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All subjects (including unvalidated):
subject book bibliographic info
boats/ships, figural graffiti drawings Benefiel and Keegan (2016), Inscriptions in the Private Sphere in the Greco-Roman World, 17, 43, 61, 62, 63, 65, 66, 68, 70, 71, 92, 120
boats/ships, symbols Breytenbach and Tzavella (2022), Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas, 240
ship Meister (2019), Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity, 66
ship, aeneas Giusti (2018), Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries, 218, 221
ship, argo Giusti (2018), Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries, 72
ship, argo, as first Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135, 154
Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135, 154
ship, arrival on, dionysus Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro, (2021), The Gods of the Greeks, 308, 315
ship, as metaphor Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 14, 115, 173, 253, 254, 255, 256, 257, 258, 259, 260, 261, 262, 263, 264, 265, 266, 267, 268
ship, augustus, and alexandrian Clark (2007), Divine Qualities: Cult and Community in Republican Rome, 272
ship, boat Porton (1988), Gentiles and Israelites in Mishnah-Tosefta, 29, 40, 122, 165, 167, 208, 210, 213, 236, 247, 254
ship, bound for rome Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 326
ship, captain Mathews (2013), Riches, Poverty, and the Faithful: Perspectives on Wealth in the Second Temple Period and the Apocalypse of John, 205
ship, collapsible Poulsen (2021), Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography, 197, 198, 199, 200, 204, 211, 213, 214, 215, 218
ship, exekias, kylix with dionysus in Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro, (2021), The Gods of the Greeks, 315
ship, for delian theoria, theseus Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 92
ship, from, clazomenae, vase fragment with satyrs on Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro, (2021), The Gods of the Greeks, 308
ship, imagery, trojan horse as a Cueva et al. (2018b), Re-Wiring the Ancient Novel. Volume 2: Roman Novels and Other Important Texts, 24
ship, in athens, apuleius at dionysiac Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 184, 188, 209, 217, 326
ship, isis, name of Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 31, 259
ship, isis, of offered as first-fruits of new years navigation Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 5, 158
ship, kyrénia Ferrándiz (2022), Shipwrecks, Legal Landscapes and Mediterranean Paradigms: Gone Under Sea, 152
ship, lucius erastos captain Kalinowski (2021), Memory, Family, and Community in Roman Ephesos, 302, 303, 304
ship, mercury, aeneas’ Giusti (2018), Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries, 218, 221
ship, metaphor, trojan horse ~ Cueva et al. (2018b), Re-Wiring the Ancient Novel. Volume 2: Roman Novels and Other Important Texts, 22
ship, minerva, built first Sider (2001), Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian, 126
ship, motif as structuring device Pasco-Pranger (2006), Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar 102, 103, 105
ship, motif, trojan horse as a Cueva et al. (2018b), Re-Wiring the Ancient Novel. Volume 2: Roman Novels and Other Important Texts, 25
ship, of fusion re, of with osiris Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 303, 306
ship, of isis, and purifies it, named priest, chief, utters prayers over mithras, to be in charge of initiation Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 281
ship, of isis, and purifies priest, chief, utters prayers over it, appears in visitation Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 273
ship, of isis, and purifies priest, chief, utters prayers over it, carries out rites of first initiation Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 286
ship, of isis, and purifies priest, chief, utters prayers over it, embraced and regarded as father Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 325
ship, of isis, and purifies priest, chief, utters prayers over it, enters chamber of goddess Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 17, 264
ship, of isis, and purifies priest, chief, utters prayers over it, greeted in lodging Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 284
ship, of isis, and purifies priest, chief, utters prayers over it, severe and strict Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 278
ship, of isis, baskets, with spices and offerings, loaded on Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 263
ship, of isis, beak, curving, of stern of Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 263
ship, of isis, carnival, fancy-dress, and Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 47
ship, of isis, citrus-wood, in Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 263
ship, of isis, egg, used in purifying Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 261
ship, of isis, egyptian paintings, on Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 260
ship, of isis, gold cup, gold leaf, on stern of Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 263
ship, of isis, golden letters, on sail of Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 262
ship, of isis, letters, gold, on sail of Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 262
ship, of isis, new years commerce, and Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 5, 158, 259
ship, of isis, offered by priests as first-fruits of new years navigation Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 5, 158
ship, of isis, offered by priests as first-fruits of new years navigation, naming, dedication, and launching of Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 259
ship, of isis, prayer, to moon-goddess, over Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 261
ship, of isis, spices, placed on Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 263
ship, of isis, sulphur, used in purifying Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 261
ship, of isis, temple, return to, after launching Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 17
ship, of isis, torch, used by priest in purifying Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 261
ship, of mast, of isis, rounded pine Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 262
ship, of offered as first-fruits of new years navigation, isis, named, dedicated and launched Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 31
ship, of osiris, afaya/wef-barque Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 40, 45, 254, 350
ship, of priest, chief, utters prayers over isis, and purifies it Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 261
ship, of re Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 34, 298
ship, of sail, of isis, with inwoven gold letters Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 262
ship, of state Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 212
ship, of stern, of isis, shining with gold leaf Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 263
ship, of temple, return to, after launching isis, dwelling hired within precinct Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 355
ship, of the soul Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 245
ship, of torch, used by priest in purifying isis, and kore Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 126
ship, of torch, used by priest in purifying isis, carried in right hand of initiate Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 314
ship, of venus, paphian, name of isis among cyprians Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 355
ship, paintings, egyptian, on Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 260
ship, panathenaea Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020), Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity, 351, 357
ship, panathenaic MacDougall (2022), Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition. 67, 68
ship, philokyrios captain Kalinowski (2021), Memory, Family, and Community in Roman Ephesos, 302, 303, 304
ship, pilot of a Wright (2015), The Letter of Aristeas : 'Aristeas to Philocrates' or 'On the Translation of the Law of the Jews' 387, 394, 399
ship, preserved, aeneas Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 8, 132, 165
ship, procopius, on aeneas’ Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 132
ship, rams, rostra Bruun and Edmondson (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy, 348
ship, re, of and palm-branch Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 203
ship, re, of and purification Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 287
ship, re, of and radiate crown Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 314, 316, 357
ship, re, of as great god Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 329, 330
ship, re, of isis and re Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 155, 159, 165, 322
ship, re, of with osiris Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 297
ship, son Langstaff, Stuckenbruck, and Tilly, (2022), The Lord’s Prayer, 53
ship, soul, as Cover (2023), Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names. 517, 518, 519
ship, transformations, phaeacian Skempis and Ziogas (2014), Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic 200
shipping Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 10, 46, 50, 131, 195, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247
Mathews (2013), Riches, Poverty, and the Faithful: Perspectives on Wealth in the Second Temple Period and the Apocalypse of John, 204
shipping, economy, roman Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 80, 81
shipping, hathor, in solar barque, as patron of Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 37
shipping, sea trade, maritime commerce Lalone (2019), Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess, 7, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249
ships Archibald et al (2011), The Economies of Hellenistic Societies, Third to First Centuries BC 311, 327, 328, 407
Clay and Vergados (2022), Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry, 66, 72, 183, 184
Eliav (2023), A Jew in the Roman Bathhouse: Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Mediterranean, 93
Gygax and Zuiderhoek (2021), Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity, 24, 58
Hachlili (2005), Jewish Funerary Customs, Practices And Rites In The Second Temple Period, 36, 149
Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 36, 563, 564, 567, 667, 756, 952, 966, 967, 1100, 1104, 1129
Klein and Wienand (2022), City of Caesar, City of God: Constantinople and Jerusalem in Late Antiquity, 121, 198
Mathews (2013), Riches, Poverty, and the Faithful: Perspectives on Wealth in the Second Temple Period and the Apocalypse of John, 11, 58, 212
Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 205, 320, 463, 470, 471, 477, 478, 482
Thonemann (2020), An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams, 34, 35, 54, 55, 87, 100, 118, 119, 206, 207
ships, ajax, in the catalogue of Finkelberg (2019), Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays, 291, 292, 293, 299, 303
ships, akhaia, akhaians, peloponnese, anticipated in catalogue of Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 306, 307
ships, as land-extensions Ferrándiz (2022), Shipwrecks, Legal Landscapes and Mediterranean Paradigms: Gone Under Sea, 6
ships, catalog of Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 150, 153, 154
ships, catalogue of Finkelberg (2019), Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays, 119, 141, 144, 166, 209, 276, 291, 292, 295, 299, 303, 315
Lalone (2019), Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess, 10, 11, 59, 96, 97
Marincola et al. (2021), Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians, 79
Skempis and Ziogas (2014), Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic 183, 187, 188, 189
ships, catalogue of homer, iliad Laemmle (2021), Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration, 27, 201, 202, 203, 205, 206, 207, 208, 213, 214, 230, 233, 234, 235, 236, 237, 289, 299, 306, 308, 309, 354
ships, catalogue of the Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 4, 27
ships, collateral object of pledge Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 80, 81
ships, crews Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 516, 737, 767, 821, 1070, 1103
ships, diomedes, in the catalogue of Finkelberg (2019), Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays, 291, 292
ships, displayed as spoils Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 131, 132
ships, donations, of Gygax (2016), Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism, 206
ships, goose, shape of in sterns of Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 263
ships, greek language and ritual, in launching of Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 17, 268
ships, greek, cargo capacities of Parkins and Smith (1998), Trade, Traders and the Ancient City, 124
ships, iliad, homer, and the catalog of Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 150, 153, 154
ships, images to provide for dead Satlow (2013), The Gift in Antiquity, 149
ships, invented by, athena Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro, (2021), The Gods of the Greeks, 76
ships, launching of Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 17, 268
ships, launching of prayed for Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 17, 268
ships, name, of Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 273
ships, names, of Clark (2007), Divine Qualities: Cult and Community in Republican Rome, 275
ships, pandora, and Bremmer (2008), Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East, 29
ships, proclaimed, launching of Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 17, 268
ships, sea power and seafaring, individual Joseph (2022), Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic, 178, 179, 180, 181, 182, 183, 184
ships, xerxes, watching grain Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 212, 213

List of validated texts:
34 validated results for "ship"
1. Hebrew Bible, Jonah, 1.4-1.5, 1.7-1.10, 1.14-1.16 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Ships • ship captain • ship(s)

 Found in books: Mathews (2013), Riches, Poverty, and the Faithful: Perspectives on Wealth in the Second Temple Period and the Apocalypse of John, 58, 205, 212; Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 320, 477, 478

sup>
1.4 וַיהוָה הֵטִיל רוּחַ־גְּדוֹלָה אֶל־הַיָּם וַיְהִי סַעַר־גָּדוֹל בַּיָּם וְהָאֳנִיָּה חִשְּׁבָה לְהִשָּׁבֵר׃ 1.5 וַיִּירְאוּ הַמַּלָּחִים וַיִּזְעֲקוּ אִישׁ אֶל־אֱלֹהָיו וַיָּטִלוּ אֶת־הַכֵּלִים אֲשֶׁר בָּאֳנִיָּה אֶל־הַיָּם לְהָקֵל מֵעֲלֵיהֶם וְיוֹנָה יָרַד אֶל־יַרְכְּתֵי הַסְּפִינָה וַיִּשְׁכַּב וַיֵּרָדַם׃
1.7
וַיֹּאמְרוּ אִישׁ אֶל־רֵעֵהוּ לְכוּ וְנַפִּילָה גוֹרָלוֹת וְנֵדְעָה בְּשֶׁלְּמִי הָרָעָה הַזֹּאת לָנוּ וַיַּפִּלוּ גּוֹרָלוֹת וַיִּפֹּל הַגּוֹרָל עַל־יוֹנָה׃ 1.8 וַיֹּאמְרוּ אֵלָיו הַגִּידָה־נָּא לָנוּ בַּאֲשֶׁר לְמִי־הָרָעָה הַזֹּאת לָנוּ מַה־מְּלַאכְתְּךָ וּמֵאַיִן תָּבוֹא מָה אַרְצֶךָ וְאֵי־מִזֶּה עַם אָתָּה׃ 1.9 וַיֹּאמֶר אֲלֵיהֶם עִבְרִי אָנֹכִי וְאֶת־יְהוָה אֱלֹהֵי הַשָּׁמַיִם אֲנִי יָרֵא אֲשֶׁר־עָשָׂה אֶת־הַיָּם וְאֶת־הַיַּבָּשָׁה׃' 1.14 וַיִּקְרְאוּ אֶל־יְהוָה וַיֹּאמְרוּ אָנָּה יְהוָה אַל־נָא נֹאבְדָה בְּנֶפֶשׁ הָאִישׁ הַזֶּה וְאַל־תִּתֵּן עָלֵינוּ דָּם נָקִיא כִּי־אַתָּה יְהוָה כַּאֲשֶׁר חָפַצְתָּ עָשִׂיתָ׃ 1.15 וַיִּשְׂאוּ אֶת־יוֹנָה וַיְטִלֻהוּ אֶל־הַיָּם וַיַּעֲמֹד הַיָּם מִזַּעְפּוֹ׃ 1.16 וַיִּירְאוּ הָאֲנָשִׁים יִרְאָה גְדוֹלָה אֶת־יְהוָה וַיִּזְבְּחוּ־זֶבַח לַיהוָה וַיִּדְּרוּ נְדָרִים׃'' None
sup>
1.4 But the LORD hurled a great wind into the sea, and there was a mighty tempest in the sea, so that the ship was like to be broken. 1.5 And the mariners were afraid, and cried every man unto his god; and they cast forth the wares that were in the ship into the sea, to lighten it unto them. But Jonah was gone down into the innermost parts of the ship; and he lay, and was fast asleep.
1.7
And they said every one to his fellow: ‘Come, and let us cast lots, that we may know for whose cause this evil is upon us.’ So they cast lots, and the lot fell upon Jonah. 1.8 Then said they unto him: ‘Tell us, we pray thee, for whose cause this evil is upon us: what is thine occupation? and whence comest thou? what is thy country? and of what people art thou?’ 1.9 And he said unto them: ‘I am an Hebrew; and I fear the LORD, the God of heaven, who hath made the sea and the dry land.’ 1.10 Then were the men exceedingly afraid, and said unto him: ‘What is this that thou hast done?’ For the men knew that he fled from the presence of the LORD, because he had told them.
1.14
Wherefore they cried unto the LORD, and said: ‘We beseech Thee, O LORD, we beseech Thee, let us not perish for this man’s life, and lay not upon us innocent blood; for Thou, O LORD, hast done as it pleased Thee.’ 1.15 So they took up Jonah, and cast him forth into the sea; and the sea ceased from its raging. 1.16 Then the men feared the LORD exceedingly; and they offered a sacrifice unto the LORD, and made vows.'' None
2. Hesiod, Works And Days, 25-41, 111, 118-237, 649-650 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Argo, as first ship • Catalog of Ships • Iliad (Homer), and the Catalog of Ships • king(ship)

 Found in books: Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 121, 123; Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 150; Laks (2022), Plato's Second Republic: An Essay on the Laws. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2022 196; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 121, 123

sup>
25 καὶ κεραμεὺς κεραμεῖ κοτέει καὶ τέκτονι τέκτων, 26 καὶ πτωχὸς πτωχῷ φθονέει καὶ ἀοιδὸς ἀοιδῷ. 27 ὦ Πέρση, σὺ δὲ ταῦτα τεῷ ἐνικάτθεο θυμῷ, 28 μηδέ σʼ Ἔρις κακόχαρτος ἀπʼ ἔργου θυμὸν ἐρύκοι 29 νείκεʼ ὀπιπεύοντʼ ἀγορῆς ἐπακουὸν ἐόντα. 30 ὤρη γάρ τʼ ὀλίγη πέλεται νεικέων τʼ ἀγορέων τε, 31 ᾧτινι μὴ βίος ἔνδον ἐπηετανὸς κατάκειται 32 ὡραῖος, τὸν γαῖα φέρει, Δημήτερος ἀκτήν. 33 τοῦ κε κορεσσάμενος νείκεα καὶ δῆριν ὀφέλλοις 34 κτήμασʼ ἐπʼ ἀλλοτρίοις· σοὶ δʼ οὐκέτι δεύτερον ἔσται 35 ὧδʼ ἔρδειν· ἀλλʼ αὖθι διακρινώμεθα νεῖκος 36 ἰθείῃσι δίκῃς, αἵ τʼ ἐκ Διός εἰσιν ἄρισται. 37 ἤδη μὲν γὰρ κλῆρον ἐδασσάμεθʼ, ἀλλὰ τὰ πολλὰ 38 ἁρπάζων ἐφόρεις μέγα κυδαίνων βασιλῆας 39 δωροφάγους, οἳ τήνδε δίκην ἐθέλουσι δίκασσαι. 40 νήπιοι, οὐδὲ ἴσασιν ὅσῳ πλέον ἥμισυ παντὸς 41 οὐδʼ ὅσον ἐν μαλάχῃ τε καὶ ἀσφοδέλῳ μέγʼ ὄνειαρ.
111
οἳ μὲν ἐπὶ Κρόνου ἦσαν, ὅτʼ οὐρανῷ ἐμβασίλευεν·118 αὐτομάτη πολλόν τε καὶ ἄφθονον· οἳ δʼ ἐθελημοὶ 119 ἥσυχοι ἔργʼ ἐνέμοντο σὺν ἐσθλοῖσιν πολέεσσιν. 120 ἀφνειοὶ μήλοισι, φίλοι μακάρεσσι θεοῖσιν. 121 αὐτὰρ ἐπεὶ δὴ τοῦτο γένος κατὰ γαῖʼ ἐκάλυψε,— 122 τοὶ μὲν δαίμονες ἁγνοὶ ἐπιχθόνιοι καλέονται 123 ἐσθλοί, ἀλεξίκακοι, φύλακες θνητῶν ἀνθρώπων, 124 οἵ ῥα φυλάσσουσίν τε δίκας καὶ σχέτλια ἔργα 1
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ἠέρα ἑσσάμενοι πάντη φοιτῶντες ἐπʼ αἶαν, 126 πλουτοδόται· καὶ τοῦτο γέρας βασιλήιον ἔσχον—, 127 δεύτερον αὖτε γένος πολὺ χειρότερον μετόπισθεν 128 ἀργύρεον ποίησαν Ὀλύμπια δώματʼ ἔχοντες, 129 χρυσέῳ οὔτε φυὴν ἐναλίγκιον οὔτε νόημα. 130 ἀλλʼ ἑκατὸν μὲν παῖς ἔτεα παρὰ μητέρι κεδνῇ 131 ἐτρέφετʼ ἀτάλλων, μέγα νήπιος, ᾧ ἐνὶ οἴκῳ. 132 ἀλλʼ ὅτʼ ἄρʼ ἡβήσαι τε καὶ ἥβης μέτρον ἵκοιτο, 133 παυρίδιον ζώεσκον ἐπὶ χρόνον, ἄλγεʼ ἔχοντες 134 ἀφραδίῃς· ὕβριν γὰρ ἀτάσθαλον οὐκ ἐδύναντο 135 ἀλλήλων ἀπέχειν, οὐδʼ ἀθανάτους θεραπεύειν 136 ἤθελον οὐδʼ ἔρδειν μακάρων ἱεροῖς ἐπὶ βωμοῖς, 137 ἣ θέμις ἀνθρώποις κατὰ ἤθεα. τοὺς μὲν ἔπειτα 138 Ζεὺς Κρονίδης ἔκρυψε χολούμενος, οὕνεκα τιμὰς 139 οὐκ ἔδιδον μακάρεσσι θεοῖς, οἳ Ὄλυμπον ἔχουσιν. 140 αὐτὰρ ἐπεὶ καὶ τοῦτο γένος κατὰ γαῖʼ ἐκάλυψε,— 141 τοὶ μὲν ὑποχθόνιοι μάκαρες θνητοῖς καλέονται, 142 δεύτεροι, ἀλλʼ ἔμπης τιμὴ καὶ τοῖσιν ὀπηδεῖ—, 143 Ζεὺς δὲ πατὴρ τρίτον ἄλλο γένος μερόπων ἀνθρώπων 144 χάλκειον ποίησʼ, οὐκ ἀργυρέῳ οὐδὲν ὁμοῖον, 145 ἐκ μελιᾶν, δεινόν τε καὶ ὄβριμον· οἷσιν Ἄρηος 146 ἔργʼ ἔμελεν στονόεντα καὶ ὕβριες· οὐδέ τι σῖτον 147 ἤσθιον, ἀλλʼ ἀδάμαντος ἔχον κρατερόφρονα θυμόν, 148 ἄπλαστοι· μεγάλη δὲ βίη καὶ χεῖρες ἄαπτοι 149 ἐξ ὤμων ἐπέφυκον ἐπὶ στιβαροῖσι μέλεσσιν. 150 ὧν δʼ ἦν χάλκεα μὲν τεύχεα, χάλκεοι δέ τε οἶκοι 151 χαλκῷ δʼ εἰργάζοντο· μέλας δʼ οὐκ ἔσκε σίδηρος. 152 καὶ τοὶ μὲν χείρεσσιν ὕπο σφετέρῃσι δαμέντες 153 βῆσαν ἐς εὐρώεντα δόμον κρυεροῦ Αίδαο 154 νώνυμνοι· θάνατος δὲ καὶ ἐκπάγλους περ ἐόντας 155 εἷλε μέλας, λαμπρὸν δʼ ἔλιπον φάος ἠελίοιο. 156 αὐτὰρ ἐπεὶ καὶ τοῦτο γένος κατὰ γαῖʼ ἐκάλυψεν, 157 αὖτις ἔτʼ ἄλλο τέταρτον ἐπὶ χθονὶ πουλυβοτείρῃ 158 Ζεὺς Κρονίδης ποίησε, δικαιότερον καὶ ἄρειον, 159 ἀνδρῶν ἡρώων θεῖον γένος, οἳ καλέονται 160 ἡμίθεοι, προτέρη γενεὴ κατʼ ἀπείρονα γαῖαν. 161 καὶ τοὺς μὲν πόλεμός τε κακὸς καὶ φύλοπις αἰνή, 162 τοὺς μὲν ὑφʼ ἑπταπύλῳ Θήβῃ, Καδμηίδι γαίῃ, 163 ὤλεσε μαρναμένους μήλων ἕνεκʼ Οἰδιπόδαο, 164 τοὺς δὲ καὶ ἐν νήεσσιν ὑπὲρ μέγα λαῖτμα θαλάσσης 165 ἐς Τροίην ἀγαγὼν Ἑλένης ἕνεκʼ ἠυκόμοιο. 166 ἔνθʼ ἤτοι τοὺς μὲν θανάτου τέλος ἀμφεκάλυψε, 167 τοῖς δὲ δίχʼ ἀνθρώπων βίοτον καὶ ἤθεʼ ὀπάσσας 168 Ζεὺς Κρονίδης κατένασσε πατὴρ ἐς πείρατα γαίης. 169 Πέμπτον δʼ αὖτις ἔτʼ ἄ λλο γένος θῆκʼ εὐρύοπα Ζεὺς 169 ἀνδρῶν, οἳ γεγάασιν ἐπὶ χθονὶ πουλυβοτείρῃ. 169 τοῖσι δʼ ὁμῶς ν εάτοις τιμὴ καὶ κῦδος ὀπηδεῖ. 169 τοῦ γὰρ δεσμὸ ν ἔλυσε πα τὴρ ἀνδρῶν τε θεῶν τε. 169 τηλοῦ ἀπʼ ἀθανάτων· τοῖσιν Κρόνος ἐμβασιλεύει. 170 καὶ τοὶ μὲν ναίουσιν ἀκηδέα θυμὸν ἔχοντες 171 ἐν μακάρων νήσοισι παρʼ Ὠκεανὸν βαθυδίνην, 172 ὄλβιοι ἥρωες, τοῖσιν μελιηδέα καρπὸν 173 τρὶς ἔτεος θάλλοντα φέρει ζείδωρος ἄρουρα. 174 μηκέτʼ ἔπειτʼ ὤφελλον ἐγὼ πέμπτοισι μετεῖναι 175 ἀνδράσιν, ἀλλʼ ἢ πρόσθε θανεῖν ἢ ἔπειτα γενέσθαι. 176 νῦν γὰρ δὴ γένος ἐστὶ σιδήρεον· οὐδέ ποτʼ ἦμαρ 177 παύονται καμάτου καὶ ὀιζύος, οὐδέ τι νύκτωρ 178 φθειρόμενοι. χαλεπὰς δὲ θεοὶ δώσουσι μερίμνας· 179 ἀλλʼ ἔμπης καὶ τοῖσι μεμείξεται ἐσθλὰ κακοῖσιν. 180 Ζεὺς δʼ ὀλέσει καὶ τοῦτο γένος μερόπων ἀνθρώπων, 181 εὖτʼ ἂν γεινόμενοι πολιοκρόταφοι τελέθωσιν. 182 οὐδὲ πατὴρ παίδεσσιν ὁμοίιος οὐδέ τι παῖδες, 183 οὐδὲ ξεῖνος ξεινοδόκῳ καὶ ἑταῖρος ἑταίρῳ, 184 οὐδὲ κασίγνητος φίλος ἔσσεται, ὡς τὸ πάρος περ. 185 αἶψα δὲ γηράσκοντας ἀτιμήσουσι τοκῆας· 186 μέμψονται δʼ ἄρα τοὺς χαλεποῖς βάζοντες ἔπεσσι 187 σχέτλιοι οὐδὲ θεῶν ὄπιν εἰδότες· οὐδέ κεν οἵ γε 188 γηράντεσσι τοκεῦσιν ἀπὸ θρεπτήρια δοῖεν 189 χειροδίκαι· ἕτερος δʼ ἑτέρου πόλιν ἐξαλαπάξει. 190 οὐδέ τις εὐόρκου χάρις ἔσσεται οὔτε δικαίου 191 οὔτʼ ἀγαθοῦ, μᾶλλον δὲ κακῶν ῥεκτῆρα καὶ ὕβριν 192 ἀνέρες αἰνήσουσι· δίκη δʼ ἐν χερσί, καὶ αἰδὼς 193 οὐκ ἔσται· βλάψει δʼ ὁ κακὸς τὸν ἀρείονα φῶτα 194 μύθοισιν σκολιοῖς ἐνέπων, ἐπὶ δʼ ὅρκον ὀμεῖται. 195 ζῆλος δʼ ἀνθρώποισιν ὀιζυροῖσιν ἅπασι 196 δυσκέλαδος κακόχαρτος ὁμαρτήσει, στυγερώπης. 197 καὶ τότε δὴ πρὸς Ὄλυμπον ἀπὸ χθονὸς εὐρυοδείης 198 λευκοῖσιν φάρεσσι καλυψαμένα χρόα καλὸν 199 ἀθανάτων μετὰ φῦλον ἴτον προλιπόντʼ ἀνθρώπους 200 Αἰδὼς καὶ Νέμεσις· τὰ δὲ λείψεται ἄλγεα λυγρὰ 201 θνητοῖς ἀνθρώποισι· κακοῦ δʼ οὐκ ἔσσεται ἀλκή. 202 νῦν δʼ αἶνον βασιλεῦσιν ἐρέω φρονέουσι καὶ αὐτοῖς· 203 ὧδʼ ἴρηξ προσέειπεν ἀηδόνα ποικιλόδειρον 204 ὕψι μάλʼ ἐν νεφέεσσι φέρων ὀνύχεσσι μεμαρπώς· 205 ἣ δʼ ἐλεόν, γναμπτοῖσι πεπαρμένη ἀμφʼ ὀνύχεσσι, 206 μύρετο· τὴν ὅγʼ ἐπικρατέως πρὸς μῦθον ἔειπεν· 207 δαιμονίη, τί λέληκας; ἔχει νύ σε πολλὸν ἀρείων· 208 τῇ δʼ εἶς, ᾗ σʼ ἂν ἐγώ περ ἄγω καὶ ἀοιδὸν ἐοῦσαν· 209 δεῖπνον δʼ, αἴ κʼ ἐθέλω, ποιήσομαι ἠὲ μεθήσω. 210 ἄφρων δʼ, ὅς κʼ ἐθέλῃ πρὸς κρείσσονας ἀντιφερίζειν· 211 νίκης τε στέρεται πρός τʼ αἴσχεσιν ἄλγεα πάσχει. 212 ὣς ἔφατʼ ὠκυπέτης ἴρηξ, τανυσίπτερος ὄρνις. 213 ὦ Πέρση, σὺ δʼ ἄκουε δίκης, μηδʼ ὕβριν ὄφελλε· 214 ὕβρις γάρ τε κακὴ δειλῷ βροτῷ· οὐδὲ μὲν ἐσθλὸς 215 ῥηιδίως φερέμεν δύναται, βαρύθει δέ θʼ ὑπʼ αὐτῆς 216 ἐγκύρσας ἄτῃσιν· ὁδὸς δʼ ἑτέρηφι παρελθεῖν 217 κρείσσων ἐς τὰ δίκαια· Δίκη δʼ ὑπὲρ Ὕβριος ἴσχει 218 ἐς τέλος ἐξελθοῦσα· παθὼν δέ τε νήπιος ἔγνω. 219 αὐτίκα γὰρ τρέχει Ὅρκος ἅμα σκολιῇσι δίκῃσιν. 220 τῆς δὲ Δίκης ῥόθος ἑλκομένης, ᾗ κʼ ἄνδρες ἄγωσι 221 δωροφάγοι, σκολιῇς δὲ δίκῃς κρίνωσι θέμιστας. 222 ἣ δʼ ἕπεται κλαίουσα πόλιν καὶ ἤθεα λαῶν, 223 ἠέρα ἑσσαμένη, κακὸν ἀνθρώποισι φέρουσα, 224 οἵ τε μιν ἐξελάσωσι καὶ οὐκ ἰθεῖαν ἔνειμαν. 2
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Οἳ δὲ δίκας ξείνοισι καὶ ἐνδήμοισι διδοῦσιν 226 ἰθείας καὶ μή τι παρεκβαίνουσι δικαίου, 227 τοῖσι τέθηλε πόλις, λαοὶ δʼ ἀνθεῦσιν ἐν αὐτῇ· 228 εἰρήνη δʼ ἀνὰ γῆν κουροτρόφος, οὐδέ ποτʼ αὐτοῖς 229 ἀργαλέον πόλεμον τεκμαίρεται εὐρύοπα Ζεύς· 230 οὐδέ ποτʼ ἰθυδίκῃσι μετʼ ἀνδράσι λιμὸς ὀπηδεῖ 231 οὐδʼ ἄτη, θαλίῃς δὲ μεμηλότα ἔργα νέμονται. 232 τοῖσι φέρει μὲν γαῖα πολὺν βίον, οὔρεσι δὲ δρῦς 233 ἄκρη μέν τε φέρει βαλάνους, μέσση δὲ μελίσσας· 234 εἰροπόκοι δʼ ὄιες μαλλοῖς καταβεβρίθασιν· 235 τίκτουσιν δὲ γυναῖκες ἐοικότα τέκνα γονεῦσιν· 236 θάλλουσιν δʼ ἀγαθοῖσι διαμπερές· οὐδʼ ἐπὶ νηῶν 237 νίσσονται, καρπὸν δὲ φέρει ζείδωρος ἄρουρα.
