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178 results for "tablets"
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 11-24 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 68
24. of wealth: this Strife well serves humanity.
2. Homer, Iliad, 9.413 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •cultic ritual practice, curse tablets •death and the afterlife, curse tablets Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 400
9.413. / For my mother the goddess, silver-footed Thetis, telleth me that twofold fates are bearing me toward the doom of death: if I abide here and war about the city of the Trojans, then lost is my home-return, but my renown shall be imperishable; but if I return home to my dear native land,
3. Homeric Hymns, To Demeter, 227-230 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 120
230. Her face. A long time there she sat, heart-sore,
4. Homer, Odyssey, 4.563-4.567, 11.38-11.41, 11.488-11.491, 19.455-19.458 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •cultic ritual practice, curse tablets •death and the afterlife, curse tablets •curse tablets, Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 120; Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 142, 400
5. Pindar, Pythian Odes, 11.28 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets (katadesmoi), adversarial function Found in books: Eidinow (2007), Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks, 294
6. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 1.75-1.78 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Eidinow (2007), Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks, 294
7. Aeschylus, Persians, 605-632, 604 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 407
604. ἐν ὄμμασιν τἀνταῖα φαίνεται θεῶν,
8. Lysias, Orations, 12.76, 19.46 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 494, 840
9. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets, Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 62
10. Plato, Protagoras, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Mikalson (2016), New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society, 285
11. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Eidinow (2007), Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks, 294
731a. τινων αὐτὸν μὲν ψέγειν, τὸ δὲ κτῆμα μηδὲν μᾶλλον διὰ τὸν κεκτημένον ἀτιμάζειν, ἀλλὰ κτᾶσθαι κατὰ δύναμιν. φιλονικείτω δὲ ἡμῖν πᾶς πρὸς ἀρετὴν ἀφθόνως. ὁ μὲν γὰρ τοιοῦτος τὰς πόλεις αὔξει, ἁμιλλώμενος μὲν αὐτός, τοὺς ἄλλους δὲ οὐ κολούων διαβολαῖς· ὁ δὲ φθονερός, τῇ τῶν ἄλλων διαβολῇ δεῖν οἰόμενος ὑπερέχειν, αὐτός τε ἧττον συντείνει πρὸς ἀρετὴν τὴν ἀληθῆ, τούς τε ἀνθαμιλλωμένους εἰς ἀθυμίαν καθίστησι τῷ ἀδίκως ψέγεσθαι, καὶ διὰ ταῦτα 731a. then the man himself must be blamed, but his possession must not be disesteemed any the more because of its possessor,—rather one should strive to gain it with all one’s might. Let every one of us be ambitious to gain excellence, but without jealousy. For a man of this character enlarges a State, since he strives hard himself and does not thwart the others by calumny; but the jealous man, thinking that calumny of others is the best way to secure his own superiority, makes less effort himself to win true excellence, and disheartens his rivals by getting them unjustly blamed; whereby he causes the whole State
12. Plato, Laches, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 1186
13. Plato, Gorgias, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Mikalson (2016), New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society, 285
14. Herodotus, Histories, a b c d\n0 1.159 1.159 1 159 \n1 2.81 2.81 2 81 \n2 2.115.4 2.115.4 2 115 \n3 9.78.1 9.78.1 9 78 \n4 8.106 8.106 8 106 \n5 2.121ε2 2.121ε2 2 121ε2\n6 8.105 8.105 8 105 \n7 9.35 9.35 9 35 \n8 9.34 9.34 9 34 \n9 9.33 9.33 9 33 \n10 5.62 5.62 5 62 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Mikalson (2016), New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society, 285
1.159. When they came to Branchidae , Aristodicus, speaking for all, put this question to the oracle: “Lord, Pactyes the Lydian has come to us a suppliant fleeing a violent death at the hands of the Persians; and they demand him of us, telling the men of Cyme to surrender him. ,But we, as much as we fear the Persian power, have not dared give up this suppliant of ours until it is clearly made known to us by you whether we are to do this or not.” Thus Aristodicus inquired; and the god again gave the same answer, that Pactyes should be surrendered to the Persians. ,With that Aristodicus did as he had already decided; he went around the temple, and took away the sparrows and all the families of nesting birds that were in it. But while he was doing so, a voice (they say) came out of the inner shrine calling to Aristodicus, and saying, “Vilest of men, how dare you do this? Will you rob my temple of those that take refuge with me?” ,Then Aristodicus had his answer ready: “Lord,” he said, “will you save your own suppliants, yet tell the men of Cyme to deliver up theirs?” But the god replied, “Yes, I do command them, so that you may perish all the sooner for your impiety, and never again come to inquire of my oracle about giving up those that seek refuge with you.”
15. Xenophon, Memoirs, 4.2.13 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 1147
4.2.13. βούλει οὖν, ἔφη ὁ Σωκράτης, γράψωμεν ἐνταυθοῖ μὲν δέλτα , ἐνταυθοῖ δὲ ἄλφα , εἶτα ὅ τι μὲν ἂν δοκῇ ἡμῖν τῆς δικαιοσύνης ἔργον εἶναι, πρὸς τὸ δέλτα τιθῶμεν, ὅ τι δʼ ἂν τῆς ἀδικίας, πρὸς τὸ ἄλφα ; εἴ τί σοι δοκεῖ, ἔφη, προσδεῖν τούτων, ποίει ταῦτα. καὶ ὁ Σωκράτης γράψας ὥσπερ εἶπεν, οὐκοῦν, ἔφη, ἔστιν ἐν ἀνθρώποις ψεύδεσθαι; 4.2.13. I propose, then, that we write J in this column and I in that, and then proceed to place under these letters, J and I, what we take to be the works of justice and injustice respectively. Do so, if you think it helps at all. Having written down the letters as he proposed, Socrates went on:
16. Aristophanes, Wasps, 947-948, 946 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 71
946. οὔκ, ἀλλ' ἐκεῖνό μοι δοκεῖ πεπονθέναι,
17. Xenophon, Hellenica, 2.4.21-2.4.22, 4.4.2-4.4.3, 6.3.2-6.3.17, 7.3.6 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 1131; Mikalson (2016), New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society, 285
18. Xenophon, The Persian Expedition, 1.7.18, 4.2.13 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •cultic ritual practice, curse tablets •death and the afterlife, curse tablets •curse tablets Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 302; Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 1147
1.7.18. ἐνταῦθα Κῦρος Σιλανὸν καλέσας τὸν Ἀμπρακιώτην μάντιν ἔδωκεν αὐτῷ δαρεικοὺς τρισχιλίους, ὅτι τῇ ἑνδεκάτῃ ἀπʼ ἐκείνης ἡμέρᾳ πρότερον θυόμενος εἶπεν αὐτῷ ὅτι βασιλεὺς οὐ μαχεῖται δέκα ἡμερῶν, Κῦρος δʼ εἶπεν· οὐκ ἄρα ἔτι μαχεῖται, εἰ ἐν ταύταις οὐ μαχεῖται ταῖς ἡμέραις· ἐὰν δʼ ἀληθεύσῃς, ὑπισχνοῦμαί σοι δέκα τάλαντα. τοῦτο τὸ χρυσίον τότε ἀπέδωκεν, ἐπεὶ παρῆλθον αἱ δέκα ἡμέραι. 4.2.13. ἐννοήσας δʼ ὁ Ξενοφῶν μή, εἰ ἔρημον καταλίποι τὸν ἡλωκότα λόφον, καὶ πάλιν λαβόντες οἱ πολέμιοι ἐπιθοῖντο τοῖς ὑποζυγίοις παριοῦσιν (ἐπὶ πολὺ δʼ ἦν τὰ ὑποζύγια ἅτε διὰ στενῆς τῆς ὁδοῦ πορευόμενα), καταλείπει ἐπὶ τοῦ λόφου λοχαγοὺς Κηφισόδωρον Κηφισοφῶντος Ἀθηναῖον καὶ Ἀμφικράτην Ἀμφιδήμου Ἀθηναῖον καὶ Ἀρχαγόραν Ἀργεῖον φυγάδα, αὐτὸς δὲ σὺν τοῖς λοιποῖς ἐπορεύετο ἐπὶ τὸν δεύτερον λόφον, καὶ τῷ αὐτῷ τρόπῳ καὶ τοῦτον αἱροῦσιν. 4.2.13. Xenophon, however, becoming apprehensive lest, if he should leave unoccupied the hill he had just captured, the enemy might take possession of it again and attack the baggage train as it passed (and the train stretched out a long way because of the narrowness of the road it was following), left three captains upon the hill, Cephisodorus, son of Cephisophon, an Athenian, Amphicrates, son of Amphidemus, also an Athenian, and Archagoras, an Argive exile; while he himself with the rest of the troops proceeded against the second hill, which they captured in the same fashion as the first.
19. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 3.86.1, 8.15, 8.65-8.69 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 473, 494, 1067
3.86.1. τοῦ δ’ αὐτοῦ θέρους τελευτῶντος Ἀθηναῖοι εἴκοσι ναῦς ἔστειλαν ἐς Σικελίαν καὶ Λάχητα τὸν Μελανώπου στρατηγὸν αὐτῶν καὶ Χαροιάδην τὸν Εὐφιλήτου. 3.86.1. At the close of the same summer the Athenians sent twenty ships under the command of Laches, son of Melanopus, and Charceades, son of Euphiletus, to Sicily ,
20. Isaeus, Orations, 4.19, 8.19-8.20 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 1052; Mikalson (2016), New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society, 285
21. Demosthenes, Orations, 19.156, 20.82, 23.40, 28.16, 33.10, 40.39, 45.19, 53.3, 58.30-58.34, 59.32-59.34, 59.50-59.61 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 707, 976, 1044, 1050, 1147; Mikalson (2016), New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society, 285
22. Dinarchus, Fragments, None (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 1114
23. Aeschines, Against Ctesiphon, 3.109-3.111 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets, Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 66
24. Aristotle, Politics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Mikalson (2016), New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society, 285
25. Aeschines, Letters, 3.191 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Mikalson (2016), New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society, 285
26. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 19.3, 29.1-29.3 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets •cultic ritual practice, curse tablets •death and the afterlife, curse tablets Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 305; Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 937, 1197
27. Theocritus, Idylls, 2.44-2.46 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablet Found in books: Brule (2003), Women of Ancient Greece, 169
28. Anon., Testament of Solomon, 14.1, 16.1 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets, Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 325
29. Cicero, Brutus, 217 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets, Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 55, 71
217. is cum tribunus plebis Curionem et Octavium consules produxisset Curioque multa dixisset sedente Cn. Octavio conlega, qui devinctus erat fasciis et multis medicamentis propter dolorem artuum delibutus, 'numquam,' inquit,' Octavi, conlegae tuo gratiam referes: qui nisi se suo more iactavisset, hodie te istic muscae comedissent.' Memoria autem ita fuit nulla, ut aliquotiens, tria cum proposuisset, aut quartum adderet aut tertium quaereret; qui in iudicio privato vel maximo, cum ego pro Titinia Cottae peroravissem, ille contra me pro Ser. Naevio diceret, subito totam causam oblitus est idque veneficiis et cantionibus Titiniae factum esse dicebat. Magna haec immemoris ingeni signa; sed nihil turpius quam quod etiam in scriptis obliviscebatur oblivisceretur Manutius quid paulo ante posuisset, ut in eo libro, ubi se exeuntem e senatu et cum Pansa nostro et cum Curione filio conloquentem facit [cum senatum Caesar consul habuisset cum ... habuisset secl. Ernesti ] omnisque ille sermo ductus est ductus est Orelli : ductus esset Lambinus : ductus L : ducitur vulg. e percontatione fili quid in senatu esset actum. In quo multis verbis cum inveheretur in Caesarem Curio disputatioque esset inter eos, ut est consuetudo dialogorum disputatioque ... dialogorum secl. Kayser , cum sermo esset institutus senatu misso in quo... misso secl. Eberhard , quem senatum Caesar consul habuisset, reprendit eas res quas idem Caesar anno post et deinceps reliquis annis administravisset administravit M : administravisset C in Gallia.
30. Cicero, Brutus, 217 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets, Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 55, 71
217. is cum tribunus plebis Curionem et Octavium consules produxisset Curioque multa dixisset sedente Cn. Octavio conlega, qui devinctus erat fasciis et multis medicamentis propter dolorem artuum delibutus, 'numquam,' inquit,' Octavi, conlegae tuo gratiam referes: qui nisi se suo more iactavisset, hodie te istic muscae comedissent.' Memoria autem ita fuit nulla, ut aliquotiens, tria cum proposuisset, aut quartum adderet aut tertium quaereret; qui in iudicio privato vel maximo, cum ego pro Titinia Cottae peroravissem, ille contra me pro Ser. Naevio diceret, subito totam causam oblitus est idque veneficiis et cantionibus Titiniae factum esse dicebat. Magna haec immemoris ingeni signa; sed nihil turpius quam quod etiam in scriptis obliviscebatur oblivisceretur Manutius quid paulo ante posuisset, ut in eo libro, ubi se exeuntem e senatu et cum Pansa nostro et cum Curione filio conloquentem facit [cum senatum Caesar consul habuisset cum ... habuisset secl. Ernesti ] omnisque ille sermo ductus est ductus est Orelli : ductus esset Lambinus : ductus L : ducitur vulg. e percontatione fili quid in senatu esset actum. In quo multis verbis cum inveheretur in Caesarem Curio disputatioque esset inter eos, ut est consuetudo dialogorum disputatioque ... dialogorum secl. Kayser , cum sermo esset institutus senatu misso in quo... misso secl. Eberhard , quem senatum Caesar consul habuisset, reprendit eas res quas idem Caesar anno post et deinceps reliquis annis administravisset administravit M : administravisset C in Gallia.
31. Strabo, Geography, 9.1.19, 9.1.21-9.1.22 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 829, 1052, 1197
9.1.19. The greater men's fondness for learning about things that are famous and the greater the number of men who have talked about them, the greater the censure, if one is not master of the historical facts. For example, in his Collection of the Rivers, Callimachus says that it makes him laugh if anyone makes bold to write that the Athenian virgins draw pure liquid from the Eridanus, from which even cattle would hold aloof. Its sources are indeed existent now, with pure and potable water, as they say, outside the Gates of Diochares, as they are called, near the Lyceium; but in earlier times there was also a fountain near by which was constructed by man, with abundant and excellent water; and even if the water is not so now, why should it be a thing to wonder at, if in early times the water was abundant and pure, and therefore also potable, but in later times underwent a change? However, it is not permitted me to linger over details, since they are so numerous, nor yet, on the other hand, to pass by them all in silence without even mentioning one or another of them in a summary way. 9.1.21. After the Peiraeus comes the deme Phalereis, on the seaboard next to it; then Halimusii, Aexoneis, Alaeeis, Aexonici, and Anagyrasii. Then Thoreis, Lamptreis, Aegilieis, Anaphlystii, Ateneis. These are the demes as far as the cape of Sounion. Between the aforesaid demes is a long cape, the first cape after Aexoneis, Zoster; then another after Thoreis, I mean Astypalaea; off the former of these lies the island Phabra and off the latter the island Eleussa; and also opposite Aexonieis is Hydrussa. And in the neighborhood of Anaphlystus is also the shrine of Pan, and the sanctuary of Aphrodite Colias, at which place, they say, were cast forth by the waves the last wreckage of the ships after the Persian naval battle near Salamis, the wreckage concerning which Apollo predicted the women of Colias will cook food with the oars. off these places, too, is the island Belbina, at no great distance, and also Patroclou Charax. But most of these islands are uninhabited. 9.1.22. On doubling the cape of Sounion one comes to Sounion, a noteworthy deme; then to Thoricus; then to a deme called Potamus, whose inhabitants are called Potamii; then to Prasia, to Steiria, to Brauron, where is the sanctuary of the Artemis Brauronia, to Halae Araphenides, where is the sanctuary of Artemis Tauropolos, to Myrrinus, to Probalinthus, and to Marathon, where Miltiades utterly destroyed the forces under Datis the Persian, without waiting for the Lacedemonians, who came too late because they wanted the full moon. Here, too, is the scene of the myth of the Marathonian bull, which was slain by Theseus. After Marathon one comes to Tricorynthus; then to Rhamnus, the sanctuary of Nemesis; then to Psaphis, the land of the Oropians. In the neighborhood of Psaphis is the Amphiaraeium, an oracle once held in honor, where in his flight Amphiaraus, as Sophocles says, with four-horse chariot, armour and all, was received by a cleft that was made in the Theban dust. Oropus has often been disputed territory; for it is situated on the common boundary of Attica and Boeotia. off this coast are islands: off Thoricus and Sounion lies the island Helene; it is rugged and deserted, and in its length of about sixty stadia extends parallel to the coast. This island, they say, is mentioned by the poet where Alexander says to Helen: Not even when first I snatched thee from lovely Lacedemon and sailed with thee on the seafaring ships, and in the island Cranae joined with thee in love and couch; for he calls Cranae the island now called Helene from the fact that the intercourse took place there. And after Helene comes Euboea, which lies off the next stretch of coast; it likewise is narrow and long and in length lies parallel to the mainland, like Helene. The voyage from Sounion to the southerly promontory of Euboea, which is called Leuce Acte, is three hundred stadia. However, I shall discuss Euboea later; but as for the demes in the interior of Attica, it would be tedious to recount them because of their great number.
32. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 15.54.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •cultic ritual practice, curse tablets •death and the afterlife, curse tablets Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 305
15.54.2.  Certain local oracle-mongers likewise came up to Epameinondas, saying that the Lacedaemonians were destined to meet with a great disaster by the tomb of the daughters of Leuctrus and Scedasus for the following reasons.
