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17 results for "syncrisis"
1. Hebrew Bible, Psalms, 2.7, 8.5-8.7 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Martin and Whitlark (2018), Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric, 36, 37, 61
2.7. "אֲסַפְּרָה אֶל חֹק יְהוָה אָמַר אֵלַי בְּנִי אַתָּה אֲנִי הַיּוֹם יְלִדְתִּיךָ׃", 8.5. "מָה־אֱנוֹשׁ כִּי־תִזְכְּרֶנּוּ וּבֶן־אָדָם כִּי תִפְקְדֶנּוּ׃", 8.6. "וַתְּחַסְּרֵהוּ מְּעַט מֵאֱלֹהִים וְכָבוֹד וְהָדָר תְּעַטְּרֵהוּ׃", 8.7. "תַּמְשִׁילֵהוּ בְּמַעֲשֵׂי יָדֶיךָ כֹּל שַׁתָּה תַחַת־רַגְלָיו׃", 2.7. "I will tell of the decree: The LORD said unto me: 'Thou art My son, this day have I begotten thee.", 8.5. "What is man, that Thou art mindful of him? And the son of man, that Thou thinkest of him?", 8.6. "Yet Thou hast made him but little lower than the angels, And hast crowned him with glory and honour.", 8.7. "Thou hast made him to have dominion over the works of Thy hands; Thou hast put all things under His feet:",
2. Aristotle, Rhetoric, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •syncrisis, jesus/angels Found in books: Martin and Whitlark (2018), Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric, 108
3. Anaximenes of Lampsacus, Rhetoric To Alexander, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Martin and Whitlark (2018), Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric, 36
4. Cicero, Topica, 23 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •syncrisis, jesus/angels Found in books: Martin and Whitlark (2018), Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric, 107
23. ab effectis rebus hoc modo: Cum mulier viro in manum convenit, omnia quae mulieris fuerunt viri fiunt dotis nomine. Ex comparatione autem omnia valent quae sunt huius modi: Quod in re maiore valet valeat in re minore re minore OLV , ut si in urbe fines non reguntur reguntur O : regantur codd. , nec aqua in urbe arceatur. Item contra: Quod in minore valet, valeat in maiore. Licet idem exemplum convertere. Item: Quod in re pari valet, valeat in hac quae par quae par codd. : qui par B : quoi par Buecheler est; ut: Quoniam usus auctoritas fundi biennium est, sit etiam aedium. At in lege aedes non appellantur et sunt ceterarum (at in lege aedes non appel- lantur) et ceterarum Madvig rerum omnium quarum annuus est usus. Valeat aequitas, quae paribus in causis paria iura desiderat.
5. Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory, 3.7.10, 4.1.76-4.1.77, 5.7.35, 5.11.36-5.11.44 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •syncrisis, jesus/angels Found in books: Martin and Whitlark (2018), Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric, 34, 108, 214
3.7.10.  There is greater variety required in the praise of men. In the first place there is a distinction to be made as regards time between the period in which the objects of our praise lived and the time preceding their birth; and further, in the case of the dead, we must also distinguish the period following their death. With regard to things preceding a man's birth, there are his country, his parents and his ancestors, a theme which may be handled in two ways. For either it will be creditable to the objects of our praise not to have fallen short of the fair fame of their country and of their sires or to have ennobled a humble origin by the glory of their achievements. 5.7.35.  If to this kind of evidence anyone should wish to add evidence of the sort known as supernatural, based on oracles, prophecies and omens, I would remind him that there are two ways in which these may be treated. There is the general method, with regard to which there is an endless dispute between the adherents of the Stoics and the Epicureans, as to whether the world is governed by providence. The other is special and is concerned with particular departments of the art of divination, according as they may happen to affect the question at issue. 5.11.36.  Authority also may be drawn from external sources to support a case. Those who follow the Greeks, who call such arguments κρίσεις, style them judgments or adjudications, thereby referring not to matters on which judicial sentence has been pronounced (for such decisions form examples or precedents), but to whatever may be regarded as expressing the opinion of nations, peoples, philosophers, distinguished citizens, or illustrious poets. 5.11.37.  