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οὔτε τι ναυτιλίης σεσοφισμένος οὔτε τι νηῶν. 650 οὐ γάρ πώ ποτε νηί γʼ ἐπέπλων εὐρέα πόντον, ' None
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25 Potter hates potter, builder builder, and 26 A beggar bears his fellow-beggar spite, 27 Likewise all singers. Perses, understand 28 My verse, don’t let the evil Strife invite 29 Your heart to shrink from work and make you gaze 30 And listen to the quarrels in the square - 31 No time for quarrels or to spend one’s day 32 In public life when in your granary there 33 Is not stored up a year’s stock of the grain 34 Demeter grants the earth. Get in that store, 35 Then you may wrangle, struggling to obtain 36 Other men’s goods – a chance shall come no more 37 To do this. Let’s set straight our wrangling 38 With Zeus’s laws, so excellent and fair. 39 We split our goods in two, but, capturing 40 The greater part, you carried it from there 41 And praised those kings, bribe-eaters, who adore
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As well, in silence, for Zeus took away118 of gold, existing under Cronus’ reign 119 When he ruled Heaven. There was not a trace 120 of woe among them since they felt no pain; 121 There was no dread old age but, always rude 122 of health, away from grief, they took delight 123 In plenty, while in death they seemed subdued 124 By sleep. Life-giving earth, of its own right, 1
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Would bring forth plenteous fruit. In harmony 126 They lived, with countless flocks of sheep, at ease 127 With all the gods. But when this progeny 128 Was buried underneath the earth – yet these 129 Live on, land-spirits, holy, pure and blessed, 130 Who guard mankind from evil, watching out 131 For all the laws and heinous deeds, while dressed 132 In misty vapour, roaming all about 133 The land, bestowing wealth, this kingly right 134 Being theirs – a second race the Olympians made, 135 A silver one, far worse, unlike, in sight 136 And mind, the golden, for a young child stayed, 137 A large bairn, in his mother’s custody, 138 Just playing inside for a hundred years. 139 But when they all reached their maturity, 140 They lived a vapid life, replete with tears, 141 Through foolishness, unable to forbear 142 To brawl, spurning the gods, refusing, too, 143 To sacrifice (a law kept everywhere). 144 Then Zeus, since they would not give gods their due, 145 In rage hid them, as did the earth – all men 146 Have called the race Gods Subterranean, 147 Second yet honoured still. A third race then 148 Zeus fashioned out of bronze, quite different than 149 The second, with ash spears, both dread and stout; 150 They liked fell warfare and audacity; 151 They ate no corn, encased about 152 With iron, full invincibility 153 In hands, limbs, shoulders, and the arms they plied 154 Were bronze, their houses, too, their tools; they knew 155 of no black iron. Later, when they died 156 It was self-slaughter – they descended to 157 Chill Hades’ mouldy house, without a name. 158 Yes, black death took them off, although they’d been 159 Impetuous, and they the sun’s bright flame 160 Would see no more, nor would this race be seen 161 Themselves, screened by the earth. Cronus’ son then 162 Fashioned upon the lavish land one more, 163 The fourth, more just and brave – of righteous men, 164 Called demigods. It was the race before 165 Our own upon the boundless earth. Foul war 166 And dreadful battles vanquished some of these, 167 While some in Cadmus’ Thebes, while looking for 168 The flocks of Oedipus, found death. The sea 169 Took others as they crossed to Troy fight 170 For fair-tressed Helen. They were screened as well 171 In death. Lord Zeus arranged it that they might 172 Live far from others. Thus they came to dwell, 173 Carefree, among the blessed isles, content 174 And affluent, by the deep-swirling sea. 175 Sweet grain, blooming three times a year, was sent 176 To them by the earth, that gives vitality 177 To all mankind, and Cronus was their lord, 178 Far from the other gods, for Zeus, who reign 179 Over gods and men, had cut away the cord 180 That bound him. Though the lowest race, its gain 181 Were fame and glory. A fifth progeny 182 All-seeing Zeus produced, who populated 183 The fecund earth. I wish I could not be 184 Among them, but instead that I’d been fated 185 To be born later or be in my grave 186 Already: for it is of iron made. 187 Each day in misery they ever slave, 188 And even in the night they do not fade 189 Away. The gods will give to them great woe 190 But mix good with the bad. Zeus will destroy 191 Them too when babies in their cribs shall grow 192 Grey hair. No bond a father with his boy 193 Shall share, nor guest with host, nor friend with friend – 194 No love of brothers as there was erstwhile, 195 Respect for aging parents at an end. 196 Their wretched children shall with words of bile 197 Find fault with them in their irreverence 198 And not repay their bringing up. We’ll find 199 Cities brought down. There’ll be no deference 200 That’s given to the honest, just and kind. 201 The evil and the proud will get acclaim, 202 Might will be right and shame shall cease to be, 203 The bad will harm the good whom they shall maim 204 With crooked words, swearing false oaths. We’ll see 205 Envy among the wretched, foul of face 206 And voice, adoring villainy, and then 207 Into Olympus from the endless space 208 Mankind inhabits, leaving mortal men, 209 Fair flesh veiled by white robes, shall Probity 210 And Shame depart, and there’ll be grievous pain 211 For men: against all evil there shall be 212 No safeguard. Now I’ll tell, for lords who know 213 What it purports, a fable: once, on high, 214 Clutched in its talon-grip, a bird of prey 215 Took off a speckled nightingale whose cry 216 Was “Pity me”, but, to this bird’s dismay, 217 He said disdainfully: “You silly thing, 218 Why do you cry? A stronger one by far 219 Now has you. Although you may sweetly sing, 220 You go where I decide. Perhaps you are 221 My dinner or perhaps I’ll let you go. 222 A fool assails a stronger, for he’ll be 223 The loser, suffering scorn as well as woe.” 224 Thus spoke the swift-winged bird. Listen to me, 2
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Perses – heed justice and shun haughtiness; 226 It aids no common man: nobles can’t stay 227 It easily because it will oppre 228 Us all and bring disgrace. The better way 229 Is Justice, who will outstrip Pride at last. 230 Fools learn this by experience because 231 The God of Oaths, by running very fast, 232 Keeps pace with and requites all crooked laws. 233 When men who swallow bribes and crookedly 234 Pass sentences and drag Justice away, 235 There’s great turmoil, and then, in misery 236 Weeping and covered in a misty spray, 237 She comes back to the city, carrying
649
One who is nursing). You must take good care 650 of your sharp-toothed dog; do not scant his meat ' None
3. Homer, Iliad, 2.484-2.759, 2.867-2.875, 18.478-18.608 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Ajax, in the Catalogue of Ships • Akhaia, Akhaians (Peloponnese), anticipated in Catalogue of Ships • Catalog of Ships • Catalogue of Ships • Catalogue of Ships (Homer, Iliad • Diomedes, in the Catalogue of Ships • Iliad (Homer), and the Catalog of Ships • Priest, chief, utters prayers over ship of Isis, and purifies it, embraced and regarded as father • ship, • ships

 Found in books: Bowie (2021), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, 96, 232; Finkelberg (2019), Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays, 119, 209, 276, 291, 293, 315; Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 325; Hawes (2021), Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth, 94, 128, 149; Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 150, 153, 154; Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 306, 307; Laemmle (2021), Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration, 27, 202, 206, 207, 213, 214, 230, 309; Lalone (2019), Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess, 59, 96, 97; Skempis and Ziogas (2014), Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic 183, 187, 188; Thonemann (2020), An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams, 87

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2.484 ἔσπετε νῦν μοι Μοῦσαι Ὀλύμπια δώματʼ ἔχουσαι· 2.485 ὑμεῖς γὰρ θεαί ἐστε πάρεστέ τε ἴστέ τε πάντα, 2.486 ἡμεῖς δὲ κλέος οἶον ἀκούομεν οὐδέ τι ἴδμεν· 2.487 οἵ τινες ἡγεμόνες Δαναῶν καὶ κοίρανοι ἦσαν· 2.488 πληθὺν δʼ οὐκ ἂν ἐγὼ μυθήσομαι οὐδʼ ὀνομήνω, 2.489 οὐδʼ εἴ μοι δέκα μὲν γλῶσσαι, δέκα δὲ στόματʼ εἶεν, 2.490 φωνὴ δʼ ἄρρηκτος, χάλκεον δέ μοι ἦτορ ἐνείη, 2.491 εἰ μὴ Ὀλυμπιάδες Μοῦσαι Διὸς αἰγιόχοιο 2.492 θυγατέρες μνησαίαθʼ ὅσοι ὑπὸ Ἴλιον ἦλθον· 2.493 ἀρχοὺς αὖ νηῶν ἐρέω νῆάς τε προπάσας. 2.494 Βοιωτῶν μὲν Πηνέλεως καὶ Λήϊτος ἦρχον 2.495 Ἀρκεσίλαός τε Προθοήνωρ τε Κλονίος τε, 2.496 οἵ θʼ Ὑρίην ἐνέμοντο καὶ Αὐλίδα πετρήεσσαν 2.497 Σχοῖνόν τε Σκῶλόν τε πολύκνημόν τʼ Ἐτεωνόν, 2.498 Θέσπειαν Γραῖάν τε καὶ εὐρύχορον Μυκαλησσόν, 2.499 οἵ τʼ ἀμφʼ Ἅρμʼ ἐνέμοντο καὶ Εἰλέσιον καὶ Ἐρυθράς, 2.500 οἵ τʼ Ἐλεῶνʼ εἶχον ἠδʼ Ὕλην καὶ Πετεῶνα, 2.501 Ὠκαλέην Μεδεῶνά τʼ ἐϋκτίμενον πτολίεθρον, 2.502 Κώπας Εὔτρησίν τε πολυτρήρωνά τε Θίσβην, 2.503 οἵ τε Κορώνειαν καὶ ποιήενθʼ Ἁλίαρτον, 2.504 οἵ τε Πλάταιαν ἔχον ἠδʼ οἳ Γλισᾶντʼ ἐνέμοντο, 2.505 οἵ θʼ Ὑποθήβας εἶχον ἐϋκτίμενον πτολίεθρον, 2.506 Ὀγχηστόν θʼ ἱερὸν Ποσιδήϊον ἀγλαὸν ἄλσος, 2.507 οἵ τε πολυστάφυλον Ἄρνην ἔχον, οἵ τε Μίδειαν 2.508 Νῖσάν τε ζαθέην Ἀνθηδόνα τʼ ἐσχατόωσαν· 2.509 τῶν μὲν πεντήκοντα νέες κίον, ἐν δὲ ἑκάστῃ 2.510 κοῦροι Βοιωτῶν ἑκατὸν καὶ εἴκοσι βαῖνον. 2.511 οἳ δʼ Ἀσπληδόνα ναῖον ἰδʼ Ὀρχομενὸν Μινύειον, 2.512 τῶν ἦρχʼ Ἀσκάλαφος καὶ Ἰάλμενος υἷες Ἄρηος 2.513 οὓς τέκεν Ἀστυόχη δόμῳ Ἄκτορος Ἀζεΐδαο, 2.514 παρθένος αἰδοίη ὑπερώϊον εἰσαναβᾶσα 2.515 Ἄρηϊ κρατερῷ· ὃ δέ οἱ παρελέξατο λάθρῃ· 2.516 τοῖς δὲ τριήκοντα γλαφυραὶ νέες ἐστιχόωντο. 2.517 αὐτὰρ Φωκήων Σχεδίος καὶ Ἐπίστροφος ἦρχον 2.518 υἷες Ἰφίτου μεγαθύμου Ναυβολίδαο, 2.519 οἳ Κυπάρισσον ἔχον Πυθῶνά τε πετρήεσσαν 2.520 Κρῖσάν τε ζαθέην καὶ Δαυλίδα καὶ Πανοπῆα, 2.521 οἵ τʼ Ἀνεμώρειαν καὶ Ὑάμπολιν ἀμφενέμοντο, 2.522 οἵ τʼ ἄρα πὰρ ποταμὸν Κηφισὸν δῖον ἔναιον, 2.523 οἵ τε Λίλαιαν ἔχον πηγῇς ἔπι Κηφισοῖο· 2.524 τοῖς δʼ ἅμα τεσσαράκοντα μέλαιναι νῆες ἕποντο. 2.525 οἳ μὲν Φωκήων στίχας ἵστασαν ἀμφιέποντες, 2.526 Βοιωτῶν δʼ ἔμπλην ἐπʼ ἀριστερὰ θωρήσσοντο. 2.527 Λοκρῶν δʼ ἡγεμόνευεν Ὀϊλῆος ταχὺς Αἴας 2.528 μείων, οὔ τι τόσος γε ὅσος Τελαμώνιος Αἴας 2.529 ἀλλὰ πολὺ μείων· ὀλίγος μὲν ἔην λινοθώρηξ, 2.530 ἐγχείῃ δʼ ἐκέκαστο Πανέλληνας καὶ Ἀχαιούς· 2.531 οἳ Κῦνόν τʼ ἐνέμοντʼ Ὀπόεντά τε Καλλίαρόν τε 2.532 Βῆσσάν τε Σκάρφην τε καὶ Αὐγειὰς ἐρατεινὰς 2.533 Τάρφην τε Θρόνιον τε Βοαγρίου ἀμφὶ ῥέεθρα· 2.534 τῷ δʼ ἅμα τεσσαράκοντα μέλαιναι νῆες ἕποντο 2.535 Λοκρῶν, οἳ ναίουσι πέρην ἱερῆς Εὐβοίης. 2.536 οἳ δʼ Εὔβοιαν ἔχον μένεα πνείοντες Ἄβαντες 2.537 Χαλκίδα τʼ Εἰρέτριάν τε πολυστάφυλόν θʼ Ἱστίαιαν 2.538 Κήρινθόν τʼ ἔφαλον Δίου τʼ αἰπὺ πτολίεθρον, 2.539 οἵ τε Κάρυστον ἔχον ἠδʼ οἳ Στύρα ναιετάασκον, 2.540 τῶν αὖθʼ ἡγεμόνευʼ Ἐλεφήνωρ ὄζος Ἄρηος 2.541 Χαλκωδοντιάδης μεγαθύμων ἀρχὸς Ἀβάντων. 2.542 τῷ δʼ ἅμʼ Ἄβαντες ἕποντο θοοὶ ὄπιθεν κομόωντες 2.543 αἰχμηταὶ μεμαῶτες ὀρεκτῇσιν μελίῃσι 2.544 θώρηκας ῥήξειν δηΐων ἀμφὶ στήθεσσι· 2.545 τῷ δʼ ἅμα τεσσαράκοντα μέλαιναι νῆες ἕποντο. 2.546 οἳ δʼ ἄρʼ Ἀθήνας εἶχον ἐϋκτίμενον πτολίεθρον 2.547 δῆμον Ἐρεχθῆος μεγαλήτορος, ὅν ποτʼ Ἀθήνη 2.548 θρέψε Διὸς θυγάτηρ, τέκε δὲ ζείδωρος ἄρουρα, 2.549 κὰδ δʼ ἐν Ἀθήνῃς εἷσεν ἑῷ ἐν πίονι νηῷ· 2.550 ἔνθα δέ μιν ταύροισι καὶ ἀρνειοῖς ἱλάονται 2.551 κοῦροι Ἀθηναίων περιτελλομένων ἐνιαυτῶν· 2.552 τῶν αὖθʼ ἡγεμόνευʼ υἱὸς Πετεῶο Μενεσθεύς. 2.553 τῷ δʼ οὔ πώ τις ὁμοῖος ἐπιχθόνιος γένετʼ ἀνὴρ 2.554 κοσμῆσαι ἵππους τε καὶ ἀνέρας ἀσπιδιώτας· 2.555 Νέστωρ οἶος ἔριζεν· ὃ γὰρ προγενέστερος ἦεν· 2.556 τῷ δʼ ἅμα πεντήκοντα μέλαιναι νῆες ἕποντο. 2.557 Αἴας δʼ ἐκ Σαλαμῖνος ἄγεν δυοκαίδεκα νῆας, 2.558 στῆσε δʼ ἄγων ἵνʼ Ἀθηναίων ἵσταντο φάλαγγες. 2.559 οἳ δʼ Ἄργός τʼ εἶχον Τίρυνθά τε τειχιόεσσαν 2.560 Ἑρμιόνην Ἀσίνην τε, βαθὺν κατὰ κόλπον ἐχούσας, 2.561 Τροιζῆνʼ Ἠϊόνας τε καὶ ἀμπελόεντʼ Ἐπίδαυρον, 2.562 οἵ τʼ ἔχον Αἴγιναν Μάσητά τε κοῦροι Ἀχαιῶν, 2.563 τῶν αὖθʼ ἡγεμόνευε βοὴν ἀγαθὸς Διομήδης 2.564 καὶ Σθένελος, Καπανῆος ἀγακλειτοῦ φίλος υἱός· 2.565 τοῖσι δʼ ἅμʼ Εὐρύαλος τρίτατος κίεν ἰσόθεος φὼς 2.566 Μηκιστέος υἱὸς Ταλαϊονίδαο ἄνακτος· 2.567 συμπάντων δʼ ἡγεῖτο βοὴν ἀγαθὸς Διομήδης· 2.568 τοῖσι δʼ ἅμʼ ὀγδώκοντα μέλαιναι νῆες ἕποντο. 2.569 οἳ δὲ Μυκήνας εἶχον ἐϋκτίμενον πτολίεθρον 2.570 ἀφνειόν τε Κόρινθον ἐϋκτιμένας τε Κλεωνάς, 2.571 Ὀρνειάς τʼ ἐνέμοντο Ἀραιθυρέην τʼ ἐρατεινὴν 2.572 καὶ Σικυῶνʼ, ὅθʼ ἄρʼ Ἄδρηστος πρῶτʼ ἐμβασίλευεν, 2.573 οἵ θʼ Ὑπερησίην τε καὶ αἰπεινὴν Γονόεσσαν 2.574 Πελλήνην τʼ εἶχον ἠδʼ Αἴγιον ἀμφενέμοντο 2.575 Αἰγιαλόν τʼ ἀνὰ πάντα καὶ ἀμφʼ Ἑλίκην εὐρεῖαν, 2.576 τῶν ἑκατὸν νηῶν ἦρχε κρείων Ἀγαμέμνων 2.577 Ἀτρεΐδης· ἅμα τῷ γε πολὺ πλεῖστοι καὶ ἄριστοι 2.578 λαοὶ ἕποντʼ· ἐν δʼ αὐτὸς ἐδύσετο νώροπα χαλκὸν 2.579 κυδιόων, πᾶσιν δὲ μετέπρεπεν ἡρώεσσιν 2.580 οὕνεκʼ ἄριστος ἔην πολὺ δὲ πλείστους ἄγε λαούς. 2.581 οἳ δʼ εἶχον κοίλην Λακεδαίμονα κητώεσσαν, 2.582 Φᾶρίν τε Σπάρτην τε πολυτρήρωνά τε Μέσσην, 2.583 Βρυσειάς τʼ ἐνέμοντο καὶ Αὐγειὰς ἐρατεινάς, 2.584 οἵ τʼ ἄρʼ Ἀμύκλας εἶχον Ἕλος τʼ ἔφαλον πτολίεθρον, 2.585 οἵ τε Λάαν εἶχον ἠδʼ Οἴτυλον ἀμφενέμοντο, 2.586 τῶν οἱ ἀδελφεὸς ἦρχε βοὴν ἀγαθὸς Μενέλαος 2.587 ἑξήκοντα νεῶν· ἀπάτερθε δὲ θωρήσσοντο· 2.588 ἐν δʼ αὐτὸς κίεν ᾗσι προθυμίῃσι πεποιθὼς 2.589 ὀτρύνων πόλεμον δέ· μάλιστα δὲ ἵετο θυμῷ 2.590 τίσασθαι Ἑλένης ὁρμήματά τε στοναχάς τε. 2.591 οἳ δὲ Πύλον τʼ ἐνέμοντο καὶ Ἀρήνην ἐρατεινὴν 2.592 καὶ Θρύον Ἀλφειοῖο πόρον καὶ ἐΰκτιτον Αἰπὺ 2.593 καὶ Κυπαρισσήεντα καὶ Ἀμφιγένειαν ἔναιον 2.594 καὶ Πτελεὸν καὶ Ἕλος καὶ Δώριον, ἔνθά τε Μοῦσαι 2.595 ἀντόμεναι Θάμυριν τὸν Θρήϊκα παῦσαν ἀοιδῆς 2.596 Οἰχαλίηθεν ἰόντα παρʼ Εὐρύτου Οἰχαλιῆος· 2.597 στεῦτο γὰρ εὐχόμενος νικησέμεν εἴ περ ἂν αὐταὶ 2.598 Μοῦσαι ἀείδοιεν κοῦραι Διὸς αἰγιόχοιο· 2.599 αἳ δὲ χολωσάμεναι πηρὸν θέσαν, αὐτὰρ ἀοιδὴν 2.600 θεσπεσίην ἀφέλοντο καὶ ἐκλέλαθον κιθαριστύν· 2.601 τῶν αὖθʼ ἡγεμόνευε Γερήνιος ἱππότα Νέστωρ· 2.602 τῷ δʼ ἐνενήκοντα γλαφυραὶ νέες ἐστιχόωντο. 2.603 οἳ δʼ ἔχον Ἀρκαδίην ὑπὸ Κυλλήνης ὄρος αἰπὺ 2.604 Αἰπύτιον παρὰ τύμβον ἵνʼ ἀνέρες ἀγχιμαχηταί, 2.605 οἳ Φενεόν τʼ ἐνέμοντο καὶ Ὀρχομενὸν πολύμηλον 2.606 Ῥίπην τε Στρατίην τε καὶ ἠνεμόεσσαν Ἐνίσπην 2.607 καὶ Τεγέην εἶχον καὶ Μαντινέην ἐρατεινὴν 2.608 Στύμφηλόν τʼ εἶχον καὶ Παρρασίην ἐνέμοντο, 2.609 τῶν ἦρχʼ Ἀγκαίοιο πάϊς κρείων Ἀγαπήνωρ 2.610 ἑξήκοντα νεῶν· πολέες δʼ ἐν νηῒ ἑκάστῃ 2.611 Ἀρκάδες ἄνδρες ἔβαινον ἐπιστάμενοι πολεμίζειν. 2.612 αὐτὸς γάρ σφιν δῶκεν ἄναξ ἀνδρῶν Ἀγαμέμνων 2.613 νῆας ἐϋσσέλμους περάαν ἐπὶ οἴνοπα πόντον 2.614 Ἀτρεΐδης, ἐπεὶ οὔ σφι θαλάσσια ἔργα μεμήλει. 2.615 οἳ δʼ ἄρα Βουπράσιόν τε καὶ Ἤλιδα δῖαν ἔναιον 2.616 ὅσσον ἐφʼ Ὑρμίνη καὶ Μύρσινος ἐσχατόωσα 2.617 πέτρη τʼ Ὠλενίη καὶ Ἀλήσιον ἐντὸς ἐέργει, 2.618 τῶν αὖ τέσσαρες ἀρχοὶ ἔσαν, δέκα δʼ ἀνδρὶ ἑκάστῳ 2.619 νῆες ἕποντο θοαί, πολέες δʼ ἔμβαινον Ἐπειοί. 2.620 τῶν μὲν ἄρʼ Ἀμφίμαχος καὶ Θάλπιος ἡγησάσθην 2.621 υἷες ὃ μὲν Κτεάτου, ὃ δʼ ἄρʼ Εὐρύτου, Ἀκτορίωνε· 2.622 τῶν δʼ Ἀμαρυγκεΐδης ἦρχε κρατερὸς Διώρης· 2.623 τῶν δὲ τετάρτων ἦρχε Πολύξεινος θεοειδὴς 2.624 υἱὸς Ἀγασθένεος Αὐγηϊάδαο ἄνακτος. 2.625 οἳ δʼ ἐκ Δουλιχίοιο Ἐχινάων θʼ ἱεράων 2.626 νήσων, αἳ ναίουσι πέρην ἁλὸς Ἤλιδος ἄντα, 2.627 τῶν αὖθʼ ἡγεμόνευε Μέγης ἀτάλαντος Ἄρηϊ 2.628 Φυλεΐδης, ὃν τίκτε Διῒ φίλος ἱππότα Φυλεύς, 2.629 ὅς ποτε Δουλίχιον δʼ ἀπενάσσατο πατρὶ χολωθείς· 2.631 αὐτὰρ Ὀδυσσεὺς ἦγε Κεφαλλῆνας μεγαθύμους, 2.632 οἵ ῥʼ Ἰθάκην εἶχον καὶ Νήριτον εἰνοσίφυλλον 2.633 καὶ Κροκύλειʼ ἐνέμοντο καὶ Αἰγίλιπα τρηχεῖαν, 2.634 οἵ τε Ζάκυνθον ἔχον ἠδʼ οἳ Σάμον ἀμφενέμοντο, 2.635 οἵ τʼ ἤπειρον ἔχον ἠδʼ ἀντιπέραιʼ ἐνέμοντο· 2.636 τῶν μὲν Ὀδυσσεὺς ἦρχε Διὶ μῆτιν ἀτάλαντος· 2.637 τῷ δʼ ἅμα νῆες ἕποντο δυώδεκα μιλτοπάρῃοι. 2.638 Αἰτωλῶν δʼ ἡγεῖτο Θόας Ἀνδραίμονος υἱός, 2.639 οἳ Πλευρῶνʼ ἐνέμοντο καὶ Ὤλενον ἠδὲ Πυλήνην' '2.645 Κρητῶν δʼ Ἰδομενεὺς δουρὶ κλυτὸς ἡγεμόνευεν, 2.646 οἳ Κνωσόν τʼ εἶχον Γόρτυνά τε τειχιόεσσαν, 2.647 Λύκτον Μίλητόν τε καὶ ἀργινόεντα Λύκαστον 2.648 Φαιστόν τε Ῥύτιόν τε, πόλεις εὖ ναιετοώσας, 2.649 ἄλλοι θʼ οἳ Κρήτην ἑκατόμπολιν ἀμφενέμοντο. 2.650 τῶν μὲν ἄρʼ Ἰδομενεὺς δουρὶ κλυτὸς ἡγεμόνευε 2.651 Μηριόνης τʼ ἀτάλαντος Ἐνυαλίῳ ἀνδρειφόντῃ· 2.653 Τληπόλεμος δʼ Ἡρακλεΐδης ἠΰς τε μέγας τε 2.654 ἐκ Ῥόδου ἐννέα νῆας ἄγεν Ῥοδίων ἀγερώχων, 2.655 οἳ Ῥόδον ἀμφενέμοντο διὰ τρίχα κοσμηθέντες 2.656 Λίνδον Ἰηλυσόν τε καὶ ἀργινόεντα Κάμειρον. 2.657 τῶν μὲν Τληπόλεμος δουρὶ κλυτὸς ἡγεμόνευεν, 2.658 ὃν τέκεν Ἀστυόχεια βίῃ Ἡρακληείῃ, 2.659 τὴν ἄγετʼ ἐξ Ἐφύρης ποταμοῦ ἄπο Σελλήεντος 2.660 πέρσας ἄστεα πολλὰ διοτρεφέων αἰζηῶν. 2.661 Τληπόλεμος δʼ ἐπεὶ οὖν τράφʼ ἐνὶ μεγάρῳ εὐπήκτῳ, 2.662 αὐτίκα πατρὸς ἑοῖο φίλον μήτρωα κατέκτα 2.663 ἤδη γηράσκοντα Λικύμνιον ὄζον Ἄρηος· 2.664 αἶψα δὲ νῆας ἔπηξε, πολὺν δʼ ὅ γε λαὸν ἀγείρας 2.665 βῆ φεύγων ἐπὶ πόντον· ἀπείλησαν γάρ οἱ ἄλλοι 2.666 υἱέες υἱωνοί τε βίης Ἡρακληείης. 2.667 αὐτὰρ ὅ γʼ ἐς Ῥόδον ἷξεν ἀλώμενος ἄλγεα πάσχων· 2.668 τριχθὰ δὲ ᾤκηθεν καταφυλαδόν, ἠδὲ φίληθεν 2.669 ἐκ Διός, ὅς τε θεοῖσι καὶ ἀνθρώποισιν ἀνάσσει, 2.670 καί σφιν θεσπέσιον πλοῦτον κατέχευε Κρονίων. 2.671 Νιρεὺς αὖ Σύμηθεν ἄγε τρεῖς νῆας ἐΐσας 2.672 Νιρεὺς Ἀγλαΐης υἱὸς Χαρόποιό τʼ ἄνακτος 2.673 Νιρεύς, ὃς κάλλιστος ἀνὴρ ὑπὸ Ἴλιον ἦλθε 2.674 τῶν ἄλλων Δαναῶν μετʼ ἀμύμονα Πηλεΐωνα· 2.675 ἀλλʼ ἀλαπαδνὸς ἔην, παῦρος δέ οἱ εἵπετο λαός. 2.676 οἳ δʼ ἄρα Νίσυρόν τʼ εἶχον Κράπαθόν τε Κάσον τε 2.677 καὶ Κῶν Εὐρυπύλοιο πόλιν νήσους τε Καλύδνας, 2.678 τῶν αὖ Φείδιππός τε καὶ Ἄντιφος ἡγησάσθην 2.679 Θεσσαλοῦ υἷε δύω Ἡρακλεΐδαο ἄνακτος· 2.681 νῦν αὖ τοὺς ὅσσοι τὸ Πελασγικὸν Ἄργος ἔναιον, 2.682 οἵ τʼ Ἄλον οἵ τʼ Ἀλόπην οἵ τε Τρηχῖνα νέμοντο, 2.683 οἵ τʼ εἶχον Φθίην ἠδʼ Ἑλλάδα καλλιγύναικα, 2.684 Μυρμιδόνες δὲ καλεῦντο καὶ Ἕλληνες καὶ Ἀχαιοί, 2.685 τῶν αὖ πεντήκοντα νεῶν ἦν ἀρχὸς Ἀχιλλεύς. 2.686 ἀλλʼ οἵ γʼ οὐ πολέμοιο δυσηχέος ἐμνώοντο· 2.687 οὐ γὰρ ἔην ὅς τίς σφιν ἐπὶ στίχας ἡγήσαιτο· 2.688 κεῖτο γὰρ ἐν νήεσσι ποδάρκης δῖος Ἀχιλλεὺς 2.689 κούρης χωόμενος Βρισηΐδος ἠϋκόμοιο, 2.690 τὴν ἐκ Λυρνησσοῦ ἐξείλετο πολλὰ μογήσας 2.691 Λυρνησσὸν διαπορθήσας καὶ τείχεα Θήβης, 2.692 κὰδ δὲ Μύνητʼ ἔβαλεν καὶ Ἐπίστροφον ἐγχεσιμώρους, 2.693 υἱέας Εὐηνοῖο Σεληπιάδαο ἄνακτος· 2.694 τῆς ὅ γε κεῖτʼ ἀχέων, τάχα δʼ ἀνστήσεσθαι ἔμελλεν. 2.695 οἳ δʼ εἶχον Φυλάκην καὶ Πύρασον ἀνθεμόεντα 2.696 Δήμητρος τέμενος, Ἴτωνά τε μητέρα μήλων, 2.697 ἀγχίαλόν τʼ Ἀντρῶνα ἰδὲ Πτελεὸν λεχεποίην, 2.698 τῶν αὖ Πρωτεσίλαος ἀρήϊος ἡγεμόνευε 2.699 ζωὸς ἐών· τότε δʼ ἤδη ἔχεν κάτα γαῖα μέλαινα. 2.700 τοῦ δὲ καὶ ἀμφιδρυφὴς ἄλοχος Φυλάκῃ ἐλέλειπτο 2.701 καὶ δόμος ἡμιτελής· τὸν δʼ ἔκτανε Δάρδανος ἀνὴρ 2.702 νηὸς ἀποθρῴσκοντα πολὺ πρώτιστον Ἀχαιῶν. 2.703 οὐδὲ μὲν οὐδʼ οἳ ἄναρχοι ἔσαν, πόθεόν γε μὲν ἀρχόν· 2.704 ἀλλά σφεας κόσμησε Ποδάρκης ὄζος Ἄρηος 2.705 Ἰφίκλου υἱὸς πολυμήλου Φυλακίδαο 2.706 αὐτοκασίγνητος μεγαθύμου Πρωτεσιλάου 2.707 ὁπλότερος γενεῇ· ὁ δʼ ἅμα πρότερος καὶ ἀρείων 2.708 ἥρως Πρωτεσίλαος ἀρήϊος· οὐδέ τι λαοὶ 2.709 δεύονθʼ ἡγεμόνος, πόθεόν γε μὲν ἐσθλὸν ἐόντα· 2.711 οἳ δὲ Φερὰς ἐνέμοντο παραὶ Βοιβηΐδα λίμνην 2.712 Βοίβην καὶ Γλαφύρας καὶ ἐϋκτιμένην Ἰαωλκόν, 2.713 τῶν ἦρχʼ Ἀδμήτοιο φίλος πάϊς ἕνδεκα νηῶν 2.714 Εὔμηλος, τὸν ὑπʼ Ἀδμήτῳ τέκε δῖα γυναικῶν 2.715 Ἄλκηστις Πελίαο θυγατρῶν εἶδος ἀρίστη. 2.716 οἳ δʼ ἄρα Μηθώνην καὶ Θαυμακίην ἐνέμοντο 2.717 καὶ Μελίβοιαν ἔχον καὶ Ὀλιζῶνα τρηχεῖαν, 2.718 τῶν δὲ Φιλοκτήτης ἦρχεν τόξων ἐῢ εἰδὼς 2.719 ἑπτὰ νεῶν· ἐρέται δʼ ἐν ἑκάστῃ πεντήκοντα 2.720 ἐμβέβασαν τόξων εὖ εἰδότες ἶφι μάχεσθαι. 2.721 ἀλλʼ ὃ μὲν ἐν νήσῳ κεῖτο κρατέρʼ ἄλγεα πάσχων 2.722 Λήμνῳ ἐν ἠγαθέῃ, ὅθι μιν λίπον υἷες Ἀχαιῶν 2.723 ἕλκεϊ μοχθίζοντα κακῷ ὀλοόφρονος ὕδρου· 2.724 ἔνθʼ ὅ γε κεῖτʼ ἀχέων· τάχα δὲ μνήσεσθαι ἔμελλον 2.730 οἵ τʼ ἔχον Οἰχαλίην πόλιν Εὐρύτου Οἰχαλιῆος, 2.731 τῶν αὖθʼ ἡγείσθην Ἀσκληπιοῦ δύο παῖδε 2.732 ἰητῆρʼ ἀγαθὼ Ποδαλείριος ἠδὲ Μαχάων· 2.734 οἳ δʼ ἔχον Ὀρμένιον, οἵ τε κρήνην Ὑπέρειαν, 2.735 οἵ τʼ ἔχον Ἀστέριον Τιτάνοιό τε λευκὰ κάρηνα, 2.736 τῶν ἦρχʼ Εὐρύπυλος Εὐαίμονος ἀγλαὸς υἱός· 2.738 οἳ δʼ Ἄργισσαν ἔχον καὶ Γυρτώνην ἐνέμοντο, 2.739 Ὄρθην Ἠλώνην τε πόλιν τʼ Ὀλοοσσόνα λευκήν, 2.740 τῶν αὖθʼ ἡγεμόνευε μενεπτόλεμος Πολυποίτης 2.741 υἱὸς Πειριθόοιο τὸν ἀθάνατος τέκετο Ζεύς· 2.742 τόν ῥʼ ὑπὸ Πειριθόῳ τέκετο κλυτὸς Ἱπποδάμεια 2.743 ἤματι τῷ ὅτε Φῆρας ἐτίσατο λαχνήεντας, 2.744 τοὺς δʼ ἐκ Πηλίου ὦσε καὶ Αἰθίκεσσι πέλασσεν· 2.745 οὐκ οἶος, ἅμα τῷ γε Λεοντεὺς ὄζος Ἄρηος 2.746 υἱὸς ὑπερθύμοιο Κορώνου Καινεΐδαο· 2.748 Γουνεὺς δʼ ἐκ Κύφου ἦγε δύω καὶ εἴκοσι νῆας· 2.749 τῷ δʼ Ἐνιῆνες ἕποντο μενεπτόλεμοί τε Περαιβοὶ 2.750 οἳ περὶ Δωδώνην δυσχείμερον οἰκίʼ ἔθεντο, 2.751 οἵ τʼ ἀμφʼ ἱμερτὸν Τιταρησσὸν ἔργα νέμοντο 2.752 ὅς ῥʼ ἐς Πηνειὸν προΐει καλλίρροον ὕδωρ, 2.753 οὐδʼ ὅ γε Πηνειῷ συμμίσγεται ἀργυροδίνῃ, 2.754 ἀλλά τέ μιν καθύπερθεν ἐπιρρέει ἠΰτʼ ἔλαιον· 2.755 ὅρκου γὰρ δεινοῦ Στυγὸς ὕδατός ἐστιν ἀπορρώξ. 2.756 Μαγνήτων δʼ ἦρχε Πρόθοος Τενθρηδόνος υἱός, 2.757 οἳ περὶ Πηνειὸν καὶ Πήλιον εἰνοσίφυλλον 2.758 ναίεσκον· τῶν μὲν Πρόθοος θοὸς ἡγεμόνευε,
2.867
Νάστης αὖ Καρῶν ἡγήσατο βαρβαροφώνων, 2.868 οἳ Μίλητον ἔχον Φθιρῶν τʼ ὄρος ἀκριτόφυλλον 2.869 Μαιάνδρου τε ῥοὰς Μυκάλης τʼ αἰπεινὰ κάρηνα· 2.870 τῶν μὲν ἄρʼ Ἀμφίμαχος καὶ Νάστης ἡγησάσθην, 2.871 Νάστης Ἀμφίμαχός τε Νομίονος ἀγλαὰ τέκνα, 2.872 ὃς καὶ χρυσὸν ἔχων πόλεμον δʼ ἴεν ἠΰτε κούρη 2.873 νήπιος, οὐδέ τί οἱ τό γʼ ἐπήρκεσε λυγρὸν ὄλεθρον, 2.874 ἀλλʼ ἐδάμη ὑπὸ χερσὶ ποδώκεος Αἰακίδαο 2.875 ἐν ποταμῷ, χρυσὸν δʼ Ἀχιλεὺς ἐκόμισσε δαΐφρων.
