153; Tomson (2019), Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries. 363, 364, 368, 369, 374, 382, 594; Widdicombe (2000), The Fatherhood of God from Origen to Athanasius, 211; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 5, 92, 100, 107, 119, 121, 127, 130, 140, 141, 142, 144, 146, 148, 157, 158, 161, 163, 164, 166, 169, 170, 171, 173, 175, 176, 178, 179, 181, 183, 185, 187, 188, 189, 191, 193, 197, 204, 210, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 224, 225, 228, 244, 245, 247, 248, 249, 250, 254, 262, 265, 269, 270, 271, 276, 279, 280, 285, 286, 293, 295, 297; Wilson (2022), Paul and the Jewish Law: A Stoic Ethical Perspective on his Inconsistency, 111, 210; deSilva (2022), Ephesians, 125, 126, 128, 144, 222, 318; Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová (2016), Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria , 36, 330

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2.9 θλίψις καὶ στενοχωρία, ἐπὶ πᾶσαν ψυχὴν ἀνθρώπου τοῦ κατεργαζομένου τὸ κακόν, Ἰουδαίου τε πρῶτον καὶ Ἕλληνος·
2.15
οἵτινες ἐνδείκνυνται τὸ ἔργον τοῦ νόμου γραπτὸν ἐν ταῖς καρδίαις αὐτῶν, συνμαρτυρούσης αὐτῶν τῆς συνειδήσεως καὶ μεταξὺ ἀλλήλων τῶν λογισμῶν κατηγορούντων ἢ καὶ ἀπολογουμένων,
2.29
ἀλλʼ ὁ ἐν τῷ κρυπτῷ Ἰουδαῖος, καὶ περιτομὴ καρδίας ἐν πνεύματι οὐ γράμματι, οὗ ὁ ἔπαινος οὐκ ἐξ ἀνθρώπων ἀλλʼ ἐκ τοῦ θεοῦ.
3.1
Τί οὖν τὸ περισσὸν τοῦ Ἰουδαίου, ἢ τίς ἡ ὠφελία τῆς περιτομῆς;
3.9
Τί οὖν; προεχόμεθα; οὐ πάντως, προῃτιασάμεθα γὰρ Ἰουδαίους τε καὶ Ἕλληνας πάντας ὑφʼ ἁμαρτίαν εἶναι,
3.10
καθὼς γέγραπται ὅτι
3.20
διότι ἐξ ἔργων νόμουοὐ δικαιωθήσεται πᾶσα σὰρξ ἐνώπιον αὐτοῦ,διὰ γὰρ νόμου ἐπίγνωσις ἁμαρτίας. 3.21 νυνὶ δὲ χωρὶς νόμου δικαιοσύνη θεοῦ πεφανέρωται, μαρτυρουμένη ὑπὸ τοῦ νόμου καὶ τῶν προφητῶν, 3.22 δικαιοσύνη δὲ θεοῦ διὰ πίστεως Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ, εἰς πάντας τοὺς πιστεύοντας, οὐ γάρ ἐστιν διαστολή. 3.23 πάντες γὰρ ἥμαρτον καὶ ὑστεροῦνται τῆς δόξης τοῦ θεοῦ, 3.24 δικαιούμενοι δωρεὰν τῇ αὐτοῦ χάριτι διὰ τῆς ἀπολυτρώσεως τῆς ἐν Χριστῷ Ἰησοῦ·
3.27
Ποῦ οὖν ἡ καύχησις; ἐξεκλείσθη. διὰ ποίου νόμου; τῶν ἔργων; οὐχί, ἀλλὰ διὰ νόμου πίστεως. 3.28 λογιζόμεθα γὰρ δικαιοῦσθαι πίστει ἄνθρωπον χωρὶς ἔργων νόμου. 3.29 ἢ Ἰουδαίων ὁ θεὸς μόνον; οὐχὶ καὶ ἐθνῶν;
4.6
καθάπερ καὶ Δαυεὶδ λέγει τὸν μακαρισμὸν τοῦ ἀνθρώπου ᾧ ὁ θεὸς λογίζεται δικαιοσύνην χωρὶς ἔργων
4.12
καὶ πατέρα περιτομῆς τοῖς οὐκ ἐκ περιτομῆς μόνον ἀλλὰ καὶ τοῖς στοιχοῦσιν τοῖς ἴχνεσιν τῆς ἐν ἀκροβυστίᾳ πίστεως τοῦ πατρὸς ἡμῶν Ἀβραάμ.
5.5
ἡ δὲἐλπὶς οὐ καταισχύνει.ὅτι ἡ ἀγάπη τοῦ θεοῦ ἐκκέχυται ἐν ταῖς καρδίαις ἡμῶν διὰ πνεύματος ἁγίου τοῦ δοθέντος ἡμῖν·
5.11
οὐ μόνον δέ, ἀλλὰ καὶ καυχώμενοι ἐν τῷ θεῷ διὰ τοῦ κυρίου ἡμῶν Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ, διʼ οὗ νῦν τὴν καταλλαγὴν ἐλάβομεν. 5.12 Διὰ τοῦτο ὥσπερ διʼ ἑνὸς ἀνθρώπου ἡ ἁμαρτία εἰς τὸν κόσμον εἰσῆλθεν καὶ διὰ τῆς ἁμαρτίας ὁ θάνατος, καὶ οὕτως εἰς πάντας ἀνθρώπους ὁ θάνατος διῆλθεν ἐφʼ ᾧ πάντες ἥμαρτον-.
5.21
ἵνα ὥσπερ ἐβασίλευσεν ἡ ἁμαρτία ἐν τῷ θανάτῳ, οὕτως καὶ ἡ χάρις βασιλεύσῃ διὰ δικαιοσύνης εἰς ζωὴν αἰώνιον διὰ Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ τοῦ κυρίου ἡμῶν.
6.1
Τί οὖν ἐροῦμεν; ἐπιμένωμεν τῇ ἁμαρτίᾳ, ἵνα ἡ χάρις πλεονάσῃ; 6.2 μὴ γένοιτο· οἵτινες ἀπεθάνομεν τῇ ἁμαρτίᾳ, πῶς ἔτι ζήσομεν ἐν αὐτῇ;
6.4
συνετάφημεν οὖν αὐτῷ διὰ τοῦ βαπτίσματος εἰς τὸν θάνατον, ἵνα ὥσπερ ἠγέρθη Χριστὸς ἐκ νεκρῶν διὰ τῆς δόξης τοῦ πατρός, οὕτως καὶ ἡμεῖς ἐν καινότητι ζωῆς περιπατήσωμεν.
6.23
τὰ γὰρ ὀψώνια τῆς ἁμαρτίας θάνατος, τὸ δὲ χάρισμα τοῦ θεοῦ ζωὴ αἰώνιος ἐν Χριστῷ Ἰησοῦ τῷ κυρίῳ ἡμῶν.
7.4
ὥστε, ἀδελφοί μου, καὶ ὑμεῖς ἐθανατώθητε τῷ νόμῳ διὰ τοῦ σώματος τοῦ χριστοῦ, εἰς τὸ γενέσθαι ὑμᾶς ἑτέρῳ, τῷ ἐκ νεκρῶν ἐγερθέντι ἵνα καρποφορήσωμεν τῷ θεῷ.
7.14
οἴδαμεν γὰρ ὅτι ὁ νόμος πνευματικός ἐστιν· ἐγὼ δὲ σάρκινός εἰμι, πεπραμένος ὑπὸ τὴν ἁμαρτίαν.
7.25
χάρις δὲ τῷ θεῷ διὰ Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ τοῦ κυρίου ἡμῶν. ἄρα οὖν αὐτὸς ἐγὼ τῷ μὲν νοῒ δουλεύω νόμῳ θεοῦ, τῇ δὲ σαρκὶ νόμῳ ἁμαρτίας.
