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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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24 results for "tyche"
1. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 12.2 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •tyche soteira, in cultic worship Found in books: Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 136
2. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 664 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •tyche soteira, in cultic worship Found in books: Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 136
664. τύχη δὲ σωτὴρ ναῦν θέλουσʼ ἐφέζετο, 664. And Fortune, saviour, willing on our ship sat.
3. Herodotus, Histories, 2.137-2.138 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •tyche soteira, in cultic worship Found in books: Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 136
2.137. After him reigned a blind man called Anysis, of the town of that name. In his reign Egypt was invaded by Sabacos king of Ethiopia and a great army of Ethiopians. ,The blind man fled to the marshes, and the Ethiopian ruled Egypt for fifty years, during which he distinguished himself for the following: ,he would never put to death any Egyptian wrongdoer but sentenced all, according to the severity of their offenses, to raise embankments in their native towns. Thus the towns came to stand yet higher than before; ,for after first being built on embankments made by the excavators of the canals in the reign of Sesostris, they were yet further raised in the reign of the Ethiopian. ,of the towns in Egypt that were raised, in my opinion, Bubastis is especially prominent, where there is also a temple of Bubastis , a building most worthy of note. Other temples are greater and more costly, but none more pleasing to the eye than this. Bubastis is, in the Greek language, Artemis. 2.138. Her temple is of this description: except for the entrance, it stands on an island; for two channels approach it from the Nile without mixing with one another, running as far as the entryway of the temple, the one and the other flowing around it, each a hundred feet wide and shaded by trees. ,The outer court is sixty feet high, adorned with notable figures ten feet high. The whole circumference of the city commands a view down into the temple in its midst; for the city's level has been raised, but that of the temple has been left as it was from the first, so that it can be seen into from above. ,A stone wall, cut with figures, runs around it; within is a grove of very tall trees growing around a great shrine where the image of the goddess is; the temple is a square, each side measuring an eighth of a mile. ,A road, paved with stone, about three eighths of a mile long leads to the entrance, running eastward through the marketplace, towards the temple of Hermes; this road is about four hundred feet wide, and bordered by trees reaching to heaven. Such is this temple.
4. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 80-81 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 136
5. Apuleius, The Golden Ass, 11.9, 11.15, 11.25 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •tyche soteira, in cultic worship Found in books: Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 136
11.9. Amongst the pleasures and popular delights which wandered hither and thither, you might see the procession of the goddess triumphantly marching forward. The women, attired in white vestments and rejoicing because they wore garlands and flowers upon their heads, bedspread the road with herbs which they bare in their aprons. This marked the path this regal and devout procession would pass. Others carried mirrors on their backs to testify obeisance to the goddess who came after. Other bore combs of ivory and declared by the gesture and motions of their arms that they were ordained and ready to dress the goddess. Others dropped balm and other precious ointments as they went. Then came a great number of men as well as women with candles, torches, and other lights, doing honor to the celestial goddess. After that sounded the musical harmony of instruments. Then came a fair company of youths, appareled in white vestments, singing both meter and verse a comely song which some studious poet had made in honor of the Muses. In the meantime there arrived the blowers of trumpets, who were dedicated to the god Serapis. Before them were officers who prepared room for the goddess to pass. 11.15. “O my friend Lucius, after the enduring so many labors and escaping so many tempests of fortune, you have at length come to the port and haven of rest and mercy. Your noble linage, your dignity, your education, or any thing else did not avail you. But you have endured so many servile pleasures due to the folly of youth. Thusly you have had an unpleasant reward for your excessive curiosity. But however the blindness of Fortune has tormented you in various dangers, so it is now that, unbeknownst to her, you have come to this present felicity. Let Fortune go and fume with fury in another place. Let her find some other matter on which to execute her cruelty. Fortune