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25 results for "theomachist"
1. Hymn To Dionysus, To Dionysus, 0 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •theomachist, theomachus Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 123
2. Homer, Odyssey, 9.175-9.176 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •theomachist, theomachus Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 316
3. Homer, Iliad, 5.742, 6.130-6.141 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •theomachist, theomachus Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 123, 126, 303, 314, 316
5.742. / and therein is Strife, therein Valour, and therein Onset, that maketh the blood run cold, and therein is the head of the dread monster, the Gorgon, dread and awful, a portent of Zeus that beareth the aegis. And upon her head she set the helmet with two horns and with bosses four, wrought of gold, and fitted with the men-at-arms of an hundred cities. 6.130. / Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.131. / Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.132. / Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.133. / Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.134. / Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.135. / But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.136. / But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.137. / But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.138. / But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.139. / But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.140. / and he lived not for long, seeing that he was hated of all the immortal gods. So would not I be minded to fight against the blessed gods. But if thou art of men, who eat the fruit of the field, draw nigh, that thou mayest the sooner enter the toils of destruction. Then spake to him the glorious son of Hippolochus: 6.141. / and he lived not for long, seeing that he was hated of all the immortal gods. So would not I be minded to fight against the blessed gods. But if thou art of men, who eat the fruit of the field, draw nigh, that thou mayest the sooner enter the toils of destruction. Then spake to him the glorious son of Hippolochus:
4. Aeschylus, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •theomachist, theomachus Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 303
5. Aeschylus, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •theomachist, theomachus Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 303
6. Euripides, Helen, 391 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •theomachist, theomachus Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 316
391. ὃς ἐξέφυσεν ̓Αερόπης λέκτρων ἄπο
7. Sophocles, Antigone, 876, 956-965, 955 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 303
8. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 437, 827 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 316
9. Sophocles, Women of Trachis, 1098 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •theomachist, theomachus Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 316
10. Euripides, Bacchae, 1016, 1030, 1110, 1155, 1274-1276, 212, 215-247, 251-254, 263-265, 278-283, 343-344, 352-357, 471-474, 507, 511-514, 526-529, 537-542, 616-631, 794-797, 850-854, 912-913, 995-996, 475 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 459
475. εὖ τοῦτʼ ἐκιβδήλευσας, ἵνʼ ἀκοῦσαι θέλω. Διόνυσος
11. Euripides, Hippolytus, 281 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •theomachist, theomachus Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 314
12. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 806 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •theomachist, theomachus Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 316
13. Aristotle, Politics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •theomachist, theomachus Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 316
14. Septuagint, 3 Maccabees, 1.12, 3.25, 5.5-5.6, 5.11, 5.27-5.30, 5.42-5.43, 6.27 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •theomachist, theomachus Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 459
1.12. Even after the law had been read to him, he did not cease to maintain that he ought to enter, saying, "Even if those men are deprived of this honor, I ought not to be." 3.25. Therefore we have given orders that, as soon as this letter shall arrive, you are to send to us those who live among you, together with their wives and children, with insulting and harsh treatment, and bound securely with iron fetters, to suffer the sure and shameful death that befits enemies. 5.5. The servants in charge of the Jews went out in the evening and bound the hands of the wretched people and arranged for their continued custody through the night, convinced that the whole nation would experience its final destruction. 5.6. For to the Gentiles it appeared that the Jews were left without any aid, 5.11. But the Lord sent upon the king a portion of sleep, that beneficence which from the beginning, night and day, is bestowed by him who grants it to whomever he wishes. 5.27. But he, upon receiving the report and being struck by the unusual invitation to come out -- since he had been completely overcome by incomprehension -- inquired what the matter was for which this had been so zealously completed for him. 5.28. This was the act of God who rules over all things, for he had implanted in the king's mind a forgetfulness of the things he had previously devised. 5.29. Then Hermon and all the king's friends pointed out that the beasts and the armed forces were ready, "O king, according to your eager purpose." 5.30. But at these words he was filled with an overpowering wrath, because by the providence of God his whole mind had been deranged in regard to these matters; and with a threatening look he said, 5.42. Upon this the king, a Phalaris in everything and filled with madness, took no account of the changes of mind which had come about within him for the protection of the Jews, and he firmly swore an irrevocable oath that he would send them to death without delay, mangled by the knees and feet of the beasts, 5.43. and would also march against Judea and rapidly level it to the ground with fire and spear, and by burning to the ground the temple inaccessible to him would quickly render it forever empty of those who offered sacrifices there. 6.27. Loose and untie their unjust bonds! Send them back to their homes in peace, begging pardon for your former actions!
15. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 4.1-4.41, 4.389-4.415 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •theomachist, theomachus Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 303
4.1. At non Alcithoe Minyeias orgia censet 4.2. accipienda dei, sed adhuc temeraria Bacchum 4.3. progeniem negat esse Iovis, sociasque sorores 4.4. inpietatis habet. Festum celebrare sacerdos 4.5. inmunesque operum famulas dominasque suorum 4.6. pectora pelle tegi, crinales solvere vittas, 4.7. serta coma, manibus frondentes sumere thyrsos 4.8. iusserat, et saevam laesi fore numinis iram 4.9. vaticinatus erat. Parent matresque nurusque 4.10. telasque calathosque infectaque pensa reponunt, 4.11. turaque dant Bacchumque vocant Bromiumque Lyaeumque 4.12. ignigenamque satumque iterum solumque bimatrem: 4.13. additur his Nyseus indetonsusque Thyoneus, 4.14. et cum Lenaeo genialis consitor uvae, 4.15. Nycteliusque Eleleusque parens et Iacchus et Euhan, 4.16. et quae praeterea per Graias plurima gentes 4.17. nomina, Liber, habes. Tibi enim inconsumpta iuventa est, 4.18. tu puer aeternus, tu formosissimus alto 4.19. conspiceris caelo, tibi, cum sine cornibus adstas, 4.20. virgineum caput est. Oriens tibi victus, adusque 4.21. decolor extremo qua tingitur India Gange: 4.22. Penthea tu, venerande, bipenniferumque Lycurgum 4.23. sacrilegos mactas, Tyrrhenaque mittis in aequor 4.24. corpora, tu biiugum pictis insignia frenis 4.25. colla premis lyncum; bacchae satyrique sequuntur, 4.26. quique senex ferula titubantes ebrius artus 4.27. sustinet et pando non fortiter haeret asello. 4.28. Quacumque ingrederis, clamor iuvenalis et una 4.29. femineae voces inpulsaque tympana palmis 4.30. concavaque aera sot longoque foramine buxus. 4.31. “Placatus mitisque” rogant Ismenides “adsis,” 4.32. iussaque sacra colunt. Solae Minyeides intus 4.33. intempestiva turbantes festa Minerva 4.34. aut ducunt lanas, aut stamina pollice versant, 4.35. aut haerent telae famulasque laboribus urgent. 4.36. E quibus una levi deducens pollice filum 4.37. “dum cessant aliae commentaque sacra frequentant, 4.38. nos quoque, quas Pallas, melior dea, detinet” inquit, 4.39. “utile opus manuum vario sermone levemus: 4.40. perque vices aliquid, quod tempora longa videri 4.41. non sinat, in medium vacuas referamus ad aures.” 4.389. Finis erat dictis. Sed adhuc Minyeia proles 4.390. urget opus spernitque deum festumque profanat, 4.391. tympana cum subito non adparentia raucis 4.392. obstrepuere sonis, et adunco tibia cornu 4.393. tinnulaque aera sot; redolent murraeque crocique, 4.394. resque fide maior, coepere virescere telae 4.395. inque hederae faciem pendens frondescere vestis. 4.396. Pars abit in vites, et quae modo fila fuerunt, 4.397. palmite mutantur; de stamine pampinus exit; 4.398. purpura fulgorem pictis adcommodat uvis. 4.399. Iamque dies exactus erat, tempusque subibat, 4.400. quod tu nec tenebras nec possis dicere lucem, 4.401. sed cum luce tamen dubiae confinia noctis: 4.402. tecta repente quati pinguesque ardere videntur 4.403. lampades et rutilis conlucere ignibus aedes 4.404. falsaque saevarum simulacra ululare ferarum. 