18.478
ποίει δὲ πρώτιστα σάκος μέγα τε στιβαρόν τε 18.479 πάντοσε δαιδάλλων, περὶ δʼ ἄντυγα βάλλε φαεινὴν 18.480 τρίπλακα μαρμαρέην, ἐκ δʼ ἀργύρεον τελαμῶνα. 18.481 πέντε δʼ ἄρʼ αὐτοῦ ἔσαν σάκεος πτύχες· αὐτὰρ ἐν αὐτῷ 18.482 ποίει δαίδαλα πολλὰ ἰδυίῃσι πραπίδεσσιν. 18.483 ἐν μὲν γαῖαν ἔτευξʼ, ἐν δʼ οὐρανόν, ἐν δὲ θάλασσαν, 18.484 ἠέλιόν τʼ ἀκάμαντα σελήνην τε πλήθουσαν, 18.485 ἐν δὲ τὰ τείρεα πάντα, τά τʼ οὐρανὸς ἐστεφάνωται, 18.486 Πληϊάδας θʼ Ὑάδας τε τό τε σθένος Ὠρίωνος 18.487 Ἄρκτόν θʼ, ἣν καὶ Ἄμαξαν ἐπίκλησιν καλέουσιν, 18.488 ἥ τʼ αὐτοῦ στρέφεται καί τʼ Ὠρίωνα δοκεύει, 18.489 οἴη δʼ ἄμμορός ἐστι λοετρῶν Ὠκεανοῖο. 18.490 ἐν δὲ δύω ποίησε πόλεις μερόπων ἀνθρώπων 18.491 καλάς. ἐν τῇ μέν ῥα γάμοι τʼ ἔσαν εἰλαπίναι τε, 18.492 νύμφας δʼ ἐκ θαλάμων δαΐδων ὕπο λαμπομενάων 18.493 ἠγίνεον ἀνὰ ἄστυ, πολὺς δʼ ὑμέναιος ὀρώρει· 18.494 κοῦροι δʼ ὀρχηστῆρες ἐδίνεον, ἐν δʼ ἄρα τοῖσιν 18.495 αὐλοὶ φόρμιγγές τε βοὴν ἔχον· αἳ δὲ γυναῖκες 18.496 ἱστάμεναι θαύμαζον ἐπὶ προθύροισιν ἑκάστη. 18.497 λαοὶ δʼ εἰν ἀγορῇ ἔσαν ἀθρόοι· ἔνθα δὲ νεῖκος 18.498 ὠρώρει, δύο δʼ ἄνδρες ἐνείκεον εἵνεκα ποινῆς 18.499 ἀνδρὸς ἀποφθιμένου· ὃ μὲν εὔχετο πάντʼ ἀποδοῦναι 18.500 δήμῳ πιφαύσκων, ὃ δʼ ἀναίνετο μηδὲν ἑλέσθαι· 18.501 ἄμφω δʼ ἱέσθην ἐπὶ ἴστορι πεῖραρ ἑλέσθαι. 18.502 λαοὶ δʼ ἀμφοτέροισιν ἐπήπυον ἀμφὶς ἀρωγοί· 18.503 κήρυκες δʼ ἄρα λαὸν ἐρήτυον· οἳ δὲ γέροντες 18.504 εἵατʼ ἐπὶ ξεστοῖσι λίθοις ἱερῷ ἐνὶ κύκλῳ, 18.505 σκῆπτρα δὲ κηρύκων ἐν χέρσʼ ἔχον ἠεροφώνων· 18.506 τοῖσιν ἔπειτʼ ἤϊσσον, ἀμοιβηδὶς δὲ δίκαζον. 18.507 κεῖτο δʼ ἄρʼ ἐν μέσσοισι δύω χρυσοῖο τάλαντα, 18.508 τῷ δόμεν ὃς μετὰ τοῖσι δίκην ἰθύντατα εἴποι. 18.509 τὴν δʼ ἑτέρην πόλιν ἀμφὶ δύω στρατοὶ ἥατο λαῶν 18.510 τεύχεσι λαμπόμενοι· δίχα δέ σφισιν ἥνδανε βουλή, 18.511 ἠὲ διαπραθέειν ἢ ἄνδιχα πάντα δάσασθαι 18.512 κτῆσιν ὅσην πτολίεθρον ἐπήρατον ἐντὸς ἔεργεν· 18.513 οἳ δʼ οὔ πω πείθοντο, λόχῳ δʼ ὑπεθωρήσσοντο. 18.514 τεῖχος μέν ῥʼ ἄλοχοί τε φίλαι καὶ νήπια τέκνα 18.515 ῥύατʼ ἐφεσταότες, μετὰ δʼ ἀνέρες οὓς ἔχε γῆρας· 18.516 οἳ δʼ ἴσαν· ἦρχε δʼ ἄρά σφιν Ἄρης καὶ Παλλὰς Ἀθήνη 18.517 ἄμφω χρυσείω, χρύσεια δὲ εἵματα ἕσθην, 18.518 καλὼ καὶ μεγάλω σὺν τεύχεσιν, ὥς τε θεώ περ 18.519 ἀμφὶς ἀριζήλω· λαοὶ δʼ ὑπολίζονες ἦσαν. 18.520 οἳ δʼ ὅτε δή ῥʼ ἵκανον ὅθι σφίσιν εἶκε λοχῆσαι 18.521 ἐν ποταμῷ, ὅθι τʼ ἀρδμὸς ἔην πάντεσσι βοτοῖσιν, 18.522 ἔνθʼ ἄρα τοί γʼ ἵζοντʼ εἰλυμένοι αἴθοπι χαλκῷ. 18.523 τοῖσι δʼ ἔπειτʼ ἀπάνευθε δύω σκοποὶ εἵατο λαῶν 18.524 δέγμενοι ὁππότε μῆλα ἰδοίατο καὶ ἕλικας βοῦς. 18.525 οἳ δὲ τάχα προγένοντο, δύω δʼ ἅμʼ ἕποντο νομῆες 18.526 τερπόμενοι σύριγξι· δόλον δʼ οὔ τι προνόησαν. 18.527 οἳ μὲν τὰ προϊδόντες ἐπέδραμον, ὦκα δʼ ἔπειτα 18.528 τάμνοντʼ ἀμφὶ βοῶν ἀγέλας καὶ πώεα καλὰ 18.529 ἀργεννέων οἰῶν, κτεῖνον δʼ ἐπὶ μηλοβοτῆρας. 18.530 οἳ δʼ ὡς οὖν ἐπύθοντο πολὺν κέλαδον παρὰ βουσὶν 18.531 εἰράων προπάροιθε καθήμενοι, αὐτίκʼ ἐφʼ ἵππων 18.532 βάντες ἀερσιπόδων μετεκίαθον, αἶψα δʼ ἵκοντο. 18.533 στησάμενοι δʼ ἐμάχοντο μάχην ποταμοῖο παρʼ ὄχθας, 18.534 βάλλον δʼ ἀλλήλους χαλκήρεσιν ἐγχείῃσιν. 18.535 ἐν δʼ Ἔρις ἐν δὲ Κυδοιμὸς ὁμίλεον, ἐν δʼ ὀλοὴ Κήρ, 18.536 ἄλλον ζωὸν ἔχουσα νεούτατον, ἄλλον ἄουτον, 18.537 ἄλλον τεθνηῶτα κατὰ μόθον ἕλκε ποδοῖιν· 18.538 εἷμα δʼ ἔχʼ ἀμφʼ ὤμοισι δαφοινεὸν αἵματι φωτῶν. 18.539 ὡμίλευν δʼ ὥς τε ζωοὶ βροτοὶ ἠδʼ ἐμάχοντο, 18.540 νεκρούς τʼ ἀλλήλων ἔρυον κατατεθνηῶτας. 18.541 ἐν δʼ ἐτίθει νειὸν μαλακὴν πίειραν ἄρουραν 18.542 εὐρεῖαν τρίπολον· πολλοὶ δʼ ἀροτῆρες ἐν αὐτῇ 18.543 ζεύγεα δινεύοντες ἐλάστρεον ἔνθα καὶ ἔνθα. 18.544 οἳ δʼ ὁπότε στρέψαντες ἱκοίατο τέλσον ἀρούρης, 18.545 τοῖσι δʼ ἔπειτʼ ἐν χερσὶ δέπας μελιηδέος οἴνου 18.546 δόσκεν ἀνὴρ ἐπιών· τοὶ δὲ στρέψασκον ἀνʼ ὄγμους, 18.547 ἱέμενοι νειοῖο βαθείης τέλσον ἱκέσθαι. 18.548 ἣ δὲ μελαίνετʼ ὄπισθεν, ἀρηρομένῃ δὲ ἐῴκει, 18.549 χρυσείη περ ἐοῦσα· τὸ δὴ περὶ θαῦμα τέτυκτο. 18.550 ἐν δʼ ἐτίθει τέμενος βασιλήϊον· ἔνθα δʼ ἔριθοι 18.551 ἤμων ὀξείας δρεπάνας ἐν χερσὶν ἔχοντες. 18.552 δράγματα δʼ ἄλλα μετʼ ὄγμον ἐπήτριμα πῖπτον ἔραζε, 18.553 ἄλλα δʼ ἀμαλλοδετῆρες ἐν ἐλλεδανοῖσι δέοντο. 18.554 τρεῖς δʼ ἄρʼ ἀμαλλοδετῆρες ἐφέστασαν· αὐτὰρ ὄπισθε 18.555 παῖδες δραγμεύοντες ἐν ἀγκαλίδεσσι φέροντες 18.556 ἀσπερχὲς πάρεχον· βασιλεὺς δʼ ἐν τοῖσι σιωπῇ 18.557 σκῆπτρον ἔχων ἑστήκει ἐπʼ ὄγμου γηθόσυνος κῆρ. 18.558 κήρυκες δʼ ἀπάνευθεν ὑπὸ δρυῒ δαῖτα πένοντο, 18.559 βοῦν δʼ ἱερεύσαντες μέγαν ἄμφεπον· αἳ δὲ γυναῖκες 18.560 δεῖπνον ἐρίθοισιν λεύκʼ ἄλφιτα πολλὰ πάλυνον. 18.561 ἐν δʼ ἐτίθει σταφυλῇσι μέγα βρίθουσαν ἀλωὴν 18.562 καλὴν χρυσείην· μέλανες δʼ ἀνὰ βότρυες ἦσαν, 18.563 ἑστήκει δὲ κάμαξι διαμπερὲς ἀργυρέῃσιν. 18.564 ἀμφὶ δὲ κυανέην κάπετον, περὶ δʼ ἕρκος ἔλασσε 18.565 κασσιτέρου· μία δʼ οἴη ἀταρπιτὸς ἦεν ἐπʼ αὐτήν, 18.566 τῇ νίσοντο φορῆες ὅτε τρυγόῳεν ἀλωήν. 18.567 παρθενικαὶ δὲ καὶ ἠΐθεοι ἀταλὰ φρονέοντες 18.568 πλεκτοῖς ἐν ταλάροισι φέρον μελιηδέα καρπόν. 18.569 τοῖσιν δʼ ἐν μέσσοισι πάϊς φόρμιγγι λιγείῃ 18.570 ἱμερόεν κιθάριζε, λίνον δʼ ὑπὸ καλὸν ἄειδε 18.571 λεπταλέῃ φωνῇ· τοὶ δὲ ῥήσσοντες ἁμαρτῇ 18.572 μολπῇ τʼ ἰυγμῷ τε ποσὶ σκαίροντες ἕποντο. 18.573 ἐν δʼ ἀγέλην ποίησε βοῶν ὀρθοκραιράων· 18.574 αἳ δὲ βόες χρυσοῖο τετεύχατο κασσιτέρου τε, 18.575 μυκηθμῷ δʼ ἀπὸ κόπρου ἐπεσσεύοντο νομὸν δὲ 18.576 πὰρ ποταμὸν κελάδοντα, παρὰ ῥοδανὸν δονακῆα. 18.577 χρύσειοι δὲ νομῆες ἅμʼ ἐστιχόωντο βόεσσι 18.578 τέσσαρες, ἐννέα δέ σφι κύνες πόδας ἀργοὶ ἕποντο. 18.579 σμερδαλέω δὲ λέοντε δύʼ ἐν πρώτῃσι βόεσσι 18.580 ταῦρον ἐρύγμηλον ἐχέτην· ὃ δὲ μακρὰ μεμυκὼς 18.581 ἕλκετο· τὸν δὲ κύνες μετεκίαθον ἠδʼ αἰζηοί. 18.582 τὼ μὲν ἀναρρήξαντε βοὸς μεγάλοιο βοείην 18.583 ἔγκατα καὶ μέλαν αἷμα λαφύσσετον· οἳ δὲ νομῆες 18.584 αὔτως ἐνδίεσαν ταχέας κύνας ὀτρύνοντες. 18.585 οἳ δʼ ἤτοι δακέειν μὲν ἀπετρωπῶντο λεόντων, 18.586 ἱστάμενοι δὲ μάλʼ ἐγγὺς ὑλάκτεον ἔκ τʼ ἀλέοντο. 18.587 ἐν δὲ νομὸν ποίησε περικλυτὸς ἀμφιγυήεις 18.588 ἐν καλῇ βήσσῃ μέγαν οἰῶν ἀργεννάων, 18.589 σταθμούς τε κλισίας τε κατηρεφέας ἰδὲ σηκούς. 18.590 ἐν δὲ χορὸν ποίκιλλε περικλυτὸς ἀμφιγυήεις, 18.591 τῷ ἴκελον οἷόν ποτʼ ἐνὶ Κνωσῷ εὐρείῃ 18.592 Δαίδαλος ἤσκησεν καλλιπλοκάμῳ Ἀριάδνῃ. 18.593 ἔνθα μὲν ἠΐθεοι καὶ παρθένοι ἀλφεσίβοιαι 18.594 ὀρχεῦντʼ ἀλλήλων ἐπὶ καρπῷ χεῖρας ἔχοντες. 18.595 τῶν δʼ αἳ μὲν λεπτὰς ὀθόνας ἔχον, οἳ δὲ χιτῶνας 18.596 εἵατʼ ἐϋννήτους, ἦκα στίλβοντας ἐλαίῳ· 18.597 καί ῥʼ αἳ μὲν καλὰς στεφάνας ἔχον, οἳ δὲ μαχαίρας 18.598 εἶχον χρυσείας ἐξ ἀργυρέων τελαμώνων. 18.599 οἳ δʼ ὁτὲ μὲν θρέξασκον ἐπισταμένοισι πόδεσσι 18.600 ῥεῖα μάλʼ, ὡς ὅτε τις τροχὸν ἄρμενον ἐν παλάμῃσιν 18.601 ἑζόμενος κεραμεὺς πειρήσεται, αἴ κε θέῃσιν· 18.602 ἄλλοτε δʼ αὖ θρέξασκον ἐπὶ στίχας ἀλλήλοισι. 18.603 πολλὸς δʼ ἱμερόεντα χορὸν περιίσταθʼ ὅμιλος 18.604 τερπόμενοι· δοιὼ δὲ κυβιστητῆρε κατʼ αὐτοὺς 18.605 μολπῆς ἐξάρχοντες ἐδίνευον κατὰ μέσσους. 18.606 ἐν δʼ ἐτίθει ποταμοῖο μέγα σθένος Ὠκεανοῖο 18.607 ἄντυγα πὰρ πυμάτην σάκεος πύκα ποιητοῖο. 18.608 αὐτὰρ ἐπεὶ δὴ τεῦξε σάκος μέγα τε στιβαρόν τε,'' None
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2.484 Even as a bull among the herd stands forth far the chiefest over all, for that he is pre-eminent among the gathering kine, even such did Zeus make Agamemnon on that day, pre-eminent among many, and chiefest amid warriors.Tell me now, ye Muses that have dwellings on Olympus— 2.485 for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.490 and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains, 2.495 and Arcesilaus and Prothoënor and Clonius; these were they that dwelt in Hyria and rocky Aulis and Schoenus and Scolus and Eteonus with its many ridges, Thespeia, Graea, and spacious Mycalessus; and that dwelt about Harma and Eilesium and Erythrae; 2.500 and that held Eleon and Hyle and Peteon, Ocalea and Medeon, the well-built citadel, Copae, Eutresis, and Thisbe, the haunt of doves; that dwelt in Coroneia and grassy Haliartus, and that held Plataea and dwelt in Glisas; 2.505 that held lower Thebe, the well-built citadel, and holy Onchestus, the bright grove of Poseidon; and that held Arne, rich in vines, and Mideia and sacred Nisa and Anthedon on the seaboard. of these there came fifty ships, and on board of each 2.510 /went young men of the Boeotians an hundred and twenty. 2.514 went young men of the Boeotians an hundred and twenty. And they that dwelt in Aspledon and Orchomenus of the Minyae were led by Ascalaphus and Ialmenus, sons of Ares, whom, in the palace of Actor, son of Azeus, Astyoche, the honoured maiden, conceived of mighty Ares, when she had entered into her upper chamber; 2.515 for he lay with her in secret. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships.And of the Phocians Schedius and Epistrophus were captains, sons of great-souled Iphitus, son of Naubolus; these were they that held Cyparissus and rocky Pytho, 2.520 and sacred Crisa and Daulis and Panopeus; and that dwelt about Anemoreia and Hyampolis, and that lived beside the goodly river Cephisus, and that held Lilaea by the springs of Cephisus. With these followed forty black ships. 2.525 And their leaders busily marshalled the ranks of the Phocians, and made ready for battle hard by the Boeotians on the left.And the Loerians had as leader the swift son of Oïleus, Aias the less, in no wise as great as Telamonian Aias, but far less. Small of stature was he, with corselet of linen, 2.530 /but with the spear he far excelled the whole host of Hellenes and Achaeans. These were they that dwelt in Cynus and Opus and Calliarus and Bessa and Scarphe and lovely Augeiae and Tarphe and Thronium about the streams of Boagrius. With Aias followed forty black ships of 2.535 the Locrians that dwell over against sacred Euboea.And the Abantes, breathing fury, that held Euboea and Chalcis and Eretria and Histiaea, rich in vines, and Cerinthus, hard by the sea, and the steep citadel of Dios; and that held Carystus and dwelt in Styra,— 2.540 all these again had as leader Elephenor, scion of Ares, him that was son of Chalcodon and captain of the great-souled Abantes. And with him followed the swift Abantes, with hair long at the back, spearmen eager with outstretched ashen spears to rend the corselets about the breasts of the foemen. 2.545 /And with him there followed forty black ships. 2.549 And with him there followed forty black ships. And they that held Athens, the well-built citadel, the land of great-hearted Erechtheus, whom of old Athene, daughter of Zeus, fostered, when the earth, the giver of grain, had borne him; and she made him to dwell in Athens, in her own rich sanctuary, 2.550 and there the youths of the Athenians, as the years roll on in their courses, seek to win his favour with sacrifices of bulls and rams;—these again had as leader Menestheus, son of Peteos. Like unto him was none other man upon the face of the earth for the marshalling of chariots and of warriors that bear the shield. 2.555 Only Nestor could vie with him, for he was the elder. And with him there followed fifty black ships.And Aias led from Salamis twelve ships, and stationed them where the battalions of the Athenians stood.And they that held Argos and Tiryns, famed for its walls, 2.560 and Hermione and Asine, that enfold the deep gulf, Troezen and Eïonae and vine-clad Epidaurus, and the youths of the Achaeans that held Aegina and Mases,—these again had as leaders Diomedes, good at the war-cry, and Sthenelus, dear son of glorious Capaneus. 2.565 And with them came a third, Euryalus, a godlike warrior, son of king Mecisteus, son of Talaus; but leader over them all was Diomedes, good at the war-cry. And with these there followed eighty black ships.And they that held Mycenae, the well-built citadel, 2.570 and wealthy Corinth, and well-built Cleonae, and dwelt in Orneiae and lovely Araethyrea and Sicyon, wherein at the first Adrastus was king; and they that held Hyperesia and steep Gonoessa and Pellene, 2.575 and that dwelt about Aegium and throughout all Aegialus, and about broad Helice,—of these was the son of Atreus, lord Agamemnon, captain, with an hundred ships. With him followed most people by far and goodliest; and among them he himself did on his gleaming bronze, a king all-glorious, and was pre-eminent among all the warriors, 2.580 for that he was noblest, and led a people far the most in number. 2.584 for that he was noblest, and led a people far the most in number. And they that held the hollow land of Lacedaemon with its many ravines, and Pharis and Sparta and Messe, the haunt of doves, and that dwelt in Bryseiae and lovely Augeiae, and that held Amyclae and Helus, a citadel hard by the sea, ' "2.585 and that held Laas, and dwelt about Oetylus,—these were led by Agamemnon's brother, even Menelaus, good at the war-cry, with sixty ships; and they were marshalled apart. And himself he moved among them, confident in his zeal, urging his men to battle; and above all others was his heart fain " "2.590 to get him requital for his strivings and groanings for Helen's sake.And they that dwelt in Pylos and lovely Arene and Thryum, the ford of Alpheius, and fair-founded Aepy, and that had their abodes in Cyparisseïs and Amphigeneia and Pteleos and Helus and Dorium, " "2.594 to get him requital for his strivings and groanings for Helen's sake.And they that dwelt in Pylos and lovely Arene and Thryum, the ford of Alpheius, and fair-founded Aepy, and that had their abodes in Cyparisseïs and Amphigeneia and Pteleos and Helus and Dorium, " '2.595 where the Muses met Thamyris the Thracian and made an end of his singing, even as he was journeying from Oechalia, from the house of Eurytus the Oechalian: for he vaunted with boasting that he would conquer, were the Muses themselves to sing against him, the daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis; but they in their wrath maimed him, 2.600 and took from him his wondrous song, and made him forget his minstrelsy;—all these folk again had as leader the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia. And with him were ranged ninety hollow ships.And they that held Arcadia beneath the steep mountain of Cyllene, beside the tomb of Aepytus, where are warriors that fight in close combat; 2.605 and they that dwelt in Pheneos and Orchomenus, rich in flocks, and Rhipe and Stratia and wind-swept Enispe; and that held Tegea and lovely Mantineia; and that held Stymphalus and dwelt in Parrhasia, —all these were led by the son of Ancaeus, Lord Agapenor, 2.610 with sixty ships; and on each ship embarked full many Arcadian warriors well-skilled in fight. For of himself had the king of men, Agamemnon, given them benched ships wherewith to cross over the wine-dark sea, even the son of Atreus, for with matters of seafaring had they naught to do. 2.615 And they that dwelt in Buprasium and goodly Elis, all that part thereof that Hyrmine and Myrsinus on the seaboard and the rock of Olen and Alesium enclose between them—these again had four leaders, and ten swift ships followed each one, and many Epeians embarked thereon. 2.619 And they that dwelt in Buprasium and goodly Elis, all that part thereof that Hyrmine and Myrsinus on the seaboard and the rock of Olen and Alesium enclose between them—these again had four leaders, and ten swift ships followed each one, and many Epeians embarked thereon. ' "2.620 of these some were led by Amphimachus and Thalpius, of the blood of Actor, sons, the one of Cteatus and the other of Eurytus; and of some was the son of Amarynceus captain, even mighty Diores; and of the fourth company godlike Polyxeinus was captain, son of king Agasthenes, Augeias' son. " "2.624 of these some were led by Amphimachus and Thalpius, of the blood of Actor, sons, the one of Cteatus and the other of Eurytus; and of some was the son of Amarynceus captain, even mighty Diores; and of the fourth company godlike Polyxeinus was captain, son of king Agasthenes, Augeias' son. " '2.625 And those from Dulichiuni and the Echinae, the holy isles, that lie across the sea, over against Elis, these again had as leader Meges, the peer of Ares, even the son of Phyleus, whom the horseman Phyleus, dear to Zeus, begat—he that of old had gone to dwell in Dulichium in wrath against his father. 2.630 And with Meges there followed forty black ships.And Odysseus led the great-souled Cephallenians that held Ithaca and Neritum, covered with waving forests, and that dwelt in Crocyleia and rugged Aegilips; and them that held Zacynthus, and that dwelt about Samos, 2.634 And with Meges there followed forty black ships.And Odysseus led the great-souled Cephallenians that held Ithaca and Neritum, covered with waving forests, and that dwelt in Crocyleia and rugged Aegilips; and them that held Zacynthus, and that dwelt about Samos, ' "2.635 and held the mainland and dwelt on the shores over against the isles. of these was Odysseus captain, the peer of Zeus in counsel. And with him there followed twelve ships with vermilion prows.And the Aetolians were led by Thoas, Andraemon's son, even they that dwelt in Pleuron and Olenus and Pylene and Chalcis, hard by the sea, and rocky Calydon. For the sons of great-hearted Oeneus were no more, neither did he himself still live, and fair-haired Meleager was dead, to whom had commands been given that he should bear full sway among the Aetolians. And with Thoas there followed forty black ships. " "2.640 ,Now all the other gods and men, lords of chariots, slumbered the whole night through, but Zeus was not holden of sweet sleep, for he was pondering in his heart how he might do honour to Achilles and lay many low beside the ships of the Achaeans. And this plan seemed to his mind the best, ,Now all the other gods and men, lords of chariots, slumbered the whole night through, but Zeus was not holden of sweet sleep, for he was pondering in his heart how he might do honour to Achilles and lay many low beside the ships of the Achaeans. And this plan seemed to his mind the best, ,Now all the other gods and men, lords of chariots, slumbered the whole night through, but Zeus was not holden of sweet sleep, for he was pondering in his heart how he might do honour to Achilles and lay many low beside the ships of the Achaeans. And this plan seemed to his mind the best, ,Now all the other gods and men, lords of chariots, slumbered the whole night through, but Zeus was not holden of sweet sleep, for he was pondering in his heart how he might do honour to Achilles and lay many low beside the ships of the Achaeans. And this plan seemed to his mind the best, ,Now all the other gods and men, lords of chariots, slumbered the whole night through, but Zeus was not holden of sweet sleep, for he was pondering in his heart how he might do honour to Achilles and lay many low beside the ships of the Achaeans. And this plan seemed to his mind the best, ,to send to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, a baneful dream. So he spake, and addressed him with winged words:Up, go, thou baneful Dream, unto the swift ships of the Achaeans, and when thou art come to the hut of Agamemnon, son of Atreus, ,to send to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, a baneful dream. So he spake, and addressed him with winged words:Up, go, thou baneful Dream, unto the swift ships of the Achaeans, and when thou art come to the hut of Agamemnon, son of Atreus, ,to send to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, a baneful dream. So he spake, and addressed him with winged words:Up, go, thou baneful Dream, unto the swift ships of the Achaeans, and when thou art come to the hut of Agamemnon, son of Atreus, ,to send to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, a baneful dream. So he spake, and addressed him with winged words:Up, go, thou baneful Dream, unto the swift ships of the Achaeans, and when thou art come to the hut of Agamemnon, son of Atreus, ,to send to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, a baneful dream. So he spake, and addressed him with winged words:Up, go, thou baneful Dream, unto the swift ships of the Achaeans, and when thou art come to the hut of Agamemnon, son of Atreus, ,tell him all my word truly, even as I charge thee. Bid him arm the long-haired Achaeans with all speed, since now he may take the broad-wayed city of the Trojans. For the immortals, that have homes upon Olympus, are no longer divided in counsel, ,tell him all my word truly, even as I charge thee. Bid him arm the long-haired Achaeans with all speed, since now he may take the broad-wayed city of the Trojans. For the immortals, that have homes upon Olympus, are no longer divided in counsel, ,tell him all my word truly, even as I charge thee. Bid him arm the long-haired Achaeans with all speed, since now he may take the broad-wayed city of the Trojans. For the immortals, that have homes upon Olympus, are no longer divided in counsel, ,tell him all my word truly, even as I charge thee. Bid him arm the long-haired Achaeans with all speed, since now he may take the broad-wayed city of the Trojans. For the immortals, that have homes upon Olympus, are no longer divided in counsel, ,tell him all my word truly, even as I charge thee. Bid him arm the long-haired Achaeans with all speed, since now he may take the broad-wayed city of the Trojans. For the immortals, that have homes upon Olympus, are no longer divided in counsel, ,since Hera hath Vent the minds of all by her supplication, and over the Trojans hang woes. So spake he, and the Dream went his way, when he had heard this saying. Forthwith he came to the swift ships of the Achaeans, and went his way to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, and found him sleeping in his hut, and over him was shed ambrosial slumber. ,since Hera hath Vent the minds of all by her supplication, and over the Trojans hang woes. So spake he, and the Dream went his way, when he had heard this saying. Forthwith he came to the swift ships of the Achaeans, and went his way to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, and found him sleeping in his hut, and over him was shed ambrosial slumber. ,since Hera hath Vent the minds of all by her supplication, and over the Trojans hang woes. So spake he, and the Dream went his way, when he had heard this saying. Forthwith he came to the swift ships of the Achaeans, and went his way to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, and found him sleeping in his hut, and over him was shed ambrosial slumber. ,since Hera hath Vent the minds of all by her supplication, and over the Trojans hang woes. So spake he, and the Dream went his way, when he had heard this saying. Forthwith he came to the swift ships of the Achaeans, and went his way to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, and found him sleeping in his hut, and over him was shed ambrosial slumber. ,since Hera hath Vent the minds of all by her supplication, and over the Trojans hang woes. So spake he, and the Dream went his way, when he had heard this saying. Forthwith he came to the swift ships of the Achaeans, and went his way to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, and found him sleeping in his hut, and over him was shed ambrosial slumber. ,So he took his stand above his head, in the likeness of the son of Neleus, even Nestor, whom above all the elders Agamemnon held in honour; likening himself to him, the Dream from heaven spake, saying:Thou sleepest, son of wise-hearted Atreus, the tamer of horses. To sleep the whole night through beseemeth not a man that is a counsellor, ,So he took his stand above his head, in the likeness of the son of Neleus, even Nestor, whom above all the elders Agamemnon held in honour; likening himself to him, the Dream from heaven spake, saying:Thou sleepest, son of wise-hearted Atreus, the tamer of horses. To sleep the whole night through beseemeth not a man that is a counsellor, ,So he took his stand above his head, in the likeness of the son of Neleus, even Nestor, whom above all the elders Agamemnon held in honour; likening himself to him, the Dream from heaven spake, saying:Thou sleepest, son of wise-hearted Atreus, the tamer of horses. To sleep the whole night through beseemeth not a man that is a counsellor, ,So he took his stand above his head, in the likeness of the son of Neleus, even Nestor, whom above all the elders Agamemnon held in honour; likening himself to him, the Dream from heaven spake, saying:Thou sleepest, son of wise-hearted Atreus, the tamer of horses. To sleep the whole night through beseemeth not a man that is a counsellor, ,So he took his stand above his head, in the likeness of the son of Neleus, even Nestor, whom above all the elders Agamemnon held in honour; likening himself to him, the Dream from heaven spake, saying:Thou sleepest, son of wise-hearted Atreus, the tamer of horses. To sleep the whole night through beseemeth not a man that is a counsellor, ,to whom a host is entrusted, and upon whom rest so many cares. But now, hearken thou quickly unto me, for I am a messenger to thee from Zeus, who, far away though he be, hath exceeding care for thee and pity. He biddeth thee arm the long-haired Achaeans with all speed, since now thou mayest take the broad-wayed city of the Trojans. ,to whom a host is entrusted, and upon whom rest so many cares. But now, hearken thou quickly unto me, for I am a messenger to thee from Zeus, who, far away though he be, hath exceeding care for thee and pity. He biddeth thee arm the long-haired Achaeans with all speed, since now thou mayest take the broad-wayed city of the Trojans. ,to whom a host is entrusted, and upon whom rest so many cares. But now, hearken thou quickly unto me, for I am a messenger to thee from Zeus, who, far away though he be, hath exceeding care for thee and pity. He biddeth thee arm the long-haired Achaeans with all speed, since now thou mayest take the broad-wayed city of the Trojans. ,to whom a host is entrusted, and upon whom rest so many cares. But now, hearken thou quickly unto me, for I am a messenger to thee from Zeus, who, far away though he be, hath exceeding care for thee and pity. He biddeth thee arm the long-haired Achaeans with all speed, since now thou mayest take the broad-wayed city of the Trojans. ,to whom a host is entrusted, and upon whom rest so many cares. But now, hearken thou quickly unto me, for I am a messenger to thee from Zeus, who, far away though he be, hath exceeding care for thee and pity. He biddeth thee arm the long-haired Achaeans with all speed, since now thou mayest take the broad-wayed city of the Trojans. ,For the immortals that have homes upon Olympus are no longer divided in counsel, since Hera hath bent the minds of all by her supplication, and over the Trojans hang woes by the will of Zeus. But do thou keep this in thy heart, nor let forgetfulness lay hold of thee, whenso honey-hearted sleep shall let thee go. ,For the immortals that have homes upon Olympus are no longer divided in counsel, since Hera hath bent the minds of all by her supplication, and over the Trojans hang woes by the will of Zeus. But do thou keep this in thy heart, nor let forgetfulness lay hold of thee, whenso honey-hearted sleep shall let thee go. ,For the immortals that have homes upon Olympus are no longer divided in counsel, since Hera hath bent the minds of all by her supplication, and over the Trojans hang woes by the will of Zeus. But do thou keep this in thy heart, nor let forgetfulness lay hold of thee, whenso honey-hearted sleep shall let thee go. ,For the immortals that have homes upon Olympus are no longer divided in counsel, since Hera hath bent the minds of all by her supplication, and over the Trojans hang woes by the will of Zeus. But do thou keep this in thy heart, nor let forgetfulness lay hold of thee, whenso honey-hearted sleep shall let thee go. ,For the immortals that have homes upon Olympus are no longer divided in counsel, since Hera hath bent the minds of all by her supplication, and over the Trojans hang woes by the will of Zeus. But do thou keep this in thy heart, nor let forgetfulness lay hold of thee, whenso honey-hearted sleep shall let thee go. ,So spoke the Dream, and departed, and left him there, pondering in his heart on things that were not to be brought to pass. For in sooth he deemed that he should take the city of Priam that very day, fool that he was! seeing he knew not what deeds Zeus was purposing, ,So spoke the Dream, and departed, and left him there, pondering in his heart on things that were not to be brought to pass. For in sooth he deemed that he should take the city of Priam that very day, fool that he was! seeing he knew not what deeds Zeus was purposing, ,So spoke the Dream, and departed, and left him there, pondering in his heart on things that were not to be brought to pass. For in sooth he deemed that he should take the city of Priam that very day, fool that he was! seeing he knew not what deeds Zeus was purposing, ,So spoke the Dream, and departed, and left him there, pondering in his heart on things that were not to be brought to pass. For in sooth he deemed that he should take the city of Priam that very day, fool that he was! seeing he knew not what deeds Zeus was purposing, ,So spoke the Dream, and departed, and left him there, pondering in his heart on things that were not to be brought to pass. For in sooth he deemed that he should take the city of Priam that very day, fool that he was! seeing he knew not what deeds Zeus was purposing, ,who was yet to bring woes and groanings on Trojans alike and Danaans throughout the course of stubborn fights. Then he awoke from sleep, and the divine voice was ringing in his ears. He sat upright and did on his soft tunic, fair and glistering, and about him cast his great cloak, and beneath his shining feet he bound his fair sandals, ,who was yet to bring woes and groanings on Trojans alike and Danaans throughout the course of stubborn fights. Then he awoke from sleep, and the divine voice was ringing in his ears. He sat upright and did on his soft tunic, fair and glistering, and about him cast his great cloak, and beneath his shining feet he bound his fair sandals, ,who was yet to bring woes and groanings on Trojans alike and Danaans throughout the course of stubborn fights. Then he awoke from sleep, and the divine voice was ringing in his ears. He sat upright and did on his soft tunic, fair and glistering, and about him cast his great cloak, and beneath his shining feet he bound his fair sandals, ,who was yet to bring woes and groanings on Trojans alike and Danaans throughout the course of stubborn fights. Then he awoke from sleep, and the divine voice was ringing in his ears. He sat upright and did on his soft tunic, fair and glistering, and about him cast his great cloak, and beneath his shining feet he bound his fair sandals, ,who was yet to bring woes and groanings on Trojans alike and Danaans throughout the course of stubborn fights. Then he awoke from sleep, and the divine voice was ringing in his ears. He sat upright and did on his soft tunic, fair and glistering, and about him cast his great cloak, and beneath his shining feet he bound his fair sandals, ,and about his shoulders flung his silver-studded sword; and he grasped the sceptre of his fathers, imperishable ever, and therewith took his way along the ships of the brazen-coated Achaeans.Now the goddess Dawn went up to high Olympus, to announce the light to Zeus and the other immortals, ,and about his shoulders flung his silver-studded sword; and he grasped the sceptre of his fathers, imperishable ever, and therewith took his way along the ships of the brazen-coated Achaeans.Now the goddess Dawn went up to high Olympus, to announce the light to Zeus and the other immortals, ,and about his shoulders flung his silver-studded sword; and he grasped the sceptre of his fathers, imperishable ever, and therewith took his way along the ships of the brazen-coated Achaeans.Now the goddess Dawn went up to high Olympus, to announce the light to Zeus and the other immortals, ,and about his shoulders flung his silver-studded sword; and he grasped the sceptre of his fathers, imperishable ever, and therewith took his way along the ships of the brazen-coated Achaeans.Now the goddess Dawn went up to high Olympus, to announce the light to Zeus and the other immortals, ,and about his shoulders flung his silver-studded sword; and he grasped the sceptre of his fathers, imperishable ever, and therewith took his way along the ships of the brazen-coated Achaeans.Now the goddess Dawn went up to high Olympus, to announce the light to Zeus and the other immortals, ,but Agamemnon bade the clear-voiced heralds summon to the place of gathering the long-haired Achaeans. And they made summons, and the men gathered full quickly.But the king first made the council of the great-souled elders to sit down beside the ship of Nestor, the king Pylos-born. ,but Agamemnon bade the clear-voiced heralds summon to the place of gathering the long-haired Achaeans. And they made summons, and the men gathered full quickly.But the king first made the council of the great-souled elders to sit down beside the ship of Nestor, the king Pylos-born. ,but Agamemnon bade the clear-voiced heralds summon to the place of gathering the long-haired Achaeans. And they made summons, and the men gathered full quickly.But the king first made the council of the great-souled elders to sit down beside the ship of Nestor, the king Pylos-born. ,but Agamemnon bade the clear-voiced heralds summon to the place of gathering the long-haired Achaeans. And they made summons, and the men gathered full quickly.But the king first made the council of the great-souled elders to sit down beside the ship of Nestor, the king Pylos-born. ,but Agamemnon bade the clear-voiced heralds summon to the place of gathering the long-haired Achaeans. And they made summons, and the men gathered full quickly.But the king first made the council of the great-souled elders to sit down beside the ship of Nestor, the king Pylos-born. ,And when he had called them together, he contrived a cunning plan, and said:Hearken, my friends, a Dream from heaven came to me in my sleep through the ambrosial night, and most like was it to goodly Nestor, in form and in stature and in build. It took its stand above my head, and spake to me, saying: ,And when he had called them together, he contrived a cunning plan, and said:Hearken, my friends, a Dream from heaven came to me in my sleep through the ambrosial night, and most like was it to goodly Nestor, in form and in stature and in build. It took its stand above my head, and spake to me, saying: ,And when he had called them together, he contrived a cunning plan, and said:Hearken, my friends, a Dream from heaven came to me in my sleep through the ambrosial night, and most like was it to goodly Nestor, in form and in stature and in build. It took its stand above my head, and spake to me, saying: ,And when he had called them together, he contrived a cunning plan, and said:Hearken, my friends, a Dream from heaven came to me in my sleep through the ambrosial night, and most like was it to goodly Nestor, in form and in stature and in build. It took its stand above my head, and spake to me, saying: ,And when he had called them together, he contrived a cunning plan, and said:Hearken, my friends, a Dream from heaven came to me in my sleep through the ambrosial night, and most like was it to goodly Nestor, in form and in stature and in build. It took its stand above my head, and spake to me, saying: ,‘Thou sleepest, son of wise-hearted Atreus, the tamer of horses. To sleep the whole night through beseemeth not a man that is a counsellor, to whom a host is entrusted, and upon whom rest so many cares. But now, hearken thou quickly unto me, for I am a messenger to thee from Zeus, who, far away though he be, hath exceeding care for thee and pity. ,‘Thou sleepest, son of wise-hearted Atreus, the tamer of horses. To sleep the whole night through beseemeth not a man that is a counsellor, to whom a host is entrusted, and upon whom rest so many cares. But now, hearken thou quickly unto me, for I am a messenger to thee from Zeus, who, far away though he be, hath exceeding care for thee and pity. ,‘Thou sleepest, son of wise-hearted Atreus, the tamer of horses. To sleep the whole night through beseemeth not a man that is a counsellor, to whom a host is entrusted, and upon whom rest so many cares. But now, hearken thou quickly unto me, for I am a messenger to thee from Zeus, who, far away though he be, hath exceeding care for thee and pity. ,‘Thou sleepest, son of wise-hearted Atreus, the tamer of horses. To sleep the whole night through beseemeth not a man that is a counsellor, to whom a host is entrusted, and upon whom rest so many cares. But now, hearken thou quickly unto me, for I am a messenger to thee from Zeus, who, far away though he be, hath exceeding care for thee and pity. ,‘Thou sleepest, son of wise-hearted Atreus, the tamer of horses. To sleep the whole night through beseemeth not a man that is a counsellor, to whom a host is entrusted, and upon whom rest so many cares. But now, hearken thou quickly unto me, for I am a messenger to thee from Zeus, who, far away though he be, hath exceeding care for thee and pity. ,He biddeth thee arm the long-haired Achaeans with all speed, since now thou mayest take the broad-wayed city of the Trojans. For the immortals that have homes upon Olympus are no longer divided in counsel, since Hera hath bent the minds of all by her supplication, and over the Trojans hang woes by the will of Zeus. ,He biddeth thee arm the long-haired Achaeans with all speed, since now thou mayest take the broad-wayed city of the Trojans. For the immortals that have homes upon Olympus are no longer divided in counsel, since Hera hath bent the minds of all by her supplication, and over the Trojans hang woes by the will of Zeus. ,He biddeth thee arm the long-haired Achaeans with all speed, since now thou mayest take the broad-wayed city of the Trojans. For the immortals that have homes upon Olympus are no longer divided in counsel, since Hera hath bent the minds of all by her supplication, and over the Trojans hang woes by the will of Zeus. ,He biddeth thee arm the long-haired Achaeans with all speed, since now thou mayest take the broad-wayed city of the Trojans. For the immortals that have homes upon Olympus are no longer divided in counsel, since Hera hath bent the minds of all by her supplication, and over the Trojans hang woes by the will of Zeus. ,He biddeth thee arm the long-haired Achaeans with all speed, since now thou mayest take the broad-wayed city of the Trojans. For the immortals that have homes upon Olympus are no longer divided in counsel, since Hera hath bent the minds of all by her supplication, and over the Trojans hang woes by the will of Zeus. ,But do thou keep this in thy heart.’ So spake he, and was flown away, and sweet sleep let me go. Nay, come now, if in any wise we may, let us arm the sons of the Achaeans; but first will I make trial of them in speech, as is right, and will bid them flee with their benched ships; ,But do thou keep this in thy heart.’ So spake he, and was flown away, and sweet sleep let me go. Nay, come now, if in any wise we may, let us arm the sons of the Achaeans; but first will I make trial of them in speech, as is right, and will bid them flee with their benched ships; ,But do thou keep this in thy heart.’ So spake he, and was flown away, and sweet sleep let me go. Nay, come now, if in any wise we may, let us arm the sons of the Achaeans; but first will I make trial of them in speech, as is right, and will bid them flee with their benched ships; ,But do thou keep this in thy heart.’ So spake he, and was flown away, and sweet sleep let me go. Nay, come now, if in any wise we may, let us arm the sons of the Achaeans; but first will I make trial of them in speech, as is right, and will bid them flee with their benched ships; ,But do thou keep this in thy heart.’ So spake he, and was flown away, and sweet sleep let me go. Nay, come now, if in any wise we may, let us arm the sons of the Achaeans; but first will I make trial of them in speech, as is right, and will bid them flee with their benched ships; ,but do you from this side and from that bespeak them, and strive to hold them back. ,but do you from this side and from that bespeak them, and strive to hold them back. ,but do you from this side and from that bespeak them, and strive to hold them back. ,but do you from this side and from that bespeak them, and strive to hold them back. ,but do you from this side and from that bespeak them, and strive to hold them back. So saying, he sate him down, and among them uprose Nestor, that was king of sandy Pylos. He with good intent addressed their gathering and spake among them:My friends, leaders and rulers of the Argives, ,were it any other of the Achaeans that told us this dream we might deem it a false thing, and turn away therefrom the more; but now hath he seen it who declares himself to be far the mightiest of the Achaeans. Nay, come then, if in any wise we may arm the sons of the Achaeans. He spake, and led the way forth from the council, ,were it any other of the Achaeans that told us this dream we might deem it a false thing, and turn away therefrom the more; but now hath he seen it who declares himself to be far the mightiest of the Achaeans. Nay, come then, if in any wise we may arm the sons of the Achaeans. He spake, and led the way forth from the council, ,were it any other of the Achaeans that told us this dream we might deem it a false thing, and turn away therefrom the more; but now hath he seen it who declares himself to be far the mightiest of the Achaeans. Nay, come then, if in any wise we may arm the sons of the Achaeans. He spake, and led the way forth from the council, ,were it any other of the Achaeans that told us this dream we might deem it a false thing, and turn away therefrom the more; but now hath he seen it who declares himself to be far the mightiest of the Achaeans. Nay, come then, if in any wise we may arm the sons of the Achaeans. He spake, and led the way forth from the council, ,were it any other of the Achaeans that told us this dream we might deem it a false thing, and turn away therefrom the more; but now hath he seen it who declares himself to be far the mightiest of the Achaeans. Nay, come then, if in any wise we may arm the sons of the Achaeans. He spake, and led the way forth from the council, ,and the other sceptred kings rose up thereat and obeyed the shepherd of the host; and the people the while were hastening on. Even as the tribes of thronging bees go forth from some hollow rock, ever coming on afresh, and in clusters over the flowers of spring fly in throngs, some here, some there; ,and the other sceptred kings rose up thereat and obeyed the shepherd of the host; and the people the while were hastening on. Even as the tribes of thronging bees go forth from some hollow rock, ever coming on afresh, and in clusters over the flowers of spring fly in throngs, some here, some there; ,and the other sceptred kings rose up thereat and obeyed the shepherd of the host; and the people the while were hastening on. Even as the tribes of thronging bees go forth from some hollow rock, ever coming on afresh, and in clusters over the flowers of spring fly in throngs, some here, some there; ,and the other sceptred kings rose up thereat and obeyed the shepherd of the host; and the people the while were hastening on. Even as the tribes of thronging bees go forth from some hollow rock, ever coming on afresh, and in clusters over the flowers of spring fly in throngs, some here, some there; ,and the other sceptred kings rose up thereat and obeyed the shepherd of the host; and the people the while were hastening on. Even as the tribes of thronging bees go forth from some hollow rock, ever coming on afresh, and in clusters over the flowers of spring fly in throngs, some here, some there; ,even so from the ships and huts before the low sea-beach marched forth in companies their many tribes to the place of gathering. And in their midst blazed forth Rumour, messenger of Zeus, urging them to go; and they were gathered. ,even so from the ships and huts before the low sea-beach marched forth in companies their many tribes to the place of gathering. And in their midst blazed forth Rumour, messenger of Zeus, urging them to go; and they were gathered. ,even so from the ships and huts before the low sea-beach marched forth in companies their many tribes to the place of gathering. And in their midst blazed forth Rumour, messenger of Zeus, urging them to go; and they were gathered. ,even so from the ships and huts before the low sea-beach marched forth in companies their many tribes to the place of gathering. And in their midst blazed forth Rumour, messenger of Zeus, urging them to go; and they were gathered. ,even so from the ships and huts before the low sea-beach marched forth in companies their many tribes to the place of gathering. And in their midst blazed forth Rumour, messenger of Zeus, urging them to go; and they were gathered. ,And the place of gathering was in a turmoil, and the earth groaned beneath them, as the people sate them down, and a din arose. Nine heralds with shouting sought to restrain them, if so be they might refrain from uproar and give ear to the kings, nurtured of Zeus. Hardly at the last were the people made to sit, and were stayed in their places, ,And the place of gathering was in a turmoil, and the earth groaned beneath them, as the people sate them down, and a din arose. Nine heralds with shouting sought to restrain them, if so be they might refrain from uproar and give ear to the kings, nurtured of Zeus. Hardly at the last were the people made to sit, and were stayed in their places, ,And the place of gathering was in a turmoil, and the earth groaned beneath them, as the people sate them down, and a din arose. Nine heralds with shouting sought to restrain them, if so be they might refrain from uproar and give ear to the kings, nurtured of Zeus. Hardly at the last were the people made to sit, and were stayed in their places, ,And the place of gathering was in a turmoil, and the earth groaned beneath them, as the people sate them down, and a din arose. Nine heralds with shouting sought to restrain them, if so be they might refrain from uproar and give ear to the kings, nurtured of Zeus. Hardly at the last were the people made to sit, and were stayed in their places, ,And the place of gathering was in a turmoil, and the earth groaned beneath them, as the people sate them down, and a din arose. Nine heralds with shouting sought to restrain them, if so be they might refrain from uproar and give ear to the kings, nurtured of Zeus. Hardly at the last were the people made to sit, and were stayed in their places, ,ceasing from their clamour. Then among them lord Agamemnon uprose, bearing in his hands the sceptre which Hephaestus had wrought with toil. Hephaestus gave it to king Zeus, son of Cronos, and Zeus gave it to the messenger Argeïphontes; and Hermes, the lord, gave it to Pelops, driver of horses, ,ceasing from their clamour. Then among them lord Agamemnon uprose, bearing in his hands the sceptre which Hephaestus had wrought with toil. Hephaestus gave it to king Zeus, son of Cronos, and Zeus gave it to the messenger Argeïphontes; and Hermes, the lord, gave it to Pelops, driver of horses, ,ceasing from their clamour. Then among them lord Agamemnon uprose, bearing in his hands the sceptre which Hephaestus had wrought with toil. Hephaestus gave it to king Zeus, son of Cronos, and Zeus gave it to the messenger Argeïphontes; and Hermes, the lord, gave it to Pelops, driver of horses, ,ceasing from their clamour. Then among them lord Agamemnon uprose, bearing in his hands the sceptre which Hephaestus had wrought with toil. Hephaestus gave it to king Zeus, son of Cronos, and Zeus gave it to the messenger Argeïphontes; and Hermes, the lord, gave it to Pelops, driver of horses, ,ceasing from their clamour. Then among them lord Agamemnon uprose, bearing in his hands the sceptre which Hephaestus had wrought with toil. Hephaestus gave it to king Zeus, son of Cronos, and Zeus gave it to the messenger Argeïphontes; and Hermes, the lord, gave it to Pelops, driver of horses, ,and Pelops in turn gave it to Atreus, shepherd of the host; and Atreus at his death left it to Thyestes, rich in flocks, and Thyestes again left it to Agamemnon to bear, that so he might be lord of many isles and of all Argos. ,and Pelops in turn gave it to Atreus, shepherd of the host; and Atreus at his death left it to Thyestes, rich in flocks, and Thyestes again left it to Agamemnon to bear, that so he might be lord of many isles and of all Argos. ,and Pelops in turn gave it to Atreus, shepherd of the host; and Atreus at his death left it to Thyestes, rich in flocks, and Thyestes again left it to Agamemnon to bear, that so he might be lord of many isles and of all Argos. ,and Pelops in turn gave it to Atreus, shepherd of the host; and Atreus at his death left it to Thyestes, rich in flocks, and Thyestes again left it to Agamemnon to bear, that so he might be lord of many isles and of all Argos. ,and Pelops in turn gave it to Atreus, shepherd of the host; and Atreus at his death left it to Thyestes, rich in flocks, and Thyestes again left it to Agamemnon to bear, that so he might be lord of many isles and of all Argos. Thereon he leaned, and spake his word among the Argives: , My friends, Danaan warriors, squires of Ares, great Zeus, son of Cronos, hath ensnared me in grievous blindness of heart, cruel god! seeing that of old he promised me, and bowed his head thereto, that not until I had sacked well-walled Ilios should I get me home; but now hath he planned cruel deceit, and bids me return inglorious to Argos, , My friends, Danaan warriors, squires of Ares, great Zeus, son of Cronos, hath ensnared me in grievous blindness of heart, cruel god! seeing that of old he promised me, and bowed his head thereto, that not until I had sacked well-walled Ilios should I get me home; but now hath he planned cruel deceit, and bids me return inglorious to Argos, , My friends, Danaan warriors, squires of Ares, great Zeus, son of Cronos, hath ensnared me in grievous blindness of heart, cruel god! seeing that of old he promised me, and bowed his head thereto, that not until I had sacked well-walled Ilios should I get me home; but now hath he planned cruel deceit, and bids me return inglorious to Argos, , My friends, Danaan warriors, squires of Ares, great Zeus, son of Cronos, hath ensnared me in grievous blindness of heart, cruel god! seeing that of old he promised me, and bowed his head thereto, that not until I had sacked well-walled Ilios should I get me home; but now hath he planned cruel deceit, and bids me return inglorious to Argos, , My friends, Danaan warriors, squires of Ares, great Zeus, son of Cronos, hath ensnared me in grievous blindness of heart, cruel god! seeing that of old he promised me, and bowed his head thereto, that not until I had sacked well-walled Ilios should I get me home; but now hath he planned cruel deceit, and bids me return inglorious to Argos, ,when I have lost much people. So, I ween, must be the good pleasure of Zeus, supreme in might, who hath laid low the heads of many cities, yea, and shall yet lay low, for his power is above all. A shameful thing is this even for the hearing of men that are yet to be, ,when I have lost much people. So, I ween, must be the good pleasure of Zeus, supreme in might, who hath laid low the heads of many cities, yea, and shall yet lay low, for his power is above all. A shameful thing is this even for the hearing of men that are yet to be, ,when I have lost much people. So, I ween, must be the good pleasure of Zeus, supreme in might, who hath laid low the heads of many cities, yea, and shall yet lay low, for his power is above all. A shameful thing is this even for the hearing of men that are yet to be, ,when I have lost much people. So, I ween, must be the good pleasure of Zeus, supreme in might, who hath laid low the heads of many cities, yea, and shall yet lay low, for his power is above all. A shameful thing is this even for the hearing of men that are yet to be, ,when I have lost much people. So, I ween, must be the good pleasure of Zeus, supreme in might, who hath laid low the heads of many cities, yea, and shall yet lay low, for his power is above all. A shameful thing is this even for the hearing of men that are yet to be, ,how that thus vainly so goodly and so great a host of the Achaeans warred a bootless war, and fought with men fewer than they, and no end thereof hath as yet been seen. For should we be minded, both Achaeans and Trojans, to swear a solemn oath with sacrifice, and to number ourselves, ,how that thus vainly so goodly and so great a host of the Achaeans warred a bootless war, and fought with men fewer than they, and no end thereof hath as yet been seen. For should we be minded, both Achaeans and Trojans, to swear a solemn oath with sacrifice, and to number ourselves, ,how that thus vainly so goodly and so great a host of the Achaeans warred a bootless war, and fought with men fewer than they, and no end thereof hath as yet been seen. For should we be minded, both Achaeans and Trojans, to swear a solemn oath with sacrifice, and to number ourselves, ,how that thus vainly so goodly and so great a host of the Achaeans warred a bootless war, and fought with men fewer than they, and no end thereof hath as yet been seen. For should we be minded, both Achaeans and Trojans, to swear a solemn oath with sacrifice, and to number ourselves, ,how that thus vainly so goodly and so great a host of the Achaeans warred a bootless war, and fought with men fewer than they, and no end thereof hath as yet been seen. For should we be minded, both Achaeans and Trojans, to swear a solemn oath with sacrifice, and to number ourselves, ,and should the Trojans be gathered together, even all they that have dwellings in the city, and we Achaeans be marshalled by tens, and choose, each company of us, a man of the Trojans to pour our wine, then would many tens lack a cup-bearer; so far, I deem, do the sons of the Achaeans outnumber the Trojans that dwell in the city. ,and should the Trojans be gathered together, even all they that have dwellings in the city, and we Achaeans be marshalled by tens, and choose, each company of us, a man of the Trojans to pour our wine, then would many tens lack a cup-bearer; so far, I deem, do the sons of the Achaeans outnumber the Trojans that dwell in the city. ,and should the Trojans be gathered together, even all they that have dwellings in the city, and we Achaeans be marshalled by tens, and choose, each company of us, a man of the Trojans to pour our wine, then would many tens lack a cup-bearer; so far, I deem, do the sons of the Achaeans outnumber the Trojans that dwell in the city. ,and should the Trojans be gathered together, even all they that have dwellings in the city, and we Achaeans be marshalled by tens, and choose, each company of us, a man of the Trojans to pour our wine, then would many tens lack a cup-bearer; so far, I deem, do the sons of the Achaeans outnumber the Trojans that dwell in the city. ,and should the Trojans be gathered together, even all they that have dwellings in the city, and we Achaeans be marshalled by tens, and choose, each company of us, a man of the Trojans to pour our wine, then would many tens lack a cup-bearer; so far, I deem, do the sons of the Achaeans outnumber the Trojans that dwell in the city. ,But allies there be out of many cities, men that wield the spear, who hinder me mightily, and for all that I am fain, suffer me not to sack the well-peopled citadel of Ilios. Already have nine years of great Zeus gone by, ,But allies there be out of many cities, men that wield the spear, who hinder me mightily, and for all that I am fain, suffer me not to sack the well-peopled citadel of Ilios. Already have nine years of great Zeus gone by, ,But allies there be out of many cities, men that wield the spear, who hinder me mightily, and for all that I am fain, suffer me not to sack the well-peopled citadel of Ilios. Already have nine years of great Zeus gone by, ,But allies there be out of many cities, men that wield the spear, who hinder me mightily, and for all that I am fain, suffer me not to sack the well-peopled citadel of Ilios. Already have nine years of great Zeus gone by, ,But allies there be out of many cities, men that wield the spear, who hinder me mightily, and for all that I am fain, suffer me not to sack the well-peopled citadel of Ilios. Already have nine years of great Zeus gone by, ,and lo, our ships' timbers are rotted, and the tackling loosed; and our wives, I ween, and little children sit in our halls awaiting us; yet is our task wholly unaccomplished in furtherance whereof we came hither. Nay, come, even as I shall bid, let us all obey: ,and lo, our ships' timbers are rotted, and the tackling loosed; and our wives, I ween, and little children sit in our halls awaiting us; yet is our task wholly unaccomplished in furtherance whereof we came hither. Nay, come, even as I shall bid, let us all obey: ,and lo, our ships' timbers are rotted, and the tackling loosed; and our wives, I ween, and little children sit in our halls awaiting us; yet is our task wholly unaccomplished in furtherance whereof we came hither. Nay, come, even as I shall bid, let us all obey: ,and lo, our ships' timbers are rotted, and the tackling loosed; and our wives, I ween, and little children sit in our halls awaiting us; yet is our task wholly unaccomplished in furtherance whereof we came hither. Nay, come, even as I shall bid, let us all obey: ,and lo, our ships' timbers are rotted, and the tackling loosed; and our wives, I ween, and little children sit in our halls awaiting us; yet is our task wholly unaccomplished in furtherance whereof we came hither. Nay, come, even as I shall bid, let us all obey: ,let us flee with our ships to our dear native land; for no more is there hope that we shall take broad-wayed Troy. So spake he, and roused the hearts in the breasts of all throughout the multitude, as many as had not heard the council. And the gathering was stirred like the long sea-waves of the Icarian main, ,let us flee with our ships to our dear native land; for no more is there hope that we shall take broad-wayed Troy. So spake he, and roused the hearts in the breasts of all throughout the multitude, as many as had not heard the council. And the gathering was stirred like the long sea-waves of the Icarian main, ,let us flee with our ships to our dear native land; for no more is there hope that we shall take broad-wayed Troy. So spake he, and roused the hearts in the breasts of all throughout the multitude, as many as had not heard the council. And the gathering was stirred like the long sea-waves of the Icarian main, ,let us flee with our ships to our dear native land; for no more is there hope that we shall take broad-wayed Troy. So spake he, and roused the hearts in the breasts of all throughout the multitude, as many as had not heard the council. And the gathering was stirred like the long sea-waves of the Icarian main, ,let us flee with our ships to our dear native land; for no more is there hope that we shall take broad-wayed Troy. So spake he, and roused the hearts in the breasts of all throughout the multitude, as many as had not heard the council. And the gathering was stirred like the long sea-waves of the Icarian main, ,which the East Wind or the South Wind has raised, rushing upon them from the clouds of father Zeus. And even as when the West Wind at its coming stirreth a deep cornfield with its violent blast, and the ears bow thereunder, even so was all their gathering stirred, and they with loud shouting rushed towards the ships; ,which the East Wind or the South Wind has raised, rushing upon them from the clouds of father Zeus. And even as when the West Wind at its coming stirreth a deep cornfield with its violent blast, and the ears bow thereunder, even so was all their gathering stirred, and they with loud shouting rushed towards the ships; ,which the East Wind or the South Wind has raised, rushing upon them from the clouds of father Zeus. And even as when the West Wind at its coming stirreth a deep cornfield with its violent blast, and the ears bow thereunder, even so was all their gathering stirred, and they with loud shouting rushed towards the ships; ,which the East Wind or the South Wind has raised, rushing upon them from the clouds of father Zeus. And even as when the West Wind at its coming stirreth a deep cornfield with its violent blast, and the ears bow thereunder, even so was all their gathering stirred, and they with loud shouting rushed towards the ships; ,which the East Wind or the South Wind has raised, rushing upon them from the clouds of father Zeus. And even as when the West Wind at its coming stirreth a deep cornfield with its violent blast, and the ears bow thereunder, even so was all their gathering stirred, and they with loud shouting rushed towards the ships; ,and from beneath their feet the dust arose on high. And they called each one to his fellow to lay hold of the ships and draw them into the bright sea, and they set themselves to clear the launching-ways, and their shouting went up to heaven, so fain were they of their return home; and they began to take the props from beneath the ships. ,and from beneath their feet the dust arose on high. And they called each one to his fellow to lay hold of the ships and draw them into the bright sea, and they set themselves to clear the launching-ways, and their shouting went up to heaven, so fain were they of their return home; and they began to take the props from beneath the ships. ,and from beneath their feet the dust arose on high. And they called each one to his fellow to lay hold of the ships and draw them into the bright sea, and they set themselves to clear the launching-ways, and their shouting went up to heaven, so fain were they of their return home; and they began to take the props from beneath the ships. ,and from beneath their feet the dust arose on high. And they called each one to his fellow to lay hold of the ships and draw them into the bright sea, and they set themselves to clear the launching-ways, and their shouting went up to heaven, so fain were they of their return home; and they began to take the props from beneath the ships. ,and from beneath their feet the dust arose on high. And they called each one to his fellow to lay hold of the ships and draw them into the bright sea, and they set themselves to clear the launching-ways, and their shouting went up to heaven, so fain were they of their return home; and they began to take the props from beneath the ships. ,Then would the Argives have accomplished their return even beyond what was ordained, had not Hera spoken a word to Athena, saying:Out upon it, child of Zeus that beareth the aegis, unwearied one! Is it thus indeed that the Argives are to flee to their dear native land over the broad back of the sea? ,Then would the Argives have accomplished their return even beyond what was ordained, had not Hera spoken a word to Athena, saying:Out upon it, child of Zeus that beareth the aegis, unwearied one! Is it thus indeed that the Argives are to flee to their dear native land over the broad back of the sea? ,Then would the Argives have accomplished their return even beyond what was ordained, had not Hera spoken a word to Athena, saying:Out upon it, child of Zeus that beareth the aegis, unwearied one! Is it thus indeed that the Argives are to flee to their dear native land over the broad back of the sea? ,Then would the Argives have accomplished their return even beyond what was ordained, had not Hera spoken a word to Athena, saying:Out upon it, child of Zeus that beareth the aegis, unwearied one! Is it thus indeed that the Argives are to flee to their dear native land over the broad back of the sea? ,Then would the Argives have accomplished their return even beyond what was ordained, had not Hera spoken a word to Athena, saying:Out upon it, child of Zeus that beareth the aegis, unwearied one! Is it thus indeed that the Argives are to flee to their dear native land over the broad back of the sea? ,Aye, and they would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the brazen-coated Achaeans; with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man, ,Aye, and they would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the brazen-coated Achaeans; with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man, ,Aye, and they would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the brazen-coated Achaeans; with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man, ,Aye, and they would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the brazen-coated Achaeans; with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man, ,Aye, and they would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the brazen-coated Achaeans; with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man, ,neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So spake she, and the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, failed not to hearken. Down from the peaks of Olympus she went darting, and speedily came to the swift ships of the Achaeans. There she found Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel, ,neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So spake she, and the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, failed not to hearken. Down from the peaks of Olympus she went darting, and speedily came to the swift ships of the Achaeans. There she found Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel, ,neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So spake she, and the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, failed not to hearken. Down from the peaks of Olympus she went darting, and speedily came to the swift ships of the Achaeans. There she found Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel, ,neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So spake she, and the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, failed not to hearken. Down from the peaks of Olympus she went darting, and speedily came to the swift ships of the Achaeans. There she found Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel, ,neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So spake she, and the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, failed not to hearken. Down from the peaks of Olympus she went darting, and speedily came to the swift ships of the Achaeans. There she found Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel, ,as he stood. He laid no hand upon his benched, black ship, for that grief had come upon his heart and soul; and flashing-eyed Athene stood near him, and said:Son of Laërtes, sprung from Zeus, Odysseus of many wiles, is it thus indeed that ye will fling yourselves ,as he stood. He laid no hand upon his benched, black ship, for that grief had come upon his heart and soul; and flashing-eyed Athene stood near him, and said:Son of Laërtes, sprung from Zeus, Odysseus of many wiles, is it thus indeed that ye will fling yourselves ,as he stood. He laid no hand upon his benched, black ship, for that grief had come upon his heart and soul; and flashing-eyed Athene stood near him, and said:Son of Laërtes, sprung from Zeus, Odysseus of many wiles, is it thus indeed that ye will fling yourselves ,as he stood. He laid no hand upon his benched, black ship, for that grief had come upon his heart and soul; and flashing-eyed Athene stood near him, and said:Son of Laërtes, sprung from Zeus, Odysseus of many wiles, is it thus indeed that ye will fling yourselves ,as he stood. He laid no hand upon his benched, black ship, for that grief had come upon his heart and soul; and flashing-eyed Athene stood near him, and said:Son of Laërtes, sprung from Zeus, Odysseus of many wiles, is it thus indeed that ye will fling yourselves ,on your benched ships to flee to your dear native land? Aye, and ye would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the Achaeans, and hold thee back no more; ,on your benched ships to flee to your dear native land? Aye, and ye would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the Achaeans, and hold thee back no more; ,on your benched ships to flee to your dear native land? Aye, and ye would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the Achaeans, and hold thee back no more; ,on your benched ships to flee to your dear native land? Aye, and ye would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the Achaeans, and hold thee back no more; ,on your benched ships to flee to your dear native land? Aye, and ye would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the Achaeans, and hold thee back no more; ,and with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man, neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So said she, and he knew the voice of the goddess as she spake, and set him to run, and cast from him his cloak, which his herald gathered up, even Eurybates of Ithaca, that waited on him. ,and with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man, neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So said she, and he knew the voice of the goddess as she spake, and set him to run, and cast from him his cloak, which his herald gathered up, even Eurybates of Ithaca, that waited on him. ,and with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man, neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So said she, and he knew the voice of the goddess as she spake, and set him to run, and cast from him his cloak, which his herald gathered up, even Eurybates of Ithaca, that waited on him. ,and with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man, neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So said she, and he knew the voice of the goddess as she spake, and set him to run, and cast from him his cloak, which his herald gathered up, even Eurybates of Ithaca, that waited on him. ,and with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man, neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So said she, and he knew the voice of the goddess as she spake, and set him to run, and cast from him his cloak, which his herald gathered up, even Eurybates of Ithaca, that waited on him. ,But himself he went straight to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, and received at his hand the staff of his fathers, imperishable ever, and therewith went his way along the ships of the brazen-coated Achaeans. ,But himself he went straight to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, and received at his hand the staff of his fathers, imperishable ever, and therewith went his way along the ships of the brazen-coated Achaeans. ,But himself he went straight to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, and received at his hand the staff of his fathers, imperishable ever, and therewith went his way along the ships of the brazen-coated Achaeans. ,But himself he went straight to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, and received at his hand the staff of his fathers, imperishable ever, and therewith went his way along the ships of the brazen-coated Achaeans. ,But himself he went straight to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, and received at his hand the staff of his fathers, imperishable ever, and therewith went his way along the ships of the brazen-coated Achaeans. Whomsoever he met that was a chieftain or man of note, to his side would he come and with gentle words seek to restrain him, saying: , Good Sir, it beseems not to seek to affright thee as if thou were a coward, but do thou thyself sit thee down, and make the rest of thy people to sit. For thou knowest not yet clearly what is the mind of the son of Atreus; now he does but make trial, whereas soon he will smite the sons of the Achaeans. Did we not all hear what he spake in the council? , Good Sir, it beseems not to seek to affright thee as if thou were a coward, but do thou thyself sit thee down, and make the rest of thy people to sit. For thou knowest not yet clearly what is the mind of the son of Atreus; now he does but make trial, whereas soon he will smite the sons of the Achaeans. Did we not all hear what he spake in the council? , Good Sir, it beseems not to seek to affright thee as if thou were a coward, but do thou thyself sit thee down, and make the rest of thy people to sit. For thou knowest not yet clearly what is the mind of the son of Atreus; now he does but make trial, whereas soon he will smite the sons of the Achaeans. Did we not all hear what he spake in the council? , Good Sir, it beseems not to seek to affright thee as if thou were a coward, but do thou thyself sit thee down, and make the rest of thy people to sit. For thou knowest not yet clearly what is the mind of the son of Atreus; now