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30 results for "vipsanius"
1. Cicero, In Verrem, 2.2.84-2.2.85 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •vipsanius agrippa, m., on public art Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58
2. Varro, On Agriculture, 1.59.2 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •vipsanius agrippa, m., on public art Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58
3. Cicero, Brutus, 261 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •vipsanius agrippa, m., his pantheon Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 102
261. Caesar autem rationem adhibens consuetudinem vitiosam et corruptam pura et incorrupta consuetudine emendat emendabat OG . Itaque cum ad hanc elegantiam verborum Latinorum—quae, etiam si orator non sis et sis ingenuus civis Romanus, tamen necessaria est—adiungit illa oratoria ornamenta dicendi, tum videtur tamquam tabulas bene pictas conlocare in bono lumine. Hanc cum habeat praecipuam laudem, in communibus non video cui debeat cedere. Splendidam quandam minimeque veteratoriam rationem dicendi tenet, voce motu forma etiam magnificam et generosam magnificam et generosam Lambinus ( coll. Suet. Iul. 55): magnifica et generosa L quodam modo.
4. Cicero, Brutus, 261 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •vipsanius agrippa, m., his pantheon Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 102
261. Caesar autem rationem adhibens consuetudinem vitiosam et corruptam pura et incorrupta consuetudine emendat emendabat OG . Itaque cum ad hanc elegantiam verborum Latinorum—quae, etiam si orator non sis et sis ingenuus civis Romanus, tamen necessaria est—adiungit illa oratoria ornamenta dicendi, tum videtur tamquam tabulas bene pictas conlocare in bono lumine. Hanc cum habeat praecipuam laudem, in communibus non video cui debeat cedere. Splendidam quandam minimeque veteratoriam rationem dicendi tenet, voce motu forma etiam magnificam et generosam magnificam et generosam Lambinus ( coll. Suet. Iul. 55): magnifica et generosa L quodam modo.
5. Cicero, Letters To His Friends, 7.23, 7.23.1-7.23.2, 13.2 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •vipsanius agrippa, m., on public art Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58
6. Cicero, Philippicae, 9.14 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •vipsanius agrippa, m., on public art Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58
7. Ovid, Tristia, 3.1.31-3.1.34 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •vipsanius agrippa, m., on public art Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58
8. Ovid, Fasti, 1.640-1.648 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •vipsanius agrippa, m., his pantheon Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 102
1.640. nunc te sacratae constituere manus. 1.641. Furius antiquam populi superator Etrusci 1.642. voverat et voti solverat ille fidem, 1.643. causa, quod a patribus sumptis secesserat armis 1.644. volgus, et ipsa suas Roma timebat opes. 1.645. causa recens melior: passos Germania crines 1.646. porrigit auspiciis, dux venerande, tuis; 1.647. inde triumphatae libasti munera gentis 1.648. templaque fecisti, quam colis ipse, deae. 1.640. Camillus, conqueror of the Etruscan people, 1.641. Vowed your ancient temple and kept his vow. 1.642. His reason was that the commoners had armed themselves, 1.643. Seceding from the nobles, and Rome feared their power. 1.644. This latest reason was a better one: revered Leader, Germany 1.645. offered up her dishevelled tresses, at your command: 1.646. From that, you dedicated the spoils of a defeated race, 1.647. And built a shrine to the goddess that you yourself worship. 1.648. A goddess your mother honoured by her life, and by an altar,
9. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, 6.4.2, 6.5.2, 6.7.3, 7.5.3-7.5.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •vipsanius agrippa, m., his pantheon •vipsanius agrippa, m., on public art Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58, 102
10. Horace, Sermones, 2.3.16 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •vipsanius agrippa, m., on public art Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58
11. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 9.119-9.121, 34.92, 35.4-35.5, 35.26, 36.41 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •vipsanius agrippa, m., his pantheon •vipsanius agrippa, m., on public art Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58, 134, 226
12. Martial, Epigrams, 9.59 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •vipsanius agrippa, m., on public art Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58
13. Martial, Epigrams, 9.59 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •vipsanius agrippa, m., on public art Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58
14. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 29.3.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •vipsanius agrippa, m., on public art Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58
15. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 31 (1st cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •vipsanius agrippa, m., on public art Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58
16. Seneca The Younger, De Beneficiis, 2.33.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •vipsanius agrippa, m., his pantheon Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 102
17. Arrian, Epicteti Dissertationes, 2.24.7 (1st cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •vipsanius agrippa, m., on public art Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58
18. Appian, The Mithridatic Wars, 117 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •vipsanius agrippa, m., his pantheon Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 134
19. Tacitus, Dialogus De Oratoribus, 28.5-28.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •vipsanius agrippa, m., on public art Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58
20. Suetonius, Nero, 25.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •vipsanius agrippa, m., his pantheon Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 134
21. Statius, Siluae, 4.6 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •vipsanius agrippa, m., on public art Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58
22. Plutarch, Lucullus, 39 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •vipsanius agrippa, m., on public art Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58
23. Plutarch, Tiberius And Gaius Gracchus, 4.2-4.4, 13.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •vipsanius agrippa, m., on public art Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58
24. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 43.14.6, 43.15.5, 43.17.2, 43.21.2, 44.35.1, 51.17.6, 51.22.1-51.22.3, 52.5.1, 52.9.3-52.9.5, 52.13.6, 56.25 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 134
51.17.6.  So much for these events. In the palace quantities of treasure were found. For Cleopatra had taken practically all the offerings from even the holiest shrines and so helped the Romans swell their spoils without incurring any defilement on their own part. Large sums were also obtained from every man against whom any charge of misdemeanour were brought.