4.405. Fumida iamdudum latitant per tecta sorores, 4.406. diversaeque locis ignes ac lumina vitant; 4.407. dumque petunt tenebras, parvos membrana per artus 4.408. porrigitur tenuique includit bracchia pinna. 4.409. Nec qua perdiderint veterem ratione figuram 4.410. scire sinunt tenebrae. Non illas pluma levavit, 4.411. sustinuere tamen se perlucentibus alis; 4.412. conataeque loqui minimam et pro corpore vocem 4.413. emittunt, peraguntque leves stridore querellas. 4.414. Tectaque, non silvas celebrant lucemque perosae 4.415. nocte volant, seroque tenent a vespere nomen.
16. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 3.65.7, 5.50.2-5.50.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •theomachist, theomachus Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 126, 303, 459
3.65.7.  But some of the poets, one of whom is Antimachus, state that Lycurgus was king, not of Thrace, but of Arabia, and that the attack upon Dionysus and the Bacchantes was made at the Nysa which is in Arabia. However this may be, Dionysus, they say, punished the impious but treated all other men honourably, and then made his return journey from India to Thebes upon an elephant. 5.50.2.  The myth relates that two sons, Butes and Lycurgus, were born to Boreas, but not by the same mother; and Butes, who was the younger, formed a plot against his brother, and on being discovered he received no punishment from Lycurgus beyond that he was ordered by Lycurgus to gather ships and, together with his accomplices in the plot, to seek out another land in which to make his home. 5.50.3.  Consequently Butes, together with the Thracians who were implicated with him, set forth, and making his way through the islands of the Cyclades he seized the island of Strongylê, where he made his home and proceeded to plunder many of those who sailed past the island. And since they had no women they sailed here and there and seized them from the land. 5.50.4.  Now some of the islands of the Cyclades had no inhabitants whatsoever and others were sparsely settled; consequently they sailed further, and having been repulsed once from Euboea, they sailed to Thessaly, where Butes and his companions, upon landing, came upon the female devotees of Dionysus as they were celebrating the orgies of the god near Drius, as it is called, in Achaea Phthiotis. 5.50.5.  As Butes and his companions rushed at the women, these threw away the sacred objects, and some of them fled for safety to the sea, and others to the mountain called Dius; but Coronis, the myth continues, was seized by Butes and forced to lie with him. And she, in anger at the seizure and at the insolent treatment she had received, called upon Dionysus to lend her his aid. And the god struck Butes with madness, because of which he lost his mind and, throwing himself into a well, met his death.
17. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 8.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •theomachist, theomachus Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 459
18. Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, 2.2.2, 3.5.1-3.5.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •theomachist, theomachus Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 303
2.2.2. καὶ γίνεται Ἀκρισίῳ μὲν ἐξ Εὐρυδίκης τῆς Λακεδαίμονος Δανάη, Προίτῳ δὲ ἐκ Σθενεβοίας Λυσίππη καὶ Ἰφινόη καὶ Ἰφιάνασσα. αὗται δὲ ὡς ἐτελειώθησαν, ἐμάνησαν, ὡς μὲν Ἡσίοδός φησιν, ὅτι τὰς Διονύσου τελετὰς οὐ κατεδέχοντο, ὡς δὲ Ἀκουσίλαος λέγει, διότι τὸ τῆς Ἥρας ξόανον ἐξηυτέλισαν. γενόμεναι δὲ ἐμμανεῖς ἐπλανῶντο ἀνὰ τὴν Ἀργείαν ἅπασαν, αὖθις δὲ τὴν Ἀρκαδίαν καὶ τὴν Πελοπόννησον 1 -- διελθοῦσαι μετʼ ἀκοσμίας ἁπάσης διὰ τῆς ἐρημίας ἐτρόχαζον. Μελάμπους δὲ ὁ Ἀμυθάονος καὶ Εἰδομένης τῆς Ἄβαντος, μάντις ὢν καὶ τὴν διὰ φαρμάκων καὶ καθαρμῶν θεραπείαν πρῶτος εὑρηκώς, ὑπισχνεῖται θεραπεύειν τὰς παρθένους, εἰ λάβοι τὸ τρίτον μέρος τῆς δυναστείας. οὐκ ἐπιτρέποντος δὲ Προίτου θεραπεύειν ἐπὶ μισθοῖς τηλικούτοις, ἔτι μᾶλλον ἐμαίνοντο αἱ παρθένοι καὶ προσέτι μετὰ τούτων αἱ λοιπαὶ γυναῖκες· καὶ γὰρ αὗται τὰς οἰκίας ἀπολιποῦσαι τοὺς ἰδίους ἀπώλλυον παῖδας καὶ εἰς τὴν ἐρημίαν ἐφοίτων. προβαινούσης δὲ ἐπὶ πλεῖστον τῆς συμφορᾶς, τοὺς αἰτηθέντας μισθοὺς ὁ Προῖτος ἐδίδου. ὁ δὲ ὑπέσχετο θεραπεύειν ὅταν ἕτερον τοσοῦτον τῆς γῆς ὁ ἀδελφὸς αὐτοῦ λάβῃ Βίας. Προῖτος δὲ εὐλαβηθεὶς μὴ βραδυνούσης τῆς θεραπείας αἰτηθείη καὶ πλεῖον, θεραπεύειν συνεχώρησεν ἐπὶ τούτοις. Μελάμπους δὲ παραλαβὼν τοὺς δυνατωτάτους τῶν νεανιῶν μετʼ ἀλαλαγμοῦ καί τινος ἐνθέου χορείας ἐκ τῶν ὀρῶν αὐτὰς εἰς Σικυῶνα συνεδίωξε. κατὰ δὲ τὸν διωγμὸν ἡ πρεσβυτάτη τῶν θυγατέρων Ἰφινόη μετήλλαξεν· ταῖς δὲ λοιπαῖς τυχούσαις καθαρμῶν σωφρονῆσαι συνέβη. καὶ ταύτας μὲν ἐξέδοτο Προῖτος Μελάμποδι καὶ Βίαντι, παῖδα δʼ ὕστερον ἐγέννησε Μεγαπένθην. 