33. Ovid, Amores, 3.7.29 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets, Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 57
3.7.29. Sagave poenicea defixit nomina cera
34. Catullus, Poems, 5.10-5.13, 7.11-7.12 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets, Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 68, 72, 96
35. Plutarch, Apopthegmata Romana, 13 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 784
36. Lucan, Pharsalia, 6.438-6.830 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets, Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 84
37. Tacitus, Agricola, 43.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •curses and curse tablets Found in books: Shannon-Henderson (2019), Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s , 117
38. Tacitus, Annals, 1.9.3, 1.10.1, 1.73, 2.29.2, 2.69, 2.69.2-2.69.3, 3.12, 3.12.4, 3.12.7, 3.13.1-3.13.2, 3.16.3, 3.18.2, 4.15.3, 12.64.2, 12.65.1, 12.65.3, 13.5.2, 14.13.3, 16.30.2, 16.31.1-16.31.2, 16.32.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •curses and curse tablets •curse tablets, Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 56; Shannon-Henderson (2019), Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s , 116, 117, 132, 278, 345
1.73. Haud pigebit referre in Falanio et Rubrio, modicis equitibus Romanis, praetemptata crimina, ut quibus initiis, quanta Tiberii arte gravissimum exitium inrepserit, dein repressum sit, postremo arserit cunctaque corripuerit, noscatur. Falanio obiciebat accusator, quod inter cultores Augusti, qui per omnis domos in modum collegiorum habebantur, Cassium quendam mimum corpore infamem adscivisset, quodque venditis hortis statuam Augusti simul mancipasset. Rubrio crimini dabatur violatum periurio numen Augusti. quae ubi Tiberio notuere, scripsit consulibus non ideo decretum patri suo caelum, ut in perniciem civium is honor verteretur. Cassium histrionem solitum inter alios eiusdem artis interesse ludis, quos mater sua in memoriam Augusti sacrasset; nec contra religiones fieri quod effigies eius, ut alia numinum simulacra, venditionibus hortorum et domuum accedant. ius iurandum perinde aestimandum quam si Iovem fefellisset: deorum iniurias dis curae. 2.69. At Germanicus Aegypto remeans cuncta quae apud legiones aut urbes iusserat abolita vel in contrarium versa cognoscit. hinc graves in Pisonem contumeliae, nec minus acerba quae ab illo in Caesarem intentabantur. dein Piso abire Syria statuit. mox adversa Germanici valetudine detentus, ubi recreatum accepit votaque pro incolumitate solvebantur, admotas hostias, sacrificalem apparatum, festam Antiochensium plebem per lictores proturbat. tum Seleuciam degreditur, opperiens aegritudinem, quae rursum Germanico acciderat. saevam vim morbi augebat persuasio veneni a Pisone accepti; et reperiebantur solo ac parietibus erutae humanorum corporum reliquiae, carmina et devotiones et nomen Germanici plumbeis tabulis insculptum, semusti cineres ac tabo obliti aliaque malefica quis creditur animas numinibus infernis sacrari. simul missi a Pisone incusabantur ut valetudinis adversa rimantes. 3.12. Die senatus Caesar orationem habuit meditato tem- peramento. patris sui legatum atque amicum Pisonem fuisse adiutoremque Germanico datum a se auctore senatu rebus apud Orientem administrandis. illic contumacia et certaminibus asperasset iuvenem exituque eius laetatus esset an scelere extinxisset, integris animis diiudicandum. 'nam si legatus officii terminos, obsequium erga imperatorem exuit eiusdemque morte et luctu meo laetatus est, odero seponamque a domo mea et privatas inimicitias non vi principis ulciscar: sin facinus in cuiuscumque mortalium nece vindicandum detegitur, vos vero et liberos Germanici et nos parentes iustis solaciis adficite. simulque illud reputate, turbide et seditiose tractaverit exercitus Piso, quaesita sint per ambitionem studia militum, armis repetita provincia, an falsa haec in maius vulgaverint accusatores, quorum ego nimiis studiis iure suscenseo. nam quo pertinuit nudare corpus et contrectandum vulgi oculis permittere differrique etiam per externos tamquam veneno interceptus esset, si incerta adhuc ista et scrutanda sunt? defleo equidem filium meum semperque deflebo: sed neque reum prohibeo quo minus cuncta proferat, quibus innocentia eius sublevari aut, si qua fuit iniquitas Germanici, coargui possit, vosque oro ne, quia dolori meo causa conexa est, obiecta crimina pro adprobatis accipiatis. si quos propinquus sanguis aut fides sua patronos dedit, quantum quisque eloquentia et cura valet, iuvate periclitantem: ad eundem laborem, eandem constantiam accusatores hortor. id solum Germanico super leges praestiterimus, quod in curia potius quam in foro, apud senatum quam apud iudices de morte eius anquiritur: cetera pari modestia tractentur. nemo Drusi lacrimas, nemo maestitiam meam spectet, nec si qua in nos adversa finguntur.' 1.73.  It will not be unremunerative to recall the first, tentative charges brought in the case of Falanius and Rubrius, two Roman knights of modest position; if only to show from what beginnings, thanks to the art of Tiberius, the accursed thing crept in, and, after a temporary check, at last broke out, an all-devouring conflagration. Against Falanius the accuser alleged that he had admitted a certain Cassius, mime and catamite, among the "votaries of Augustus," who were maintained, after the fashion of fraternities, in all the great houses: also, that when selling his gardens, he had parted with a statue of Augustus as well. To Rubrius the crime imputed was violation of the deity of Augustus by perjury. When the facts came to the knowledge of Tiberius, he wrote to the consuls that place in heaven had not been decreed to his father in order that the honour might be turned to the destruction of his countrymen. Cassius, the actor, with others of his trade, had regularly taken part in the games which his own mother had consecrated to the memory of Augustus; nor was it an act of sacrilege, if the effigies of that sovereign, like other images of other gods, went with the property, whenever a house or garden was sold. As to the perjury, it was on the same footing as if the defendant had taken the name of Jupiter in vain: the gods must look to their own wrongs. 2.69.  On the way from Egypt, Germanicus learned that all orders issued by him to the legions or the cities had been rescinded or reversed. Hence galling references to Piso: nor were the retorts directed by him against the prince less bitter. Then Piso determined to leave Syria. Checked almost immediately by the ill-health of Germanicus, then hearing that he had rallied and that the vows made for his recovery were already being paid, he took his lictors and swept the streets clear of the victims at the altars, the apparatus of sacrifice, and the festive populace of Antioch. After this, he left for Seleucia, awaiting the outcome of the malady which had again attacked Germanicus. The cruel virulence of the disease was intensified by the patient's belief that Piso had given him poison; and it is a fact that explorations in the floor and walls brought to light the remains of human bodies, spells, curses, leaden tablets engraved with the name Germanicus, charred and blood-smeared ashes, and others of the implements of witchcraft by which it is believed the living soul can be devoted to the powers of the grave. At the same time, emissaries from Piso were accused of keeping a too inquisitive watch upon the ravages of the disease. 3.12.  On the day the senate met, the Caesar spoke with calculated moderation. "Piso," he said, "had been his father's lieutet and friend; and he himself, at the instance of the senate, had assigned him to Germanicus as his coadjutor in the administration of the East. Whether, in that position, he had merely exasperated the youthful prince by perversity and contentiousness, and then betrayed pleasure at his death, or whether he had actually cut short his days by crime, was a question they must determine with open minds. For" (he proceeded) "if the case is one of a subordinate who, after ignoring the limits of his commission and the deference owed to his superior, has exulted over that superior's death and my own sorrow, I shall renounce his friendship, banish him from my house, and redress my grievances as a man without invoking my powers as a sovereign. But if murder comes to light — and it would call for vengeance, were the victim the meanest of mankind — then do you see to it that proper requital is made to the children of Germanicus and to us, his parents. At the same time, consider the following points:— Did Piso's treatment of the armies make for disorder and sedition? Did he employ corrupt means to win the favour of the private soldiers? Did he levy war in order to repossess himself of the province? Or are these charges falsehoods, published with enlargements by the accusers; at whose zealous indiscretions I myself feel some justifiable anger? For what was the object in stripping the corpse naked and exposing it to the degrading contact of the vulgar gaze? Or in diffusing the report — and among foreigners — that he fell a victim to poison, if that is an issue still uncertain and in need of scrutiny? True, I lament my son, and shall lament him always. But far from hampering the defendant in adducing every circumstance which may tend to relieve his innocence or to convict Germanicus of injustice (if injustice there was), I beseech you that, even though the case is bound up with a personal sorrow of my own, you will not therefore receive the assertion of guilt as a proof of guilt. If kinship or a sense of loyalty has made some of you his advocates, then let each, with all the eloquence and devotion he can command, aid him in his hour of danger. To the accusers I commend a similar industry, a similar constancy. The only extra-legal concession we shall be found to have made to Germanicus is this, that the inquiry into his death is being held not in the Forum but in the Curia, not before a bench of judges but the senate. Let the rest of the proceedings show the like restraint: let none regard the tears of Drusus, none my own sadness, nor yet any fictions invented to our discredit."
39. Plutarch, Aristides, 13 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 784
40. New Testament, 2 Timothy, 1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •antinoopolis, curse tablet invoking antinoos Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 514
41. Nicomachus of Gerasa, Excerpts, 6.276.12-6.276.18 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets, Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 87
42. Plutarch, Solon, 12.3-12.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 1067
12.3. Μύρωνος δὲ τοῦ Φλυέως κατηγοροῦντος ἑάλωσαν οἱ ἄνδρες, καὶ μετέστησαν οἱ ζῶντες· τῶν δʼ ἀποθανόντων τοὺς νεκροὺς ἀνορύξαντες ἐξέρριψαν ὑπὲρ τοὺς ὅρους. ταύταις δὲ ταῖς ταραχαῖς καὶ Μεγαρέων συνεπιθεμένων ἀπέβαλόν τε Νίσαιαν οἱ Ἀθηναῖοι καὶ Σαλαμῖνος ἐξέπεσον αὖθις. καὶ φόβοι τινὲς ἐκ δεισιδαιμονίας ἅμα καὶ φάσματα κατεῖχε τὴν πόλιν, οἵ τε μάντεις ἄγη καὶ μιασμοὺς δεομένους καθαρμῶν προφαίνεσθαι διὰ τῶν ἱερῶν ἠγόρευον. 12.4. οὕτω δὴ μετάπεμπτος αὐτοῖς ἧκεν ἐκ Κρήτης Ἐπιμενίδης ὁ Φαίστιος, ὃν ἕβδομον ἐν τοῖς σοφοῖς καταριθμοῦσιν ἔνιοι τῶν οὐ προσιεμένων τὸν Περίανδρον. ἐδόκει δέ τις εἶναι θεοφιλὴς καὶ σοφὸς περὶ τὰ θεῖα τὴν ἐνθουσιαστικὴν καὶ τελεστικὴν σοφίαν, διὸ καὶ παῖδα νύμφης ὄνομα Βάλτης καὶ Κούρητα νέον αὐτὸν οἱ τότε ἄνθρωποι προσηγόρευον. ἐλθὼν δὲ καὶ τῷ Σόλωνι χρησάμενος φίλῳ πολλὰ προσυπειργάσατο καὶ προωδοποίησεν αὐτῷ τῆς νομοθεσίας. 12.3. Myron of Phlya conducted the prosecution, and the family of Megacles was found guilty. Those who were alive were banished, and the bodies of the dead were dug up and cast forth beyond the borders of the country. During these disturbances the Megarians also attacked the Athenians, who lost Nisaea, and were driven out of Salamis once more. The city was also visited with superstitious fears and strange appearances, and the seers declared that their sacrifices indicated pollutions and defilements which demanded expiation. 12.4. Under these circumstances they summoned to their aid from Crete Epimenides of Phaestus, who is reckoned as the seventh Wise Man by some of those who refuse Periander a place in the list. See note on Plut. Sol. 3.5 , and cf. Aristot. Const. Ath. 1 . He was reputed to be a man beloved of the gods, and endowed with a mystical and heaven-sent wisdom in religious matters. Therefore the men of his time said that he was the son of a nymph named Balte, and called him a new Cures. The Curetes were Cretan priests of Idaean Zeus, who took their name from the demi-gods to whose care Rhea was said to have committed the infant Zeus. On coming to Athens he made Solon his friend, assisted him in many ways, and paved the way for his legislation.