8.15
οὐ γὰρ ἐλάβετε πνεῦμα δουλείας πάλιν εἰς φόβον, ἀλλὰ ἐλάβετε πνεῦμα υἱοθεσίας, ἐν ᾧ κράζομεν
9.3
ηὐχόμην γὰρ ἀνάθεμα εἶναι αὐτὸς ἐγὼ ἀπὸ τοῦ χριστοῦ ὑπὲρ τῶν ἀδελφῶν μου τῶν συγγενῶν μου κατὰ σάρκα, οἵτινές εἰσιν Ἰσραηλεῖται,
9.16
ἄρα οὖν οὐ τοῦ θέλοντος οὐδὲ τοῦ τρέχοντος, ἀλλὰ τοῦ ἐλεῶντος θεοῦ.
9.18
ἄρα οὖν ὃν θέλει ἐλεεῖ, ὃν δὲ θέλεισκληρύνει. 9.19 Ἐρεῖς μοι οὖν Τί ἔτι μέμφεται; 9.20 τῷ γὰρ βουλήματι αὐτοῦ τίς ἀνθέστηκεν; ὦ ἄνθρωπε, μενοῦνγε σὺ τίς εἶ ὁ ἀνταποκρινόμενος τῷ θεῷ;μὴ ἐρεῖ τὸ πλάσμα τῷ πλάσαντιΤί με ἐποίησας οὕτως; 9.21 ἢ οὐκ ἔχει ἐξουσίανὁ κεραμεὺς τοῦ πηλοῦἐκ τοῦ αὐτοῦ φυράματος ποιῆσαι ὃ μὲν εἰς τιμὴν σκεῦος, ὃ δὲ εἰς ἀτιμίαν; 9.22 εἰ δὲ θέλων ὁ θεὸς ἐνδείξασθαι τὴν ὀργὴν καὶ γνωρίσαι τὸ δυνατὸν αὐτοῦἤνεγκενἐν πολλῇ μακροθυμίᾳσκεύη ὀργῆςκατηρτισμέναεἰς ἀπώλειαν, 9.23 ἵνα γνωρίσῃ τὸν πλοῦτον τῆς δόξης αὐτοῦ ἐπὶ σκεύη ἐλέους, ἃ προητοίμασεν εἰς δόξαν,
11.6
εἰ δὲ χάριτι, οὐκέτι ἐξ ἔργων, ἐπεὶ ἡ χάρις οὐκέτι γίνεται χάρις.
11.11
Λέγω οὖν, μὴ ἔπταισαν ἵνα πέσωσιν; μὴ γένοιτο· ἀλλὰ τῷ αὐτῶν παραπτώματι ἡ σωτηρία τοῖς ἔθνεσιν, εἰς τὸπαραζηλῶσαιαὐτούς.
11.23
κἀκεῖνοι δέ, ἐὰν μὴ ἐπιμένωσι τῇ ἀπιστίᾳ, ἐνκεντρισθήσονται· δυνατὸς γάρ ἐστιν ὁ θεὸς πάλιν ἐνκεντρίσαι αὐτούς.
11.26
καθὼς γέγραπται
11.36
ὅτι ἐξ αὐτοῦ καὶ διʼ αὐτοῦ καὶ εἰς αὐτὸν τὰ πάντα· αὐτῷ ἡ δόξα εἰς τοὺς αἰῶνας· ἀμήν.
1
3.12
ἡ νὺξ προέκοψεν, ἡ δὲ ἡμέρα ἤγγικεν. ἀποθώμεθα οὖν τὰ ἔργα τοῦ σκότους, ἐνδυσώμεθα δὲ τὰ ὅπλα τοῦ φωτός.
15.7
Διὸ προσλαμβάνεσθε ἀλλήλους, καθὼς καὶ ὁ χριστὸς προσελάβετο ἡμᾶς, εἰς δόξαν τοῦ θεοῦ.' ' None
sup>
2.9 oppression and anguish, on every soul of man who works evil, on the Jew first, and also on the Greek.
2.15
in that they show the work of the law written in their hearts, their conscience testifying with them, and their thoughts among themselves accusing or else excusing them)
2.29
but he is a Jew who is one inwardly, and circumcision is that of the heart, in the spirit not in the letter; whose praise is not from men, but from God.
3.1
Then what advantage does the Jew have? Or what is the profit of circumcision?
3.9
What then? Are we better than they? No, in no way. For we previously charged both Jews and Greeks, that they are all under sin.
3.10
As it is written, "There is no one righteous. No, not one.
3.20
Because by the works of the law, no flesh will be justified in his sight. For through the law comes the knowledge of sin. 3.21 But now apart from the law, a righteousness of God has been revealed, being testified by the law and the prophets; 3.22 even the righteousness of God through faith in Jesus Christ to all and on all those who believe. For there is no distinction, 3.23 for all have sinned, and fall short of the glory of God; 3.24 being justified freely by his grace through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus;
3.27
Where then is the boasting? It is excluded. By what manner of law? of works? No, but by a law of faith. 3.28 We maintain therefore that a man is justified by faith apart from the works of the law. ' "3.29 Or is God the God of Jews only? Isn't he the God of Gentiles also? Yes, of Gentiles also, " '3 , Then what advantage does the Jew have? Or what is the profit of circumcision? , Much in every way! Because first of all, they were entrusted with the oracles of God. , For what if some were without faith? Will their lack of faith nullify the faithfulness of God? , May it never be! Yes, let God be found true, but every man a liar. As it is written, "That you might be justified in your words, And might prevail when you come into judgment.", But if our unrighteousness commends the righteousness of God, what will we say? Is God unrighteous who inflicts wrath? I speak like men do. , May it never be! For then how will God judge the world? , For if the truth of God through my lie abounded to his glory, why am I also still judged as a sinner? , Why not (as we are slanderously reported, and as some affirm that we say), "Let us do evil, that good may come?" Those who say so are justly condemned. , What then? Are we better than they? No, in no way. For we previously charged both Jews and Greeks, that they are all under sin. , As it is written, "There is no one righteous. No, not one. , There is no one who understands. There is no one who seeks after God. , They have all turned aside. They have together become unprofitable. There is no one who does good, No, not, so much as one.", "Their throat is an open tomb. With their tongues they have used deceit." "The poison of vipers is under their lips;", "Whose mouth is full of cursing and bitterness.", "Their feet are swift to shed blood. , Destruction and misery are in their ways. , The way of peace, they haven\'t known.", "There is no fear of God before their eyes.", Now we know that whatever things the law says, it speaks to those who are under the law, that every mouth may be closed, and all the world may be brought under the judgment of God. , Because by the works of the law, no flesh will be justified in his sight. For through the law comes the knowledge of sin. , But now apart from the law, a righteousness of God has been revealed, being testified by the law and the prophets; , even the righteousness of God through faith in Jesus Christ to all and on all those who believe. For there is no distinction, , for all have sinned, and fall short of the glory of God; , being justified freely by his grace through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus; , whom God set forth to be an atoning sacrifice, through faith in his blood, for a demonstration of his righteousness through the passing over of prior sins, in God\'s forbearance; , to demonstrate his righteousness at this present time; that he might himself be just, and the justifier of him who has faith in Jesus. , Where then is the boasting? It is excluded. By what manner of law? of works? No, but by a law of faith. , We maintain therefore that a man is justified by faith apart from the works of the law. , Or is God the God of Jews only? Isn\'t he the God of Gentiles also? Yes, of Gentiles also, , since indeed there is one God who will justify the circumcised by faith, and the uncircumcised through faith. , Do we then nullify the law through faith? May it never be! No, we establish the law.