has no power against those who serve and honor our goddess. What good did it do her that you endured thieves, savage beasts, great servitude, dangerous waits, long journeys, and fear of death every day? Know that now you are safe and under the protection of her who, by her clear light, brightens the other gods. Wherefore rejoice and take a countece appropriate to your white garment. Follow the parade of this devout and honorable procession so that those who do not worship the goddess may see and acknowledge their error. Behold Lucius, you are delivered from so great miseries by the providence of the goddess Isis. Rejoice therefore and triumph in the victory over fortune. And so that you may live more safe and sure, make yourself one of this holy order. Dedicate your mind to our religion and take upon yourself the voluntary yoke of ministry. And when you begin to serve and honor the goddess, then you shall feel the fruit of your liberty.” 11.25. “O holy and blessed lady, the perpetual comfort of humankind: you, by your bounty and grace, nourish all the world and listen with great affection to the adversities of the miserable. As a loving mother you take no rest, neither are you idle at any time in bestowing benefits and succoring all men on land as well as on the sea. You are she who puts away all storms and dangers from man’s life by your right hand. Whereby also you restrain the fatal dispositions, appease the great tempests of fortune, and keep back the course of the stars. The celestial gods honor you and the infernal gods keep you in reverence. You encompass all the world, you give light to the sun, you govern the world, you strike down the power of hell. Because of you the times return and the planets rejoice, and the elements serve you. At your command the winds blow, the clouds increase, the seeds prosper, and the fruits prevail. The birds of the air, the beasts of the hill, the serpents of the den, and the fishes of the sea tremble at your majesty. But my spirit is not able to give you sufficient praise, my patrimony is unable to satisfy your sacrifice, my voice has no power to utter that which I think. No, not if I had a thousand mouths and so many tongues. However, as a good religious person and, according to my estate, I will always keep you in remembrance and close you within my breast.” When I had ended my prayer, I went to embrace the great priest Mithras, my spiritual father, and to demand his pardon, since I was unable to recompense the good which he had done to me.
6. Epigraphy, Inscr. De Delos, 2448  Tagged with subjects: •tyche soteira, in cultic worship Found in books: Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 136
7. Epigraphy, I. Louvre, 16  Tagged with subjects: •tyche soteira, in cultic worship Found in books: Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 136
8. Epigraphy, Ccca V, 4  Tagged with subjects: •tyche soteira, in cultic worship Found in books: Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 136
9. Epigraphy, I. Epidauros Asklepieion, 334  Tagged with subjects: •tyche soteira, in cultic worship Found in books: Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 136
10. Epigraphy, Avp, 126  Tagged with subjects: •tyche soteira, in cultic worship Found in books: Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 136
11. Septuagint, Orph. Hymn, 27.12  Tagged with subjects: •tyche soteira, in cultic worship Found in books: Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 136
12. Epigraphy, Igbulg Iii, 1476, 1628  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 136
13. Epigraphy, Stratonikeia, 507, 510, 516, 1108  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 136
14. Epigraphy, Seg, 23.687, 34.989, 42.87, 57.68  Tagged with subjects: •tyche soteira, in cultic worship Found in books: Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 136
15. Epigraphy, Igbulg Iv, 2034  Tagged with subjects: •tyche soteira, in cultic worship Found in books: Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 136
16. Epigraphy, Tam 15.2, 1350  Tagged with subjects: •tyche soteira, in cultic worship Found in books: Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 136
17. Epigraphy, Ig Iv, 419, 421, 561, 570  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 136
18. Epigraphy, I.Ephesos, 1238, 3220  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 136
19. Epigraphy, I.Cret., None  Tagged with subjects: •tyche soteira, in cultic worship Found in books: Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 136
20. Epigraphy, Cirb, 76, 36  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 136
21. Epigraphy, Cig, 6753  Tagged with subjects: •tyche soteira, in cultic worship Found in books: Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 136
22. Epigraphy, Be, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 136
23. Epigraphy, Mama, None  Tagged with subjects: •tyche soteira, in cultic worship Found in books: Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 136
24. Epigraphy, Ig Xii,4, 564  Tagged with subjects: •tyche soteira, in cultic worship Found in books: Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 136