43. Plutarch, Table Talk, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets, Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 76
44. Plutarch, Greek Questions, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •death and the afterlife, curse tablets Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 426
45. Plutarch, Placita Philosophorum (874D-911C), 18.8 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 840, 1050
46. Plutarch, Pericles, 38.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets, Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 147
38.2. ὁ γοῦν Θεόφραστος ἐν τοῖς Ἠθικοῖς διαπορήσας εἰ πρὸς τὰς τύχας τρέπεται τὰ ἤθη καὶ κινούμενα τοῖς τῶν σωμάτων πάθεσιν ἐξίσταται τῆς ἀρετῆς, ἱστόρηκεν ὅτι νοσῶν ὁ Περικλῆς ἐπισκοπουμένῳ τινὶ τῶν φίλων δείξειε περίαπτον ὑπὸ τῶν γυναικῶν τῷ τραχήλῳ περιηρτημένον, ὡς σφόδρα κακῶς ἔχων ὁπότε καὶ ταύτην ὑπομένοι τὴν ἀβελτερίαν. 38.2. Certain it is that Theophrastus, in his Ethics , querying whether one’s character follows the bent of one’s fortunes and is forced by bodily sufferings to abandon its high excellence, records this fact, that Pericles, as he lay sick, showed one of his friends who was come to see him an amulet that the women had hung round his neck, as much as to say that he was very badly off to put up with such folly as that.
47. Plutarch, Nicias, 23.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •cultic ritual practice, curse tablets •death and the afterlife, curse tablets Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 302
23.5. τῷ μέντοι Νικίᾳ συνηνέχθη τότε μηδὲ μάντιν ἔχειν ἔμπειρον· ὁ γὰρ συνήθης αὐτοῦ καὶ τὸ πολὺ τῆς δεισιδαιμονίας ἀφαιρῶν Στιλβίδης ἐτεθνήκει μικρὸν ἔμπροσθεν. ἐπεὶ τὸ σημεῖον, ὥς φησι Φιλόχορος, φεύγουσιν οὐκ ἦν πονηρόν, ἀλλὰ καὶ πάνυ χρηστόν· ἐπικρύψεως γὰρ αἱ σὺν φόβῳ πράξεις δέονται, τὸ δὲ φῶς πολέμιόν ἐστιν αὐταῖς. 23.5.
48. Plutarch, Moralia, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 1081
49. Plutarch, Demosthenes, 23 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 976
50. Plutarch, Demetrius, 23 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 976
51. Arrian, Anabasis of Alexander, 1.10.4, 3.24.4 (1st cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 976, 1147
1.10.4. ὁ δὲ τὰ μὲν ἄλλα φιλανθρώπως πρὸς τὴν πρεσβείαν ἀπεκρίνατο, ἐπιστολὴν δὲ γράψας πρὸς τὸν δῆμον ἐξῄτει τοὺς ἀμφὶ Δημοσθένην καὶ Λυκοῦργον· καὶ Ὑπερείδην δὲ ἐξῄτει καὶ Πολύευκτον καὶ Χάρητα καὶ Χαρίδημον καὶ Ἐφιάλτην καὶ Διότιμον καὶ Μοιροκλέα· 3.24.4. αὐτὸς δὲ ἐπανελθὼν εἰς τὸ στρατόπεδον, ἔνθενπερ ὡρμήθη ἐς τῶν Μάρδων τὴν γῆν, κατέλαβε τοὺς Ἕλληνας τοὺς μισθοφόρους ἥκοντας καὶ τοὺς Λακεδαιμονίων πρέσβεις, οἳ παρὰ βασιλέα Δαρεῖον ἐπρέσβευον, Καλλιστρατίδαν τε καὶ Παύσιππον καὶ Μόνιμον καὶ Ὀνόμαντα, καὶ Ἀθηναίων Δρωπίδην. τούτους μὲν δὴ ξυλλαβὼν ἐν φυλακῇ εἶχε, τοὺς Σινωπέων δὲ ἀφῆκεν, ὅτι Σινωπεῖς οὔτε τοῦ κοινοῦ τῶν Ἑλλήνων μετεῖχον, ὑπὸ Πέρσαις τε τεταγμένοι οὑκ ἀπεικότα ποιεῖν ἐδόκουν παρὰ τὸν βασιλέα σφῶν πρεσβεύοντες.
52. New Testament, Acts, a b c d\n0 13.6 13.6 13 6 \n1 13.11 13.11 13 11 \n2 13.8 13.8 13 8 \n3 13.12 13.12 13 12 \n4 13.7 13.7 13 7 \n5 13.10 13.10 13 10 \n6 19.19 19.19 19 19 \n7 13.9 13.9 13 9 \n8 19.18 19.18 19 18 \n9 19.20 19.20 19 20 \n10 "19.19" "19.19" "19 19" (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Luck (2006), Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts, 468
13.6. Διελθόντες δὲ ὅλην τὴν νῆσον ἄχρι Πάφου εὗρον ἄνδρα τινὰ μάγον ψευδοπροφήτην Ἰουδαῖον ᾧ ὄνομα Βαριησοῦς, 13.6. When they had gone through the island to Paphos, they found a certain sorcerer, a false prophet, a Jew, whose name was Bar Jesus,
53. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 28.19-28.20, 28.39, 33.12 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets, Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 55, 76, 87, 147
54. Aelius Aristides, The Isthmian Oration: Regarding Poseidon, 23-24 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Nasrallah (2019), Archaeology and the Letters of Paul, 167, 168, 169
55. Aelius Aristidesthe Isthmian Oration, The Isthmian Oration Regarding Poseidon, 23-24 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Nasrallah (2019), Archaeology and the Letters of Paul, 167, 168, 169
56. Anon., Mekhilta Derabbi Shimeon Ben Yohai, 1.5, 6.48, 6.51 (2nd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Mikalson (2016), New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society, 285
57. Nag Hammadi, The Apocryphon of John, 10 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets, Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 325
58. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.22.3, 1.23.9, 1.38.4, 2.4.7, 6.20 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets •curse tablets (defixiones) •defixiones (curse tablets) •gods, as mentioned in curse tablets, defixiones •curse tablets, Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 70; Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 749, 1086, 1114; Nasrallah (2019), Archaeology and the Letters of Paul, 167
1.22.3. Ἀφροδίτην δὲ τὴν Πάνδημον, ἐπεί τε Ἀθηναίους Θησεὺς ἐς μίαν ἤγαγεν ἀπὸ τῶν δήμων πόλιν, αὐτήν τε σέβεσθαι καὶ Πειθὼ κατέστησε· τὰ μὲν δὴ παλαιὰ ἀγάλματα οὐκ ἦν ἐπʼ ἐμοῦ, τὰ δὲ ἐπʼ ἐμοῦ τεχνιτῶν ἦν οὐ τῶν ἀφανεστάτων. ἔστι δὲ καὶ Γῆς Κουροτρόφου καὶ Δήμητρος ἱερὸν Χλόης· τὰ δὲ ἐς τὰς ἐπωνυμίας ἔστιν αὐτῶν διδαχθῆναι τοῖς ἱερεῦσιν ἐλθόντα ἐς λόγους. 1.23.9. ἀνδριάντων δὲ ὅσοι μετὰ τὸν ἵππον ἑστήκασιν Ἐπιχαρίνου μὲν ὁπλιτοδρομεῖν ἀσκήσαντος τὴν εἰκόνα ἐποίησε Κριτίας , Οἰνοβίῳ δὲ ἔργον ἐστὶν ἐς Θουκυδίδην τὸν Ὀλόρου χρηστόν· ψήφισμα γὰρ ἐνίκησεν Οἰνόβιος κατελθεῖν ἐς Ἀθήνας Θουκυδίδην, καί οἱ δολοφονηθέντι ὡς κατῄει μνῆμά ἐστιν οὐ πόρρω πυλῶν Μελιτίδων. 1.38.4. ἔστι δὲ Ἱπποθόωντος ἡρῷον, ἀφʼ οὗ τὴν φυλὴν ὀνομάζουσι, καὶ πλησίον Ζάρηκος. τοῦτον μαθεῖν παρὰ Ἀπόλλωνι μουσικήν φασιν, ἐγὼ δὲ ξένον μὲν ἀφικόμενον ἐς τὴν γῆν Λακεδαιμόνιόν τε εἶναι δοκῶ καὶ Ζάρακα ἐν τῇ Λακωνικῇ πόλιν ἀπὸ τούτου πρὸς θαλάσσῃ καλεῖσθαι· εἰ δέ τις Ζάρηξ ἐπιχώριος Ἀθηναίοις ἥρως, οὐδὲν ἐς αὐτὸν ἔχω λέγειν. 2.4.7. ὑπὲρ τοῦτο Μητρὸς θεῶν ναός ἐστι καὶ στήλη καὶ θρόνος· λίθων καὶ αὐτὴ καὶ ὁ θρόνος. ὁ δὲ τῶν Μοιρῶν καὶ ὁ Δήμητρος καὶ Κόρης οὐ φανερὰ ἔχουσι τὰ ἀγάλματα. ταύτῃ καὶ τὸ τῆς Βουναίας ἐστὶν Ἥρας ἱερὸν ἱδρυσαμένου Βούνου τοῦ Ἑρμοῦ· καὶ διʼ αὐτὸ ἡ θεὸς καλεῖται Βουναία. 1.22.3. When Theseus had united into one state the many Athenian parishes, he established the cults of Aphrodite Pandemos (Common) and of Persuasion. The old statues no longer existed in my time, but those I saw were the work of no inferior artists. There is also a sanctuary of Earth, Nurse of Youth, and of Demeter Chloe (Green). You can learn all about their names by conversing with the priests. 1.23.9. of the statues that stand after the horse, the likeness of Epicharinus who practised the race in armour was made by Critius, while Oenobius performed a kind service for Thucydides the son of Olorus. The great historian of the Peloponnesian war. He succeeded in getting a decree passed for the return of Thucydides to Athens , who was treacherously murdered as he was returning, and there is a monument to him not far from the Melitid gate. 1.38.4. There is also a shrine of the hero Hippothoon, after whom the tribe is named, and hard by one of Zarex. The latter they say learned music from Apollo, but my opinion is that he was a Lacedaemonian who came as a stranger to the land, and that after him is named Zarax , a town in the Laconian territory near the sea. If there is a native Athenian hero called Zarex, I have nothing to say concerning him. 2.4.7. Above it are a temple of the Mother of the gods and a throne; the image and the throne are made of stone. The temple of the Fates and that of Demeter and the Maid have images that are not exposed to view. Here, too, is the temple of Hera Bunaea set up by Bunus the son of Hermes. It is for this reason that the goddess is called Bunaea.