4.6
Even as David also pronounces blessing on the man to whom God counts righteousness apart from works,
4.12
The father of circumcision to those who not only are of the circumcision, but who also walk in the steps of that faith of our father Abraham, which he had in uncircumcision. ' "4 , What then will we say that Abraham, our forefather, has found according to the flesh? , For if Abraham was justified by works, he has something to boast about, but not toward God. , For what does the Scripture say? "Abraham believed God, and it was accounted to him for righteousness.", Now to him who works, the reward is not accounted as of grace, but as of debt. , But to him who doesn\'t work, but believes in him who justifies the ungodly, his faith is accounted for righteousness. , Even as David also pronounces blessing on the man to whom God counts righteousness apart from works, , "Blessed are they whose iniquities are forgiven, Whose sins are covered. , Blessed is the man whom the Lord will by no means charge with sin.", Is this blessing then pronounced on the circumcised, or on the uncircumcised also? For we say that faith was accounted to Abraham for righteousness. , How then was it counted? When he was in circumcision, or in uncircumcision? Not in circumcision, but in uncircumcision. , He received the sign of circumcision, a seal of the righteousness of the faith which he had while he was in uncircumcision, that he might be the father of all those who believe, though they be in uncircumcision, that righteousness might also be accounted to them. , The father of circumcision to those who not only are of the circumcision, but who also walk in the steps of that faith of our father Abraham, which he had in uncircumcision. , For the promise to Abraham and to his seed that he should be heir of the world wasn\'t through the law, but through the righteousness of faith. , For if those who are of the law are heirs, faith is made void, and the promise is made of no effect. , For the law works wrath, for where there is no law, neither is there disobedience. , For this cause it is of faith, that it may be according to grace, to the end that the promise may be sure to all the seed, not to that only which is of the law, but to that also which is of the faith of Abraham, who is the father of us all. , As it is written, "I have made you a father of many nations." This is in the presence of him whom he believed: God, who gives life to the dead, and calls the things that are not, as though they were. , Who in hope believed against hope, to the end that he might become a father of many nations, according to that which had been spoken, "So will your seed be.", Without being weakened in faith, he didn\'t consider his own body, already having been worn out, (he being about a hundred years old), and the deadness of Sarah\'s womb. , Yet, looking to the promise of God, he didn\'t waver through unbelief, but grew strong through faith, giving glory to God, , and being fully assured that what he had promised, he was able also to perform. , Therefore it also was "reckoned to him for righteousness.", Now it was not written that it was accounted to him for his sake alone, , but for our sake also, to whom it will be accounted, who believe in him who raised Jesus, our Lord, from the dead, , who was delivered up for our trespasses, and was raised for our justification. ' "
5.5
and hope doesn't disappoint us, because God's love has been poured out into our hearts through the Holy Spirit who was given to us. " 5.11 Not only so, but we also rejoice in God through our Lord Jesus Christ, through whom we have now received the reconciliation. 5.12 Therefore, as sin entered into the world through one man, and death through sin; and so death passed to all men, because all sinned.
5.21
that as sin reigned in death, even so might grace reign through righteousness to eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord. 5 , Being therefore justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ; , through whom we also have our access by faith into this grace in which we stand. We rejoice in hope of the glory of God. , Not only this, but we also rejoice in our sufferings, knowing that suffering works perseverance; , and perseverance, proven character; and proven character, hope: , and hope doesn't disappoint us, because God's love has been poured out into our hearts through the Holy Spirit who was given to us. , For while we were yet weak, at the right time Christ died for the ungodly. , For one will hardly die for a righteous man. Yet perhaps for a righteous person someone would even dare to die. , But God commends his own love toward us, in that while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us. , Much more then, being now justified by his blood, we will be saved from God's wrath through him. , For if, while we were enemies, we were reconciled to God through the death of his Son, much more, being reconciled, we will be saved by his life. , Not only so, but we also rejoice in God through our Lord Jesus Christ, through whom we have now received the reconciliation. , Therefore, as sin entered into the world through one man, and death through sin; and so death passed to all men, because all sinned. , For until the law, sin was in the world; but sin is not charged when there is no law. , Nevertheless death reigned from Adam until Moses, even over those whose sins weren't like Adam's disobedience, who is a foreshadowing of him who was to come. , But the free gift isn't like the trespass. For if by the trespass of the one the many died, much more did the grace of God, and the gift by the grace of the one man, Jesus Christ, abound to the many. , The gift is not as through one who sinned: for the judgment came by one to condemnation, but the free gift came of many trespasses to justification. , For if by the trespass of the one, death reigned through the one; so much more will those who receive the abundance of grace and of the gift of righteousness reign in life through the one, Jesus Christ. , So then as through one trespass, all men were condemned; even so through one act of righteousness, all men were justified to life. , For as through the one man's disobedience many were made sinners, even so through the obedience of the one will many be made righteous. , The law came in besides, that the trespass might abound; but where sin abounded, grace did abound more exceedingly; , that as sin reigned in death, even so might grace reign through righteousness to eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord. " "
6.1
What shall we say then? Shall we continue in sin, that grace may abound? 6.2 May it never be! We who died to sin, how could we live in it any longer?
6.4
We were buried therefore with him through baptism to death, that just like Christ was raised from the dead through the glory of the Father, so we also might walk in newness of life.
6.23
For the wages of sin is death, but the free gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord. 6 , What shall we say then? Shall we continue in sin, that grace may abound? , May it never be! We who died to sin, how could we live in it any longer? , Or don't you know that all we who were baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into his death? , We were buried therefore with him through baptism to death, that just like Christ was raised from the dead through the glory of the Father, so we also might walk in newness of life. , For if we have become united with him in the likeness of his death, we will also be part of his resurrection; , knowing this, that our old man was crucified with him, that the body of sin might be done away with, so that we would no longer be in bondage to sin. , For he who has died has been freed from sin. , But if we died with Christ, we believe that we will also live with him; , knowing that Christ, being raised from the dead, dies no more. Death no more has dominion over him! , For the death that he died, he died to sin one time; but the life that he lives, he lives to God. , Thus also consider yourselves also to be dead to sin, but alive to God in Christ Jesus our Lord. , Therefore don't let sin reign in your mortal body, that you should obey it in its lusts. , Neither present your members to sin as instruments of unrighteousness, but present yourselves to God, as alive from the dead, and your members as instruments of righteousness to God. , For sin will not have dominion over you. For you are not under law, but under grace. , What then? Shall we sin, because we are not under law, but under grace? May it never be! , Don't you know that to whom you present yourselves as servants to obedience, his servants you are whom you obey; whether of sin to death, or of obedience to righteousness? , But thanks be to God, that, whereas you were bondservants of sin, you became obedient from the heart to that form of teaching whereunto you were delivered. , Being made free from sin, you became bondservants of righteousness. , I speak in human terms because of the weakness of your flesh, for as you presented your members as servants to uncleanness and to wickedness upon wickedness, even so now present your members as servants to righteousness for sanctification. , For when you were servants of sin, you were free in regard to righteousness. , What fruit then did you have at that time in the things of which you are now ashamed? For the end of those things is death. , But now, being made free from sin, and having become servants of God, you have your fruit of sanctification, and the result of eternal life. , For the wages of sin is death, but the free gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord. " 7.4 Therefore, my brothers, you also were made dead to the law through the body of Christ, that you would be joined to another, to him who was raised from the dead, that we might bring forth fruit to God.