3.5.1. Διόνυσος δὲ εὑρετὴς ἀμπέλου γενόμενος, Ἥρας μανίαν αὐτῷ ἐμβαλούσης περιπλανᾶται Αἴγυπτόν τε καὶ Συρίαν. καὶ τὸ μὲν πρῶτον Πρωτεὺς αὐτὸν ὑποδέχεται βασιλεὺς Αἰγυπτίων, αὖθις δὲ εἰς Κύβελα τῆς Φρυγίας ἀφικνεῖται, κἀκεῖ καθαρθεὶς ὑπὸ Ῥέας καὶ τὰς τελετὰς ἐκμαθών, καὶ λαβὼν παρʼ ἐκείνης τὴν στολήν, ἐπὶ Ἰνδοὺς 1 -- διὰ τῆς Θράκης ἠπείγετο. Λυκοῦργος δὲ παῖς Δρύαντος, Ἠδωνῶν βασιλεύων, οἳ Στρυμόνα ποταμὸν παροικοῦσι, πρῶτος ὑβρίσας ἐξέβαλεν αὐτόν. καὶ Διόνυσος μὲν εἰς θάλασσαν πρὸς Θέτιν τὴν Νηρέως κατέφυγε, Βάκχαι δὲ ἐγένοντο αἰχμάλωτοι καὶ τὸ συνεπόμενον Σατύρων πλῆθος αὐτῷ. αὖθις δὲ αἱ Βάκχαι ἐλύθησαν ἐξαίφνης, Λυκούργῳ δὲ μανίαν ἐνεποίησε 2 -- Διόνυσος. ὁ δὲ μεμηνὼς Δρύαντα τὸν παῖδα, ἀμπέλου νομίζων κλῆμα κόπτειν, πελέκει πλήξας ἀπέκτεινε, καὶ ἀκρωτηριάσας αὐτὸν ἐσωφρόνησε. 1 -- τῆς δὲ γῆς ἀκάρπου μενούσης, ἔχρησεν ὁ θεὸς καρποφορήσειν αὐτήν, ἂν θανατωθῇ Λυκοῦργος. Ἠδωνοὶ δὲ ἀκούσαντες εἰς τὸ Παγγαῖον αὐτὸν ἀπαγαγόντες ὄρος ἔδησαν, κἀκεῖ κατὰ Διονύσου βούλησιν ὑπὸ ἵππων διαφθαρεὶς ἀπέθανε. 3.5.2. διελθὼν δὲ Θρᾴκην καὶ τὴν Ἰνδικὴν ἅπασαν, στήλας ἐκεῖ στήσας 1 -- ἧκεν εἰς Θήβας, καὶ τὰς γυναῖκας ἠνάγκασε καταλιπούσας τὰς οἰκίας βακχεύειν ἐν τῷ Κιθαιρῶνι. Πενθεὺς δὲ γεννηθεὶς ἐξ Ἀγαυῆς Ἐχίονι, παρὰ Κάδμου εἰληφὼς τὴν βασιλείαν, διεκώλυε ταῦτα γίνεσθαι, καὶ παραγενόμενος εἰς Κιθαιρῶνα τῶν Βακχῶν κατάσκοπος ὑπὸ τῆς μητρὸς Ἀγαυῆς κατὰ μανίαν ἐμελίσθη· ἐνόμισε γὰρ αὐτὸν θηρίον εἶναι. δείξας δὲ Θηβαίοις ὅτι θεός ἐστιν, ἧκεν εἰς Ἄργος, κἀκεῖ 2 -- πάλιν οὐ τιμώντων αὐτὸν ἐξέμηνε τὰς γυναῖκας. αἱ δὲ ἐν τοῖς ὄρεσι τοὺς ἐπιμαστιδίους ἔχουσαι 3 -- παῖδας τὰς σάρκας αὐτῶν ἐσιτοῦντο.
19. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 2.20.4, 2.22.1, 9.5.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •theomachist, theomachus Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 301, 303
2.20.4. τὸ δὲ μνῆμα τὸ πλησίον Χορείας μαινάδος ὀνομάζουσι, Διονύσῳ λέγοντες καὶ ἄλλας γυναῖκας καὶ ταύτην ἐς Ἄργος συστρατεύσασθαι, Περσέα δέ, ὡς ἐκράτει τῆς μάχης, φονεῦσαι τῶν γυναικῶν τὰς πολλάς· τὰς μὲν οὖν λοιπὰς θάπτουσιν ἐν κοινῷ, ταύτῃ δὲ—ἀξιώματι γὰρ δὴ προεῖχεν—ἰδίᾳ τὸ μνῆμα ἐποίησαν. 2.22.1. τῆς δὲ Ἥρας ὁ ναὸς τῆς Ἀνθείας ἐστὶ τοῦ ἱεροῦ τῆς Λητοῦς ἐν δεξιᾷ καὶ πρὸ αὐτοῦ γυναικῶν τάφος. ἀπέθανον δὲ αἱ γυναῖκες ἐν μάχῃ πρὸς Ἀργείους τε καὶ Περσέα, ἀπὸ νήσων τῶν ἐν Αἰγαίῳ Διονύσῳ συνεστρατευμέναι· καὶ διὰ τοῦτο Ἁλίας αὐτὰς ἐπονομάζουσιν. ἀντικρὺ δὲ τοῦ μνήματος τῶν γυναικῶν Δήμητρός ἐστιν ἱερὸν ἐπίκλησιν Πελασγίδος ἀπὸ τοῦ ἱδρυσαμένου Πελασγοῦ τοῦ Τριόπα, καὶ οὐ πόρρω τοῦ ἱεροῦ τάφος Πελασγοῦ. 9.5.2. τοῖς μὲν οὖν Ἄοσι κατὰ κώμας ἔτι ἦσαν αἱ οἰκήσεις· Κάδμος δὲ τὴν πόλιν τὴν καλουμένην ἔτι καὶ ἐς ἡμᾶς Καδμείαν ᾤκισεν. αὐξηθείσης δὲ ὕστερον τῆς πόλεως, οὕτω τὴν Καδμείαν ἀκρόπολιν συνέβη τῶν κάτω γενέσθαι Θηβῶν. Κάδμῳ δὲ γάμος τε ἐπιφανὴς ὑπῆρξεν, εἰ δὴ θυγατέρα Ἀφροδίτης καὶ Ἄρεως κατὰ λόγον τὸν Ἑλλήνων ἔσχε, καὶ αἱ θυγατέρες εἰλήφασιν αὐτῷ φήμην, Σεμέλη μὲν τεκεῖν ἐκ Διός, Ἰνὼ δὲ θεῶν εἶναι τῶν θαλασσίων. 2.20.4. The tomb near this they call that of the maenad Chorea, saying that she was one of the women who joined Dionysus in his expedition against Argos , and that Perseus, being victorious in the battle, put most of the women to the sword. To the rest they gave a common grave, but to Chorea they gave burial apart because of her high rank. 2.22.1. The temple of Hera Anthea (Flowery) is on the right of the sanctuary of Leto, and before it is a grave of women. They were killed in a battle against the Argives under Perseus, having come from the Aegean Islands to help Dionysus in war; for which reason they are surnamed Haliae (Women of the Sea). Facing the tomb of the women is a sanctuary of Demeter, surnamed Pelasgian from Pelasgus, son of Triopas, its founder, and not far from the sanctuary is the grave of Pelasgus. 9.5.2. When the Phoenician army under Cadmus invaded the land these tribes were defeated; the Hyantes fled from the land when night came, but the Aones begged for mercy, and were allowed by Cadmus to remain and unite with the Phoenicians. The Aones still lived in village communities, but Cadmus built the city which even at the present day is called Cadmeia. Afterwards the city grew, and so the Cadmeia became the citadel of the lower city of Thebes . Cadmus made a brilliant marriage, if, as the Greek legend says, he indeed took to wife a daughter of Aphrodite and Ares. His daughters too have made him a name; Semele was famed for having a child by Zeus, Ino for being a divinity of the sea.
20. Aelian, Varia Historia, 3.42 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •theomachist, theomachus Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 303
21. Antoninus Liberalis, Collection of Metamorphoses, 10 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •theomachist, theomachus Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 303
22. Nonnus, Dionysiaca, 17.357, 17.359, 19.104-19.105, 19.178-19.180, 21.24-21.57, 21.148-21.149, 25.282-25.283, 26.287, 26.295-26.332, 36.315 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •theomachist, theomachus Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 459, 475
23. Nonnus, Paraphrasis Sancti Evangelii Joannei (Fort. Auctore Nonno Alio, 9.73 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •theomachist, theomachus Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 475
25. Gorgias, Commentarii In Dionysium Periegetam, None  Tagged with subjects: •theomachist, theomachus Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 316