59. Lucian, The Lover of Lies, "31" (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •magic, curse tablets Found in books: Rüpke (2014), The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean. 165
60. Clement of Alexandria, Miscellanies, 5.8.43 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets, Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 86
61. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 57.18, 69.11.2-69.11.4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets, •antinoopolis, curse tablet invoking antinoos Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 56; Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 514
57.18. 1.  Germanicus, having acquired a reputation by his campaign against the Germans, advanced as far as the ocean, inflicted an overwhelming defeat upon the barbarians, collected and buried the bones of those who had fallen with Varus, and won back the military standards.,1a. Tiberius did not recall his wife Julia from the banishment to which her father Augustus had condemned her for unchastity, but even put her under lock and key until she perished from general debility and starvation.,2.  The senate urged upon Tiberius the request that the month of November, on the sixteenth day of which he had been born, should be called Tiberius: "What will you do, then, if there are thirteen Caesars?",3.  Later, when Marcus Junius and Lucius Norbanus assumed office, an omen of no little importance occurred on the very first day of the year, and it doubtless had a bearing on the fate of Germanicus. The consul Norbanus, it seems, had always been devoted to the trumpet, and as he practised on it assiduously, he wished to play the instrument on this occasion, also, at dawn, when many persons were already near his house.,4.  This proceeding startled them all alike, just as if the consul had given them a signal for battle; and they were also alarmed by the falling of the statue Janus. They were furthermore disturbed not a little by an oracle, reputed to be an utterance of the Sibyl, which, although it did not fit this period of the city's history at all, was nevertheless applied to the situation then existing.,5.  It ran: "When thrice three hundred revolving years have run their course, Civil strife upon Rome destruction shall bring, and the folly, too, of Sybaris . . ." Tiberius, now, denounced these verses as spurious and made an investigation of all the books that contained any prophecies, rejecting some as worthless and retaining others as genuine.,5a. As the Jews flocked to Rome in great numbers and were converting many of the natives to their ways, he banished most of them.,6.  At the death of Germanicus Tiberius and Livia were thoroughly pleased, but everybody else was deeply grieved. He was a man of the most striking physical beauty and likewise of the noblest spirit, and was conspicuous alike for his culture and for his strength. Though the bravest of men against the foe, he showed himself most gentle with his countrymen;,7.  and though as a Caesar he had the greatest power, he kept his ambitions on the same plane as weaker men. He never conducted himself oppressively toward his subjects or with jealousy toward Drusus or in any reprehensible way toward Tiberius.,8.  In a word, he was one of the few men of all time who have neither sinned against the fortune allotted to them nor been destroyed by it. Although on several occasions he might have obtained the imperial power, with the free consent not only of the soldiers but of the people and senate as well, he refused to do so.,9.  His death occurred at Antioch as the result of a plot formed by Piso and Plancina. For bones of men that had been buried in the house where he dwelt and sheets of lead containing curses together with his name were found while he was yet alive; and that poison was the means of his carrying off was revealed by the condition of his body, which was brought into the Forum and exhibited to all who were present.,10.  Piso later returned to Rome and was brought before the senate on the charge of murder by Tiberius himself, who thus endeavoured to clear himself of the suspicion of having destroyed Germanicus; but Piso secured a postponement of his trial and committed suicide.,11.  Germanicus at his death left three sons, whom Augustus in his will had named Caesars. The eldest of these three, Nero, assumed the toga virilis about this time.,10b. Tiberius also found some pretexts for murders; for the death of Germanicus led to the destruction of many others, on the ground that they were pleased at it.
62. Athenaeus, The Learned Banquet, None (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 147
63. Polyaenus, Stratagems, 2.32 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 840
64. Apuleius, The Golden Ass, 1.1-1.2, 2.28-2.30, 3.17, 6.22-6.23, 6.29, 9.27, 11.28, 11.30 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •tablets, curse •curse tablets, Found in books: Czajkowski et al. (2020), Law in the Roman Provinces, 378; Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 55, 61, 84
11.28. Thus I was initiated into the religion, but my desire was delayed by reason of my poverty. I had spent a great part of my goods in travel and peregrination, but most of all the cost of living in the city of Rome had dwindled my resources. In the end, being often stirred forward with great trouble of mind, I was forced to sell my robe for a little money which was nevertheless sufficient for all my affairs. Then the priest spoke to me saying, “How is it that for a little pleasure you are not afraid to sell your vestments, yet when you enter into such great ceremonies you fear to fall into poverty? Prepare yourself and abstain from all animal meats, beasts and fish.” In the meantime I frequented the sacrifices of Serapis, which were done in the night. This gave me great comfort to my peregrination, and ministered to me more plentiful living since I gained some money by pleading in the courts in the Latin language. 11.30. In this way the divine majesty persuaded me in my sleep. Whereupon I went to the priest and declared all that I had seen. Then I fasted for ten days, according to the custom, and of my own free will I abstained longer than I had been commanded. And verily I did not repent of the pain I had gone through and of the charges I had undertaken. This was because the divine providence had seen to it that I gained much money in pleading of causes. Finally, after a few days, the great god Osiris appeared to me at night, not disguised in any other form, but in his own essence. He commanded me to be an advocate in the court, and not fear the slander and envy of ill persons who begrudged me by for the religion which I had attained by much labor. Moreover, he would not suffer that I should be any longer of the number of his priests, but he allotted me to one of the higher positions. And after he appointed me a place within the ancient temple, which had been erected in the time of Sulla, I executed my office in great joy and with a shaved head.
65. Tertullian, On The Games, 9 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Goldman (2013), Color-Terms in Social and Cultural Context in Ancient Rome, 95
9. Now as to the kind of performances peculiar to the circus exhibitions. In former days equestrianism was practised in a simple way on horseback, and certainly its ordinary use had nothing sinful in it; but when it was dragged into the games, it passed from the service of God into the employment of demons. Accordingly this kind of circus performances is regarded as sacred to Castor and Pollux, to whom, Stesichorus tells us, horses were given by Mercury. And Neptune, too, is an equestrian deity, by the Greeks called Hippius. In regard to the team, they have consecrated the chariot and four to the sun; the chariot and pair to the moon. But, as the poet has it, Erichthonius first dared to yoke four horses to the chariot, and to ride upon its wheels with victorious swiftness. Erichthonius, the son of Vulcan and Minerva, fruit of unworthy passion upon earth, is a demon-monster, nay, the devil himself, and no mere snake. But if Trochilus the Argive is maker of the first chariot, he dedicated that work of his to Juno. If Romulus first exhibited the four-horse chariot at Rome, he too, I think, has a place given him among idols, at least if he and Quirinus are the same. But as chariots had such inventors, the charioteers were naturally dressed, too, in the colors of idolatry; for at first these were only two, namely white and red - the former sacred to the winter with its glistening snows, the latter sacred to the summer with its ruddy sun: but afterwards, in the progress of luxury as well as of superstition, red was dedicated by some to Mars, and white by others to the Zephyrs, while green was given to Mother Earth, or spring, and azure to the sky and sea, or autumn. But as idolatry of every kind is condemned by God, that form of it surely shares the condemnation which is offered to the elements of nature.
66. Tertullian, To Scapula, 4.3, 4.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •tablets, curse Found in books: Czajkowski et al. (2020), Law in the Roman Provinces, 378
67. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 3.42, 10.1 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 707, 1050
3.42. the estate in Eiresidae which I bought of Callimachus, bounded on the north by the property of Eurymedon of Myrrhinus, on the south by the property of Demostratus of Xypete, on the east by that of Eurymedon of Myrrhinus, and on the west by the Cephisus; three minae of silver; a silver vessel weighing 165 drachmas; a cup weighing 45 drachmas; a gold signet-ring and earring together weighing four drachmas and three obols. Euclides the lapidary owes me three minae. I enfranchise Artemis. I leave four household servants, Tychon, Bictas, Apollonides and Dionysius. 10.1. BOOK 10: EPICURUSEpicurus, son of Neocles and Chaerestrate, was a citizen of Athens of the deme Gargettus, and, as Metrodorus says in his book On Noble Birth, of the family of the Philaidae. He is said by Heraclides in his Epitome of Sotion, as well as by other authorities, to have been brought up at Samos after the Athenians had sent settlers there and to have come to Athens at the age of eighteen, at the time when Xenocrates was lecturing at the Academy and Aristotle in Chalcis. Upon the death of Alexander of Macedon and the expulsion of the Athenian settlers from Samos by Perdiccas, Epicurus left Athens to join his father in Colophon.
