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33 results for "thorikos"
1. Sophocles, Antigone, 486-489 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020), Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B, 64
2. Herodotus, Histories, 2.44, 6.67-6.68 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •thorikos, deme •demes (attic), thorikos Found in books: Ekroth (2013), The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period, 219, 226; Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020), Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B, 64
2.44. Moreover, wishing to get clear information about this matter where it was possible so to do, I took ship for Tyre in Phoenicia , where I had learned by inquiry that there was a holy temple of Heracles. ,There I saw it, richly equipped with many other offerings, besides two pillars, one of refined gold, one of emerald: a great pillar that shone at night; and in conversation with the priests, I asked how long it was since their temple was built. ,I found that their account did not tally with the belief of the Greeks, either; for they said that the temple of the god was founded when Tyre first became a city, and that was two thousand three hundred years ago. At Tyre I saw yet another temple of the so-called Thasian Heracles. ,Then I went to Thasos , too, where I found a temple of Heracles built by the Phoenicians, who made a settlement there when they voyaged in search of Europe ; now they did so as much as five generations before the birth of Heracles the son of Amphitryon in Hellas . ,Therefore, what I have discovered by inquiry plainly shows that Heracles is an ancient god. And furthermore, those Greeks, I think, are most in the right, who have established and practise two worships of Heracles, sacrificing to one Heracles as to an immortal, and calling him the Olympian, but to the other bringing offerings as to a dead hero. 6.67. So it was concerning Demaratus' loss of the kingship, and from Sparta he went into exile among the Medes because of the following reproach: after he was deposed from the kingship, he was elected to office. ,When it was the time of the date Gymnopaidia /date , Leotychides, now king in his place, saw him in the audience and, as a joke and an insult, sent a messenger to him to ask what it was like to hold office after being king. ,He was grieved by the question and said that he had experience of both, while Leotychides did not, and that this question would be the beginning for Sparta of either immense evil or immense good fortune. He said this, covered his head, left the theater, and went home, where he immediately made preparations and sacrificed an ox to Zeus. Then he summoned his mother. 6.68. When she came in, he put some of the entrails in her hands and entreated her, saying, “Mother, appealing to Zeus of the household and to all the other gods, I beseech you to tell me the truth. Who is my father? Tell me truly. ,Leotychides said in the disputes that you were already pregt by your former husband when you came to Ariston. Others say more foolishly that you approached to one of the servants, the ass-keeper, and that I am his son. ,I adjure you by the gods to speak what is true. If you have done anything of what they say, you are not the only one; you are in company with many women. There is much talk at Sparta that Ariston did not have child-bearing seed in him, or his former wives would have given him children.”
3. Philochorus, Fragments, 67 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •demes (attic), thorikos Found in books: Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020), Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B, 64
4. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 55.3 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •thorikos (deme) •demes (attic), thorikos Found in books: Lupu (2005), Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) 135; Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020), Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B, 64
5. Demosthenes, Orations, 57.67 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •demes (attic), thorikos Found in books: Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020), Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B, 64
6. Strabo, Geography, 6.1.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •demes (attic), thorikos Found in books: Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020), Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B, 61