25. Festus Sextus Pompeius, De Verborum Significatione, None (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •vipsanius agrippa, m., on public art Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58
26. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 3.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •vipsanius agrippa, m., on public art Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58
3.6. To Annius Severus, Out of a legacy which I have come in for I have just bought a Corinthian bronze, small it is true, but a charming and sharply-cut piece of work, so far as I have any knowledge of art, and that, as in everything else perhaps, is very slight. But as for the statue in question even I can appreciate its merits. For it is a nude, and neither conceals its faults, if there are any, nor hides at all its strong points. It represents an old man in a standing posture; the bones, muscles, nerves, veins, and even the wrinkles appear quite life-like; the hair is thin and scanty on the forehead; the brow is broad; the face wizened; the neck thin; the shoulders are bowed; the breast is flat, and the belly hollow. The back too gives the same impression of age, as far as a back view can. The bronze itself, judging by the genuine colour, is old and of great antiquity. In fact, in every respect it is a work calculated to catch the eye of a connoisseur and to delight the eye of an amateur, and this is what tempted me to purchase it, although I am the merest novice. But I bought it not to keep it at home - for as yet I have no Corinthian art work in my house - but that I might put it up in my native country in some frequented place, and I specially had in mind the Temple of Jupiter. For the statue seems to me to be worthy of the temple, and the gift to be worthy of the god. So I hope that you will show me your usual kindness when I give you a commission, and that you will undertake the following for me. Will you order a pedestal to be made, of any marble you like, to be inscribed with my name and titles, if you think the latter ought to be mentioned? I will send you the statue as soon as I can find anyone who is not overburdened with luggage, or I will bring myself along with it, as I dare say you would prefer me to do. For, if only my duties allow me, I am intending to run down thither. You are glad that I promise to come, but you will frown when I add that I can only stay a few days. For the business which hitherto has kept me from getting away will not allow of my being absent any longer. Farewell.
27. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 3.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •vipsanius agrippa, m., on public art Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58
3.6. To Annius Severus, Out of a legacy which I have come in for I have just bought a Corinthian bronze, small it is true, but a charming and sharply-cut piece of work, so far as I have any knowledge of art, and that, as in everything else perhaps, is very slight. But as for the statue in question even I can appreciate its merits. For it is a nude, and neither conceals its faults, if there are any, nor hides at all its strong points. It represents an old man in a standing posture; the bones, muscles, nerves, veins, and even the wrinkles appear quite life-like; the hair is thin and scanty on the forehead; the brow is broad; the face wizened; the neck thin; the shoulders are bowed; the breast is flat, and the belly hollow. The back too gives the same impression of age, as far as a back view can. The bronze itself, judging by the genuine colour, is old and of great antiquity. In fact, in every respect it is a work calculated to catch the eye of a connoisseur and to delight the eye of an amateur, and this is what tempted me to purchase it, although I am the merest novice. But I bought it not to keep it at home - for as yet I have no Corinthian art work in my house - but that I might put it up in my native country in some frequented place, and I specially had in mind the Temple of Jupiter. For the statue seems to me to be worthy of the temple, and the gift to be worthy of the god. So I hope that you will show me your usual kindness when I give you a commission, and that you will undertake the following for me. Will you order a pedestal to be made, of any marble you like, to be inscribed with my name and titles, if you think the latter ought to be mentioned? I will send you the statue as soon as I can find anyone who is not overburdened with luggage, or I will bring myself along with it, as I dare say you would prefer me to do. For, if only my duties allow me, I am intending to run down thither. You are glad that I promise to come, but you will frown when I add that I can only stay a few days. For the business which hitherto has kept me from getting away will not allow of my being absent any longer. Farewell.
28. Scriptores Historiae Augustae, Aurelian, 33.3 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •vipsanius agrippa, m., his pantheon Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 134
29. Plutarch, Tiberius Gracchus, 1  Tagged with subjects: •vipsanius agrippa, m., on public art Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58
30. Strabo, Geography, 12.3.31  Tagged with subjects: •vipsanius agrippa, m., his pantheon Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 134
12.3.31. Here, also, is Kainon Chorion, as it is called, a rock that is sheer and fortified by nature, being less than two hundred stadia distant from Cabeira. It has on its summit a spring that sends forth much water, and at its foot a river and a deep ravine. The height of the rock above the neck is immense, so that it is impregnable; and it is enclosed by remarkable walls, except the part where they have been pulled down by the Romans. And the whole country around is so overgrown with forests, and so mountainous and waterless, that it is impossible for an enemy to encamp within one hundred and twenty stadia. Here it was that the most precious of the treasures of Mithridates were kept, which are now stored in the Capitolium, where they were dedicated by Pompey. Pythodoris possesses the whole of this country, which is adjacent to the barbarian country occupied by her, and also Zelitis and Megalopolitis. As for Cabeira, which by Pompey had been built into a city and called Diospolis, Pythodoris further adorned it and changed its name to Sebaste; and she uses the city as a royal residence. It has also the sanctuary of Men of Pharnaces, as it is called, — the village-city Ameria, which has many temple servants, and also a sacred territory, the fruit of which is always reaped by the ordained priest. And the kings revered this sanctuary so exceedingly that they proclaimed the royal oath as follows: By the Fortune of the king and by Men of Pharnaces. And this is also the sanctuary of Selene, like that among the Albanians and those in Phrygia, I mean that of Men in the place of the same name and that of Men Ascaeus near the Antiocheia that is near Pisidia and that of Men in the country of the Antiocheians.