7.14
For we know that the law is spiritual, but I am fleshly, sold under sin. ' "
7.25
I thank God through Jesus Christ, our Lord! So then with the mind, I myself serve God's law, but with the flesh, the sin's law. " '7 , Or don\'t you know, brothers (for I speak to men who know the law), that the law has dominion over a man for as long as he lives? , For the woman that has a husband is bound by law to the husband while he lives, but if the husband dies, she is discharged from the law of the husband. , So then if, while the husband lives, she is joined to another man, she would be called an adulteress. But if the husband dies, she is free from the law, so that she is no adulteress, though she is joined to another man. , Therefore, my brothers, you also were made dead to the law through the body of Christ, that you would be joined to another, to him who was raised from the dead, that we might bring forth fruit to God. , For when we were in the flesh, the sinful passions which were through the law, worked in our members to bring forth fruit to death. , But now we have been discharged from the law, having died to that in which we were held; so that we serve in newness of the spirit, and not in oldness of the letter. , What shall we say then? Is the law sin? May it never be! However, I wouldn\'t have known sin, except through the law. For I wouldn\'t have known coveting, unless the law had said, "You shall not covet.", But sin, finding occasion through the commandment, produced in me all kinds of coveting. For apart from the law, sin is dead. , I was alive apart from the law once, but when the commandment came, sin revived, and I died. , The commandment, which was for life, this I found to be for death; , for sin, finding occasion through the commandment, deceived me, and through it killed me. , Therefore the law indeed is holy, and the commandment holy, and righteous, and good. , Did then that which is good become death to me? May it never be! But sin, that it might be shown to be sin, by working death to me through that which is good; that through the commandment sin might become exceeding sinful. , For we know that the law is spiritual, but I am fleshly, sold under sin. , For I don\'t know what I am doing. For I don\'t practice what I desire to do; but what I hate, that I do. , But if what I don\'t desire, that I do, I consent to the law that it is good. , So now it is no more I that do it, but sin which dwells in me. , For I know that in me, that is, in my flesh, dwells no good thing. For desire is present with me, but I don\'t find it doing that which is good. , For the good which I desire, I don\'t do; but the evil which I don\'t desire, that I practice. , But if what I don\'t desire, that I do, it is no more I that do it, but sin which dwells in me. , I find then the law, that, to me, while I desire to do good, evil is present. , For I delight in God\'s law after the inward man, , but I see a different law in my members, warring against the law of my mind, and bringing me into captivity under the law of sin which is in my members. , What a wretched man I am! Who will deliver me out of the body of this death? , I thank God through Jesus Christ, our Lord! So then with the mind, I myself serve God\'s law, but with the flesh, the sin\'s law.
8.15
For you didn\'t receive the spirit of bondage again to fear, but you received the Spirit of adoption, by whom we cry, "Abba! Father!"' "8 , There is therefore now no condemnation to those who are in Christ Jesus, who don\'t walk according to the flesh, but according to the Spirit. , For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus made me free from the law of sin and of death. , For what the law couldn\'t do, in that it was weak through the flesh, God did, sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh and for sin, he condemned sin in the flesh; , that the ordice of the law might be fulfilled in us, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit. , For those who live according to the flesh set their minds on the things of the flesh, but those who live according to the Spirit, the things of the Spirit. , For the mind of the flesh is death, but the mind of the Spirit is life and peace; , because the mind of the flesh is hostile towards God; for it is not subject to God\'s law, neither indeed can it be. , Those who are in the flesh can\'t please God. , But you are not in the flesh but in the Spirit, if it is so that the Spirit of God dwells in you. But if any man doesn\'t have the Spirit of Christ, he is not his. , If Christ is in you, the body is dead because of sin, but the spirit is alive because of righteousness. , But if the Spirit of him who raised up Jesus from the dead dwells in you, he who raised up Christ Jesus from the dead will also give life to your mortal bodies through his Spirit who dwells in you. , So then, brothers, we are debtors, not to the flesh, to live after the flesh. , For if you live after the flesh, you must die; but if by the Spirit you put to death the deeds of the body, you will live. , For as many as are led by the Spirit of God, these are children of God. , For you didn\'t receive the spirit of bondage again to fear, but you received the Spirit of adoption, by whom we cry, "Abba! Father!", The Spirit himself testifies with our spirit that we are children of God; , and if children, then heirs; heirs of God, and joint-heirs with Christ; if indeed we suffer with him, that we may also be glorified with him. , For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory which will be revealed toward us. , For the creation waits with eager expectation for the sons of God to be revealed. , For the creation was subjected to vanity, not of its own will, but because of him who subjected it, in hope , that the creation itself also will be delivered from the bondage of decay into the liberty of the glory of the children of God. , For we know that the whole creation groans and travails in pain together until now. , Not only so, but ourselves also, who have the first fruits of the Spirit, even we ourselves groan within ourselves, waiting for adoption, the redemption of our body. , For we were saved in hope, but hope that is seen is not hope. For who hopes for that which he sees? , But if we hope for that which we don\'t see, we wait for it with patience. , In the same way, the Spirit also helps our weaknesses, for we don\'t know how to pray as we ought. But the Spirit himself makes intercession for us with groanings which can\'t be uttered. , He who searches the hearts knows what is on the Spirit\'s mind, because he makes intercession for the saints according to God. , We know that all things work together for good for those who love God, to those who are called according to his purpose. , For whom he foreknew, he also predestined to be conformed to the image of his Son, that he might be the firstborn among many brothers. , Whom he predestined, those he also called. Whom he called, those he also justified. Whom he justified, those he also glorified. , What then shall we say about these things? If God is for us, who can be against us? , He who didn\'t spare his own Son, but delivered him up for us all, how would he not also with him freely give us all things? , Who could bring a charge against God\'s elect? It is God who justifies. , Who is he who condemns? It is Christ who died, yes rather, who was raised from the dead, who is at the right hand of God, who also makes intercession for us. , Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Could oppression, or anguish, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword? , Even as it is written, "For your sake we are killed all day long. We were accounted as sheep for the slaughter.", No, in all these things, we are more than conquerors through him who loved us. , For I am persuaded, that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor principalities, nor things present, nor things to come, nor powers, , nor height, nor depth, nor any other created thing, will be able to separate us from the love of God, which is in Christ Jesus our Lord.
9.3
For I could wish that I myself were accursed from Christ for my brothers' sake, my relatives according to the flesh, " 9.16 So then it is not of him who wills, nor of him who runs, but of God who has mercy.