he does but make trial, whereas soon he will smite the sons of the Achaeans. Did we not all hear what he spake in the council? , Good Sir, it beseems not to seek to affright thee as if thou were a coward, but do thou thyself sit thee down, and make the rest of thy people to sit. For thou knowest not yet clearly what is the mind of the son of Atreus; now he does but make trial, whereas soon he will smite the sons of the Achaeans. Did we not all hear what he spake in the council? ,Beware lest waxing wroth he work mischief to the sons of the Achaeans. Proud is the heart of kings, fostered of heaven; for their honour is from Zeus, and Zeus, god of counsel, loveth them. But whatsoever man of the people he saw, and found brawling, him would he smite with his staff; and chide with words, saying, ,Beware lest waxing wroth he work mischief to the sons of the Achaeans. Proud is the heart of kings, fostered of heaven; for their honour is from Zeus, and Zeus, god of counsel, loveth them. But whatsoever man of the people he saw, and found brawling, him would he smite with his staff; and chide with words, saying, ,Beware lest waxing wroth he work mischief to the sons of the Achaeans. Proud is the heart of kings, fostered of heaven; for their honour is from Zeus, and Zeus, god of counsel, loveth them. But whatsoever man of the people he saw, and found brawling, him would he smite with his staff; and chide with words, saying, ,Beware lest waxing wroth he work mischief to the sons of the Achaeans. Proud is the heart of kings, fostered of heaven; for their honour is from Zeus, and Zeus, god of counsel, loveth them. But whatsoever man of the people he saw, and found brawling, him would he smite with his staff; and chide with words, saying, ,Beware lest waxing wroth he work mischief to the sons of the Achaeans. Proud is the heart of kings, fostered of heaven; for their honour is from Zeus, and Zeus, god of counsel, loveth them. But whatsoever man of the people he saw, and found brawling, him would he smite with his staff; and chide with words, saying, , Fellow, sit thou still, and hearken to the words of others that are better men than thou; whereas thou art unwarlike and a weakling, neither to be counted in war nor in counsel. In no wise shall we Achaeans all be kings here. No good thing is a multitude of lords; let there be one lord, , Fellow, sit thou still, and hearken to the words of others that are better men than thou; whereas thou art unwarlike and a weakling, neither to be counted in war nor in counsel. In no wise shall we Achaeans all be kings here. No good thing is a multitude of lords; let there be one lord, , Fellow, sit thou still, and hearken to the words of others that are better men than thou; whereas thou art unwarlike and a weakling, neither to be counted in war nor in counsel. In no wise shall we Achaeans all be kings here. No good thing is a multitude of lords; let there be one lord, , Fellow, sit thou still, and hearken to the words of others that are better men than thou; whereas thou art unwarlike and a weakling, neither to be counted in war nor in counsel. In no wise shall we Achaeans all be kings here. No good thing is a multitude of lords; let there be one lord, , Fellow, sit thou still, and hearken to the words of others that are better men than thou; whereas thou art unwarlike and a weakling, neither to be counted in war nor in counsel. In no wise shall we Achaeans all be kings here. No good thing is a multitude of lords; let there be one lord, ,one king, to whom the son of crooked-counselling Cronos hath vouchsafed the sceptre and judgments, that he may take counsel for his people. Thus masterfully did he range through the host, and they hasted back to the place of gathering from their ships and huts with noise, as when a wave of the loud-resounding sea ,one king, to whom the son of crooked-counselling Cronos hath vouchsafed the sceptre and judgments, that he may take counsel for his people. Thus masterfully did he range through the host, and they hasted back to the place of gathering from their ships and huts with noise, as when a wave of the loud-resounding sea ,one king, to whom the son of crooked-counselling Cronos hath vouchsafed the sceptre and judgments, that he may take counsel for his people. Thus masterfully did he range through the host, and they hasted back to the place of gathering from their ships and huts with noise, as when a wave of the loud-resounding sea ,one king, to whom the son of crooked-counselling Cronos hath vouchsafed the sceptre and judgments, that he may take counsel for his people. Thus masterfully did he range through the host, and they hasted back to the place of gathering from their ships and huts with noise, as when a wave of the loud-resounding sea ,one king, to whom the son of crooked-counselling Cronos hath vouchsafed the sceptre and judgments, that he may take counsel for his people. Thus masterfully did he range through the host, and they hasted back to the place of gathering from their ships and huts with noise, as when a wave of the loud-resounding sea ,thundereth on the long beach, and the deep roareth.Now the others sate them down and were stayed in their places, only there still kept chattering on Thersites of measureless speech, whose mind was full of great store of disorderly words, wherewith to utter revilings against the kings, idly, and in no orderly wise, ,thundereth on the long beach, and the deep roareth.Now the others sate them down and were stayed in their places, only there still kept chattering on Thersites of measureless speech, whose mind was full of great store of disorderly words, wherewith to utter revilings against the kings, idly, and in no orderly wise, ,thundereth on the long beach, and the deep roareth.Now the others sate them down and were stayed in their places, only there still kept chattering on Thersites of measureless speech, whose mind was full of great store of disorderly words, wherewith to utter revilings against the kings, idly, and in no orderly wise, ,thundereth on the long beach, and the deep roareth.Now the others sate them down and were stayed in their places, only there still kept chattering on Thersites of measureless speech, whose mind was full of great store of disorderly words, wherewith to utter revilings against the kings, idly, and in no orderly wise, ,thundereth on the long beach, and the deep roareth.Now the others sate them down and were stayed in their places, only there still kept chattering on Thersites of measureless speech, whose mind was full of great store of disorderly words, wherewith to utter revilings against the kings, idly, and in no orderly wise, ,but whatsoever he deemed would raise a laugh among the Argives. Evil-favoured was he beyond all men that came to Ilios: he was bandy-legged and lame in the one foot, and his two shoulders were rounded, stooping together over his chest, and above them his head was warped, and a scant stubble grew thereon. ,but whatsoever he deemed would raise a laugh among the Argives. Evil-favoured was he beyond all men that came to Ilios: he was bandy-legged and lame in the one foot, and his two shoulders were rounded, stooping together over his chest, and above them his head was warped, and a scant stubble grew thereon. ,but whatsoever he deemed would raise a laugh among the Argives. Evil-favoured was he beyond all men that came to Ilios: he was bandy-legged and lame in the one foot, and his two shoulders were rounded, stooping together over his chest, and above them his head was warped, and a scant stubble grew thereon. ,but whatsoever he deemed would raise a laugh among the Argives. Evil-favoured was he beyond all men that came to Ilios: he was bandy-legged and lame in the one foot, and his two shoulders were rounded, stooping together over his chest, and above them his head was warped, and a scant stubble grew thereon. ,but whatsoever he deemed would raise a laugh among the Argives. Evil-favoured was he beyond all men that came to Ilios: he was bandy-legged and lame in the one foot, and his two shoulders were rounded, stooping together over his chest, and above them his head was warped, and a scant stubble grew thereon. ,Hateful was he to Achilles above all, and to Odysseus, for it was they twain that he was wont to revile; but now again with shrill cries he uttered abuse against goodly Agamemnon. With him were the Achaeans exceeding wroth, and had indignation in their hearts. ,Hateful was he to Achilles above all, and to Odysseus, for it was they twain that he was wont to revile; but now again with shrill cries he uttered abuse against goodly Agamemnon. With him were the Achaeans exceeding wroth, and had indignation in their hearts. ,Hateful was he to Achilles above all, and to Odysseus, for it was they twain that he was wont to revile; but now again with shrill cries he uttered abuse against goodly Agamemnon. With him were the Achaeans exceeding wroth, and had indignation in their hearts. ,Hateful was he to Achilles above all, and to Odysseus, for it was they twain that he was wont to revile; but now again with shrill cries he uttered abuse against goodly Agamemnon. With him were the Achaeans exceeding wroth, and had indignation in their hearts. ,Hateful was he to Achilles above all, and to Odysseus, for it was they twain that he was wont to revile; but now again with shrill cries he uttered abuse against goodly Agamemnon. With him were the Achaeans exceeding wroth, and had indignation in their hearts. Howbeit with loud shoutings he spake and chid Agamemnon: , Son of Atreus, with what art thou now again discontent, or what lack is thine? Filled are thy huts with bronze, and women full many are in thy huts, chosen spoils that we Achaeans give thee first of all, whensoe'er we take a citadel. Or dost thou still want gold also, , Son of Atreus, with what art thou now again discontent, or what lack is thine? Filled are thy huts with bronze, and women full many are in thy huts, chosen spoils that we Achaeans give thee first of all, whensoe'er we take a citadel. Or dost thou still want gold also, , Son of Atreus, with what art thou now again discontent, or what lack is thine? Filled are thy huts with bronze, and women full many are in thy huts, chosen spoils that we Achaeans give thee first of all, whensoe'er we take a citadel. Or dost thou still want gold also, , Son of Atreus, with what art thou now again discontent, or what lack is thine? Filled are thy huts with bronze, and women full many are in thy huts, chosen spoils that we Achaeans give thee first of all, whensoe'er we take a citadel. Or dost thou still want gold also, , Son of Atreus, with what art thou now again discontent, or what lack is thine? Filled are thy huts with bronze, and women full many are in thy huts, chosen spoils that we Achaeans give thee first of all, whensoe'er we take a citadel. Or dost thou still want gold also, ,which some man of the horse-taming Trojans shall bring thee out of Ilios as a ransom for his son, whom I haply have bound and led away or some other of the Achaeans? Or is it some young girl for thee to know in love, whom thou wilt keep apart for thyself? Nay, it beseemeth not one that is their captain to bring to ill the sons of the Achaeans. ,which some man of the horse-taming Trojans shall bring thee out of Ilios as a ransom for his son, whom I haply have bound and led away or some other of the Achaeans? Or is it some young girl for thee to know in love, whom thou wilt keep apart for thyself? Nay, it beseemeth not one that is their captain to bring to ill the sons of the Achaeans. ,which some man of the horse-taming Trojans shall bring thee out of Ilios as a ransom for his son, whom I haply have bound and led away or some other of the Achaeans? Or is it some young girl for thee to know in love, whom thou wilt keep apart for thyself? Nay, it beseemeth not one that is their captain to bring to ill the sons of the Achaeans. ,which some man of the horse-taming Trojans shall bring thee out of Ilios as a ransom for his son, whom I haply have bound and led away or some other of the Achaeans? Or is it some young girl for thee to know in love, whom thou wilt keep apart for thyself? Nay, it beseemeth not one that is their captain to bring to ill the sons of the Achaeans. ,which some man of the horse-taming Trojans shall bring thee out of Ilios as a ransom for his son, whom I haply have bound and led away or some other of the Achaeans? Or is it some young girl for thee to know in love, whom thou wilt keep apart for thyself? Nay, it beseemeth not one that is their captain to bring to ill the sons of the Achaeans. ,Soft fools! base things of shame, ye women of Achaea, men no more, homeward let us go with our ships, and leave this fellow here in the land of Troy to digest his prizes, that so he may learn whether in us too there is aught of aid for him or no—for him that hath now done dishonour to Achilles, a man better far than he; ,Soft fools! base things of shame, ye women of Achaea, men no more, homeward let us go with our ships, and leave this fellow here in the land of Troy to digest his prizes, that so he may learn whether in us too there is aught of aid for him or no—for him that hath now done dishonour to Achilles, a man better far than he; ,Soft fools! base things of shame, ye women of Achaea, men no more, homeward let us go with our ships, and leave this fellow here in the land of Troy to digest his prizes, that so he may learn whether in us too there is aught of aid for him or no—for him that hath now done dishonour to Achilles, a man better far than he; ,Soft fools! base things of shame, ye women of Achaea, men no more, homeward let us go with our ships, and leave this fellow here in the land of Troy to digest his prizes, that so he may learn whether in us too there is aught of aid for him or no—for him that hath now done dishonour to Achilles, a man better far than he; ,Soft fools! base things of shame, ye women of Achaea, men no more, homeward let us go with our ships, and leave this fellow here in the land of Troy to digest his prizes, that so he may learn whether in us too there is aught of aid for him or no—for him that hath now done dishonour to Achilles, a man better far than he; ,for he hath taken away, and keepeth his prize by his own arrogant act. of a surety there is naught of wrath in the heart of Achilles; nay, he heedeth not at all; else, son of Atreus, wouldest thou now work insolence for the last time. So spake Thersites, railing at Agamemnon, shepherd of the host. But quickly to his side came goodly Odysseus, ,for he hath taken away, and keepeth his prize by his own arrogant act. of a surety there is naught of wrath in the heart of Achilles; nay, he heedeth not at all; else, son of Atreus, wouldest thou now work insolence for the last time. So spake Thersites, railing at Agamemnon, shepherd of the host. But quickly to his side came goodly Odysseus, ,for he hath taken away, and keepeth his prize by his own arrogant act. of a surety there is naught of wrath in the heart of Achilles; nay, he heedeth not at all; else, son of Atreus, wouldest thou now work insolence for the last time. So spake Thersites, railing at Agamemnon, shepherd of the host. But quickly to his side came goodly Odysseus, ,for he hath taken away, and keepeth his prize by his own arrogant act. of a surety there is naught of wrath in the heart of Achilles; nay, he heedeth not at all; else, son of Atreus, wouldest thou now work insolence for the last time. So spake Thersites, railing at Agamemnon, shepherd of the host. But quickly to his side came goodly Odysseus, ,for he hath taken away, and keepeth his prize by his own arrogant act. of a surety there is naught of wrath in the heart of Achilles; nay, he heedeth not at all; else, son of Atreus, wouldest thou now work insolence for the last time. So spake Thersites, railing at Agamemnon, shepherd of the host. But quickly to his side came goodly Odysseus, ,and with an angry glance from beneath his brows, chid him with harsh words, saying:Thersites of reckless speech, clear-voiced talker though thou art, refrain thee, and be not minded to strive singly against kings. For I deem that there is no viler mortal than thou amongst all those that with the sons of Atreus came beneath Ilios. ,and with an angry glance from beneath his brows, chid him with harsh words, saying:Thersites of reckless speech, clear-voiced talker though thou art, refrain thee, and be not minded to strive singly against kings. For I deem that there is no viler mortal than thou amongst all those that with the sons of Atreus came beneath Ilios. ,and with an angry glance from beneath his brows, chid him with harsh words, saying:Thersites of reckless speech, clear-voiced talker though thou art, refrain thee, and be not minded to strive singly against kings. For I deem that there is no viler mortal than thou amongst all those that with the sons of Atreus came beneath Ilios. ,and with an angry glance from beneath his brows, chid him with harsh words, saying:Thersites of reckless speech, clear-voiced talker though thou art, refrain thee, and be not minded to strive singly against kings. For I deem that there is no viler mortal than thou amongst all those that with the sons of Atreus came beneath Ilios. ,and with an angry glance from beneath his brows, chid him with harsh words, saying:Thersites of reckless speech, clear-voiced talker though thou art, refrain thee, and be not minded to strive singly against kings. For I deem that there is no viler mortal than thou amongst all those that with the sons of Atreus came beneath Ilios. ,Wherefore 'twere well thou shouldst not take the name of kings in thy mouth as thou protest, to cast reproaches upon them, and to watch for home-going. In no wise do we know clearly as yet how these things are to be, whether it be for good or ill that we sons of the Achaeans shall return. Therefore dost thou now continually utter revilings against Atreus' son, Agamemnon, shepherd of the host, ,Wherefore 'twere well thou shouldst not take the name of kings in thy mouth as thou protest, to cast reproaches upon them, and to watch for home-going. In no wise do we know clearly as yet how these things are to be, whether it be for good or ill that we sons of the Achaeans shall return. Therefore dost thou now continually utter revilings against Atreus' son, Agamemnon, shepherd of the host, ,Wherefore 'twere well thou shouldst not take the name of kings in thy mouth as thou protest, to cast reproaches upon them, and to watch for home-going. In no wise do we know clearly as yet how these things are to be, whether it be for good or ill that we sons of the Achaeans shall return. Therefore dost thou now continually utter revilings against Atreus' son, Agamemnon, shepherd of the host, ,Wherefore 'twere well thou shouldst not take the name of kings in thy mouth as thou protest, to cast reproaches upon them, and to watch for home-going. In no wise do we know clearly as yet how these things are to be, whether it be for good or ill that we sons of the Achaeans shall return. Therefore dost thou now continually utter revilings against Atreus' son, Agamemnon, shepherd of the host, ,Wherefore 'twere well thou shouldst not take the name of kings in thy mouth as thou protest, to cast reproaches upon them, and to watch for home-going. In no wise do we know clearly as yet how these things are to be, whether it be for good or ill that we sons of the Achaeans shall return. Therefore dost thou now continually utter revilings against Atreus' son, Agamemnon, shepherd of the host, ,for that the Danaan warriors give him gifts full many; whereas thou pratest on with railings. But I will speak out to thee, and this word shall verily be brought to pass: if I find thee again playing the fool, even as now thou dost, then may the head of Odysseus abide no more upon his shoulders, ,for that the Danaan warriors give him gifts full many; whereas thou pratest on with railings. But I will speak out to thee, and this word shall verily be brought to pass: if I find thee again playing the fool, even as now thou dost, then may the head of Odysseus abide no more upon his shoulders, ,for that the Danaan warriors give him gifts full many; whereas thou pratest on with railings. But I will speak out to thee, and this word shall verily be brought to pass: if I find thee again playing the fool, even as now thou dost, then may the head of Odysseus abide no more upon his shoulders, ,for that the Danaan warriors give him gifts full many; whereas thou pratest on with railings. But I will speak out to thee, and this word shall verily be brought to pass: if I find thee again playing the fool, even as now thou dost, then may the head of Odysseus abide no more upon his shoulders, ,for that the Danaan warriors give him gifts full many; whereas thou pratest on with railings. But I will speak out to thee, and this word shall verily be brought to pass: if I find thee again playing the fool, even as now thou dost, then may the head of Odysseus abide no more upon his shoulders, ,nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. ,nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. ,nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. ,nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. ,nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. ,So spake Odysseus, and with his staff smote his back and shoulders; and Thersites cowered down, and a big tear fell from him, and a bloody weal rose up on his back beneath the staff of gold. Then he sate him down, and fear came upon him, and stung by pain with helpless looks he wiped away the tear. ,So spake Odysseus, and with his staff smote his back and shoulders; and Thersites cowered down, and a big tear fell from him, and a bloody weal rose up on his back beneath the staff of gold. Then he sate him down, and fear came upon him, and stung by pain with helpless looks he wiped away the tear. ,So spake Odysseus, and with his staff smote his back and shoulders; and Thersites cowered down, and a big tear fell from him, and a bloody weal rose up on his back beneath the staff of gold. Then he sate him down, and fear came upon him, and stung by pain with helpless looks he wiped away the tear. ,So spake Odysseus, and with his staff smote his back and shoulders; and Thersites cowered down, and a big tear fell from him, and a bloody weal rose up on his back beneath the staff of gold. Then he sate him down, and fear came upon him, and stung by pain with helpless looks he wiped away the tear. ,So spake Odysseus, and with his staff smote his back and shoulders; and Thersites cowered down, and a big tear fell from him, and a bloody weal rose up on his back beneath the staff of gold. Then he sate him down, and fear came upon him, and stung by pain with helpless looks he wiped away the tear. ,But the Achaeans, sore vexed at heart though they were, broke into a merry laugh at him, and thus would one speak with a glance at his neighbour:Out upon it! verily hath Odysseus ere now wrought good deeds without number as leader in good counsel and setting battle in army, but now is this deed far the best that he hath wrought among the Argives, ,But the Achaeans, sore vexed at heart though they were, broke into a merry laugh at him, and thus would one speak with a glance at his neighbour:Out upon it! verily hath Odysseus ere now wrought good deeds without number as leader in good counsel and setting battle in army, but now is this deed far the best that he hath wrought among the Argives, ,But the Achaeans, sore vexed at heart though they were, broke into a merry laugh at him, and thus would one speak with a glance at his neighbour:Out upon it! verily hath Odysseus ere now wrought good deeds without number as leader in good counsel and setting battle in army, but now is this deed far the best that he hath wrought among the Argives, ,But the Achaeans, sore vexed at heart though they were, broke into a merry laugh at him, and thus would one speak with a glance at his neighbour:Out upon it! verily hath Odysseus ere now wrought good deeds without number as leader in good counsel and setting battle in army, but now is this deed far the best that he hath wrought among the Argives, ,But the Achaeans, sore vexed at heart though they were, broke into a merry laugh at him, and thus would one speak with a glance at his neighbour:Out upon it! verily hath Odysseus ere now wrought good deeds without number as leader in good counsel and setting battle in army, but now is this deed far the best that he hath wrought among the Argives, ,seeing he hath made this scurrilous babbler to cease from his prating. Never again, I ween, will his proud spirit henceforth set him on to rail at kings with words of reviling. So spake the multitude; but up rose Odysseus, sacker of cities, the sceptre in his hand, and by his side flashing-eyed Athene, ,seeing he hath made this scurrilous babbler to cease from his prating. Never again, I ween, will his proud spirit henceforth set him on to rail at kings with words of reviling. So spake the multitude; but up rose Odysseus, sacker of cities, the sceptre in his hand, and by his side flashing-eyed Athene, ,seeing he hath made this scurrilous babbler to cease from his prating. Never again, I ween, will his proud spirit henceforth set him on to rail at kings with words of reviling. So spake the multitude; but up rose Odysseus, sacker of cities, the sceptre in his hand, and by his side flashing-eyed Athene, ,seeing he hath made this scurrilous babbler to cease from his prating. Never again, I ween, will his proud spirit henceforth set him on to rail at kings with words of reviling. So spake the multitude; but up rose Odysseus, sacker of cities, the sceptre in his hand, and by his side flashing-eyed Athene, ,seeing he hath made this scurrilous babbler to cease from his prating. Never again, I ween, will his proud spirit henceforth set him on to rail at kings with words of reviling. So spake the multitude; but up rose Odysseus, sacker of cities, the sceptre in his hand, and by his side flashing-eyed Athene, ,in the likeness of a herald, bade the host keep silence, that the sons of the Achaeans, both the nearest and the farthest, might hear his words, and lay to heart his counsel. He with good intent addressed their gathering and spake among them:Son of Atreus, now verily are the Achaeans minded to make thee, O king, ,in the likeness of a herald, bade the host keep silence, that the sons of the Achaeans, both the nearest and the farthest, might hear his words, and lay to heart his counsel. He with good intent addressed their gathering and spake among them:Son of Atreus, now verily are the Achaeans minded to make thee, O king, ,in the likeness of a herald, bade the host keep silence, that the sons of the Achaeans, both the nearest and the farthest, might hear his words, and lay to heart his counsel. He with good intent addressed their gathering and spake among them:Son of Atreus, now verily are the Achaeans minded to make thee, O king, ,in the likeness of a herald, bade the host keep silence, that the sons of the Achaeans, both the nearest and the farthest, might hear his words, and lay to heart his counsel. He with good intent addressed their gathering and spake among them:Son of Atreus, now verily are the Achaeans minded to make thee, O king, ,in the likeness of a herald, bade the host keep silence, that the sons of the Achaeans, both the nearest and the farthest, might hear his words, and lay to heart his counsel. He with good intent addressed their gathering and spake among them:Son of Atreus, now verily are the Achaeans minded to make thee, O king, ,the most despised among all mortal men, nor will they fulfill the promise that they made to thee, while faring hitherward from Argos, the pasture-land of horses, that not until thou hadst sacked well-walled Ilios shouldest thou get thee home. For like little children or widow women ,the most despised among all mortal men, nor will they fulfill the promise that they made to thee, while faring hitherward from Argos, the pasture-land of horses, that not until thou hadst sacked well-walled Ilios shouldest thou get thee home. For like little children or widow women ,the most despised among all mortal men, nor will they fulfill the promise that they made to thee, while faring hitherward from Argos, the pasture-land of horses, that not until thou hadst sacked well-walled Ilios shouldest thou get thee home. For like little children or widow women ,the most despised among all mortal men, nor will they fulfill the promise that they made to thee, while faring hitherward from Argos, the pasture-land of horses, that not until thou hadst sacked well-walled Ilios shouldest thou get thee home. For like little children or widow women ,the most despised among all mortal men, nor will they fulfill the promise that they made to thee, while faring hitherward from Argos, the pasture-land of horses, that not until thou hadst sacked well-walled Ilios shouldest thou get thee home. For like little children or widow women ,do they wail each to the other in longing to return home. Verily there is toil enough to make a man return disheartened. For he that abideth but one single month far from his wife in his benched ship hath vexation of heart, even he whom winter blasts and surging seas keep afar; ,do they wail each to the other in longing to return home. Verily there is toil enough to make a man return disheartened. For he that abideth but one single month far from his wife in his benched ship hath vexation of heart, even he whom winter blasts and surging seas keep afar; ,do they wail each to the other in longing to return home. Verily there is toil enough to make a man return disheartened. For he that abideth but one single month far from his wife in his benched ship hath vexation of heart, even he whom winter blasts and surging seas keep afar; ,do they wail each to the other in longing to return home. Verily there is toil enough to make a man return disheartened. For he that abideth but one single month far from his wife in his benched ship hath vexation of heart, even he whom winter blasts and surging seas keep afar; ,do they wail each to the other in longing to return home. Verily there is toil enough to make a man return disheartened. For he that abideth but one single month far from his wife in his benched ship hath vexation of heart, even he whom winter blasts and surging seas keep afar; ,but for us is the ninth year at its turn, while we abide here; wherefore I count it not shame that the Achaeans have vexation of heart beside their beaked ships; yet even so it is a shameful thing to tarry long, and return empty. Endure, my friends, and abide for a time, that we may know ,but for us is the ninth year at its turn, while we abide here; wherefore I count it not shame that the Achaeans have vexation of heart beside their beaked ships; yet even so it is a shameful thing to tarry long, and return empty. Endure, my friends, and abide for a time, that we may know ,but for us is the ninth year at its turn, while we abide here; wherefore I count it not shame that the Achaeans have vexation of heart beside their beaked ships; yet even so it is a shameful thing to tarry long, and return empty. Endure, my friends, and abide for a time, that we may know ,but for us is the ninth year at its turn, while we abide here; wherefore I count it not shame that the Achaeans have vexation of heart beside their beaked ships; yet even so it is a shameful thing to tarry long, and return empty. Endure, my friends, and abide for a time, that we may know ,but for us is the ninth year at its turn, while we abide here; wherefore I count it not shame that the Achaeans have vexation of heart beside their beaked ships; yet even so it is a shameful thing to tarry long, and return empty. Endure, my friends, and abide for a time, that we may know ,whether the prophecies of Calchas be true, or no. ,whether the prophecies of Calchas be true, or no. ,whether the prophecies of Calchas be true, or no. ,whether the prophecies of Calchas be true, or no. ,whether the prophecies of Calchas be true, or no. For this in truth do we know well in our hearts, and ye are all witnesses thereto, even as many as the fates of death have not borne away. It was but as yesterday or the day before, when the ships of the Achaeans were gathering in Aulis, laden with woes for Priam and the Trojans; ,and we round about a spring were offering to the immortals upon the holy altars hecatombs that bring fulfillment, beneath a fair plane-tree from whence flowed the bright water; then appeared a great portent: a serpent, blood-red on the back, terrible, whom the Olympian himself had sent forth to the light, ,and we round about a spring were offering to the immortals upon the holy altars hecatombs that bring fulfillment, beneath a fair plane-tree from whence flowed the bright water; then appeared a great portent: a serpent, blood-red on the back, terrible, whom the Olympian himself had sent forth to the light, ,and we round about a spring were offering to the immortals upon the holy altars hecatombs that bring fulfillment, beneath a fair plane-tree from whence flowed the bright water; then appeared a great portent: a serpent, blood-red on the back, terrible, whom the Olympian himself had sent forth to the light, ,and we round about a spring were offering to the immortals upon the holy altars hecatombs that bring fulfillment, beneath a fair plane-tree from whence flowed the bright water; then appeared a great portent: a serpent, blood-red on the back, terrible, whom the Olympian himself had sent forth to the light, ,and we round about a spring were offering to the immortals upon the holy altars hecatombs that bring fulfillment, beneath a fair plane-tree from whence flowed the bright water; then appeared a great portent: a serpent, blood-red on the back, terrible, whom the Olympian himself had sent forth to the light, ,glided from beneath the altar and darted to the plane-tree. Now upon this were the younglings of a sparrow, tender little ones, on the topmost bough, cowering beneath the leaves, eight in all, and the mother that bare them was the ninth, Then the serpent devoured them as they twittered piteously, ,glided from beneath the altar and darted to the plane-tree. Now upon this were the younglings of a sparrow, tender little ones, on the topmost bough, cowering beneath the leaves, eight in all, and the mother that bare them was the ninth, Then the serpent devoured them as they twittered piteously, ,glided from beneath the altar and darted to the plane-tree. Now upon this were the younglings of a sparrow, tender little ones, on the topmost bough, cowering beneath the leaves, eight in all, and the mother that bare them was the ninth, Then the serpent devoured them as they twittered piteously, ,glided from beneath the altar and darted to the plane-tree. Now upon this were the younglings of a sparrow, tender little ones, on the topmost bough, cowering beneath the leaves, eight in all, and the mother that bare them was the ninth, Then the serpent devoured them as they twittered piteously, ,glided from beneath the altar and darted to the plane-tree. Now upon this were the younglings of a sparrow, tender little ones, on the topmost bough, cowering beneath the leaves, eight in all, and the mother that bare them was the ninth, Then the serpent devoured them as they twittered piteously, ,and the mother fluttered around them, wailing for her dear little ones; howbeit he coiled himself and caught her by the wing as she screamed about him. But when he had devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them, the god, who had brought him to the light, made him to be unseen; for the son of crooked-counselling Cronos turned him to stone; ,and the mother fluttered around them, wailing for her dear little ones; howbeit he coiled himself and caught her by the wing as she screamed about him. But when he had devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them, the god, who had brought him to the light, made him to be unseen; for the son of crooked-counselling Cronos turned him to stone; ,and the mother fluttered around them, wailing for her dear little ones; howbeit he coiled himself and caught her by the wing as she screamed about him. But when he had devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them, the