6.1.5. The next city after Laus belongs to Brettium, and is named Temesa, though the men of today call it Tempsa; it was founded by the Ausones, but later on was settled also by the Aitolians under the leadership of Thoas; but the Aitolians were ejected by the Brettii, and then the Brettii were crushed by Hannibal and by the Romans. Near Temesa, and thickly shaded with wild olive trees, is the hero-sanctuary of Polites, one of the companions of Odysseus, who was treacherously slain by the barbarians, and for that reason became so exceedingly wroth against the country that, in accordance with an oracle, the people of the neighborhood collected tribute for him; and hence, also, the popular saying applied to those who are merciless, that they are beset by the hero of Temesa. But when the Epizephyrian Locrians captured the city, Euthymus, the pugilist, so the story goes, entered the lists against Polites, defeated him in the fight and forced him to release the natives from the tribute. People say that Homer has in mind this Temesa, not the Tamassus in Cyprus (the name is spelled both ways), when he says to Temesa, in quest of copper. And in fact copper mines are to be seen in the neighborhood, although now they have been abandoned. Near Temesa is Terina, which Hannibal destroyed, because he was unable to guard it, at the time when he had taken refuge in Brettium itself. Then comes Consentia, the metropolis of the Brettii; and a little above this city is Pandosia, a strong fortress, near which Alexander the Molossian was killed. He, too, was deceived by the oracle at Dodona, which bade him be on his guard against Acheron and Pandosia; for places which bore these names were pointed out to him in Thesprotia, but he came to his end here in Brettium. Now the fortress has three summits, and the River Acheron flows past it. And there was another oracle that helped to deceive him: Three-hilled Pandosia, much people shalt thou kill one day; for he thought that the oracle clearly meant the destruction of the enemy, not of his own people. It is said that Pandosia was once the capital of the Oinotrian Kings. After Consentia comes Hipponium, which was founded by the Locrians. Later on, the Brettii were in possession of Hipponium, but the Romans took it away from them and changed its name to Vibo Valentia. And because the country round about Hipponium has luxuriant meadows abounding in flowers, people have believed that Kore used to come hither from Sicily to gather flowers; and consequently it has become the custom among the women of Hipponium to gather flowers and to weave them into garlands, so that on festival days it is disgraceful to wear bought garlands. Hipponium has also a naval station, which was built long ago by Agathocles, the tyrant of the Siciliotes, when he made himself master of the city. Thence one sails to the Harbor of Heracles, which is the point where the headlands of Italy near the Strait begin to turn towards the west. And on this voyage one passes Medma, a city of the same Locrians aforementioned, which has the same name as a great fountain there, and possesses a naval station near by, called Emporium. Near it is also the Metaurus River, and a mooring-place bearing the same name. off this coast lie the islands of the Liparaei, at a distance of two hundred stadia from the Strait. According to some, they are the islands of Aeolus, of whom the Poet makes mention in the Odyssey. They are seven in number and are all within view both from Sicily and from the continent near Medma. But I shall tell about them when I discuss Sicily. After the Metaurus River comes a second Metaurus. Next after this river comes Scyllaion, a lofty rock which forms a peninsula, its isthmus being low and affording access to ships on both sides. This isthmus Anaxilaus, the tyrant of the Rhegini, fortified against the Tyrrheni, building a naval station there, and thus deprived the pirates of their passage through the strait. For Caenys, too, is near by, being two hundred and fifty stadia distant from Medma; it is the last cape, and with the cape on the Sicilian side, Pelorias, forms the narrows of the Strait. Cape Pelorias is one of the three capes that make the island triangular, and it bends towards the summer sunrise, just as Caenys bends towards the west, each one thus turning away from the other in the opposite direction. Now the length of the narrow passage of the Strait from Caenys as far as the Poseidonium, or the Columna Rheginorum, is about six stadia, while the shortest passage across is slightly more; and the distance is one hundred stadia from the Columna to Rhegium, where the Strait begins to widen out, as one proceeds towards the east, towards the outer sea, the sea which is called the Sicilian Sea.
7. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.31.4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •demes (attic), thorikos Found in books: Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020), Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B, 61
1.31.4. ταῦτα μὲν δὴ οὕτω λέγεται, Φλυεῦσι δέ εἰσι καὶ Μυρρινουσίοις τοῖς μὲν Ἀπόλλωνος Διονυσοδότου καὶ Ἀρτέμιδος Σελασφόρου βωμοὶ Διονύσου τε Ἀνθίου καὶ νυμφῶν Ἰσμηνίδων καὶ Γῆς, ἣν Μεγάλην θεὸν ὀνομάζουσι· ναὸς δὲ ἕτερος ἔχει βωμοὺς Δήμητρος Ἀνησιδώρας καὶ Διὸς Κτησίου καὶ Τιθρωνῆς Ἀθηνᾶς καὶ Κόρης Πρωτογόνης καὶ Σεμνῶν ὀνομαζομένων θεῶν· τὸ δὲ ἐν Μυρρινοῦντι ξόανόν ἐστι Κολαινίδος. Ἀθμονεῖς δὲ τιμῶσιν Ἀμαρυσίαν Ἄρτεμιν· 1.31.4. Such is the legend. Phlya and Myrrhinus have altars of Apollo Dionysodotus, Artemis Light-bearer, Dionysus Flower-god, the Ismenian nymphs and Earth, whom they name the Great goddess; a second temple contains altars of Demeter Anesidora (Sender-up of Gifts), Zeus Ctesius (God of Gain), Tithrone Athena, the Maid First-born and the goddesses styled August. The wooden image at Myrrhinus is of Colaenis.