9.18
So then, he has mercy on whom he desires, and he hardens whom he desires. 9.19 You will say then to me, "Why does he still find fault? For who withstands his will?" 9.20 But indeed, O man, who are you to reply against God? Will the thing formed ask him who formed it, "Why did you make me like this?"' "9.21 Or hasn't the potter a right over the clay, from the same lump to make one part a vessel for honor, and another for dishonor? " '9.22 What if God, willing to show his wrath, and to make his power known, endured with much patience vessels of wrath made for destruction, 9.23 and that he might make known the riches of his glory on vessels of mercy, which he prepared beforehand for glory, 9 , I tell the truth in Christ. I am not lying, my conscience testifying with me in the Holy Spirit, , that I have great sorrow and unceasing pain in my heart. , For I could wish that I myself were accursed from Christ for my brothers\' sake, my relatives according to the flesh, , who are Israelites; whose is the adoption, the glory, the covets, the giving of the law, the service, and the promises; , of whom are the fathers, and from whom is Christ as concerning the flesh, who is over all, God, blessed forever. Amen. , But it is not as though the word of God has come to nothing. For they are not all Israel, that are of Israel. , Neither, because they are Abraham\'s seed, are they all children. But, "In Isaac will your seed be called.", That is, it is not the children of the flesh who are children of God, but the children of the promise are counted as a seed. , For this is a word of promise, "At the appointed time I will come, and Sarah will have a son.", Not only so, but Rebecca also conceived by one, by our father Isaac. , For being not yet born, neither having done anything good or bad, that the purpose of God according to election might stand, not of works, but of him who calls, , it was said to her, "The elder will serve the younger.", Even as it is written, "Jacob I loved, but Esau I hated.", What shall we say then? Is there unrighteousness with God? May it never be! , For he said to Moses, "I will have mercy on whom I have mercy, and I will have compassion on whom I have compassion.", So then it is not of him who wills, nor of him who runs, but of God who has mercy. , For the Scripture says to Pharaoh, "For this very purpose I caused you to be raised up, that I might show in you my power, and that my name might be published abroad in all the earth.", So then, he has mercy on whom he desires, and he hardens whom he desires. , You will say then to me, "Why does he still find fault? For who withstands his will?", But indeed, O man, who are you to reply against God? Will the thing formed ask him who formed it, "Why did you make me like this?", Or hasn\'t the potter a right over the clay, from the same lump to make one part a vessel for honor, and another for dishonor? , What if God, willing to show his wrath, and to make his power known, endured with much patience vessels of wrath made for destruction, , and that he might make known the riches of his glory on vessels of mercy, which he prepared beforehand for glory, , us, whom he also called, not from the Jews only, but also from the Gentiles? , As he says also in Hosea, "I will call them \'my people,\' which were not my people; And her \'beloved,\' who was not beloved.", "It will be that in the place where it was said to them, \'You are not my people,\' There they will be called \'sons of the living God.\'", Isaiah cries concerning Israel, "If the number of the children of Israel are as the sand of the sea, It is the remt who will be saved; , For He will finish the work and cut it short in righteousness, Because the LORD will make a short work upon the earth.", As Isaiah has said before, "Unless the Lord of Hosts had left us a seed, We would have become like Sodom, And would have been made like Gomorrah.", What shall we say then? That the Gentiles, who didn\'t follow after righteousness, attained to righteousness, even the righteousness which is of faith; , but Israel, following after a law of righteousness, didn\'t arrive at the law of righteousness. , Why? Because they didn\'t seek it by faith, but as it were by works of the law. They stumbled over the stumbling stone; , even as it is written, "Behold, I lay in Zion a stumbling stone and a rock of offense; And no one who believes in him will be put to shame." 11.6 And if by grace, then it is no longer of works; otherwise grace is no longer grace. But if it is of works, it is no longer grace; otherwise work is no longer work.
11.11
I ask then, did they stumble that they might fall? May it never be! But by their fall salvation has come to the Gentiles, to provoke them to jealousy. ' "
11.23
They also, if they don't continue in their unbelief, will be grafted in, for God is able to graft them in again. " 11.26 and so all Israel will be saved. Even as it is written, "There will come out of Zion the Deliverer, And he will turn away ungodliness from Jacob.
11.36
For of him, and through him, and to him, are all things. To him be the glory for ever! Amen. ' "
1
3.12
The night is far gone, and the day is near. Let's therefore throw off the works of darkness, and let's put on the armor of light. " 15.7 Therefore receive one another, even as Christ also received you, to the glory of God. ' None
57. New Testament, Titus, 2.11, 2.13-2.14, 3.6 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Augustine’s Works, Civ. • Augustine’s Works, Enar. Ps. • Augustine’s Works, Enchir. • Augustine’s Works, Nat. orig. • Augustine’s Works, S. • Augustine’s Works, Tract. Ev. Jo. • Augustine’s Works, Tract. ep. Jo. • Augustine’s Works, c. Faust. • Christ, Mighty works of • Stoicism, good works • works, good

 Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 554; McDonough (2009), Christ as Creator: Origins of a New Testament Doctrine, 47; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 269; deSilva (2022), Ephesians, 128

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2.11 Ἐπεφάνη γὰρ ἡ χάρις τοῦ θεοῦ σωτήριος πᾶσιν ἀνθρώποις παιδεύουσα ἡμᾶς,
2.13
προσδεχόμενοι τὴν μακαρίαν ἐλπίδα καὶ ἐπιφάνειαν τῆς δόξης τοῦ μεγάλου θεοῦ καὶ σωτῆρος ἡμῶν Χριστοῦ Ἰησοῦ, 2.14 ὃς ἔδωκεν ἑαυτὸν ὑπὲρ ἡμῶν ἵνα λυτρώσηται ἡμᾶς ἀπὸ πάσης ἀνομίας καὶκαθαρίσῃ ἑαυτῷ λαὸν περιούσιον,ζηλωτὴν καλῶν ἔργων.
3.6
οὗ ἐξέχεεν ἐφʼ ἡμᾶς πλουσίως διὰ Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ τοῦ σωτῆρος ἡμῶν,'' None
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2.11 For the grace of God has appeared, bringing salvation to all men,
2.13
looking for the blessed hope and appearing of the glory of our great God and Savior, Jesus Christ; 2.14 who gave himself for us, that he might redeem us from all iniquity, and purify for himself a people for his own possession, zealous for good works.
3.6
which he poured out on us richly, through Jesus Christ our Savior; '' None
58. New Testament, John, 1.3-1.4, 1.9-1.14, 1.16, 1.18, 3.19, 3.21, 4.34, 6.29, 6.51, 9.6, 14.6, 17.4, 17.22, 17.26 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Augustine’s Works, Bapt. • Augustine’s Works, Brev. coll. • Augustine’s Works, C. Jul. • Augustine’s Works, C. Jul. imp. • Augustine’s Works, C. du. ep. Pel. • Augustine’s Works, C. litt. Petil. • Augustine’s Works, Catech. rud. • Augustine’s Works, Conf. • Augustine’s Works, Cons. • Augustine’s Works, Corrept. • Augustine’s Works, Div. quaest. • Augustine’s Works, Enar. Ps. • Augustine’s Works, Enchir. • Augustine’s Works, Exp. Rom. inch. • Augustine’s Works, Exp. quaest. Rom. • Augustine’s Works, Fid. • Augustine’s Works, Fund. • Augustine’s Works, Gen. Man. • Augustine’s Works, Gen. litt. • Augustine’s Works, Grat. • Augustine’s Works, Mor. Man. • Augustine’s Works, Mor. eccl. • Augustine’s Works, Nat. bon. • Augustine’s Works, Nat. grat. • Augustine’s Works, Pecc. merit. • Augustine’s Works, Quaest. Matt. • Augustine’s Works, Quaest. c. pag. • Augustine’s Works, Quaest. ev. • Augustine’s Works, Retract. VII • Augustine’s Works, S. • Augustine’s Works, S. Dom. m. • Augustine’s Works, Simpl. • Augustine’s Works, Solil. • Augustine’s Works, Spir. et litt. • Augustine’s Works, Symb. • Augustine’s Works, Tract. ep. Jo. • Augustine’s Works, Trin. • Augustine’s Works, Unit. eccl. • Augustine’s Works, Util. cred. • Augustine’s Works, Ver. rel. • Augustine’s Works, Virginit. • Augustine’s Works, c. Adim. • Augustine’s Works, c. Faust. • Augustine’s Works, c. Fel. • Augustine’s Works, c. Fort. • Augustine’s Works, c. ep. Man. Fund. • Christ, Mighty works of • Jesus, work/acts/miracles of • Love, of Works of Iniquity • Missionary work • Son, the, creature, work • Wonders/wonder-working • Work • deeds, works • grace, and works • works

 Found in books: Despotis and Lohr (2022), Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions, 326; Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 116, 280; Langstaff, Stuckenbruck, and Tilly, (2022), The Lord’s Prayer, 181, 182; McDonough (2009), Christ as Creator: Origins of a New Testament Doctrine, 35, 36, 47, 93; Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 369; Tellbe Wasserman and Nyman (2019), Healing and Exorcism in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity, 134, 135, 153, 185; Tite (2009), Valentinian Ethics and Paraenetic Discourse: Determining the Social Function of Moral Exhortation in Valentinian Christianity, 277; Widdicombe (2000), The Fatherhood of God from Origen to Athanasius, 89, 130, 219, 220; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 99, 100, 108, 109, 114, 125, 134, 158, 163, 172, 177, 189, 198, 215, 225, 248; Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová (2016), Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria , 36, 330

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1.3 πάντα διʼ αὐτοῦ ἐγένετο, καὶ χωρὶς αὐτοῦ ἐγένετο οὐδὲ ἕν. 1.4 ὃ γέγονεν ἐν αὐτῷ ζωὴ ἦν, καὶ ἡ ζωὴ ἦν τὸ φῶς τῶν ἀνθρώπων·
1.9
Ἦν τὸ φῶς τὸ ἀληθινὸν ὃ φωτίζει πάντα ἄνθρωπον ἐρχόμενον εἰς τὸν κόσμον. 1.10 ἐν τῷ κόσμῳ ἦν, καὶ ὁ κόσμος διʼ αὐτοῦ ἐγένετο, καὶ ὁ κόσμος αὐτὸν οὐκ ἔγνω. 1.11 Εἰς τὰ ἴδια ἦλθεν, καὶ οἱ ἴδιοι αὐτὸν οὐ παρέλαβον. 1.12 ὅσοι δὲ ἔλαβον αὐτόν, ἔδωκεν αὐτοῖς ἐξουσίαν τέκνα θεοῦ γενέσθαι, τοῖς πιστεύουσιν εἰς τὸ ὄνομα αὐτοῦ, 1.13 οἳ οὐκ ἐξ αἱμάτων οὐδὲ ἐκ θελήματος σαρκὸς οὐδὲ ἐκ θελήματος ἀνδρὸς ἀλλʼ ἐκ θεοῦ ἐγεννήθησαν. 1.14 Καὶ ὁ λόγος σὰρξ ἐγένετο καὶ ἐσκήνωσεν ἐν ἡμῖν, καὶ ἐθεασάμεθα τὴν δόξαν αὐτοῦ, δόξαν ὡς μονογενοῦς παρὰ πατρός, πλήρης χάριτος καὶ ἀληθείας·?̔
1.16
ὅτι ἐκ τοῦ πληρώματος αὐτοῦ ἡμεῖς πάντες ἐλάβομεν, καὶ χάριν ἀντὶ χάριτος·
1.18
θεὸν οὐδεὶς ἑώρακεν πώποτε· μονογενὴς θεὸς ὁ ὢν εἰς τὸν κόλπον τοῦ πατρὸς ἐκεῖνος ἐξηγήσατο.