god, who had brought him to the light, made him to be unseen; for the son of crooked-counselling Cronos turned him to stone; ,and the mother fluttered around them, wailing for her dear little ones; howbeit he coiled himself and caught her by the wing as she screamed about him. But when he had devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them, the god, who had brought him to the light, made him to be unseen; for the son of crooked-counselling Cronos turned him to stone; ,and the mother fluttered around them, wailing for her dear little ones; howbeit he coiled himself and caught her by the wing as she screamed about him. But when he had devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them, the god, who had brought him to the light, made him to be unseen; for the son of crooked-counselling Cronos turned him to stone; ,and we stood there and marveled at what was wrought. So, when the dread portent brake in upon the hecatombs of the gods, then straightway did Calchas prophesy, and address our gathering, saying: 'Why are ye thus silent, ye long-haired Achaeans? To us hath Zeus the counsellor shewed this great sign, ,and we stood there and marveled at what was wrought. So, when the dread portent brake in upon the hecatombs of the gods, then straightway did Calchas prophesy, and address our gathering, saying: 'Why are ye thus silent, ye long-haired Achaeans? To us hath Zeus the counsellor shewed this great sign, ,and we stood there and marveled at what was wrought. So, when the dread portent brake in upon the hecatombs of the gods, then straightway did Calchas prophesy, and address our gathering, saying: 'Why are ye thus silent, ye long-haired Achaeans? To us hath Zeus the counsellor shewed this great sign, ,and we stood there and marveled at what was wrought. So, when the dread portent brake in upon the hecatombs of the gods, then straightway did Calchas prophesy, and address our gathering, saying: 'Why are ye thus silent, ye long-haired Achaeans? To us hath Zeus the counsellor shewed this great sign, ,and we stood there and marveled at what was wrought. So, when the dread portent brake in upon the hecatombs of the gods, then straightway did Calchas prophesy, and address our gathering, saying: 'Why are ye thus silent, ye long-haired Achaeans? To us hath Zeus the counsellor shewed this great sign, ,late in coming, late in fulfillment, the fame whereof shall never perish. Even as this serpent devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them—the eight, and the mother that bare them was the ninth—so shall we war there for so many years, but in the tenth shall we take the broad-wayed city.' On this wise spake Calchas, ,late in coming, late in fulfillment, the fame whereof shall never perish. Even as this serpent devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them—the eight, and the mother that bare them was the ninth—so shall we war there for so many years, but in the tenth shall we take the broad-wayed city.' On this wise spake Calchas, ,late in coming, late in fulfillment, the fame whereof shall never perish. Even as this serpent devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them—the eight, and the mother that bare them was the ninth—so shall we war there for so many years, but in the tenth shall we take the broad-wayed city.' On this wise spake Calchas, ,late in coming, late in fulfillment, the fame whereof shall never perish. Even as this serpent devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them—the eight, and the mother that bare them was the ninth—so shall we war there for so many years, but in the tenth shall we take the broad-wayed city.' On this wise spake Calchas, ,late in coming, late in fulfillment, the fame whereof shall never perish. Even as this serpent devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them—the eight, and the mother that bare them was the ninth—so shall we war there for so many years, but in the tenth shall we take the broad-wayed city.' On this wise spake Calchas, ,and now all this is verily being brought to pass. Nay, come, abide ye all, ye well-greaved Achaeans, even where ye are, until we take the great city of Priam. So spake he, and the Argives shouted aloud, and all round about them the ships echoed wondrously beneath the shouting of the Achaeans, ,and now all this is verily being brought to pass. Nay, come, abide ye all, ye well-greaved Achaeans, even where ye are, until we take the great city of Priam. So spake he, and the Argives shouted aloud, and all round about them the ships echoed wondrously beneath the shouting of the Achaeans, ,and now all this is verily being brought to pass. Nay, come, abide ye all, ye well-greaved Achaeans, even where ye are, until we take the great city of Priam. So spake he, and the Argives shouted aloud, and all round about them the ships echoed wondrously beneath the shouting of the Achaeans, ,and now all this is verily being brought to pass. Nay, come, abide ye all, ye well-greaved Achaeans, even where ye are, until we take the great city of Priam. So spake he, and the Argives shouted aloud, and all round about them the ships echoed wondrously beneath the shouting of the Achaeans, ,and now all this is verily being brought to pass. Nay, come, abide ye all, ye well-greaved Achaeans, even where ye are, until we take the great city of Priam. So spake he, and the Argives shouted aloud, and all round about them the ships echoed wondrously beneath the shouting of the Achaeans, ,/as they praised the words of godlike Odysseus. ,/as they praised the words of godlike Odysseus. ,/as they praised the words of godlike Odysseus. ,/as they praised the words of godlike Odysseus. ,as they praised the words of godlike Odysseus. And there spake among them the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia:Now look you; in very truth are ye holding assembly after the manner of silly boys that care no whit for deeds of war. What then is to be the end of our compacts and our oaths? ,Nay, into the fire let us cast all counsels and plans of warriors, the drink-offerings of unmixed wine, and the hand-clasps wherein we put our trust. For vainly do we wrangle with words, nor can we find any device at all, for all our long-tarrying here. Son of Atreus, do thou as of old keep unbending purpose, ,Nay, into the fire let us cast all counsels and plans of warriors, the drink-offerings of unmixed wine, and the hand-clasps wherein we put our trust. For vainly do we wrangle with words, nor can we find any device at all, for all our long-tarrying here. Son of Atreus, do thou as of old keep unbending purpose, ,Nay, into the fire let us cast all counsels and plans of warriors, the drink-offerings of unmixed wine, and the hand-clasps wherein we put our trust. For vainly do we wrangle with words, nor can we find any device at all, for all our long-tarrying here. Son of Atreus, do thou as of old keep unbending purpose, ,Nay, into the fire let us cast all counsels and plans of warriors, the drink-offerings of unmixed wine, and the hand-clasps wherein we put our trust. For vainly do we wrangle with words, nor can we find any device at all, for all our long-tarrying here. Son of Atreus, do thou as of old keep unbending purpose, ,Nay, into the fire let us cast all counsels and plans of warriors, the drink-offerings of unmixed wine, and the hand-clasps wherein we put our trust. For vainly do we wrangle with words, nor can we find any device at all, for all our long-tarrying here. Son of Atreus, do thou as of old keep unbending purpose, ,and be leader of the Argives throughout stubborn fights; and for these, let them perish, the one or two of the Achaeans, that take secret counsel apart—yet no accomplishment shall come therefrom—to depart first to Argos or ever we have learned whether the promise of Zeus that beareth the aegis be a lie or no. ,and be leader of the Argives throughout stubborn fights; and for these, let them perish, the one or two of the Achaeans, that take secret counsel apart—yet no accomplishment shall come therefrom—to depart first to Argos or ever we have learned whether the promise of Zeus that beareth the aegis be a lie or no. ,and be leader of the Argives throughout stubborn fights; and for these, let them perish, the one or two of the Achaeans, that take secret counsel apart—yet no accomplishment shall come therefrom—to depart first to Argos or ever we have learned whether the promise of Zeus that beareth the aegis be a lie or no. ,and be leader of the Argives throughout stubborn fights; and for these, let them perish, the one or two of the Achaeans, that take secret counsel apart—yet no accomplishment shall come therefrom—to depart first to Argos or ever we have learned whether the promise of Zeus that beareth the aegis be a lie or no. ,and be leader of the Argives throughout stubborn fights; and for these, let them perish, the one or two of the Achaeans, that take secret counsel apart—yet no accomplishment shall come therefrom—to depart first to Argos or ever we have learned whether the promise of Zeus that beareth the aegis be a lie or no. ,For I declare that Cronos' son, supreme in might, gave promise with his nod on that day when the Argives went on board their swift-faring ships, bearing unto the Trojans death and fate; for he lightened on our right and shewed forth signs of good. Wherefore let no man make haste to depart homewards until each have lain with the wife of some Trojan, ,For I declare that Cronos' son, supreme in might, gave promise with his nod on that day when the Argives went on board their swift-faring ships, bearing unto the Trojans death and fate; for he lightened on our right and shewed forth signs of good. Wherefore let no man make haste to depart homewards until each have lain with the wife of some Trojan, ,For I declare that Cronos' son, supreme in might, gave promise with his nod on that day when the Argives went on board their swift-faring ships, bearing unto the Trojans death and fate; for he lightened on our right and shewed forth signs of good. Wherefore let no man make haste to depart homewards until each have lain with the wife of some Trojan, ,For I declare that Cronos' son, supreme in might, gave promise with his nod on that day when the Argives went on board their swift-faring ships, bearing unto the Trojans death and fate; for he lightened on our right and shewed forth signs of good. Wherefore let no man make haste to depart homewards until each have lain with the wife of some Trojan, ,For I declare that Cronos' son, supreme in might, gave promise with his nod on that day when the Argives went on board their swift-faring ships, bearing unto the Trojans death and fate; for he lightened on our right and shewed forth signs of good. Wherefore let no man make haste to depart homewards until each have lain with the wife of some Trojan, ,and have got him requital for his strivings and groanings for Helen's sake. Howbeit, if any man is exceeding fain to depart homewards, let him lay his hand upon his black, well-benched ship, that before the face of all he may meet death and fate. ,and have got him requital for his strivings and groanings for Helen's sake. Howbeit, if any man is exceeding fain to depart homewards, let him lay his hand upon his black, well-benched ship, that before the face of all he may meet death and fate. ,and have got him requital for his strivings and groanings for Helen's sake. Howbeit, if any man is exceeding fain to depart homewards, let him lay his hand upon his black, well-benched ship, that before the face of all he may meet death and fate. ,and have got him requital for his strivings and groanings for Helen's sake. Howbeit, if any man is exceeding fain to depart homewards, let him lay his hand upon his black, well-benched ship, that before the face of all he may meet death and fate. ,and have got him requital for his strivings and groanings for Helen's sake. Howbeit, if any man is exceeding fain to depart homewards, let him lay his hand upon his black, well-benched ship, that before the face of all he may meet death and fate. ,But do thou, O King, thyself take good counsel, and hearken to another; the word whatsoever I speak, shalt thou not lightly cast aside. Separate thy men by tribes, by clans, Agamemnon, that clan may bear aid to clan and tribe to tribe. If thou do thus, and the Achaeans obey thee, ,But do thou, O King, thyself take good counsel, and hearken to another; the word whatsoever I speak, shalt thou not lightly cast aside. Separate thy men by tribes, by clans, Agamemnon, that clan may bear aid to clan and tribe to tribe. If thou do thus, and the Achaeans obey thee, ,But do thou, O King, thyself take good counsel, and hearken to another; the word whatsoever I speak, shalt thou not lightly cast aside. Separate thy men by tribes, by clans, Agamemnon, that clan may bear aid to clan and tribe to tribe. If thou do thus, and the Achaeans obey thee, ,But do thou, O King, thyself take good counsel, and hearken to another; the word whatsoever I speak, shalt thou not lightly cast aside. Separate thy men by tribes, by clans, Agamemnon, that clan may bear aid to clan and tribe to tribe. If thou do thus, and the Achaeans obey thee, ,But do thou, O King, thyself take good counsel, and hearken to another; the word whatsoever I speak, shalt thou not lightly cast aside. Separate thy men by tribes, by clans, Agamemnon, that clan may bear aid to clan and tribe to tribe. If thou do thus, and the Achaeans obey thee, ,thou wilt know then who among thy captains is a coward, and who among thy men, and who too is brave; for they will fight each clan for itself. So shalt thou know whether it is even by the will of heaven that thou shalt not take the city, or by the cowardice of thy folk and their witlessness in war. ,thou wilt know then who among thy captains is a coward, and who among thy men, and who too is brave; for they will fight each clan for itself. So shalt thou know whether it is even by the will of heaven that thou shalt not take the city, or by the cowardice of thy folk and their witlessness in war. ,thou wilt know then who among thy captains is a coward, and who among thy men, and who too is brave; for they will fight each clan for itself. So shalt thou know whether it is even by the will of heaven that thou shalt not take the city, or by the cowardice of thy folk and their witlessness in war. ,thou wilt know then who among thy captains is a coward, and who among thy men, and who too is brave; for they will fight each clan for itself. So shalt thou know whether it is even by the will of heaven that thou shalt not take the city, or by the cowardice of thy folk and their witlessness in war. ,thou wilt know then who among thy captains is a coward, and who among thy men, and who too is brave; for they will fight each clan for itself. So shalt thou know whether it is even by the will of heaven that thou shalt not take the city, or by the cowardice of thy folk and their witlessness in war. Then in answer to him spake the king, Agamemnon: , Aye verily once more, old sir, art thou pre-eminent in speech above the sons of the Achaeans. I would, O father Zeus and Athene and Apollo, that I had ten such counsellors; then would the city of king Priam forthwith bow her head, taken and laid waste beneath our hands. , Aye verily once more, old sir, art thou pre-eminent in speech above the sons of the Achaeans. I would, O father Zeus and Athene and Apollo, that I had ten such counsellors; then would the city of king Priam forthwith bow her head, taken and laid waste beneath our hands. , Aye verily once more, old sir, art thou pre-eminent in speech above the sons of the Achaeans. I would, O father Zeus and Athene and Apollo, that I had ten such counsellors; then would the city of king Priam forthwith bow her head, taken and laid waste beneath our hands. , Aye verily once more, old sir, art thou pre-eminent in speech above the sons of the Achaeans. I would, O father Zeus and Athene and Apollo, that I had ten such counsellors; then would the city of king Priam forthwith bow her head, taken and laid waste beneath our hands. , Aye verily once more, old sir, art thou pre-eminent in speech above the sons of the Achaeans. I would, O father Zeus and Athene and Apollo, that I had ten such counsellors; then would the city of king Priam forthwith bow her head, taken and laid waste beneath our hands. ,But the son of Cronos, even Zeus that beareth the aegis, hath brought sorrows upon me, in that he casteth me into the midst of fruitless strifes and wranglings. For verily I and Achilles fought about a girl with violent words, and it was I that waxed wroth the first; but if e'er we shall be at one in counsel, ,But the son of Cronos, even Zeus that beareth the aegis, hath brought sorrows upon me, in that he casteth me into the midst of fruitless strifes and wranglings. For verily I and Achilles fought about a girl with violent words, and it was I that waxed wroth the first; but if e'er we shall be at one in counsel, ,But the son of Cronos, even Zeus that beareth the aegis, hath brought sorrows upon me, in that he casteth me into the midst of fruitless strifes and wranglings. For verily I and Achilles fought about a girl with violent words, and it was I that waxed wroth the first; but if e'er we shall be at one in counsel, ,But the son of Cronos, even Zeus that beareth the aegis, hath brought sorrows upon me, in that he casteth me into the midst of fruitless strifes and wranglings. For verily I and Achilles fought about a girl with violent words, and it was I that waxed wroth the first; but if e'er we shall be at one in counsel, ,But the son of Cronos, even Zeus that beareth the aegis, hath brought sorrows upon me, in that he casteth me into the midst of fruitless strifes and wranglings. For verily I and Achilles fought about a girl with violent words, and it was I that waxed wroth the first; but if e'er we shall be at one in counsel, ,then shall there no more be any putting off of evil for the Trojans, no not for an instant. But for this present go ye to your meal, that we may join battle. Let every man whet well his spear and bestow well his shield, and let him well give to his swift-footed horses their food, and look well to his chariot on every side, and bethink him of fighting; ,then shall there no more be any putting off of evil for the Trojans, no not for an instant. But for this present go ye to your meal, that we may join battle. Let every man whet well his spear and bestow well his shield, and let him well give to his swift-footed horses their food, and look well to his chariot on every side, and bethink him of fighting; ,then shall there no more be any putting off of evil for the Trojans, no not for an instant. But for this present go ye to your meal, that we may join battle. Let every man whet well his spear and bestow well his shield, and let him well give to his swift-footed horses their food, and look well to his chariot on every side, and bethink him of fighting; ,then shall there no more be any putting off of evil for the Trojans, no not for an instant. But for this present go ye to your meal, that we may join battle. Let every man whet well his spear and bestow well his shield, and let him well give to his swift-footed horses their food, and look well to his chariot on every side, and bethink him of fighting; ,then shall there no more be any putting off of evil for the Trojans, no not for an instant. But for this present go ye to your meal, that we may join battle. Let every man whet well his spear and bestow well his shield, and let him well give to his swift-footed horses their food, and look well to his chariot on every side, and bethink him of fighting; ,that the whole day through we may contend in hateful war. For of respite shall there intervene, no, not a whit, until night at its coming shall part the fury of warriors. Wet with sweat about the breast of many a man shall be the baldric of his sheltering shield, and about the spear shall his hand grow weary, ,that the whole day through we may contend in hateful war. For of respite shall there intervene, no, not a whit, until night at its coming shall part the fury of warriors. Wet with sweat about the breast of many a man shall be the baldric of his sheltering shield, and about the spear shall his hand grow weary, ,that the whole day through we may contend in hateful war. For of respite shall there intervene, no, not a whit, until night at its coming shall part the fury of warriors. Wet with sweat about the breast of many a man shall be the baldric of his sheltering shield, and about the spear shall his hand grow weary, ,that the whole day through we may contend in hateful war. For of respite shall there intervene, no, not a whit, until night at its coming shall part the fury of warriors. Wet with sweat about the breast of many a man shall be the baldric of his sheltering shield, and about the spear shall his hand grow weary, ,that the whole day through we may contend in hateful war. For of respite shall there intervene, no, not a whit, until night at its coming shall part the fury of warriors. Wet with sweat about the breast of many a man shall be the baldric of his sheltering shield, and about the spear shall his hand grow weary, ,and wet with sweat shall a man's horse be, as he tugs at the polished car. But whomsoever I shall see minded to tarry apart from the fight beside the beaked ships, for him shall there be no hope thereafter to escape the dogs and birds. So spake he, and the Argives shouted aloud as a wave against a high headland, ,and wet with sweat shall a man's horse be, as he tugs at the polished car. But whomsoever I shall see minded to tarry apart from the fight beside the beaked ships, for him shall there be no hope thereafter to escape the dogs and birds. So spake he, and the Argives shouted aloud as a wave against a high headland, ,and wet with sweat shall a man's horse be, as he tugs at the polished car. But whomsoever I shall see minded to tarry apart from the fight beside the beaked ships, for him shall there be no hope thereafter to escape the dogs and birds. So spake he, and the Argives shouted aloud as a wave against a high headland, ,and wet with sweat shall a man's horse be, as he tugs at the polished car. But whomsoever I shall see minded to tarry apart from the fight beside the beaked ships, for him shall there be no hope thereafter to escape the dogs and birds. So spake he, and the Argives shouted aloud as a wave against a high headland, ,and wet with sweat shall a man's horse be, as he tugs at the polished car. But whomsoever I shall see minded to tarry apart from the fight beside the beaked ships, for him shall there be no hope thereafter to escape the dogs and birds. So spake he, and the Argives shouted aloud as a wave against a high headland, ,when the South Wind cometh and maketh it to swell—even against a jutting crag that is never left by the waves of all the winds that come from this side or from that. And they arose and hasted to scatter among the ships, and made fires in the huts, and took their meal. ,when the South Wind cometh and maketh it to swell—even against a jutting crag that is never left by the waves of all the winds that come from this side or from that. And they arose and hasted to scatter among the ships, and made fires in the huts, and took their meal. ,when the South Wind cometh and maketh it to swell—even against a jutting crag that is never left by the waves of all the winds that come from this side or from that. And they arose and hasted to scatter among the ships, and made fires in the huts, and took their meal. ,when the South Wind cometh and maketh it to swell—even against a jutting crag that is never left by the waves of all the winds that come from this side or from that. And they arose and hasted to scatter among the ships, and made fires in the huts, and took their meal. ,when the South Wind cometh and maketh it to swell—even against a jutting crag that is never left by the waves of all the winds that come from this side or from that. And they arose and hasted to scatter among the ships, and made fires in the huts, and took their meal. ,And they made sacrifice one to one of the gods that are for ever, and one to another, with the prayer that they might escape from death and the toil of war. But Agamemnon, king of men, slew a fat bull of five years to the son of Cronos, supreme in might, and let call the elders, the chieftains of the Achaean host, ,And they made sacrifice one to one of the gods that are for ever, and one to another, with the prayer that they might escape from death and the toil of war. But Agamemnon, king of men, slew a fat bull of five years to the son of Cronos, supreme in might, and let call the elders, the chieftains of the Achaean host, ,And they made sacrifice one to one of the gods that are for ever, and one to another, with the prayer that they might escape from death and the toil of war. But Agamemnon, king of men, slew a fat bull of five years to the son of Cronos, supreme in might, and let call the elders, the chieftains of the Achaean host, ,And they made sacrifice one to one of the gods that are for ever, and one to another, with the prayer that they might escape from death and the toil of war. But Agamemnon, king of men, slew a fat bull of five years to the son of Cronos, supreme in might, and let call the elders, the chieftains of the Achaean host, ,And they made sacrifice one to one of the gods that are for ever, and one to another, with the prayer that they might escape from death and the toil of war. But Agamemnon, king of men, slew a fat bull of five years to the son of Cronos, supreme in might, and let call the elders, the chieftains of the Achaean host, ,Nestor, first of all, and king Idomeneus, and thereafter the twain Aiantes and the son of Tydeus, and as the sixth Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel. And unbidden came to him Menelaus, good at the war-cry, for he knew in his heart wherewith his brother was busied. ,Nestor, first of all, and king Idomeneus, and thereafter the twain Aiantes and the son of Tydeus, and as the sixth Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel. And unbidden came to him Menelaus, good at the war-cry, for he knew in his heart wherewith his brother was busied. ,Nestor, first of all, and king Idomeneus, and thereafter the twain Aiantes and the son of Tydeus, and as the sixth Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel. And unbidden came to him Menelaus, good at the war-cry, for he knew in his heart wherewith his brother was busied. ,Nestor, first of all, and king Idomeneus, and thereafter the twain Aiantes and the son of Tydeus, and as the sixth Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel. And unbidden came to him Menelaus, good at the war-cry, for he knew in his heart wherewith his brother was busied. ,Nestor, first of all, and king Idomeneus, and thereafter the twain Aiantes and the son of Tydeus, and as the sixth Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel. And unbidden came to him Menelaus, good at the war-cry, for he knew in his heart wherewith his brother was busied. ,About the bull they stood and took up the barley grains, and in prayer lord Agamemnon spake among them, saying.Zeus, most glorious, most great, lord of the dark clouds, that dwellest in the heaven, grant that the sun set not, neither darkness come upon us, until I have cast down in headlong ruin the hall of Priam, blackened with smoke, ,About the bull they stood and took up the barley grains, and in prayer lord Agamemnon spake among them, saying.Zeus, most glorious, most great, lord of the dark clouds, that dwellest in the heaven, grant that the sun set not, neither darkness come upon us, until I have cast down in headlong ruin the hall of Priam, blackened with smoke, ,About the bull they stood and took up the barley grains, and in prayer lord Agamemnon spake among them, saying.Zeus, most glorious, most great, lord of the dark clouds, that dwellest in the heaven, grant that the sun set not, neither darkness come upon us, until I have cast down in headlong ruin the hall of Priam, blackened with smoke, ,About the bull they stood and took up the barley grains, and in prayer lord Agamemnon spake among them, saying.Zeus, most glorious, most great, lord of the dark clouds, that dwellest in the heaven, grant that the sun set not, neither darkness come upon us, until I have cast down in headlong ruin the hall of Priam, blackened with smoke, ,About the bull they stood and took up the barley grains, and in prayer lord Agamemnon spake among them, saying.Zeus, most glorious, most great, lord of the dark clouds, that dwellest in the heaven, grant that the sun set not, neither darkness come upon us, until I have cast down in headlong ruin the hall of Priam, blackened with smoke, ,and have burned with consuming fire the portals thereof, and cloven about the breast of Hector his tunic, rent with the bronze; and in throngs may his comrades round about him fall headlong in the dust, and bite the earth. ,and have burned with consuming fire the portals thereof, and cloven about the breast of Hector his tunic, rent with the bronze; and in throngs may his comrades round about him fall headlong in the dust, and bite the earth. ,and have burned with consuming fire the portals thereof, and cloven about the breast of Hector his tunic, rent with the bronze; and in throngs may his comrades round about him fall headlong in the dust, and bite the earth. ,and have burned with consuming fire the portals thereof, and cloven about the breast of Hector his tunic, rent with the bronze; and in throngs may his comrades round about him fall headlong in the dust, and bite the earth. ,and have burned with consuming fire the portals thereof, and cloven about the breast of Hector his tunic, rent with the bronze; and in throngs may his comrades round about him fall headlong in the dust, and bite the earth. So spake he; but not as yet would the son of Cronos grant him fulfillment; ,nay, he accepted the sacrifice, but toil he made to wax unceasingly. Then, when they had prayed and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads and cut their throats, and flayed them; and they cut out the thigh-pieces and covered them with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. ,nay, he accepted the sacrifice, but toil he made to wax unceasingly. Then, when they had prayed and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads and cut their throats, and flayed them; and they cut out the thigh-pieces and covered them with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. ,nay, he accepted the sacrifice, but toil he made to wax unceasingly. Then, when they had prayed and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads and cut their throats, and flayed them; and they cut out the thigh-pieces and covered them with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. ,nay, he accepted the sacrifice, but toil he made to wax unceasingly. Then, when they had prayed and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads and cut their throats, and flayed them; and they cut out the thigh-pieces and covered them with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. ,nay, he accepted the sacrifice, but toil he made to wax unceasingly. Then, when they had prayed and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads and cut their throats, and flayed them; and they cut out the thigh-pieces and covered them with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. ,These they burned on billets of wood stripped of leaves, and the inner parts they pierced with spits, and held them over the flame of Hephaestus. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned and they had tasted of the inner parts, they cut up the rest and spitted it, and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. ,These they burned on billets of wood stripped of leaves, and the inner parts they pierced with spits, and held them over the flame of Hephaestus. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned and they had tasted of the inner parts, they cut up the rest and spitted it, and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. ,These they burned on billets of wood stripped of leaves, and the inner parts they pierced with spits, and held them over the flame of Hephaestus. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned and they had tasted of the inner parts, they cut up the rest and spitted it, and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. ,These they burned on billets of wood stripped of leaves, and the inner parts they pierced with spits, and held them over the flame of Hephaestus. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned and they had tasted of the inner parts, they cut up the rest and spitted it, and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. ,These they burned on billets of wood stripped of leaves, and the inner parts they pierced with spits, and held them over the flame of Hephaestus. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned and they had tasted of the inner parts, they cut up the rest and spitted it, and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. ,Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack aught of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire of food and drink, among them the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia, was first to speak, saying:Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men, ,Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack aught of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire of food and drink, among them the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia, was first to speak, saying:Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men, ,Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack aught of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire of food and drink, among them the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia, was first to speak, saying:Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men, ,Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack aught of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire of food and drink, among them the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia, was first to speak, saying:Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men, ,Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack aught of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire of food and drink, among them the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia, was first to speak, saying:Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men, ,let us now not any more remain gathered here, nor any more put off the work which verily the god vouchsafeth us. Nay, come, let the heralds of the brazen-coated Achaeans make proclamation, and gather together the host throughout the ships, and let us go thus in a body through the broad camp of the Achaeans, ,let us now not any more remain gathered here, nor any more put off the work which verily the god vouchsafeth us. Nay, come, let the heralds of the brazen-coated Achaeans make proclamation, and gather together the host throughout the ships, and let us go thus in a body through the broad camp of the Achaeans, ,let us now not any more remain gathered here, nor any more put off the work which verily the god vouchsafeth us. Nay, come, let the heralds of the brazen-coated Achaeans make proclamation, and gather together the host throughout the ships, and let us go thus in a body through the broad camp of the Achaeans, ,let us now not any more remain gathered here, nor any more put off the work which verily the god vouchsafeth us. Nay, come, let the heralds of the brazen-coated Achaeans make proclamation, and gather together the host throughout the ships, and let us go thus in a body through the broad camp of the Achaeans, ,let us now not any more remain gathered here, nor any more put off the work which verily the god vouchsafeth us. Nay, come, let the heralds of the brazen-coated Achaeans make proclamation, and gather together the host throughout the ships, and let us go thus in a body through the broad camp of the Achaeans, ,that we may with the more speed stir up sharp battle. So spake he, and the king of men, Agamemnon, failed not to hearken. Straightway he bade the clear-voiced heralds summon to battle the long-haired Achaeans. And they made summons, and the host gathered full quickly. ,that we may with the more speed stir up sharp battle. So spake he, and the king of men, Agamemnon, failed not to hearken. Straightway he bade the clear-voiced heralds summon to battle the long-haired Achaeans. And they made summons, and the host gathered full quickly. ,that we may with the more speed stir up sharp battle. So spake he, and the king of men, Agamemnon, failed not to hearken. Straightway he bade the clear-voiced heralds summon to battle the long-haired Achaeans. And they made summons, and the host gathered full quickly. ,that we may with the more speed stir up sharp battle. So spake he, and the king of men, Agamemnon, failed not to hearken. Straightway he bade the clear-voiced heralds summon to battle the long-haired Achaeans. And they made summons, and the host gathered full quickly. ,that we may with the more speed stir up sharp battle. So spake he, and the king of men, Agamemnon, failed not to hearken. Straightway he bade the clear-voiced heralds summon to battle the long-haired Achaeans. And they made summons, and the host gathered full quickly. ,The kings, nurtured of Zeus, that were about Atreus' son, sped swiftly, marshalling the host, and in their midst was the flashing-eyed Athene, bearing the priceless aegis, that knoweth neither age nor death, wherefrom are hung an hundred tassels all of gold, all of them cunningly woven, and each one of the worth of an hundred oxen. ,The kings, nurtured of Zeus, that were about Atreus' son, sped swiftly, marshalling the host, and in their midst was the flashing-eyed Athene, bearing the priceless aegis, that knoweth neither age nor death, wherefrom are hung an hundred tassels all of gold, all of them cunningly woven, and each one of the worth of an hundred oxen. ,The kings, nurtured of Zeus, that were about Atreus' son, sped swiftly, marshalling the host, and in their midst was the flashing-eyed Athene, bearing the priceless aegis, that knoweth neither age nor death, wherefrom are hung an hundred tassels all of gold, all of them cunningly woven, and each one of the worth of an hundred oxen. ,The kings, nurtured of Zeus, that were about Atreus' son, sped swiftly, marshalling the host, and in their midst was the flashing-eyed Athene, bearing the priceless aegis, that knoweth neither age nor death, wherefrom are hung an hundred tassels all of gold, all of them cunningly woven, and each one of the worth of an hundred oxen. ,The kings, nurtured of Zeus, that were about Atreus' son, sped swiftly, marshalling the host, and in their midst was the flashing-eyed Athene, bearing the priceless aegis, that knoweth neither age nor death, wherefrom are hung an hundred tassels all of gold, all of them cunningly woven, and each one of the worth of an hundred oxen. ,Therewith she sped dazzling throughout the host of the Achaeans, urging them to go forth; and in the heart of each man she roused strength to war and to battle without ceasing. And to them forthwith war became sweeter than to return in their hollow ships to their dear native land. ,Therewith she sped dazzling throughout the host of the Achaeans, urging them to go forth; and in the heart of each man she roused strength to war and to battle without ceasing. And to them forthwith war became sweeter than to return in their hollow ships to their dear native land. ,Therewith she sped dazzling throughout the host of the Achaeans, urging them to go forth; and in the heart of each man she roused strength to war and to battle without ceasing. And to them forthwith war became sweeter than to return in their hollow ships to their dear native land. ,Therewith she sped dazzling throughout the host of the Achaeans, urging them to go forth; and in the heart of each man she roused strength to war and to battle without ceasing. And to them forthwith war became sweeter than to return in their hollow ships to their dear native land. ,Therewith she sped dazzling throughout the host of the Achaeans, urging them to go forth; and in the heart of each man she roused strength to war and to battle without ceasing. And to them forthwith war became sweeter than to return in their hollow ships to their dear native land. ,Even as a consuming fire maketh a boundless forest to blaze on the peaks of a mountain, and from afar is the glare thereof to be seen, even so from their innumerable bronze, as they marched forth, went the dazzling gleam up through the sky unto the heavens. ,Even as a consuming fire maketh a boundless forest to blaze on the peaks of a mountain, and from afar is the glare thereof to be seen, even so from their innumerable bronze, as they marched forth, went the dazzling gleam up through the sky unto the heavens. ,Even as a consuming fire maketh a boundless forest to blaze on the peaks of a mountain, and from afar is the glare thereof to be seen, even so from their innumerable bronze, as they marched forth, went the dazzling gleam up through the sky unto the heavens. ,Even as a consuming fire maketh a boundless forest to blaze on the peaks of a mountain, and from afar is the glare thereof to be seen, even so from their innumerable bronze, as they marched forth, went the dazzling gleam up through the sky unto the heavens. ,Even as a consuming fire maketh a boundless forest to blaze on the peaks of a mountain, and from afar is the glare thereof to be seen, even so from their innumerable bronze, as they marched forth, went the dazzling gleam up through the sky unto the heavens. And as the many tribes of winged fowl, ,wild geese or cranes or long-necked swans on the Asian mead by the streams of Caystrius, fly this way and that, glorying in their strength of wing, and with loud cries settle ever onwards, and the mead resoundeth; even so their many tribes poured forth from ships and huts ,wild geese or cranes or long-necked swans on the Asian mead by the streams of Caystrius, fly this way and that, glorying in their strength of wing, and with loud cries settle ever onwards, and the mead resoundeth; even so their many tribes poured forth from ships and huts ,wild geese or cranes or long-necked swans on the Asian mead by the streams of Caystrius, fly this way and that, glorying in their strength of wing, and with loud cries settle ever onwards, and the mead resoundeth; even so their many tribes poured forth from ships and huts ,wild geese or cranes or long-necked swans on the Asian mead by the streams of Caystrius, fly this way and that, glorying in their strength of wing, and with loud cries settle ever onwards, and the mead resoundeth; even so their many tribes poured forth from ships and huts ,wild geese or cranes or long-necked swans on the Asian mead by the streams of Caystrius, fly this way and that, glorying in their strength of wing, and with loud cries settle ever onwards, and the mead resoundeth; even so their many tribes poured forth from ships and huts ,into the plain of Scamander, and the earth echoed wondrously beneath the tread of men and horses. So they took their stand in the flowery mead of Scamander, numberless, as are the leaves and the flowers in their season.Even as the many tribes of swarming flies ,into the plain of Scamander, and the earth echoed wondrously beneath the tread of men and horses. So they took their stand in the flowery mead of Scamander, numberless, as are the leaves and the flowers in their season.Even as the many tribes of swarming flies ,into the plain of Scamander, and the earth echoed wondrously beneath the tread of men and horses. So they took their stand in the flowery mead of Scamander, numberless, as are the leaves and the flowers in their season.Even as the many tribes of swarming flies ,into the plain of Scamander, and the earth echoed wondrously beneath the tread of men and horses. So they took their stand in the flowery mead of Scamander, numberless, as are the leaves and the flowers in their season.Even as the many tribes of swarming flies ,into the plain of Scamander, and the earth echoed wondrously beneath the tread of men and horses. So they took their stand in the flowery mead of Scamander, numberless, as are the leaves and the flowers in their season.Even as the many tribes of swarming flies ,that buzz to and fro throughout the herdsman's farmstead in the season of spring, when the milk drenches the pails, even in such numbers stood the long-haired Achaeans upon the plain in the face of the men of Troy, eager to rend them asunder.And even as goatherds separate easily the wide-scattered flocks of goats, ,that buzz to and fro throughout the herdsman's farmstead in the season of spring, when the milk drenches the pails, even in such numbers stood the long-haired Achaeans upon the plain in the face of the men of Troy, eager to rend them asunder.And even as goatherds separate easily the wide-scattered flocks of goats, ,that buzz to and fro throughout the herdsman's farmstead in the season of spring, when the milk drenches the pails, even in such numbers stood the long-haired Achaeans upon the plain in the face of the men of Troy, eager to rend them asunder.And even as goatherds separate easily the wide-scattered flocks of goats, ,that buzz to and fro throughout the herdsman's farmstead in the season of spring, when the milk drenches the pails, even in such numbers stood the long-haired Achaeans upon the plain in the face of the men of Troy, eager to rend them asunder.And even as goatherds separate easily the wide-scattered flocks of goats, ,that buzz to and fro throughout the herdsman's farmstead in the season of spring, when the milk drenches the pails, even in such numbers stood the long-haired Achaeans upon the plain in the face of the men of Troy, eager to rend them asunder.And even as goatherds separate easily the wide-scattered flocks of goats, ,when they mingle in the pasture, so did their leaders marshal them on this side and on that to enter into the battle, and among them lord Agamemnon, his eyes and head like unto Zeus that hurleth the thunderbolt, his waist like unto Ares, and his breast unto Poseidon. ,when they mingle in the pasture, so did their leaders marshal them on this side and on that to enter into the battle, and among them lord Agamemnon, his eyes and head like unto Zeus that hurleth the thunderbolt, his waist like unto Ares, and his breast unto Poseidon. ,when they mingle in the pasture, so did their leaders marshal them on this side and on that to enter into the battle, and among them lord Agamemnon, his eyes and head like unto Zeus that hurleth the thunderbolt, his waist like unto Ares, and his breast unto Poseidon. ,when they mingle in the pasture, so did their leaders marshal them on this side and on that to enter into the battle, and among them lord Agamemnon, his eyes and head like unto Zeus that hurleth the thunderbolt, his waist like unto Ares, and his breast unto Poseidon. ,when they mingle in the pasture, so did their leaders marshal them on this side and on that to enter into the battle, and among them lord Agamemnon, his eyes and head like unto Zeus that hurleth the thunderbolt, his waist like unto Ares, and his breast unto Poseidon. ,Even as a bull among the herd stands forth far the chiefest over all, for that he is pre-eminent among the gathering kine, even such did Zeus make Agamemnon on that day, pre-eminent among many, and chiefest amid warriors.Tell me now, ye Muses that have dwellings on Olympus— ,Even as a bull among the herd stands forth far the chiefest over all, for that he is pre-eminent among the gathering kine, even such did Zeus make Agamemnon on that day, pre-eminent among many, and chiefest amid warriors.Tell me now, ye Muses that have dwellings on Olympus— ,Even as a bull among the herd stands forth far the chiefest over all, for that he is pre-eminent among the gathering kine, even such did Zeus make Agamemnon on that day, pre-eminent among many, and chiefest amid warriors.Tell me now, ye Muses that have dwellings on Olympus— ,Even as a bull among the herd stands forth far the chiefest over all, for that he is pre-eminent among the gathering kine, even such did Zeus make Agamemnon on that day, pre-eminent among many, and chiefest amid warriors.Tell me now, ye Muses that have dwellings on Olympus— ,Even as a bull among the herd stands forth far the chiefest over all, for that he is pre-eminent among the gathering kine, even such did Zeus make Agamemnon on that day, pre-eminent among many, and chiefest amid warriors.Tell me now, ye Muses that have dwellings on Olympus— ,for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths ,for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths ,for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths ,for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths ,for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths ,and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains, ,and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains, ,and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains, ,and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains, ,and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains, ,and Arcesilaus and Prothoënor and Clonius; these were they that dwelt in Hyria and rocky Aulis and Schoenus and Scolus and Eteonus with its many ridges, Thespeia, Graea, and spacious Mycalessus; and that dwelt about Harma and Eilesium and Erythrae; ,and Arcesilaus and Prothoënor and Clonius; these were they that dwelt in Hyria and rocky Aulis and Schoenus and Scolus and Eteonus with its many ridges, Thespeia, Graea, and spacious Mycalessus; and that dwelt about Harma and Eilesium and Erythrae; ,and Arcesilaus and Prothoënor and Clonius; these were they that dwelt in Hyria and rocky Aulis and Schoenus and Scolus and Eteonus with its many ridges, Thespeia, Graea, and spacious Mycalessus; and that dwelt about Harma and Eilesium and Erythrae; ,and Arcesilaus and Prothoënor and Clonius; these were they that dwelt in Hyria and rocky Aulis and Schoenus and Scolus and Eteonus with its many ridges, Thespeia, Graea, and spacious Mycalessus; and that dwelt about Harma and Eilesium and Erythrae; ,and Arcesilaus and Prothoënor and Clonius; these were they that dwelt in Hyria and rocky Aulis and Schoenus and Scolus and Eteonus with its many ridges, Thespeia, Graea, and spacious Mycalessus; and that dwelt about Harma and Eilesium and Erythrae; ,and that held Eleon and Hyle and Peteon, Ocalea and Medeon, the well-built citadel, Copae, Eutresis, and Thisbe, the haunt of doves; that dwelt in Coroneia and grassy Haliartus, and that held Plataea and dwelt in Glisas; ,and that held Eleon and Hyle and Peteon, Ocalea and Medeon, the well-built citadel, Copae, Eutresis, and Thisbe, the haunt of doves; that dwelt in Coroneia and grassy Haliartus, and that held Plataea and dwelt in Glisas; ,and that held Eleon and Hyle and Peteon, Ocalea and Medeon, the well-built citadel, Copae, Eutresis, and Thisbe, the haunt of doves; that dwelt in Coroneia and grassy Haliartus, and that held Plataea and dwelt in Glisas; ,and that held Eleon and Hyle and Peteon, Ocalea and Medeon, the well-built citadel, Copae, Eutresis, and Thisbe, the haunt of doves; that dwelt in Coroneia and grassy Haliartus, and that held Plataea and dwelt in Glisas; ,and that held Eleon and Hyle and Peteon, Ocalea and Medeon, the well-built citadel, Copae, Eutresis, and Thisbe, the haunt of doves; that dwelt in Coroneia and grassy Haliartus, and that held Plataea and dwelt in Glisas; ,that held lower Thebe, the well-built citadel, and holy Onchestus, the bright grove of Poseidon; and that held Arne, rich in vines, and Mideia and sacred Nisa and Anthedon on the seaboard. of these there came fifty ships, and on board of each ,that held lower Thebe, the well-built citadel, and holy Onchestus, the bright grove of Poseidon; and that held Arne, rich in vines, and Mideia and sacred Nisa and Anthedon on the seaboard. of these there came fifty ships, and on board of each ,that held lower Thebe, the well-built citadel, and holy Onchestus, the bright grove of Poseidon; and that held Arne, rich in vines, and Mideia and sacred Nisa and Anthedon on the seaboard. of these there came fifty ships, and on board of each ,that held lower Thebe, the well-built citadel, and holy Onchestus, the bright grove of Poseidon; and that held Arne, rich in vines, and Mideia and sacred Nisa and Anthedon on the seaboard. of these there came fifty ships, and on board of each ,that held lower Thebe, the well-built citadel, and holy Onchestus, the bright grove of Poseidon; and that held Arne, rich in vines, and Mideia and sacred Nisa and Anthedon on the seaboard. of these there came fifty ships, and on board of each ,/went young men of the Boeotians an hundred and twenty. ,/went young men of the Boeotians an hundred and twenty. ,/went young men of the Boeotians an hundred and twenty. ,/went young men of the Boeotians an hundred and twenty. ,went young men of the Boeotians an hundred and twenty. And they that dwelt in Aspledon and Orchomenus of the Minyae were led by Ascalaphus and Ialmenus, sons of Ares, whom, in the palace of Actor, son of Azeus, Astyoche, the honoured maiden, conceived of mighty Ares, when she had entered into her upper chamber; ,for he lay with her in secret. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships.And of the Phocians Schedius and Epistrophus were captains, sons of great-souled Iphitus, son of Naubolus; these were they that held Cyparissus and rocky Pytho, ,for he lay with her in secret. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships.And of the Phocians Schedius and Epistrophus were captains, sons of great-souled Iphitus, son of Naubolus; these were they that held Cyparissus and rocky Pytho, ,for he lay with her in secret. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships.And of the Phocians Schedius and Epistrophus were captains, sons of great-souled Iphitus, son of Naubolus; these were they that held Cyparissus and rocky Pytho, ,for he lay with her in secret. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships.And of the Phocians Schedius and Epistrophus were captains, sons of great-souled Iphitus, son of Naubolus; these were they that held Cyparissus and rocky Pytho, ,for he lay with her in secret. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships.And of the Phocians Schedius and Epistrophus were captains, sons of great-souled Iphitus, son of Naubolus; these were they that held Cyparissus and rocky Pytho, ,and sacred Crisa and Daulis and Panopeus; and that dwelt about Anemoreia and Hyampolis, and that lived beside the goodly river Cephisus, and that held Lilaea by the springs of Cephisus. With these followed forty black ships. ,and sacred Crisa and Daulis and Panopeus; and that dwelt about Anemoreia and Hyampolis, and that lived beside the goodly river Cephisus, and that held Lilaea by the springs of Cephisus. With these followed forty black ships. ,and sacred Crisa and Daulis and Panopeus; and that dwelt about Anemoreia and Hyampolis, and that lived beside the goodly river Cephisus, and that held Lilaea by the springs of Cephisus. With these followed forty black ships. ,and sacred Crisa and Daulis and Panopeus; and that dwelt about Anemoreia and Hyampolis, and that lived beside the goodly river Cephisus, and that held Lilaea by the springs of Cephisus. With these followed forty black ships. ,and sacred Crisa and Daulis and Panopeus; and that dwelt about Anemoreia and Hyampolis, and that lived beside the goodly river Cephisus, and that held Lilaea by the springs of Cephisus. With these followed forty black ships. ,And their leaders busily marshalled the ranks of the Phocians, and made ready for battle hard by the Boeotians on the left.And the Loerians had as leader the swift son of Oïleus, Aias the less, in no wise as great as Telamonian Aias, but far less. Small of stature was he, with corselet of linen, ,And their leaders busily marshalled the ranks of the Phocians, and made ready for battle hard by the Boeotians on the left.And the Loerians had as leader the swift son of Oïleus, Aias the less, in no wise as great as Telamonian Aias, but far less. Small of stature was he, with corselet of linen, ,And their leaders busily marshalled the ranks of the Phocians, and made ready for battle hard by the Boeotians on the left.And the Loerians had as leader the swift son of Oïleus, Aias the less, in no wise as great as Telamonian Aias, but far less. Small of stature was he, with corselet of linen, ,And their leaders busily marshalled the ranks of the Phocians, and made ready for battle hard by the Boeotians on the left.And the Loerians had as leader the swift son of Oïleus, Aias the less, in no wise as great as Telamonian Aias, but far less. Small of stature was he, with corselet of linen, ,And their leaders busily marshalled the ranks of the Phocians, and made ready for battle hard by the Boeotians on the left.And the Loerians had as leader the swift son of Oïleus, Aias the less, in no wise as great as Telamonian Aias, but far less. Small of stature was he, with corselet of linen, ,/but with the spear he far excelled the whole host of Hellenes and Achaeans. These were they that dwelt in Cynus and Opus and Calliarus and Bessa and Scarphe and lovely Augeiae and Tarphe and Thronium about the streams of Boagrius. With Aias followed forty black ships of ,/but with the spear he far excelled the whole host of Hellenes and Achaeans. These were they that dwelt in Cynus and Opus and Calliarus and Bessa and Scarphe and lovely Augeiae and Tarphe and Thronium about the streams of Boagrius. With Aias followed forty black ships of ,/but with the spear he far excelled the whole host of Hellenes and Achaeans. These were they that dwelt in Cynus and Opus and Calliarus and Bessa and Scarphe and lovely Augeiae and Tarphe and Thronium about the streams of Boagrius. With Aias followed forty black ships of ,/but with the spear he far excelled the whole host of Hellenes and Achaeans. These were they that dwelt in Cynus and Opus and Calliarus and Bessa and Scarphe and lovely Augeiae and Tarphe and Thronium about the streams of Boagrius. With Aias followed forty black ships of ,/but with the spear he far excelled the whole host of Hellenes and Achaeans. These were they that dwelt in Cynus and Opus and Calliarus and Bessa and Scarphe and lovely Augeiae and Tarphe and Thronium about the streams of Boagrius. With Aias followed forty black ships of ,the Locrians that dwell over against sacred Euboea.And the Abantes, breathing fury, that held Euboea and Chalcis and Eretria and Histiaea, rich in vines, and Cerinthus, hard by the sea, and the steep citadel of Dios; and that held Carystus and dwelt in Styra,— ,the Locrians that dwell over against sacred Euboea.And the Abantes, breathing fury, that held Euboea and Chalcis and Eretria and Histiaea, rich in vines, and Cerinthus, hard by the sea, and the steep citadel of Dios; and that held Carystus and dwelt in Styra,— ,the Locrians that dwell over against sacred Euboea.And the Abantes, breathing fury, that held Euboea and Chalcis and Eretria and Histiaea, rich in vines, and Cerinthus, hard by the sea, and the steep citadel of Dios; and that held Carystus and dwelt in Styra,— ,the Locrians that dwell over against sacred Euboea.And the Abantes, breathing fury, that held Euboea and Chalcis and Eretria and Histiaea, rich in vines, and Cerinthus, hard by the sea, and the steep citadel of Dios; and that held Carystus and dwelt in Styra,— ,the Locrians that dwell over against sacred Euboea.And the Abantes, breathing fury, that held Euboea and Chalcis and Eretria and Histiaea, rich in vines, and Cerinthus, hard by the sea, and the steep citadel of Dios; and that held Carystus and dwelt in Styra,— ,all these again had as leader Elephenor, scion of Ares, him that was son of Chalcodon and captain of the great-souled Abantes. And with him followed the swift Abantes, with hair long at the back, spearmen eager with outstretched ashen spears to rend the corselets about the breasts of the foemen. ,all these again had as leader Elephenor, scion of Ares, him that was son of Chalcodon and captain of the great-souled Abantes. And with him followed the swift Abantes, with hair long at the back, spearmen eager with outstretched ashen spears to rend the corselets about the breasts of the foemen. ,all these again had as leader Elephenor, scion of Ares, him that was son of Chalcodon and captain of the great-souled Abantes. And with him followed the swift Abantes, with hair long at the back, spearmen eager with outstretched ashen spears to rend the corselets about the breasts of the foemen. ,all these again had as leader Elephenor, scion of Ares, him that was son of Chalcodon and captain of the great-souled Abantes. And with him followed the swift Abantes, with hair long at the back, spearmen eager with outstretched ashen spears to rend the corselets about the breasts of the foemen. ,all these again had as leader Elephenor, scion of Ares, him that was son of Chalcodon and captain of the great-souled Abantes. And with him followed the swift Abantes, with hair long at the back, spearmen eager with outstretched ashen spears to rend the corselets about the breasts of the foemen. ,/And with him there followed forty black ships. ,/And with him there followed forty black ships. ,/And with him there followed forty black ships. ,/And with him there followed forty black ships. ,And with him there followed forty black ships. And they that held Athens, the well-built citadel, the land of great-hearted Erechtheus, whom of old Athene, daughter of Zeus, fostered, when the earth, the giver of grain, had borne him; and she made him to dwell in Athens, in her own rich sanctuary, ,and there the youths of the Athenians, as the years roll on in their courses, seek to win his favour with sacrifices of bulls and rams;—these again had as leader Menestheus, son of Peteos. Like unto him was none other man upon the face of the earth for the marshalling of chariots and of warriors that bear the shield. ,and there the youths of the Athenians, as the years roll on in their courses, seek to win his favour with sacrifices of bulls and rams;—these again had as leader Menestheus, son of Peteos. Like unto him was none other man upon the face of the earth for the marshalling of chariots and of warriors that bear the shield. ,and there the youths of the Athenians, as the years roll on in their courses, seek to win his favour with sacrifices of bulls and rams;—these again had as leader Menestheus, son of Peteos. Like unto him was none other man upon the face of the earth for the marshalling of chariots and of warriors that bear the shield. ,and there the youths of the Athenians, as the years roll on in their courses, seek to win his favour with sacrifices of bulls and rams;—these again had as leader Menestheus, son of Peteos. Like unto him was none other man upon the face of the earth for the marshalling of chariots and of warriors that bear the shield. ,and there the youths of the Athenians, as the years roll on in their courses, seek to win his favour with sacrifices of bulls and rams;—these again had as leader Menestheus, son of Peteos. Like unto him was none other man upon the face of the earth for the marshalling of chariots and of warriors that bear the shield. ,Only Nestor could vie with him, for he was the elder. And with him there followed fifty black ships.And Aias led from Salamis twelve ships, and stationed them where the battalions of the Athenians stood.And they that held Argos and Tiryns, famed for its walls, ,Only Nestor could vie with him, for he was the elder. And with him there followed fifty black ships.And Aias led from Salamis twelve ships, and stationed them where the battalions of the Athenians stood.And they that held Argos and Tiryns, famed for its walls, ,Only Nestor could vie with him, for he was the elder. And with him there followed fifty black ships.And Aias led from Salamis twelve ships, and stationed them where the battalions of the Athenians stood.And they that held Argos and Tiryns, famed for its walls, ,Only Nestor could vie with him, for he was the elder. And with him there followed fifty black ships.And Aias led from Salamis twelve ships, and stationed them where the battalions of the Athenians stood.And they that held Argos and Tiryns, famed for its walls, ,Only Nestor could vie with him, for he was the elder. And with him there followed fifty black ships.And Aias led from Salamis twelve ships, and stationed them where the battalions of the Athenians stood.And they that held Argos and Tiryns, famed for its walls, ,and Hermione and Asine, that enfold the deep gulf, Troezen and Eïonae and vine-clad Epidaurus, and the youths of the Achaeans that held Aegina and Mases,—these again had as leaders Diomedes, good at the war-cry, and Sthenelus, dear son of glorious Capaneus. ,and Hermione and Asine, that enfold the deep gulf, Troezen and Eïonae and vine-clad Epidaurus, and the youths of the Achaeans that held Aegina and Mases,—these again had as leaders Diomedes, good at the war-cry, and Sthenelus, dear son of glorious Capaneus. ,and Hermione and Asine, that enfold the deep gulf, Troezen and Eïonae and vine-clad Epidaurus, and the youths of the Achaeans that held Aegina and Mases,—these again had as leaders Diomedes, good at the war-cry, and Sthenelus, dear son of glorious Capaneus. ,and Hermione and Asine, that enfold the deep gulf, Troezen and Eïonae and vine-clad Epidaurus, and the youths of the Achaeans that held Aegina and Mases,—these again had as leaders Diomedes, good at the war-cry, and Sthenelus, dear son of glorious Capaneus. ,and Hermione and Asine, that enfold the deep gulf, Troezen and Eïonae and vine-clad Epidaurus, and the youths of the Achaeans that held Aegina and Mases,—these again had as leaders Diomedes, good at the war-cry, and Sthenelus, dear son of glorious Capaneus. ,And with them came a third, Euryalus, a godlike warrior, son of king Mecisteus, son of Talaus; but leader over them all was Diomedes, good at the war-cry. And with these there followed eighty black ships.And they that held Mycenae, the well-built citadel, ,And with them came a third, Euryalus, a godlike warrior, son of king Mecisteus, son of Talaus; but leader over them all was Diomedes, good at the war-cry. And with these there followed eighty black ships.And they that held Mycenae, the well-built citadel, ,And with them came a third, Euryalus, a godlike warrior, son of king Mecisteus, son of Talaus; but leader over them all was Diomedes, good at the war-cry. And with these there followed eighty black ships.And they that held Mycenae, the well-built citadel, ,And with them came a third, Euryalus, a godlike warrior, son of king Mecisteus, son of Talaus; but leader over them all was Diomedes, good at the war-cry. And with these there followed eighty black ships.And they that held Mycenae, the well-built citadel, ,And with them came a third, Euryalus, a godlike warrior, son of king Mecisteus, son of Talaus; but leader over them all was Diomedes, good at the war-cry. And with these there followed eighty black ships.And they that held Mycenae, the well-built citadel, ,and wealthy Corinth, and well-built Cleonae, and dwelt in Orneiae and lovely Araethyrea and Sicyon, wherein at the first Adrastus was king; and they that held Hyperesia and steep Gonoessa and Pellene, ,and wealthy Corinth, and well-built Cleonae, and dwelt in Orneiae and lovely Araethyrea and Sicyon, wherein at the first Adrastus was king; and they that held Hyperesia and steep Gonoessa and Pellene, ,and wealthy Corinth, and well-built Cleonae, and dwelt in Orneiae and lovely Araethyrea and Sicyon, wherein at the first Adrastus was king; and they that held Hyperesia and steep Gonoessa and Pellene, ,and wealthy Corinth, and well-built Cleonae, and dwelt in Orneiae and lovely Araethyrea and Sicyon, wherein at the first Adrastus was king; and they that held Hyperesia and steep Gonoessa and Pellene, ,and wealthy Corinth, and well-built Cleonae, and dwelt in Orneiae and lovely Araethyrea and Sicyon, wherein at the first Adrastus was king; and they that held Hyperesia and steep Gonoessa and Pellene, ,and that dwelt about Aegium and throughout all Aegialus, and about broad Helice,—of these was the son of Atreus, lord Agamemnon, captain, with an hundred ships. With him followed most people by far and goodliest; and among them he himself did on his gleaming bronze, a king all-glorious, and was pre-eminent among all the warriors, ,and that dwelt about Aegium and throughout all Aegialus, and about broad Helice,—of these was the son of Atreus, lord Agamemnon, captain, with an hundred ships. With him followed most people by far and goodliest; and among them he himself did on his gleaming bronze, a king all-glorious, and was pre-eminent among all the warriors, ,and that dwelt about Aegium and throughout all Aegialus, and about broad Helice,—of these was the son of Atreus, lord Agamemnon, captain, with an hundred ships. With him followed most people by far and goodliest; and among them he himself did on his gleaming bronze, a king all-glorious, and was pre-eminent among all the warriors, ,and that dwelt about Aegium and throughout all Aegialus, and about broad Helice,—of these was the son of Atreus, lord Agamemnon, captain, with an hundred ships. With him followed most people by far and goodliest; and among them he himself did on his gleaming bronze, a king all-glorious, and was pre-eminent among all the warriors, ,and that dwelt about Aegium and throughout all Aegialus, and about broad Helice,—of these was the son of Atreus, lord Agamemnon, captain, with an hundred ships. With him followed most people by far and goodliest; and among them he himself did on his gleaming bronze, a king all-glorious, and was pre-eminent among all the warriors, ,for that he was noblest, and led a people far the most in number. ,for that he was noblest, and led a people far the most in number. ,for that he was noblest, and led a people far the most in number. ,for that he was noblest, and led a people far the most in number. ,for that he was noblest, and led a people far the most in number. And they that held the hollow land of Lacedaemon with its many ravines, and Pharis and Sparta and Messe, the haunt of doves, and that dwelt in Bryseiae and lovely Augeiae, and that held Amyclae and Helus, a citadel hard by the sea, ,and that held Laas, and dwelt about Oetylus,—these were led by Agamemnon's brother, even Menelaus, good at the war-cry, with sixty ships; and they were marshalled apart. And himself he moved among them, confident in his zeal, urging his men to battle; and above all others was his heart fain ,and that held Laas, and dwelt about Oetylus,—these were led by Agamemnon's brother, even Menelaus, good at the war-cry, with sixty ships; and they were marshalled apart. And himself he moved among them, confident in his zeal, urging his men to battle; and above all others was his heart fain ,and that held Laas, and dwelt about Oetylus,—these were led by Agamemnon's brother, even Menelaus, good at the war-cry, with sixty ships; and they were marshalled apart. And himself he moved among them, confident in his zeal, urging his men to battle; and above all others was his heart fain ,and that held Laas, and dwelt about Oetylus,—these were led by Agamemnon's brother, even Menelaus, good at the war-cry, with sixty ships; and they were marshalled apart. And himself he moved among them, confident in his zeal, urging his men to battle; and above all others was his heart fain ,and that held Laas, and dwelt about Oetylus,—these were led by Agamemnon's brother, even Menelaus, good at the war-cry, with sixty ships; and they were marshalled apart. And himself he moved among them, confident in his zeal, urging his men to battle; and above all others was his heart fain ,to get him requital for his strivings and groanings for Helen's sake.And they that dwelt in Pylos and lovely Arene and Thryum, the ford of Alpheius, and fair-founded Aepy, and that had their abodes in Cyparisseïs and Amphigeneia and Pteleos and Helus and Dorium, ,to get him requital for his strivings and groanings for Helen's sake.And they that dwelt in Pylos and lovely Arene and Thryum, the ford of Alpheius, and fair-founded Aepy, and that had their