8. Harpocration, Lexicon of The Ten Orators, None (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •demes (attic), thorikos Found in books: Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020), Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B, 64
9. Pollux, Onomasticon, 1.37, 8.101 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •demes (attic), thorikos •demeter and kore, at thorikos Found in books: Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020), Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B, 61; Papazarkadas (2011), Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens, 34
10. Hesychius of Alexandria, Lexicon (A-O), None (5th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •demes (attic), thorikos Found in books: Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020), Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B, 61
11. Hesychius of Alexandria, Lexicon, None (5th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •demes (attic), thorikos Found in books: Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020), Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B, 61
12. Epigraphy, Lss, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Lupu (2005), Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) 124
13. Epigraphy, Ig Ii3, 4.1802, 4.1858  Tagged with subjects: •demes (attic), thorikos Found in books: Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020), Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B, 64, 66
14. Epigraphy, Agora Xix, None  Tagged with subjects: •demeter and kore, at thorikos Found in books: Papazarkadas (2011), Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens, 34
15. Epigraphy, Ngsl2, 1, 3  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020), Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B, 61
16. Homeric Hymns, Hymn Dem., 126, 24-25, 438, 440, 51-61, 439  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020), Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B, 63, 64
17. Koerner, Gesetzestexte, 18  Tagged with subjects: •demes (attic), thorikos Found in books: Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020), Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B, 61, 63, 64, 66
18. Epigraphy, Antcl 52, 1983 (= Daux 1983), None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Ekroth (2013), The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period, 30, 138, 144, 218, 234
19. Epigraphycorinth Viii, Corinth Viii 1 (Meritt 1931), 1, 22  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Ekroth (2013), The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period, 131
20. Epigraphy, Isa, 43  Tagged with subjects: •thorikos, deme, sacrificial calendar from deme Found in books: Ekroth (2013), The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period, 319
21. Epigraphy, Jameson, Jordan, Kotansky, A Lex Sacra From Selinous (1993), None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Ekroth (2013), The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period, 219
22. Epigraphy, Seg, 21.541, 32.231, 50.168, 52.48, 54.214  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Ekroth (2013), The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period, 131; Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020), Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B, 61, 63, 64; Papazarkadas (2011), Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens, 34
23. Epigraphy, Ig Vii, 421  Tagged with subjects: •thorikos, deme, sacrificial calendar from deme Found in books: Ekroth (2013), The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period, 30
24. Epigraphy, Ig Iv, 203, 40  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Ekroth (2013), The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period, 226
25. Epigraphy, Ml, 72, 42  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Ekroth (2013), The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period, 131
26. Epigraphy, Ig I , 250, 369, 869, 383  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Papazarkadas (2011), Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens, 34
27. Epigraphy, Ig I, 14-17, 78, 241  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Ekroth (2013), The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period, 218
28. Epigraphy, I.Eleusis, 177, 229, 30, 676  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Papazarkadas (2011), Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens, 34
29. Epigraphy, Hesperia, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Ekroth (2013), The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period, 138
30. Epigraphy, Demos Rhamnountos Ii, 180  Tagged with subjects: •demes (attic), thorikos Found in books: Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020), Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B, 66
31. Epigraphy, Ad, 63  Tagged with subjects: •demes (attic), thorikos Found in books: Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020), Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B, 63
32. Epigraphy, Lscg, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Ekroth (2013), The Sacrificial Rituals of Greek Hero-Cults in the Archaic to the Early Hellenistic Period, 30, 144; Lupu (2005), Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) 124, 138
33. Epigraphy, Ig Ii2, 1-2, 1006, 1177, 1183, 1259, 134-135, 1356, 140, 143, 1496, 1672, 2605, 4977, 69, 2600  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Lupu (2005), Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) 135; Papazarkadas (2011), Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens, 34