3.19
αὕτη δέ ἐστιν ἡ κρίσις ὅτι τὸ φῶς ἐλήλυθεν εἰς τὸν κόσμον καὶ ἠγάπησαν οἱ ἄνθρωποι μᾶλλον τὸ σκότος ἢ τὸ φῶς, ἦν γὰρ αὐτῶν πονηρὰ τὰ ἔργα.
3.21
ὁ δὲ ποιῶν τὴν ἀλήθειαν ἔρχεται πρὸς τὸ φῶς, ἵνα φανερωθῇ αὐτοῦ τὰ ἔργα ὅτι ἐν θεῷ ἐστὶν εἰργασμένα.
4.34
λέγει αὐτοῖς ὁ Ἰησοῦς Ἐμὸν βρῶμά ἐστιν ἵνα ποιήσω τὸ θέλημα τοῦ πέμψαντός με καὶ τελειώσω αὐτοῦ τὸ ἔργον.
6.29
ἀπεκρίθη ὁ Ἰησοῦς καὶ εἶπεν αὐτοῖς Τοῦτό ἐστιν τὸ ἔργον τοῦ θεοῦ ἵνα πιστεύητε εἰς ὃν ἀπέστειλεν ἐκεῖνος.
6.51
ἐγώ εἰμι ὁ ἄρτος ὁ ζῶν ὁ ἐκ τοῦ οὐρανοῦ καταβάς· ἐάν τις φάγῃ ἐκ τούτου τοῦ ἄρτου ζήσει εἰς τὸν αἰῶνα, καὶ ὁ ἄρτος δὲ ὃν ἐγὼ δώσω ἡ σάρξ μου ἐστὶν ὑπὲρ τῆς τοῦ κόσμου ζωῆς.
9.6
ταῦτα εἰπὼν ἔπτυσεν χαμαὶ καὶ ἐποίησεν πηλὸν ἐκ τοῦ πτύσματος, καὶ ἐπέθηκεν αὐτοῦ τὸν πηλὸν ἐπὶ τοὺς ὀφθαλμούς,
14.6
λέγει αὐτῷ Ἰησοῦς Ἐγώ εἰμι ἡ ὁδὸς καὶ ἡ ἀλήθεια καὶ ἡ ζωή· οὐδεὶς ἔρχεται πρὸς τὸν πατέρα εἰ μὴ διʼ ἐμοῦ.
17.4
ἐγώ σε ἐδόξασα ἐπὶ τῆς γῆς,τὸ ἔργον τελειώσας ὃ δέδωκάς μοι ἵνα ποιήσω·
17.22
κἀγὼ τὴν δόξαν ἣν δέδωκάς μοι δέδωκα αὐτοῖς,
17.26
καὶ ἐγνώρισα αὐτοῖς τὸ ὄνομά σου καὶ γνωρίσω, ἵνα ἡ ἀγάπη ἣν ἠγάπησάς με ἐν αὐτοῖς ᾖ κἀγὼ ἐν αὐτοῖς.' ' None
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1.3 All things were made through him. Without him was not anything made that has been made. 1.4 In him was life, and the life was the light of men.
1.9
The true light that enlightens everyone was coming into the world. ' "1.10 He was in the world, and the world was made through him, and the world didn't recognize him. " "1.11 He came to his own, and those who were his own didn't receive him. " "1.12 But as many as received him, to them he gave the right to become God's children, to those who believe in his name: " '1.13 who were born not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God. 1.14 The Word became flesh, and lived among us. We saw his glory, such glory as of the one and only Son of the Father, full of grace and truth.
1.16
From his fullness we all received grace upon grace.