68. Papyri, Papyri Graecae Magicae, None (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 142
69. Iamblichus, Concerning The Mysteries, 3.14, 7.5 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets, Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 86
70. Babylonian Talmud, Qiddushin, None (3rd cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Eliav (2023), A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean, 244
39b. ארבע על ארבע רוחות הערוגה ואחת באמצע שפיר אלא הכא משום נוי ואי נמי משום טרחא דשמעא היא:, big strongמתני׳ /strong /big כל העושה מצוה אחת מטיבין לו ומאריכין לו ימיו ונוחל את הארץ וכל שאינו עושה מצוה אחת אין מטיבין לו ואין מאריכין לו ימיו ואינו נוחל את הארץ:, big strongגמ׳ /strong /big ורמינהי אלו דברים שאדם אוכל פירותיהן בעולם הזה והקרן קיימת לו לעולם הבא אלו הן כבוד אב ואם וגמילות חסדים והכנסת אורחים והבאת שלום בין אדם לחבירו ותלמוד תורה כנגד כולם,אמר רב יהודה הכי קאמר כל העושה מצוה אחת יתירה על זכיותיו מטיבים לו ודומה כמי שמקיים כל התורה כולה מכלל דהנך אפילו בחדא נמי אמר רב שמעיה לומר שאם היתה שקולה מכרעת,וכל העושה מצוה אחת יתירה על זכיותיו מטיבין לו ורמינהו כל שזכיותיו מרובין מעונותיו מריעין לו ודומה כמי ששרף כל התורה כולה ולא שייר ממנה אפילו אות אחת וכל שעונותיו מרובין מזכיותיו מטיבין לו ודומה כמי שקיים כל התורה כולה ולא חיסר אות אחת ממנה,אמר אביי מתניתין דעבדין ליה יום טב ויום ביש רבא אמר הא מני רבי יעקב היא דאמר שכר מצוה בהאי עלמא ליכא,דתניא רבי יעקב אומר אין לך כל מצוה ומצוה שכתובה בתורה שמתן שכרה בצדה שאין תחיית המתים תלויה בה בכיבוד אב ואם כתיב (דברים ה, טו) למען יאריכון ימיך ולמען ייטב לך בשילוח הקן כתיב (דברים כב, ז) למען ייטב לך והארכת ימים,הרי שאמר לו אביו עלה לבירה והבא לי גוזלות ועלה לבירה ושלח את האם ונטל את הבנים ובחזירתו נפל ומת היכן טובת ימיו של זה והיכן אריכות ימיו של זה אלא למען ייטב לך לעולם שכולו טוב ולמען יאריכון ימיך לעולם שכולו ארוך,ודלמא לאו הכי הוה ר' יעקב מעשה חזא ודלמא מהרהר בעבירה הוה מחשבה רעה אין הקב"ה מצרפה למעשה,ודלמא מהרהר בעבודת כוכבים הוה וכתיב (יחזקאל יד, ה) למען תפוש את בית ישראל בלבם איהו נמי הכי קאמר אי סלקא דעתך שכר מצוה בהאי עלמא אמאי לא אגין מצות עליה כי היכי דלא ליתי לידי הרהור,והא א"ר אלעזר שלוחי מצוה אין נזוקין התם בהליכתן שאני,והא אמר רבי אלעזר שלוחי מצוה אינן נזוקין לא בהליכתן ולא בחזירתן סולם רעוע הוה דקביע היזיקא וכל היכא דקביע היזיקא לא סמכינן אניסא דכתיב (שמואל א טז, ב) ויאמר שמואל איך אלך ושמע שאול והרגני,אמר רב יוסף אילמלי דרשיה אחר להאי קרא כרבי יעקב בר ברתיה לא חטא ואחר מאי הוא איכא דאמרי כי האי גוונא חזא,ואיכא דאמרי לישנא דחוצפית המתורגמן חזא דהוה גריר ליה דבר אחר אמר פה שהפיק מרגליות ילחך עפר נפק חטא,רמי רב טובי בר רב קיסנא לרבא תנן כל העושה מצוה אחת מטיבין לו עשה אין לא עשה לא ורמינהי ישב ולא עבר עבירה נותנים לו שכר כעושה מצוה אמר ליה התם כגון שבא דבר עבירה לידו וניצול הימנה,כי הא דרבי חנינא בר פפי תבעתיה ההיא מטרוניתא אמר מלתא ומלי נפשיה שיחנא וכיבא עבדה היא מילתא ואיתסי ערק טשא בההוא בי בני דכי הוו עיילין בתרין אפילו ביממא הוו מיתזקי למחר אמרו ליה רבנן מאן נטרך אמר להו שני 39b. and he was careful to plant b four /b different species b along the four sides of the garden bed and one in the middle, /b so that there would be space between them, it works out b well. /b This would show that Rav was cautious not to plant diverse kinds together. b But here, /b where Rav actually planted each species in its own bed, he did so b due to beautification, /b i.e., to improve the appearance of the garden in front of the study hall. b Alternatively, /b the reason Rav planted this way b is due to the trouble /b that would be caused to b the attendant. /b When his attendant would be sent to fetch a certain type of vegetable from the garden he would not need to search for it, but would know where the different vegetables were planted. Therefore, this does not prove that Rav was concerned about diverse kinds outside of Eretz Yisrael., strong MISHNA: /strong b Anyone who performs one mitzva has goodness bestowed upon him, his life is lengthened, and he inherits the land, /b i.e., life in the World-to-Come. b And anyone who does not perform one mitzva does not have goodness bestowed upon him, his life is not lengthened, and he does not inherit the land /b of the World-to-Come., strong GEMARA: /strong b And /b the Gemara b raises a contradiction /b from a mishna ( i Pe’a /i 1:1): b These /b are the b matters that a person /b engages in and b enjoys their profits in this world, and the principal /b reward b remains for him for the World-to-Come, /b and b they are: Honoring one’s father and mother, acts of loving kindness, hospitality /b toward b guests, and bringing peace between one person and another; and Torah study is equal to all of them. /b This indicates that one is rewarded in this world only for fulfilling these mitzvot, but not for fulfilling all mitzvot., b Rav Yehuda said /b that b this is what /b the mishna b is saying: Anyone who performs one mitzva in addition to his /b other b merits, /b and thereby tips the scale of all his deeds to the side of righteousness, b has goodness bestowed upon him and is compared to one who fulfills the entire Torah. /b The Gemara asks: One can learn b by inference /b from here b that /b with regard to b those /b mitzvot listed in the mishna in i Pe’a /i one is rewarded b even for one /b of them, notwithstanding the fact that overall his sins are more numerous. b Rav Shemaya said: /b The other mishna serves b to say that if /b one’s sins and merits b were /b of b equal /b balance, i.e., he has accrued an equal amount of merit and sin, one of these mitzvot b tilts /b the scale in his favor.,The Gemara further asks: b And /b does b anyone who performs one mitzva in addition to his /b other b merits have goodness bestowed upon him /b in this world? The Gemara b raises a contradiction /b from a i baraita /i : b Anyone whose merits are greater than his sins is punished with suffering /b in order to cleanse his sins in this world and enable him to merit full reward for his mitzvot in the World-to-Come. b And /b due to this punishment b he appears /b to observers b like one who burned the entire Torah without leaving even one letter remaining of it. /b Conversely, b anyone whose sins are greater than his merits has goodness bestowed upon him /b in this world, b and he appears like one who has fulfilled the entire Torah without lacking /b the fulfillment of b even one letter of it. /b , b Abaye said: /b When b the mishna /b said that he is rewarded, it means b that he has one good day and one bad day. /b He is rewarded for the mitzvot he performs; nevertheless, occasionally he also has bad days which cleanse him of his sins, and the i baraita /i is referring to those days. b Rava said /b that the mishna and this i baraita /i represent two different opinions. In accordance with b whose /b opinion b is this /b i baraita /i ? b It is /b in accordance with the opinion of b Rabbi Ya’akov, who says: There is no reward /b for performance of b a mitzva in this world, /b as one is rewarded for mitzvot only World-to-Come., b As it is taught /b in a i baraita /i that b Rabbi Ya’akov says: There is not a single mitzva written in the Torah whose reward /b is stated b alongside it, which is not dependent on the resurrection of the dead, /b i.e., the reward is actually bestowed in the World-to-Come, after the resurrection of the dead. How so? b With regard to honoring one’s father and mother it is written: “That your days may be long, and that it may go well with you” /b (Deuteronomy 5:16). b With regard to /b the b dispatch /b of the mother bird from b the nest it is written: “That it may be well with you, and that you may prolong your days” /b (Deuteronomy 22:7).,Despite this, it occurred that b there was /b one b whose father said to him: Climb to /b the top of b the building and fetch me chicks. And he climbed to /b the top of b the building and dispatched the mother /b bird b and took the young, /b thereby simultaneously fulfilling the mitzva to dispatch the mother bird from the nest and the mitzva to honor one’s parents, b but upon his return he fell and died. Where is the goodness of the days of this one, and where is the length of days of this one? Rather, /b the verse b “that it may be well with you” /b means b in the world where all is well, and “that your days may be long” /b is referring b to the world that is entirely long. /b ,The Gemara asks: b But perhaps this /b incident b never occurred? /b It is possible that everyone who performs these mitzvot is rewarded in this world, and the situation described by Rabbi Ya’akov never happened. The Gemara answers: b Rabbi Ya’akov /b himself b saw an incident /b of this kind. The Gemara asks: b But perhaps /b that man b was contemplating sin /b at the time, and he was punished for his thoughts? The Gemara answers that there is a principle that b the Holy One, Blessed be He, does not link a bad thought to an action, /b i.e., one is not punished for thoughts alone.,The Gemara asks: b But perhaps he was contemplating idol worship /b at the time, b and it is written /b with regard to idol worship: b “So I may take the house of Israel in their own heart” /b (Ezekiel 14:5), which indicates that one is punished for idolatrous thoughts. The Gemara answers: Rabbi Ya’akov b was saying this as well: If it enters your mind /b that there is b reward for /b performing b a mitzva in this world, why didn’t /b these b mitzvot protect him so that he should not come to contemplate /b idol worship? Since that man was not protected from thoughts of idol worship at the time, this indicates that the performance of mitzvot does not entitle one to merit reward in this world.,The Gemara asks: b But didn’t Rabbi Elazar say /b that b those on the path to perform a mitzva are not /b susceptible to b harm? /b How is it possible that this individual, who was sent by his father to perform a mitzva, could have died? The Gemara answers: b There, /b Rabbi Elazar is referring those b on their way /b to perform a mitzva, which b is different, /b as one is not susceptible to harm when he is on his way to fulfill a mitzva. In this case the individual was harmed on his return, and one is not afforded protection after having