Nay, even common sayings and popular beliefs may be found to be useful. For they form a sort of testimony, which is rendered all the more impressive by the fact that it was not given to suit special cases, but was the utterance or action of minds swayed neither by prejudice or influence, simply because it seemed the most honourable or honest thing to say or do. 5.11.38.  For instance, if I am speaking of the misfortunes of this mortal life, surely it will help me to adduce the opinion of those nations who hold that we should weep over the new-born child and rejoice over the dead. Or if I am urging the judge to shew pity, surely my argument may be assisted by the fact that Athens, the wisest of all states, regarded pity not merely as an emotion, but even as a god. 5.11.39.  Again, do we not regard the precepts of the Seven Wise Men as so many rules of life? If an adulteress is on her trial for poisoning, is she not already to be regarded as condemned by the judgment of Marcus Cato, who asserted that every adulteress was as good as a poisoner? As for reflexions drawn from the poets, not only speeches, but even et works of the philosophers, are full of them; for although the philosophers think everything inferior to their own precepts and writings, they have not thought it beneath their dignity to quote numbers of lines from the poets to lend authority to their statements. 5.11.40.  Again, a remarkable example of the weight carried by authority is provided by the fact that when the Megarians disputed the possession of Salamis with the Athenians, the latter prevailed by citing a line from Homer, which is not however found in all editions, to the effect that Ajax united his ships with those of the Athenians. 5.11.41.  Generally received sayings also become common property owing to the very fact that they are anonymous, as, for instance, "Friends are a treasure," or "Conscience is as good as a thousand witnesses," or, to quote Cicero, "In the words of the old proverb, birds of a feather flock together." Sayings such as these would not have acquired immortality had they not carried conviction of their truth to all mankind. 5.11.42.  Some include under this head the supernatural authority that is derived from oracles, as for instance the response asserting that Socrates was the wisest of mankind: indeed, they rank it above all other authorities. Such authority is rare, but may prove useful. It is employed by Cicero in his speech on the Replies of the Soothsayers and in the oration in which he denounced Catiline to the people, when he points to the statue of Jupiter crowning a column, and again in the pro Ligario, where he admits the cause of Caesar to be the better because the gods have decided in his favour. When such arguments are inherent in the case itself they are called supernatural evidence; when they are adduced from without they are styled supernatural arguments. 5.11.43.  Sometimes, again, it may be possible to produce some saying or action of the judge, of our adversary of his advocate in order to prove our point. There have therefore been some writers who have regarded examples and the use of authorities of which I am speaking as belonging to inartificial proofs, on the ground that the orator does not discover them, but receives them ready-made. 5.11.44.  But the point is of great importance. For witnesses and investigation and the like all make some pronouncement on the actual matter under trial, whereas arguments drawn from without are in themselves useless, unless the pleader has the wit to apply them in such a manner as to support the points which he is trying to make.
6. New Testament, Hebrews, None (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Martin and Whitlark (2018), Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric, 75
13.12. διὸ καὶ Ἰησοῦς, ἵνα ἁγιάσῃ διὰ τοῦ ἰδίου αἵματος τὸν λαόν, ἔξω τῆς πύλης ἔπαθεν. 13.12. Therefore Jesus also, that he might sanctify the people through his own blood, suffered outside of the gate.
7. Theon Aelius, Exercises, 110 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •syncrisis, jesus/angels Found in books: Martin and Whitlark (2018), Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric, 34
8. New Testament, Colossians, 1.15 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •syncrisis, jesus/angels Found in books: Martin and Whitlark (2018), Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric, 214
1.15. ὅς ἐστιν εἰκὼν τοῦ θεοῦ τοῦ ἀοράτου, πρωτότοκος πάσης κτίσεως, 1.15. who is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of all creation.