1.18
No one has seen God at any time. The one and only Son, who is in the bosom of the Father, he has declared him. 1 , In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. , The same was in the beginning with God. , All things were made through him. Without him was not anything made that has been made. , In him was life, and the life was the light of men. , The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness hasn\'t overcome it. , There came a man, sent from God, whose name was John. , The same came as a witness, that he might testify about the light, that all might believe through him. , He was not the light, but was sent that he might testify about the light. , The true light that enlightens everyone was coming into the world. , He was in the world, and the world was made through him, and the world didn\'t recognize him. , He came to his own, and those who were his own didn\'t receive him. , But as many as received him, to them he gave the right to become God\'s children, to those who believe in his name: , who were born not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God. , The Word became flesh, and lived among us. We saw his glory, such glory as of the one and only Son of the Father, full of grace and truth. , John testified about him. He cried out, saying, "This was he of whom I said, \'He who comes after me has surpassed me, for he was before me.\'", From his fullness we all received grace upon grace. , For the law was given through Moses. Grace and truth came through Jesus Christ. , No one has seen God at any time. The one and only Son, who is in the bosom of the Father, he has declared him. , This is John\'s testimony, when the Jews sent priests and Levites from Jerusalem to ask him, "Who are you?", He confessed, and didn\'t deny, but he confessed, "I am not the Christ.", They asked him, "What then? Are you Elijah?"He said, "I am not.""Are you the Prophet?"He answered, "No.", They said therefore to him, "Who are you? Give us an answer to take back to those who sent us. What do you say about yourself?", He said, "I am the voice of one crying in the wilderness, \'Make straight the way of the Lord,\' as Isaiah the prophet said.", The ones who had been sent were from the Pharisees. , They asked him, "Why then do you baptize, if you are not the Christ, nor Elijah, nor the Prophet?", John answered them, "I baptize in water, but among you stands one whom you don\'t know. , He is the one who comes after me, who has come to be before me, whose sandal strap I\'m not worthy to untie.", These things were done in Bethany beyond the Jordan, where John was baptizing. , The next day, he saw Jesus coming to him, and said, "Behold, the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world! , This is he of whom I said, \'After me comes a man who is preferred before me, for he was before me.\' , I didn\'t know him, but for this reason I came baptizing in water: that he would be revealed to Israel.", John testified, saying, "I have seen the Spirit descending like a dove out of heaven, and it remained on him. , I didn\'t recognize him, but he who sent me to baptize in water, he said to me, \'On whomever you will see the Spirit descending, and remaining on him, the same is he who baptizes in the Holy Spirit.\' , I have seen, and have testified that this is the Son of God.", Again, the next day, John was standing with two of his disciples, , and he looked at Jesus as he walked, and said, "Behold, the Lamb of God!", The two disciples heard him speak, and they followed Jesus. , Jesus turned, and saw them following, and said to them, "What are you looking for?"They said to him, "Rabbi" (which is to say, being interpreted, Teacher), "where are you staying?", He said to them, "Come, and see."They came and saw where he was staying, and they stayed with him that day. It was about the tenth hour. , One of the two who heard John, and followed him, was Andrew, Simon Peter\'s brother. , He first found his own brother, Simon, and said to him, "We have found the Messiah!" (which is, being interpreted, Christ). , He brought him to Jesus. Jesus looked at him, and said, "You are Simon the son of Jonah. You shall be called Cephas" (which is by interpretation, Peter). , On the next day, he was determined to go out into Galilee, and he found Philip. Jesus said to him, "Follow me.", Now Philip was from Bethsaida, of the city of Andrew and Peter. , Philip found Nathanael, and said to him, "We have found him, of whom Moses in the law, and the prophets, wrote: Jesus of Nazareth, the son of Joseph.", Nathanael said to him, "Can any good thing come out of Nazareth?"Philip said to him, "Come and see.", Jesus saw Nathanael coming to him, and said about him, "Behold, an Israelite indeed, in whom is no deceit!", Nathanael said to him, "How do you know me?"Jesus answered him, "Before Philip called you, when you were under the fig tree, I saw you.", Nathanael answered him, "Rabbi, you are the Son of God! You are King of Israel!", Jesus answered him, "Because I told you, \'I saw you underneath the fig tree,\' do you believe? You will see greater things than these!", He said to him, "Most assuredly, I tell you, hereafter you will see heaven opened, and the angels of God ascending and descending on the Son of Man." 3.19 This is the judgment, that the light has come into the world, and men loved the darkness rather than the light; for their works were evil.
3.21
But he who does the truth comes to the light, that his works may be revealed, that they have been done in God."
4.34
Jesus said to them, "My food is to do the will of him who sent me, and to accomplish his work.
6.29
Jesus answered them, "This is the work of God, that you believe in him whom he has sent."
6.51
I am the living bread which came down out of heaven. If anyone eats of this bread, he will live forever. Yes, the bread which I will give for the life of the world is my flesh."' "
9.6
When he had said this, he spat on the ground, made mud with the saliva, anointed the blind man's eyes with the mud, " 14.6 Jesus said to him, "I am the way, the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father, except through me.
17.4
I glorified you on the earth. I have accomplished the work which you have given me to do.
17.22
The glory which you have given me, I have given to them; that they may be one, even as we are one;
17.26
I made known to them your name, and will make it known; that the love with which you loved me may be in them, and I in them." ' None
59. New Testament, Luke, 1.2-1.4, 2.14, 4.34-4.35, 11.14, 17.19, 18.10-18.14, 18.42, 24.19, 24.25 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Augustine’s Works, Civ. • Augustine’s Works, Lib. arb. • Augustine’s Works, Nat. grat. • Augustine’s Works, Nat. orig. • Augustine’s Works, Pecc. merit. • Augustine’s Works, S. • Augustine’s Works, Simpl. • Christ, Mighty works of • God, Economic work • God, Work of • Jesus, work/acts/miracles of • Paul, his works as scripture • Rhetorical, works • Wonders/wonder-working • deeds, works • rejecting distinction with parables, important works of • word of God, work of • ‘works’ of Law

 Found in books: Esler (2000), The Early Christian World, 236; Graham (2022), The Church as Paradise and the Way Therein: Early Christian Appropriation of Genesis 3:22–24, 164; Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 51; Langstaff, Stuckenbruck, and Tilly, (2022), The Lord’s Prayer, 191, 202; Levison (2009), Filled with the Spirit, 321; McDonough (2009), Christ as Creator: Origins of a New Testament Doctrine, 22, 36; Motta and Petrucci (2022), Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity, 156; Strong (2021), The Fables of Jesus in the Gospel of Luke: A New Foundation for the Study of Parables 56; Tellbe Wasserman and Nyman (2019), Healing and Exorcism in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity, 54, 97, 102, 104, 185; Tomson (2019), Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries. 374; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 142, 165, 220

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1.2 καθὼς παρέδοσαν ἡμῖν οἱ ἀπʼ ἀρχῆς αὐτόπται καὶ ὑπηρέται γενόμενοι τοῦ λόγου, 1.3 ἔδοξε κἀμοὶ παρηκολουθηκότι ἄνωθεν πᾶσιν ἀκριβῶς καθεξῆς σοι γράψαι, κράτιστε Θεόφιλε, 1.4 ἵνα ἐπιγνῷς περὶ ὧν κατηχήθης λόγων τὴν ἀσφάλειαν.
2.14
Δόξα ἐν ὑψίστοις θεῷ καὶ ἐπὶ γῆς εἰρήνη ἐν ἀνθρώποις εὐδοκίας.
4.34
Ἔα, τί ἡμῖν καὶ σοί, Ἰησοῦ Ναζαρηνέ; ἦλθες ἀπολέσαι ἡμᾶς; 4.35 οἶδά σε τίς εἶ, ὁ ἅγιος τοῦ θεοῦ. καὶ ἐπετίμησεν αὐτῷ ὁ Ἰησοῦς λέγων Φιμώθητι καὶ ἔξελθε ἀπʼ αὐτοῦ. καὶ ῥίψαν αὐτὸν τὸ δαιμόνιον εἰς τὸ μέσον ἐξῆλθεν ἀπʼ αὐτοῦ μηδὲν βλάψαν αὐτόν.
11.14
Καὶ ἦν ἐκβάλλων δαιμόνιον κωφόν· ἐγένετο δὲ τοῦ δαιμονίου ἐξελθόντος ἐλάλησεν ὁ κωφός. Καὶ ἐθαύμασαν οἱ ὄχλοι·
17.19
καὶ εἶπεν αὐτῷ Ἀναστὰς πορεύου· ἡ πίστις σου σέσωκέν σε.
18.10
Ἄνθρωποι δύο ἀνέβησαν εἰς τὸ ἱερὸν προσεύξασθαι, εἷς Φαρισαῖος καὶ ὁ ἕτερος τελώνης. 18.11 ὁ Φαρισαῖος σταθεὶς ταῦτα πρὸς ἑαυτὸν προσηύχετο Ὁ θεός, εὐχαριστῶ σοι ὅτι οὐκ εἰμὶ ὥσπερ οἱ λοιποὶ τῶν ἀνθρώπων, ἅρπαγες, ἄδικοι, μοιχοί, ἢ καὶ ὡς οὗτος ὁ τελώνης· 18.12 νηστεύω δὶς τοῦ σαββάτου, ἀποδεκατεύω πάντα ὅσα κτῶμαι. 18.13 ὁ δὲ τελώνης μακρόθεν ἑστὼς οὐκ ἤθελεν οὐδὲ τοὺς ὀφθαλμοὺς ἐπᾶραι εἰς τὸν οὐρανόν, ἀλλʼ ἔτυπτε τὸ στῆθος ἑαυτοῦ λέγων Ὁ θεός, ἱλάσθητί μοι τῷ ἁμαρτωλῷ. 18.14 λέγω ὑμῖν, κατέβη οὗτος δεδικαιωμένος εἰς τὸν οἶκον αὐτοῦ παρʼ ἐκεῖνον· ὅτι πᾶς ὁ ὑψῶν ἑαυτὸν ταπεινωθήσεται, ὁ δὲ ταπεινῶν ἑαυτὸν ὑψωθήσεται.