performed a mitzva.,The Gemara asks: b But didn’t Rabbi Elazar say /b that b those on the path to perform a mitzva are not /b susceptible to b harm, neither /b when they are b on their way /b to perform the mitzva b nor when they are returning /b from performing the mitzva? The Gemara answers: In that case it b was a rickety ladder, /b and therefore b the danger was established; and anywhere that the danger is established one may not rely on a miracle, as it is written /b with regard to God’s command to Samuel to anoint David as king in place of Saul: b “And Samuel said: How will I go, and Saul will hear and kill me; /b and God said: Take in your hand a calf and say: I have come to sacrifice an offering to God” (I Samuel 16:2). Although God Himself issued the command, there was concern with regard to the established dangers., b Rav Yosef said: Had Aḥer, /b literally Other, the appellation of the former Sage Elisha ben Avuya, b interpreted this /b aforementioned b verse: /b “That it may go well with you” (Deuteronomy 5:16), b homiletically, /b as referring to the World-to-Come, b as /b did b Rabbi Ya’akov, son of his daughter, /b he would b not have sinned. /b The Gemara asks: b And what /b caused b Aḥer /b to sin? b There are /b those b who say he saw a case like this, /b where a son went up to the roof on his father’s command, dispatched the mother bird, and then died. It was witnessing this episode that led Elisha ben Avuya astray., b And there are /b those b who say /b that b he saw the tongue of Ḥutzpit the disseminator /b after the latter was executed by the government, thrown in the street, and b dragged /b along b by something else, /b a euphemism for a pig. b He said: Shall a mouth that produced pearls lap /b up b dirt? /b For this reason b he went out /b and b sinned. /b ,§ b Rav Tuvi bar Rav Kisna raises a contradiction to Rava /b and asked: b We learned /b in the mishna that b anyone who performs one mitzva has goodness bestowed upon him. /b This indicates that if one actually b performed /b the b mitzva, yes, /b he is rewarded, but if he b did not perform /b the mitzva, b no, /b he does not receive a reward. He b raises a contradiction /b based on the following statement: If b one sits and does not transgress, he receives a reward as one who performs a mitzva, /b despite the fact that he does not actually perform a mitzva. Rava b said to him: There, /b when it is referring to one who sits and does not transgress, it does not mean that he was merely sitting; rather, it is speaking of a case b where /b an opportunity to commit b a sinful act presents itself /b to him b and he is saved from it. /b ,This is b like /b an incident involving b Rabbi Ḥanina bar Pappi, who was enticed by a certain noblewoman [ i matronita /i ] /b to engage in sexual intercourse with her. b He said a formula /b of an incantation b and was covered with boils and scabs /b so as to render himself unattractive to her. b She performed an act /b of magic b and he was healed. He fled and hid in a bathhouse /b that was so dangerous, due to the demons that frequented the place, b that when two people entered /b together b even during the day they would be harmed. The next day the Sages said to him: Who protected you /b in that dangerous place? Rabbi Ḥanina bar Pappi b said to them: /b There were angels who appeared like b two /b
71. Pseudo Clementine Literature, Recognitiones (E Pseudocaesario), 5.1-5.5 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets, Found in books: Luck (2006), Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts, 468
72. Libanius, Orations, 1.245-1.249 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets, Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 64, 71
73. Eunapius, Lives of The Philosophers, 459 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Eliav (2023), A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean, 244
74. Pseudo Clementine Literature, Recognitions, 5.1-5.5 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets, Found in books: Luck (2006), Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts, 468
5.1. But on the following day, Peter rising a little earlier than usual, found us asleep; and when he saw it, he gave orders that silence should be kept for him, as though he himself wished to sleep longer, that we might not be disturbed in our rest. But when we rose refreshed with sleep, we found him, having finished his prayer, waiting for us in his bed-chamber. And as it was already dawn, he addressed us shortly, saluting us according to his custom, and immediately proceeded to the usual place for the purpose of teaching; and when he saw that many had assembled there, having invoked peace upon them according to the first religious form, he began to speak as follows:- 5.2. God, the Creator of all, at the beginning made man after His own image, and gave him dominion over the earth and sea, and over the air; as the true Prophet has told us, and as the very reason of things instructs us: for man alone is rational, and it is fitting that reason should rule over the irrational. At first, therefore, while he was still righteous, he was superior to all disorders and all frailty; but when he sinned, as we taught you yesterday, and became the servant of sin, he became at the same time liable to frailty. This therefore is written, that men may know that, as by impiety they have been made liable to suffer, so by piety they may be made free from suffering; and not only free from suffering, but by even a little faith in God be able to cure the sufferings of others. For thus the true Prophet promised us, saying, 'Verily I say to you, that if you have faith as a grain of mustard seed, you shall say to this mountain, Remove hence, and it shall remove.' Matthew 17:20 of this saving you have yourselves also had proofs; for you saw yesterday how at our presence the demons removed and were put to flight, with those sufferings which they had brought upon men. 5.3. Whereas therefore some men suffer, and others cure those who suffer, it is necessary to know the cause at once of the suffering and the cure; and this is proved to be nought else than unbelief on the part of the sufferers, and faith on the part of those who cure them. For unbelief, while it does not believe that there is to be a judgment by God, affords licence to sin, and sin makes men liable to sufferings; but faith, believing that there is to be a judgment of God, restrains men from sin; and those who do not sin are not only free from demons and sufferings, but can also put to flight the demons and sufferings of others. 5.4. From all these things, therefore, it is concluded that all evil springs from ignorance; and ignorance herself, the mother of all evils, is sprung from carelessness and sloth, and is nourished, and increased, and rooted in the senses of men by negligence; and if any one teach that she is to be put to flight, she is with difficulty and indigtly torn away, as from an ancient and hereditary abode. And therefore we must labour for a little, that we may search out the presumptions of ignorance, and cut them off by means of knowledge, especially in those who are preoccupied with some erroneous opinions, by means of which ignorance is the more firmly rooted in them, as under the appearance of a certain kind of knowledge; for nothing is worse than for one to believe that he knows what he is ignorant of, and to maintain that to be true which is false. This is as if a drunk man should think himself to be sober, and should act indeed in all respects as a drunk man, and yet think himself to be sober, and should wish to be called so by others. Thus, therefore, are those also who do not know what is true, yet hold some appearance of knowledge, and do many evil things as if they were good, and hasten destruction as if it were to salvation. 5.5. Wherefore we must, above all things, hasten to the knowledge of the truth, that, as with a light kindled thereat, we may be able to dispel the darkness of errors: for ignorance, as we have said, is a great evil; but because it has no substance, it is easily dispelled by those who are in earnest. For ignorance is nothing else than not knowing what is good for us; once know this, and ignorance perishes. Therefore the knowledge of truth ought to be eagerly sought after; and no one can confer it except the true Prophet. For this is the gate of life to those who will enter, and the road of good works to those going to the city of salvation.
75. Ammianus Marcellinus, History, 19.12.14, 22.16.2, 29.2.28 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets, •antinoopolis, curse tablet invoking antinoos •curse tablets Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 84; Eliav (2023), A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean, 245; Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 514
19.12.14. For if anyone wore on his neck an amulet against the quartan ague or any other complaint, or was accused by the testimony of the evil-disposed of passing by a grave in the evening, on the ground that he was a dealer in poisons, or a gatherer of the horrors of tombs and the vain illusions of the ghosts that walk there, he was condemned to capital punishment and so perished. 22.16.2. Now Thebais has these among cities that are especially famous: Hermopolis, Coptos and Antinoü, I.e. Antinoü(polis), also called Antinupolis (see xviii, 9, 1). Antinupolis was not actually founded by Hadrian, but he enbellished and renamed it. which Hadrian founded I.e. Antinoü(polis), also called Antinupolis (see xviii, 9, 1). Antinupolis was not actually founded by Hadrian, but he enbellished and renamed it. in honour of his favourite Antinoiis; for hundred-gated Thebes Cf. xvii. 4, 2. everyone knows. 29.2.28. In the bath a young man was seen to touch alternately with the fingers of either hand first the marble of the wall or perhaps the floor of the bath. and then his breast, and to count the seven vowels, of the Greek alphabet. thinking it a helpful remedy for a stomach trouble. He was haled into court, tortured and beheaded.