9. New Testament, Philippians, 2.6-2.11 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •syncrisis, jesus/angels Found in books: Martin and Whitlark (2018), Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric, 214
2.6. ὃς ἐν μορφῇ θεοῦ ὑπάρχων οὐχ ἁρπαγμὸν ἡγήσατο τὸ εἶναι ἴσα θεῷ, 2.7. ἀλλὰ ἑαυτὸν ἐκένωσεν μορφὴν δούλου λαβών, ἐν ὁμοιώματι ἀνθρώπων γενόμενος· καὶ σχήματι εὑρεθεὶς ὡς ἄνθρωπος 2.8. ἐταπείνωσεν ἑαυτὸν γενόμενος ὑπήκοος μέχρι θανάτου, θανάτου δὲ σταυροῦ· 2.9. διὸ καὶ ὁ θεὸς αὐτὸν ὑπερύψωσεν, καὶ ἐχαρίσατο αὐτῷ τὸ ὄνομα τὸ ὑπὲρ πᾶν ὄνομα, 2.10. ἵνα ἐν τῷ ὀνόματι Ἰησοῦπᾶν γόνυ κάμψῃἐπουρανίων καὶ ἐπιγείων καὶ καταχθονίων, 2.11. καὶ πᾶσα γλῶσσα ἐξομολογήσηταιὅτι ΚΥΡΙΟΣ ΙΗΣΟΥΣ ΧΡΙΣΤΟΣ εἰς δόξανθεοῦπατρός. 2.6. who, existing in the form of God, didn't consider it robbery to be equal with God, 2.7. but emptied himself, taking the form of a servant, being made in the likeness of men. 2.8. And being found in human form, he humbled himself, becoming obedient to death, yes, the death of the cross. 2.9. Therefore God also highly exalted him, and gave to him the name which is above every name; 2.10. that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, of those in heaven, those on earth, and those under the earth, 2.11. and that every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.
10. New Testament, Acts, 5.42, 13.33 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •syncrisis, jesus/angels Found in books: Martin and Whitlark (2018), Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric, 36, 61
5.42. πᾶσάν τε ἡμέραν ἐν τῷ ἱερῷ καὶ κατʼ οἶκον οὐκ ἐπαύοντο διδάσκοντες καὶ εὐαγγελιζόμενοι τὸν χριστὸν Ἰησοῦν. 13.33. ὅτι ταύτην ὁ θεὸς ἐκπεπλήρωκεν τοῖς τέκνοις ἡμῶν ἀναστήσας Ἰησοῦν, ὡς καὶ ἐν τῷ ψαλμῶ γέγραπται τῷ δευτέρῳ Υἱός μου εἶ σύ, ἐγὼ σήμ ν γεγέννηκά σε. 5.42. Every day, in the temple and at home, they never stopped teaching and preaching Jesus, the Christ. 13.33. that God has fulfilled the same to us, their children, in that he raised up Jesus. As it is also written in the second psalm, 'You are my Son. Today I have become your father.'
11. New Testament, 1 Timothy, 3.16 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •syncrisis, jesus/angels Found in books: Martin and Whitlark (2018), Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric, 214
3.16. καὶ ὁμολογουμένως μέγα ἐστὶν τὸ τῆς εὐσεβείας μυστήριον· 3.16. Without controversy, the mystery of godliness is great: God was revealed in the flesh, Justified in the spirit, Seen by angels, Preached among the nations, Believed on in the world, And received up in glory.
12. Aelius Aristides, Ecnomium of Rome, 32, 36, 72, 90, 33 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Martin and Whitlark (2018), Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric, 30
13. Menander of Laodicea, Rhet., 368-370 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Martin and Whitlark (2018), Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric, 34
14. Aphthonius, Progymnasmata, 36, 39, 38 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Martin and Whitlark (2018), Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric, 30
15. Anon., T. Ben., 9.3  Tagged with subjects: •syncrisis, jesus/angels Found in books: Martin and Whitlark (2018), Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric, 36