18.42
καὶ ὁ Ἰησοῦς εἶπεν αὐτῷ Ἀνάβλεψον· ἡ πίστις σου σέσωκέν σε.
24.19
καὶ εἶπεν αὐτοῖς Ποῖα; οἱ δὲ εἶπαν αὐτῷ Τὰ περὶ Ἰησοῦ τοῦ Ναζαρηνοῦ, ὃς ἐγένετο ἀνὴρ προφήτης δυνατὸς ἐν ἔργῳ καὶ λόγῳ ἐναντίον τοῦ θεοῦ καὶ παντὸς τοῦ λαοῦ,
24.25
καὶ αὐτὸς εἶπεν πρὸς αὐτούς Ὦ ἀνόητοι καὶ βραδεῖς τῇ καρδίᾳ τοῦ πιστεύειν ἐπὶ πᾶσιν οἷς ἐλάλησαν οἱ προφῆται·'' None
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1.2 even as those who from the beginning were eyewitnesses and ministers of the word delivered them to us, 1.3 it seemed good to me also, having traced the course of all things accurately from the first, to write to you in order, most excellent Theophilus; 1.4 that you might know the certainty concerning the things in which you were instructed.
2.14
"Glory to God in the highest, On earth peace, good will toward men."
4.34
saying, "Ah! what have we to do with you, Jesus of Nazareth? Have you come to destroy us? I know you who you are: the Holy One of God!" 4.35 Jesus rebuked him, saying, "Be silent, and come out of him!" When the demon had thrown him down in their midst, he came out of him, having done him no harm.
11.14
He was casting out a demon, and it was mute. It happened, when the demon had gone out, the mute man spoke; and the multitudes marveled.
17.19
Then he said to him, "Get up, and go your way. Your faith has healed you."
18.10
"Two men went up into the temple to pray; one was a Pharisee, and the other was a tax collector. ' "18.11 The Pharisee stood and prayed to himself like this: 'God, I thank you, that I am not like the rest of men, extortioners, unrighteous, adulterers, or even like this tax collector. " "18.12 I fast twice a week. I give tithes of all that I get.' " "18.13 But the tax collector, standing far away, wouldn't even lift up his eyes to heaven, but beat his breast, saying, 'God, be merciful to me, a sinner!' " '18.14 I tell you, this man went down to his house justified rather than the other; for everyone who exalts himself will be humbled, but he who humbles himself will be exalted."
18.42
Jesus said to him, "Receive your sight. Your faith has healed you."
24.19
He said to them, "What things?"They said to him, "The things concerning Jesus, the Nazarene, who was a prophet mighty in deed and word before God and all the people;
24.25
He said to them, "Foolish men, and slow of heart to believe in all that the prophets have spoken! '' None
60. New Testament, Mark, 1.27, 2.5, 2.10, 3.29, 4.39, 4.41, 5.34, 6.5, 10.52, 16.16 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Augustine’s Works, Nat. orig. • Christ, Mighty works of • God, Work of • Jesus, work/acts/miracles of • Wonders/wonder-working • deeds, works • ‘works’ of Law

 Found in books: Karfíková (2012), Grace and the Will According to Augustine, 61; Langstaff, Stuckenbruck, and Tilly, (2022), The Lord’s Prayer, 191; McDonough (2009), Christ as Creator: Origins of a New Testament Doctrine, 25, 36, 89; Tellbe Wasserman and Nyman (2019), Healing and Exorcism in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity, 12, 15, 67, 68, 70, 71, 104, 121, 122, 126, 127, 129, 155, 156, 185; Tomson (2019), Studies on Jews and Christians in the First and Second Centuries. 374; Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 175

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1.27 ὥστε συνζητεῖν αὐτοὺς λέγοντας Τί ἐστιν τοῦτο; διδαχὴ καινή· κατʼ ἐξουσίαν καὶ τοῖς πνεύμασι τοῖς ἀκαθάρτοις ἐπιτάσσει, καὶ ὑπακούουσιν αὐτῷ.
2.5
καὶ ἰδὼν ὁ Ἰησοῦς τὴν πίστιν αὐτῶν λέγει τῷ παραλυτικῷ Τέκνον, ἀφίενταί σου αἱ ἁμαρτίαι.
2.10
ἵνα δὲ εἰδῆτε ὅτι ἐξουσίαν ἔχει ὁ υἱὸς τοῦ ἀνθρώπου ἀφιέναι ἁμαρτίας ἐπὶ τῆς γῆς — λέγει τῷ παραλυτικῷ
3.29
ὃς δʼ ἂν βλασφημήσῃ εἰς τὸ πνεῦμα τὸ ἅγιον, οὐκ ἔχει ἄφεσιν εἰς τὸν αἰῶνα, ἀλλὰ ἔνοχός ἐστιν αἰωνίου ἁμαρτήματος.
4.39
καὶ διεγερθεὶς ἐπετίμησεν τῷ ἀνέμῳ καὶ εἶπεν τῇ θαλάσσῃ Σιώπα, πεφίμωσο. καὶ ἐκόπασεν ὁ ἄνεμος, καὶ ἐγένετο γαλήνη μεγάλη.
4.41
καὶ ἐφοβήθησαν φόβον μέγαν, καὶ ἔλεγον πρὸς ἀλλήλους Τίς ἄρα οὗτός ἐστιν ὅτι καὶ ὁ ἄνεμος καὶ ἡ θάλασσα ὑπακούει αὐτῷ;
5.34
ὁ δὲ εἶπεν αὐτῇ Θυγάτηρ, ἡ πίστις σου σέσωκέν σε· ὕπαγε εἰς εἰρήνην, καὶ ἴσθι ὑγιὴς ἀπὸ τῆς μάστιγός σου.
6.5
Καὶ οὐκ ἐδύνατο ἐκεῖ ποιῆσαι οὐδεμίαν δύναμιν, εἰ μὴ ὀλίγοις ἀρρώστοις ἐπιθεὶς τὰς χεῖρας ἐθεράπευσεν·
10.52
καὶ ὁ Ἰησοῦς εἶπεν αὐτῷ Ὕπαγε, ἡ πίστις σου σέσωκέν σε. καὶ εὐθὺς ἀνέβλεψεν, καὶ ἠκολούθει αὐτῷ ἐν τῇ ὁδῷ.
16.16
ὁ πιστεύσας καὶ βαπτισθεὶς σωθήσεται, ὁ δὲ ἀπιστήσας κατακριθήσεται.'' None
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1.27 They were all amazed, so that they questioned among themselves, saying, "What is this? A new teaching? For with authority he commands even the unclean spirits, and they obey him!"
2.5
Jesus, seeing their faith, said to the paralytic, "Son, your sins are forgiven you."
2.10
But that you may know that the Son of Man has authority on earth to forgive sins" -- he said to the paralytic --
3.29
but whoever may blaspheme against the Holy Spirit never has forgiveness, but is guilty of an eternal sin"
4.39
He awoke, and rebuked the wind, and said to the sea, "Peace! Be still!" The wind ceased, and there was a great calm.
4.41
They were greatly afraid, and said to one another, "Who then is this, that even the wind and the sea obey him?"
5.34
He said to her, "Daughter, your faith has made you well. Go in peace, and be cured of your disease."
6.5
He could do no mighty work the