76. Justinian, Digest, 3.5, 47.15 (5th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •tablets, curse Found in books: Czajkowski et al. (2020), Law in the Roman Provinces, 361
77. Epigraphy, Wilhelm 1904, 111, 119, 121  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 477
78. Papyri Graecae Magicae, Papyri Graecae Magicae, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Rüpke (2014), The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean. 165
79. Epigraphy, Lambert 1997, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 975
80. Epigraphy, Irh, 98  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 829
81. Epigraphy, Daniel And Maltomini 1990-2, 46-51  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Rüpke (2014), The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean. 165
82. Epigraphy, Sema, 311, 373, 383, 435, 471-473, 485, 70-71, 80, 875-877, 88, 639  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 976
83. Epigraphy, 77, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 749
84. Favorinus, Ad Il., 494  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 815
85. Epigraphy, Ieleus, 11, 119, 201, 258, 373, 56, 60, 63, 67, 87, 93, 95  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 713, 975
86. Epigraphy, Agora Xix, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 1044
87. Various, Tgf I, 29, 48, 47  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 1052
88. Epigraphy, Reinmuth 1971, 12, 17  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 1186
89. Papyri, P.Oslo, "1"  Tagged with subjects: •magic, curse tablets Found in books: Rüpke (2014), The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean. 165
90. Paulus Julius, Digesta, 77  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Mikalson (2016), New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society, 285
91. Orphic Hymns., Lithica, 726-727  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 180
92. Epigraphy, Collection Fröhner, 11  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 477, 1044, 1131, 1147
93. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, None  Tagged with subjects: •lead, curse tablets Found in books: McClay (2023), The Bacchic Gold Tablets and Poetic Tradition: Memory and Performance. 116
94. Epigraphy, Mitford 1971, 132, 137-8, 140  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 471
95. Various, Fgh 327, 0  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 707
96. Epigraphy, Panakton 1992, 400  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 1218
97. Epigraphy, Kourouniotes 1927-8, 4  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 1086
98. Various, Fgh 244, None  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 1086
99. Various, Fgh 325, 0  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 707
100. Epigraphy, Iorop, 292  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 815
101. Various, Fgh 324, None  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 1197
102. Epigraphy, Malouchou 2013A, 0  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 840
103. Epigraphy, Agora Xxviii, 55, 57, 56  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 477
104. Epigraphy, Peek, Ag I., 2.205  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 815
105. Epigraphy, Peek 1942, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 707
106. Epigraphy, Agora Xviii, 5.579  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 1146
107. Epigraphy, Wünsch 1897, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 477, 840
108. Epigraphy, Peek 1957, 207, 205  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 477
109. Epigraphy, Kroll 1972, 103, 72  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 1106
110. Anon., Supplementum Magicae, 42  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Eliav (2023), A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean, 244
111. Epigraphy, Strubbe 1997, "125", "285", 113, 114, "121"  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Rüpke (2014), The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean. 244
112. Scriptores Historiae Augustae, 5, 14.5-14.7  Tagged with subjects: •antinoopolis, curse tablet invoking antinoos Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 514
113. Hippolytus, Aiedea, 241-246, 248-251, 247  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Brule (2003), Women of Ancient Greece, 169
114. Epigraphy, Ig I , 1048, 1157, 1162-1163, 1186, 1289, 244, 252, 300, 363, 377, 458, 46, 515, 52  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Mikalson (2016), New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society, 285
115. Epigraphy, Ig I , 1077, 52  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Mikalson (2016), New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society, 285
116. Epigraphy, Cil, 6.1483, 9.2845-9.2846, 13.11069-13.11070  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablet (defixio) •defixio (curse tablet) •tablets, curse Found in books: Benefiel and Keegan (2016), Inscriptions in the Private Sphere in the Greco-Roman World, 142; Czajkowski et al. (2020), Law in the Roman Provinces, 361
117. Epigraphy, Be, 2012.129  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 1146
118. Epigraphy, Audollent, Defix. Tab., 25.1-25.6, 25.13-25.14, 25.16-25.18, 49.12-49.22  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 71, 77, 78, 180
119. Epigraphy, Agora Xvii, 140  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 1197
120. Epigraphy, Agora Xv, 492, 52, 55-56, 68, 20  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 1044
121. Epigraphy, Ae, 1963, 1974-1975, 1979, 1982, 384, 664, 691, 94, 875  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Czajkowski et al. (2020), Law in the Roman Provinces, 361
122. Epigraphy, Ad, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 1067
123. Anaxilas, The Harp-Maker, None  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets, Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 147
124. Steph. Byz., Lexicon, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 815
125. Epigraphy, Dubois 2002, 60  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 473
126. Epigraphy, Dubois 1989, 134  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 477
127. Epigraphy, D. Jordan 2000B, 116, 15, 12  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 476
128. Epigraphy, Dubois 1996, 106  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 472
129. Epigraphy, Brenne 2001, 73, 83  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 1197
130. Anon., Scholia Ad Aristophanes, Vespas, 947-948, 946  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 71
131. Anon., Sefer Harazim, 3.16-3.35  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Eliav (2023), A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean, 245
132. Artifact, Abdalla, Funerary Stelae, 57  Tagged with subjects: •antinoopolis, curse tablet invoking antinoos Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 514
133. Ambrosian Missal 119, Homily On Lazarus, Mary And Martha, 1.19, 1.23, 1.115-1.116  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Mikalson (2016), New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society, 285
134. Andocides, Orations, 1.14  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 472
135. Epigraphy, Ml, #5, #30  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 65
136. Epigraphy, Rhodes & Osborne Ghi, 26, 46  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 1086
137. Papyri, Bgu, 4.1024-4.1027  Tagged with subjects: •magic, curse tablets Found in books: Rüpke (2014), The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean. 165
138. Hypereides, Orations, 12, 17, 16  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 1114
139. Epigraphy, D. Jordan, "A Survey of Greek Defixiones Not Included In The Special Corpora", Grbs 26, 151ג€“97, 104, 107, 11-12, 167, 39, 41, 45, 62, 9, 22  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Eidinow (2007), Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks, 307
140. Epigraphy, Amph.-Orop. 3), 60.1775  Tagged with subjects: •antinoopolis, curse tablet invoking antinoos Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 514
141. Epigraphy, Ig Ii3, 1008-1011, 1027, 1030, 1153, 212-213, 223, 265, 292, 319, 324-325, 33, 336-337, 340, 348, 35-36, 360, 416, 418, 441, 48, 518-519, 54, 550, 56, 583, 61, 75, 77, 8, 81, 83, 898, 917, 930, 434  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 975
142. Epigraphy, Tam, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Mikalson (2016), New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society, 285
143. Epigraphy, Ig Ii2, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 840, 1032, 1044, 1081
144. Epigraphy, Ig Vii, 283  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 1147
145. Epigraphy, Ig Xii, 1.677  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Mikalson (2016), New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society, 285
146. Epigraphy, Ig Xii,7, 1  Tagged with subjects: •cultic ritual practice, curse tablets Found in books: Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 455
147. Horace, I. Kourion, 128-142, 127  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 77, 79
148. Eustathius, Comm. Ad Hom. Od., a b c d\n0 2.201 (19.247) 2.201 (19.247) 2 201 (19  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets, Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 74
149. Epigraphy, Sm, 2.54, 46.40-46.41  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 79
150. Epigraphy, Ig Iii3, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 74
151. Epigraphy, Gager, Curse Tablets, 1, 10, 104, 12-16, 22, 28, 36-38, 40, 42-44, 46, 48-49, 5, 50-51, 53, 57, 59, 6, 61, 70, 80, 84, 88-89, 9, 90, 92, 94, 99, 45  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 79, 180
152. Epigraphykotansky, Greek Magical Amulets, Kotansky, Greek Magical Amulets, #60  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets, Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 74
153. Epigraphy, Naveh And Shaked 1993, 12, 16  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Benefiel and Keegan (2016), Inscriptions in the Private Sphere in the Greco-Roman World, 226, 227
154. Pl., Gma, 64, 44  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Benefiel and Keegan (2016), Inscriptions in the Private Sphere in the Greco-Roman World, 236
156. Epigraphy, Ila Santons, 104  Tagged with subjects: •tablets, curse Found in books: Czajkowski et al. (2020), Law in the Roman Provinces, 478
158. Epigraphy, Dougga, 50  Tagged with subjects: •tablets, curse Found in books: Czajkowski et al. (2020), Law in the Roman Provinces, 361
160. Epigraphy, Supplmag, 1.47  Tagged with subjects: •antinoopolis, curse tablet invoking antinoos Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 514
161. Marcellus, De Medicamentis Liber, 10.34, 10.56, 10.69  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets, Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 120
162. Epigraphy, Grimm, Obelisk, None  Tagged with subjects: •antinoopolis, curse tablet invoking antinoos Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 514
163. Tgf, The Suppliants, 241-242, 240  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Eidinow (2007), Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks, 294
164. Tgf, Medea, 290-294, 296-297, 295  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Eidinow (2007), Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks, 294
166. Epigraphy, Syll. , 3.37-3.38  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 65; Eidinow and Kindt (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion, 454
167. Epigraphy, Seg, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Edmonds (2019), Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World, 79
168. Epigraphy, Rhodian Peraia, 251  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Mikalson (2016), New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society, 285
169. Epigraphy, Scpp, 62-63  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Shannon-Henderson (2019), Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s , 132
170. Epigraphy, Knidos, 147-148, 150-159, 149  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Mikalson (2016), New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society, 285, 292, 293
171. Epigraphy, Kerameikos Iii, 3-4, 6, 9, 1  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 473
172. Anon., Sefer Raziel, 3.16-3.35  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Eliav (2023), A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean, 245
173. Epigraphy, Ik Rhod. Peraia, 251  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Mikalson (2016), New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society, 285
174. Epigraphy, Ig Xiv, 1222  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 1081
175. Epigraphy, Ig Xii,9, 1242  Tagged with subjects: •curse tablets Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 1032
176. Epigraphy, Ig Xii,8, 47, 68, 51  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 839
178. Epigraphy, Tyche, 31.149-31.155  Tagged with subjects: •tablets, curse Found in books: Czajkowski et al. (2020), Law in the Roman Provinces, 478