abodes in Cyparisseïs and Amphigeneia and Pteleos and Helus and Dorium, ,to get him requital for his strivings and groanings for Helen's sake.And they that dwelt in Pylos and lovely Arene and Thryum, the ford of Alpheius, and fair-founded Aepy, and that had their abodes in Cyparisseïs and Amphigeneia and Pteleos and Helus and Dorium, ,to get him requital for his strivings and groanings for Helen's sake.And they that dwelt in Pylos and lovely Arene and Thryum, the ford of Alpheius, and fair-founded Aepy, and that had their abodes in Cyparisseïs and Amphigeneia and Pteleos and Helus and Dorium, ,to get him requital for his strivings and groanings for Helen's sake.And they that dwelt in Pylos and lovely Arene and Thryum, the ford of Alpheius, and fair-founded Aepy, and that had their abodes in Cyparisseïs and Amphigeneia and Pteleos and Helus and Dorium, ,where the Muses met Thamyris the Thracian and made an end of his singing, even as he was journeying from Oechalia, from the house of Eurytus the Oechalian: for he vaunted with boasting that he would conquer, were the Muses themselves to sing against him, the daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis; but they in their wrath maimed him, ,where the Muses met Thamyris the Thracian and made an end of his singing, even as he was journeying from Oechalia, from the house of Eurytus the Oechalian: for he vaunted with boasting that he would conquer, were the Muses themselves to sing against him, the daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis; but they in their wrath maimed him, ,where the Muses met Thamyris the Thracian and made an end of his singing, even as he was journeying from Oechalia, from the house of Eurytus the Oechalian: for he vaunted with boasting that he would conquer, were the Muses themselves to sing against him, the daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis; but they in their wrath maimed him, ,where the Muses met Thamyris the Thracian and made an end of his singing, even as he was journeying from Oechalia, from the house of Eurytus the Oechalian: for he vaunted with boasting that he would conquer, were the Muses themselves to sing against him, the daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis; but they in their wrath maimed him, ,where the Muses met Thamyris the Thracian and made an end of his singing, even as he was journeying from Oechalia, from the house of Eurytus the Oechalian: for he vaunted with boasting that he would conquer, were the Muses themselves to sing against him, the daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis; but they in their wrath maimed him, ,and took from him his wondrous song, and made him forget his minstrelsy;—all these folk again had as leader the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia. And with him were ranged ninety hollow ships.And they that held Arcadia beneath the steep mountain of Cyllene, beside the tomb of Aepytus, where are warriors that fight in close combat; ,and took from him his wondrous song, and made him forget his minstrelsy;—all these folk again had as leader the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia. And with him were ranged ninety hollow ships.And they that held Arcadia beneath the steep mountain of Cyllene, beside the tomb of Aepytus, where are warriors that fight in close combat; ,and took from him his wondrous song, and made him forget his minstrelsy;—all these folk again had as leader the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia. And with him were ranged ninety hollow ships.And they that held Arcadia beneath the steep mountain of Cyllene, beside the tomb of Aepytus, where are warriors that fight in close combat; ,and took from him his wondrous song, and made him forget his minstrelsy;—all these folk again had as leader the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia. And with him were ranged ninety hollow ships.And they that held Arcadia beneath the steep mountain of Cyllene, beside the tomb of Aepytus, where are warriors that fight in close combat; ,and took from him his wondrous song, and made him forget his minstrelsy;—all these folk again had as leader the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia. And with him were ranged ninety hollow ships.And they that held Arcadia beneath the steep mountain of Cyllene, beside the tomb of Aepytus, where are warriors that fight in close combat; ,and they that dwelt in Pheneos and Orchomenus, rich in flocks, and Rhipe and Stratia and wind-swept Enispe; and that held Tegea and lovely Mantineia; and that held Stymphalus and dwelt in Parrhasia, —all these were led by the son of Ancaeus, Lord Agapenor, ,and they that dwelt in Pheneos and Orchomenus, rich in flocks, and Rhipe and Stratia and wind-swept Enispe; and that held Tegea and lovely Mantineia; and that held Stymphalus and dwelt in Parrhasia, —all these were led by the son of Ancaeus, Lord Agapenor, ,and they that dwelt in Pheneos and Orchomenus, rich in flocks, and Rhipe and Stratia and wind-swept Enispe; and that held Tegea and lovely Mantineia; and that held Stymphalus and dwelt in Parrhasia, —all these were led by the son of Ancaeus, Lord Agapenor, ,and they that dwelt in Pheneos and Orchomenus, rich in flocks, and Rhipe and Stratia and wind-swept Enispe; and that held Tegea and lovely Mantineia; and that held Stymphalus and dwelt in Parrhasia, —all these were led by the son of Ancaeus, Lord Agapenor, ,and they that dwelt in Pheneos and Orchomenus, rich in flocks, and Rhipe and Stratia and wind-swept Enispe; and that held Tegea and lovely Mantineia; and that held Stymphalus and dwelt in Parrhasia, —all these were led by the son of Ancaeus, Lord Agapenor, ,with sixty ships; and on each ship embarked full many Arcadian warriors well-skilled in fight. For of himself had the king of men, Agamemnon, given them benched ships wherewith to cross over the wine-dark sea, even the son of Atreus, for with matters of seafaring had they naught to do. ,with sixty ships; and on each ship embarked full many Arcadian warriors well-skilled in fight. For of himself had the king of men, Agamemnon, given them benched ships wherewith to cross over the wine-dark sea, even the son of Atreus, for with matters of seafaring had they naught to do. ,with sixty ships; and on each ship embarked full many Arcadian warriors well-skilled in fight. For of himself had the king of men, Agamemnon, given them benched ships wherewith to cross over the wine-dark sea, even the son of Atreus, for with matters of seafaring had they naught to do. ,with sixty ships; and on each ship embarked full many Arcadian warriors well-skilled in fight. For of himself had the king of men, Agamemnon, given them benched ships wherewith to cross over the wine-dark sea, even the son of Atreus, for with matters of seafaring had they naught to do. ,with sixty ships; and on each ship embarked full many Arcadian warriors well-skilled in fight. For of himself had the king of men, Agamemnon, given them benched ships wherewith to cross over the wine-dark sea, even the son of Atreus, for with matters of seafaring had they naught to do. ,And they that dwelt in Buprasium and goodly Elis, all that part thereof that Hyrmine and Myrsinus on the seaboard and the rock of Olen and Alesium enclose between them—these again had four leaders, and ten swift ships followed each one, and many Epeians embarked thereon. ,And they that dwelt in Buprasium and goodly Elis, all that part thereof that Hyrmine and Myrsinus on the seaboard and the rock of Olen and Alesium enclose between them—these again had four leaders, and ten swift ships followed each one, and many Epeians embarked thereon. ,And they that dwelt in Buprasium and goodly Elis, all that part thereof that Hyrmine and Myrsinus on the seaboard and the rock of Olen and Alesium enclose between them—these again had four leaders, and ten swift ships followed each one, and many Epeians embarked thereon. ,And they that dwelt in Buprasium and goodly Elis, all that part thereof that Hyrmine and Myrsinus on the seaboard and the rock of Olen and Alesium enclose between them—these again had four leaders, and ten swift ships followed each one, and many Epeians embarked thereon. ,And they that dwelt in Buprasium and goodly Elis, all that part thereof that Hyrmine and Myrsinus on the seaboard and the rock of Olen and Alesium enclose between them—these again had four leaders, and ten swift ships followed each one, and many Epeians embarked thereon. ,of these some were led by Amphimachus and Thalpius, of the blood of Actor, sons, the one of Cteatus and the other of Eurytus; and of some was the son of Amarynceus captain, even mighty Diores; and of the fourth company godlike Polyxeinus was captain, son of king Agasthenes, Augeias' son. ,of these some were led by Amphimachus and Thalpius, of the blood of Actor, sons, the one of Cteatus and the other of Eurytus; and of some was the son of Amarynceus captain, even mighty Diores; and of the fourth company godlike Polyxeinus was captain, son of king Agasthenes, Augeias' son. ,of these some were led by Amphimachus and Thalpius, of the blood of Actor, sons, the one of Cteatus and the other of Eurytus; and of some was the son of Amarynceus captain, even mighty Diores; and of the fourth company godlike Polyxeinus was captain, son of king Agasthenes, Augeias' son. ,of these some were led by Amphimachus and Thalpius, of the blood of Actor, sons, the one of Cteatus and the other of Eurytus; and of some was the son of Amarynceus captain, even mighty Diores; and of the fourth company godlike Polyxeinus was captain, son of king Agasthenes, Augeias' son. ,of these some were led by Amphimachus and Thalpius, of the blood of Actor, sons, the one of Cteatus and the other of Eurytus; and of some was the son of Amarynceus captain, even mighty Diores; and of the fourth company godlike Polyxeinus was captain, son of king Agasthenes, Augeias' son. ,And those from Dulichiuni and the Echinae, the holy isles, that lie across the sea, over against Elis, these again had as leader Meges, the peer of Ares, even the son of Phyleus, whom the horseman Phyleus, dear to Zeus, begat—he that of old had gone to dwell in Dulichium in wrath against his father. ,And those from Dulichiuni and the Echinae, the holy isles, that lie across the sea, over against Elis, these again had as leader Meges, the peer of Ares, even the son of Phyleus, whom the horseman Phyleus, dear to Zeus, begat—he that of old had gone to dwell in Dulichium in wrath against his father. ,And those from Dulichiuni and the Echinae, the holy isles, that lie across the sea, over against Elis, these again had as leader Meges, the peer of Ares, even the son of Phyleus, whom the horseman Phyleus, dear to Zeus, begat—he that of old had gone to dwell in Dulichium in wrath against his father. ,And those from Dulichiuni and the Echinae, the holy isles, that lie across the sea, over against Elis, these again had as leader Meges, the peer of Ares, even the son of Phyleus, whom the horseman Phyleus, dear to Zeus, begat—he that of old had gone to dwell in Dulichium in wrath against his father. ,And those from Dulichiuni and the Echinae, the holy isles, that lie across the sea, over against Elis, these again had as leader Meges, the peer of Ares, even the son of Phyleus, whom the horseman Phyleus, dear to Zeus, begat—he that of old had gone to dwell in Dulichium in wrath against his father. ,And with Meges there followed forty black ships.And Odysseus led the great-souled Cephallenians that held Ithaca and Neritum, covered with waving forests, and that dwelt in Crocyleia and rugged Aegilips; and them that held Zacynthus, and that dwelt about Samos, ,And with Meges there followed forty black ships.And Odysseus led the great-souled Cephallenians that held Ithaca and Neritum, covered with waving forests, and that dwelt in Crocyleia and rugged Aegilips; and them that held Zacynthus, and that dwelt about Samos, ,And with Meges there followed forty black ships.And Odysseus led the great-souled Cephallenians that held Ithaca and Neritum, covered with waving forests, and that dwelt in Crocyleia and rugged Aegilips; and them that held Zacynthus, and that dwelt about Samos, ,And with Meges there followed forty black ships.And Odysseus led the great-souled Cephallenians that held Ithaca and Neritum, covered with waving forests, and that dwelt in Crocyleia and rugged Aegilips; and them that held Zacynthus, and that dwelt about Samos, ,And with Meges there followed forty black ships.And Odysseus led the great-souled Cephallenians that held Ithaca and Neritum, covered with waving forests, and that dwelt in Crocyleia and rugged Aegilips; and them that held Zacynthus, and that dwelt about Samos, ,and held the mainland and dwelt on the shores over against the isles. of these was Odysseus captain, the peer of Zeus in counsel. And with him there followed twelve ships with vermilion prows.And the Aetolians were led by Thoas, Andraemon's son, even they that dwelt in Pleuron and Olenus and Pylene and Chalcis, hard by the sea, and rocky Calydon. For the sons of great-hearted Oeneus were no more, neither did he himself still live, and fair-haired Meleager was dead, to whom had commands been given that he should bear full sway among the Aetolians. And with Thoas there followed forty black ships. ,and held the mainland and dwelt on the shores over against the isles. of these was Odysseus captain, the peer of Zeus in counsel. And with him there followed twelve ships with vermilion prows.And the Aetolians were led by Thoas, Andraemon's son, even they that dwelt in Pleuron and Olenus and Pylene and Chalcis, hard by the sea, and rocky Calydon. For the sons of great-hearted Oeneus were no more, neither did he himself still live, and fair-haired Meleager was dead, to whom had commands been given that he should bear full sway among the Aetolians. And with Thoas there followed forty black ships. ,and held the mainland and dwelt on the shores over against the isles. of these was Odysseus captain, the peer of Zeus in counsel. And with him there followed twelve ships with vermilion prows.And the Aetolians were led by Thoas, Andraemon's son, even they that dwelt in Pleuron and Olenus and Pylene and Chalcis, hard by the sea, and rocky Calydon. For the sons of great-hearted Oeneus were no more, neither did he himself still live, and fair-haired Meleager was dead, to whom had commands been given that he should bear full sway among the Aetolians. And with Thoas there followed forty black ships. ,and held the mainland and dwelt on the shores over against the isles. of these was Odysseus captain, the peer of Zeus in counsel. And with him there followed twelve ships with vermilion prows.And the Aetolians were led by Thoas, Andraemon's son, even they that dwelt in Pleuron and Olenus and Pylene and Chalcis, hard by the sea, and rocky Calydon. For the sons of great-hearted Oeneus were no more, neither did he himself still live, and fair-haired Meleager was dead, to whom had commands been given that he should bear full sway among the Aetolians. And with Thoas there followed forty black ships. ,and held the mainland and dwelt on the shores over against the isles. of these was Odysseus captain, the peer of Zeus in counsel. And with him there followed twelve ships with vermilion prows.And the Aetolians were led by Thoas, Andraemon's son, even they that dwelt in Pleuron and Olenus and Pylene and Chalcis, hard by the sea, and rocky Calydon. For the sons of great-hearted Oeneus were no more, neither did he himself still live, and fair-haired Meleager was dead, to whom had commands been given that he should bear full sway among the Aetolians. And with Thoas there followed forty black ships. ,And the Cretans had as leader Idomeneus, famed for his spear, even they that held Cnosus and Gortys, famed for its walls, Lyctus and Miletus and Lycastus, white with chalk, and Phaestus and Rhytium, well-peopled cities; and all they beside that dwelt in Crete of the hundred cities. ,And the Cretans had as leader Idomeneus, famed for his spear, even they that held Cnosus and Gortys, famed for its walls, Lyctus and Miletus and Lycastus, white with chalk, and Phaestus and Rhytium, well-peopled cities; and all they beside that dwelt in Crete of the hundred cities. ,And the Cretans had as leader Idomeneus, famed for his spear, even they that held Cnosus and Gortys, famed for its walls, Lyctus and Miletus and Lycastus, white with chalk, and Phaestus and Rhytium, well-peopled cities; and all they beside that dwelt in Crete of the hundred cities. ,And the Cretans had as leader Idomeneus, famed for his spear, even they that held Cnosus and Gortys, famed for its walls, Lyctus and Miletus and Lycastus, white with chalk, and Phaestus and Rhytium, well-peopled cities; and all they beside that dwelt in Crete of the hundred cities. ,And the Cretans had as leader Idomeneus, famed for his spear, even they that held Cnosus and Gortys, famed for its walls, Lyctus and Miletus and Lycastus, white with chalk, and Phaestus and Rhytium, well-peopled cities; and all they beside that dwelt in Crete of the hundred cities. ,of all these was Idomeneus, famed for his spear, captain, and Meriones, the peer of Enyalius, slayer of men. And with these there followed eighty black ships. ,of all these was Idomeneus, famed for his spear, captain, and Meriones, the peer of Enyalius, slayer of men. And with these there followed eighty black ships. ,of all these was Idomeneus, famed for his spear, captain, and Meriones, the peer of Enyalius, slayer of men. And with these there followed eighty black ships. ,of all these was Idomeneus, famed for his spear, captain, and Meriones, the peer of Enyalius, slayer of men. And with these there followed eighty black ships. ,of all these was Idomeneus, famed for his spear, captain, and Meriones, the peer of Enyalius, slayer of men. And with these there followed eighty black ships. And Tlepolemus, son of Heracles, a valiant man and tall, led from Rhodes nine ships of the lordly Rhodians, ,that dwelt in Rhodes sundered in three divisions—in Lindos and Ialysus and Cameirus, white with chalk. These were led by Tlepolemus, famed for his spear, he that was born to mighty Heracles by Astyocheia, whom he had led forth out of Ephyre from the river Selleïs, ,that dwelt in Rhodes sundered in three divisions—in Lindos and Ialysus and Cameirus, white with chalk. These were led by Tlepolemus, famed for his spear, he that was born to mighty Heracles by Astyocheia, whom he had led forth out of Ephyre from the river Selleïs, ,that dwelt in Rhodes sundered in three divisions—in Lindos and Ialysus and Cameirus, white with chalk. These were led by Tlepolemus, famed for his spear, he that was born to mighty Heracles by Astyocheia, whom he had led forth out of Ephyre from the river Selleïs, ,that dwelt in Rhodes sundered in three divisions—in Lindos and Ialysus and Cameirus, white with chalk. These were led by Tlepolemus, famed for his spear, he that was born to mighty Heracles by Astyocheia, whom he had led forth out of Ephyre from the river Selleïs, ,that dwelt in Rhodes sundered in three divisions—in Lindos and Ialysus and Cameirus, white with chalk. These were led by Tlepolemus, famed for his spear, he that was born to mighty Heracles by Astyocheia, whom he had led forth out of Ephyre from the river Selleïs, ,when he had laid waste many cities of warriors fostered of Zeus. But when Tlepolemus had grown to manhood in the well-fenced palace, forthwith he slew his own father's dear uncle, Licymnius, scion of Ares, who was then waxing old. So he straightway built him ships, and when he had gathered together much people, ,when he had laid waste many cities of warriors fostered of Zeus. But when Tlepolemus had grown to manhood in the well-fenced palace, forthwith he slew his own father's dear uncle, Licymnius, scion of Ares, who was then waxing old. So he straightway built him ships, and when he had gathered together much people, ,when he had laid waste many cities of warriors fostered of Zeus. But when Tlepolemus had grown to manhood in the well-fenced palace, forthwith he slew his own father's dear uncle, Licymnius, scion of Ares, who was then waxing old. So he straightway built him ships, and when he had gathered together much people, ,when he had laid waste many cities of warriors fostered of Zeus. But when Tlepolemus had grown to manhood in the well-fenced palace, forthwith he slew his own father's dear uncle, Licymnius, scion of Ares, who was then waxing old. So he straightway built him ships, and when he had gathered together much people, ,when he had laid waste many cities of warriors fostered of Zeus. But when Tlepolemus had grown to manhood in the well-fenced palace, forthwith he slew his own father's dear uncle, Licymnius, scion of Ares, who was then waxing old. So he straightway built him ships, and when he had gathered together much people, ,went forth in flight over the sea, for that the other sons and grandsons of mighty Heracles threatened him. But he came to Rhodes in his wanderings, suffering woes, and there his people settled in three divisions by tribes, and were loved of Zeus that is king among gods and men; ,went forth in flight over the sea, for that the other sons and grandsons of mighty Heracles threatened him. But he came to Rhodes in his wanderings, suffering woes, and there his people settled in three divisions by tribes, and were loved of Zeus that is king among gods and men; ,went forth in flight over the sea, for that the other sons and grandsons of mighty Heracles threatened him. But he came to Rhodes in his wanderings, suffering woes, and there his people settled in three divisions by tribes, and were loved of Zeus that is king among gods and men; ,went forth in flight over the sea, for that the other sons and grandsons of mighty Heracles threatened him. But he came to Rhodes in his wanderings, suffering woes, and there his people settled in three divisions by tribes, and were loved of Zeus that is king among gods and men; ,went forth in flight over the sea, for that the other sons and grandsons of mighty Heracles threatened him. But he came to Rhodes in his wanderings, suffering woes, and there his people settled in three divisions by tribes, and were loved of Zeus that is king among gods and men; ,and upon them was wondrous wealth poured by the son of Cronos.Moreover Nireus led three shapely ships from Syme, Nireus that was son of Aglaïa and Charops the king, Nireus the comeliest man that came beneath Ilios of all the Danaans after the fearless son of Peleus. ,and upon them was wondrous wealth poured by the son of Cronos.Moreover Nireus led three shapely ships from Syme, Nireus that was son of Aglaïa and Charops the king, Nireus the comeliest man that came beneath Ilios of all the Danaans after the fearless son of Peleus. ,and upon them was wondrous wealth poured by the son of Cronos.Moreover Nireus led three shapely ships from Syme, Nireus that was son of Aglaïa and Charops the king, Nireus the comeliest man that came beneath Ilios of all the Danaans after the fearless son of Peleus. ,and upon them was wondrous wealth poured by the son of Cronos.Moreover Nireus led three shapely ships from Syme, Nireus that was son of Aglaïa and Charops the king, Nireus the comeliest man that came beneath Ilios of all the Danaans after the fearless son of Peleus. ,and upon them was wondrous wealth poured by the son of Cronos.Moreover Nireus led three shapely ships from Syme, Nireus that was son of Aglaïa and Charops the king, Nireus the comeliest man that came beneath Ilios of all the Danaans after the fearless son of Peleus. ,Howbeit he was a weakling, and but few people followed with him.And they that held Nisyrus and Crapathus and Casus and Cos, the city of Eurypylus, and the Calydnian isles, these again were led by Pheidippus and Antiphus, the two sons of king Thessalus, son of Heracles. ,Howbeit he was a weakling, and but few people followed with him.And they that held Nisyrus and Crapathus and Casus and Cos, the city of Eurypylus, and the Calydnian isles, these again were led by Pheidippus and Antiphus, the two sons of king Thessalus, son of Heracles. ,Howbeit he was a weakling, and but few people followed with him.And they that held Nisyrus and Crapathus and Casus and Cos, the city of Eurypylus, and the Calydnian isles, these again were led by Pheidippus and Antiphus, the two sons of king Thessalus, son of Heracles. ,Howbeit he was a weakling, and but few people followed with him.And they that held Nisyrus and Crapathus and Casus and Cos, the city of Eurypylus, and the Calydnian isles, these again were led by Pheidippus and Antiphus, the two sons of king Thessalus, son of Heracles. ,Howbeit he was a weakling, and but few people followed with him.And they that held Nisyrus and Crapathus and Casus and Cos, the city of Eurypylus, and the Calydnian isles, these again were led by Pheidippus and Antiphus, the two sons of king Thessalus, son of Heracles. ,And with them were ranged thirty hollow ships.Now all those again that inhabited Pelasgian Argos, and dwelt in Alos and Alope and Trachis, and that held Phthia and Hellas, the land of fair women, and were called Myrmidons and Hellenes and Achaeans— ,And with them were ranged thirty hollow ships.Now all those again that inhabited Pelasgian Argos, and dwelt in Alos and Alope and Trachis, and that held Phthia and Hellas, the land of fair women, and were called Myrmidons and Hellenes and Achaeans— ,And with them were ranged thirty hollow ships.Now all those again that inhabited Pelasgian Argos, and dwelt in Alos and Alope and Trachis, and that held Phthia and Hellas, the land of fair women, and were called Myrmidons and Hellenes and Achaeans— ,And with them were ranged thirty hollow ships.Now all those again that inhabited Pelasgian Argos, and dwelt in Alos and Alope and Trachis, and that held Phthia and Hellas, the land of fair women, and were called Myrmidons and Hellenes and Achaeans— ,And with them were ranged thirty hollow ships.Now all those again that inhabited Pelasgian Argos, and dwelt in Alos and Alope and Trachis, and that held Phthia and Hellas, the land of fair women, and were called Myrmidons and Hellenes and Achaeans— ,of the fifty ships of these men was Achilles captain. Howbeit they bethought them not of dolorous war, since there was no man to lead them forth into the ranks. For he lay in idleness among the ships, the swift-footed, goodly Achilles, in wrath because of the fair-haired girl Briseïs, ,of the fifty ships of these men was Achilles captain. Howbeit they bethought them not of dolorous war, since there was no man to lead them forth into the ranks. For he lay in idleness among the ships, the swift-footed, goodly Achilles, in wrath because of the fair-haired girl Briseïs, ,of the fifty ships of these men was Achilles captain. Howbeit they bethought them not of dolorous war, since there was no man to lead them forth into the ranks. For he lay in idleness among the ships, the swift-footed, goodly Achilles, in wrath because of the fair-haired girl Briseïs, ,of the fifty ships of these men was Achilles captain. Howbeit they bethought them not of dolorous war, since there was no man to lead them forth into the ranks. For he lay in idleness among the ships, the swift-footed, goodly Achilles, in wrath because of the fair-haired girl Briseïs, ,of the fifty ships of these men was Achilles captain. Howbeit they bethought them not of dolorous war, since there was no man to lead them forth into the ranks. For he lay in idleness among the ships, the swift-footed, goodly Achilles, in wrath because of the fair-haired girl Briseïs, ,whom he had taken out of Lyrnessus after sore toil, when he wasted Lyrnessus and the walls of Thebe, and laid low Mynes and Epistrophus, warriors that raged with the spear, sons of king Evenus, Selepus' son. In sore grief for her lay Achilles idle; but soon was he to arise again. ,whom he had taken out of Lyrnessus after sore toil, when he wasted Lyrnessus and the walls of Thebe, and laid low Mynes and Epistrophus, warriors that raged with the spear, sons of king Evenus, Selepus' son. In sore grief for her lay Achilles idle; but soon was he to arise again. ,whom he had taken out of Lyrnessus after sore toil, when he wasted Lyrnessus and the walls of Thebe, and laid low Mynes and Epistrophus, warriors that raged with the spear, sons of king Evenus, Selepus' son. In sore grief for her lay Achilles idle; but soon was he to arise again. ,whom he had taken out of Lyrnessus after sore toil, when he wasted Lyrnessus and the walls of Thebe, and laid low Mynes and Epistrophus, warriors that raged with the spear, sons of king Evenus, Selepus' son. In sore grief for her lay Achilles idle; but soon was he to arise again. ,whom he had taken out of Lyrnessus after sore toil, when he wasted Lyrnessus and the walls of Thebe, and laid low Mynes and Epistrophus, warriors that raged with the spear, sons of king Evenus, Selepus' son. In sore grief for her lay Achilles idle; but soon was he to arise again. ,And they that held Phylace and flowery Pyrasus, the sanctuary of Demeter, and Iton, mother of flocks, and Antron, hard by the sea, and Pteleos, couched in grass, these again had as leader warlike Protesilaus, while yet he lived; howbeit ere now the black earth held him fast. ,And they that held Phylace and flowery Pyrasus, the sanctuary of Demeter, and Iton, mother of flocks, and Antron, hard by the sea, and Pteleos, couched in grass, these again had as leader warlike Protesilaus, while yet he lived; howbeit ere now the black earth held him fast. ,And they that held Phylace and flowery Pyrasus, the sanctuary of Demeter, and Iton, mother of flocks, and Antron, hard by the sea, and Pteleos, couched in grass, these again had as leader warlike Protesilaus, while yet he lived; howbeit ere now the black earth held him fast. ,And they that held Phylace and flowery Pyrasus, the sanctuary of Demeter, and Iton, mother of flocks, and Antron, hard by the sea, and Pteleos, couched in grass, these again had as leader warlike Protesilaus, while yet he lived; howbeit ere now the black earth held him fast. ,And they that held Phylace and flowery Pyrasus, the sanctuary of Demeter, and Iton, mother of flocks, and Antron, hard by the sea, and Pteleos, couched in grass, these again had as leader warlike Protesilaus, while yet he lived; howbeit ere now the black earth held him fast. ,His wife, her two cheeks torn in wailing, was left in Phylace and his house but half established, while, for himself, a Dardanian warrior slew him as he leapt forth from his ship by far the first of the Achaeans. Yet neither were his men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; for Podarces, scion of Ares, marshalled them, ,His wife, her two cheeks torn in wailing, was left in Phylace and his house but half established, while, for himself, a Dardanian warrior slew him as he leapt forth from his ship by far the first of the Achaeans. Yet neither were his men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; for Podarces, scion of Ares, marshalled them, ,His wife, her two cheeks torn in wailing, was left in Phylace and his house but half established, while, for himself, a Dardanian warrior slew him as he leapt forth from his ship by far the first of the Achaeans. Yet neither were his men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; for Podarces, scion of Ares, marshalled them, ,His wife, her two cheeks torn in wailing, was left in Phylace and his house but half established, while, for himself, a Dardanian warrior slew him as he leapt forth from his ship by far the first of the Achaeans. Yet neither were his men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; for Podarces, scion of Ares, marshalled them, ,His wife, her two cheeks torn in wailing, was left in Phylace and his house but half established, while, for himself, a Dardanian warrior slew him as he leapt forth from his ship by far the first of the Achaeans. Yet neither were his men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; for Podarces, scion of Ares, marshalled them, ,he that was son of Phylacus' son, Iphiclus, rich in flocks, own brother to great-souled Protesilaus, and younger-born; but the other was the elder and the better man, even the warrior, valiant Protesilaus. So the host in no wise lacked a leader, though they longed for the noble man they had lost. ,he that was son of Phylacus' son, Iphiclus, rich in flocks, own brother to great-souled Protesilaus, and younger-born; but the other was the elder and the better man, even the warrior, valiant Protesilaus. So the host in no wise lacked a leader, though they longed for the noble man they had lost. ,he that was son of Phylacus' son, Iphiclus, rich in flocks, own brother to great-souled Protesilaus, and younger-born; but the other was the elder and the better man, even the warrior, valiant Protesilaus. So the host in no wise lacked a leader, though they longed for the noble man they had lost. ,he that was son of Phylacus' son, Iphiclus, rich in flocks, own brother to great-souled Protesilaus, and younger-born; but the other was the elder and the better man, even the warrior, valiant Protesilaus. So the host in no wise lacked a leader, though they longed for the noble man they had lost. ,he that was son of Phylacus' son, Iphiclus, rich in flocks, own brother to great-souled Protesilaus, and younger-born; but the other was the elder and the better man, even the warrior, valiant Protesilaus. So the host in no wise lacked a leader, though they longed for the noble man they had lost. ,And with him there followed forty black ships.And they that dwelt in Pherae beside the lake Boebeïs, and in Boebe, and Glaphyrae, and well-built Iolcus, these were led by the dear son of Admetus with eleven ships, even by Eumelus, whom Alcestis, queenly among women, bare to Admetus, ,And with him there followed forty black ships.And they that dwelt in Pherae beside the lake Boebeïs, and in Boebe, and Glaphyrae, and well-built Iolcus, these were led by the dear son of Admetus with eleven ships, even by Eumelus, whom Alcestis, queenly among women, bare to Admetus, ,And with him there followed forty black ships.And they that dwelt in Pherae beside the lake Boebeïs, and in Boebe, and Glaphyrae, and well-built Iolcus, these were led by the dear son of Admetus with eleven ships, even by Eumelus, whom Alcestis, queenly among women, bare to Admetus, ,And with him there followed forty black ships.And they that dwelt in Pherae beside the lake Boebeïs, and in Boebe, and Glaphyrae, and well-built Iolcus, these were led by the dear son of Admetus with eleven ships, even by Eumelus, whom Alcestis, queenly among women, bare to Admetus, ,And with him there followed forty black ships.And they that dwelt in Pherae beside the lake Boebeïs, and in Boebe, and Glaphyrae, and well-built Iolcus, these were led by the dear son of Admetus with eleven ships, even by Eumelus, whom Alcestis, queenly among women, bare to Admetus, ,even she, the comeliest of the daughters of Pelias.And they that dwelt in Methone and Thaumacia, and that held Meliboea and rugged Olizon, these with their seven ships were led by Philoctetes, well-skilled in archery, ,even she, the comeliest of the daughters of Pelias.And they that dwelt in Methone and Thaumacia, and that held Meliboea and rugged Olizon, these with their seven ships were led by Philoctetes, well-skilled in archery, ,even she, the comeliest of the daughters of Pelias.And they that dwelt in Methone and Thaumacia, and that held Meliboea and rugged Olizon, these with their seven ships were led by Philoctetes, well-skilled in archery, ,even she, the comeliest of the daughters of Pelias.And they that dwelt in Methone and Thaumacia, and that held Meliboea and rugged Olizon, these with their seven ships were led by Philoctetes, well-skilled in archery, ,even she, the comeliest of the daughters of Pelias.And they that dwelt in Methone and Thaumacia, and that held Meliboea and rugged Olizon, these with their seven ships were led by Philoctetes, well-skilled in archery, ,and on each ship embarked fifty oarsmen well skilled to fight amain with the bow. But Philoctetes lay suffering grievous pains in an island, even in sacred Lemnos, where the sons of the Achaeans had left him in anguish with an evil wound from a deadly water-snake. There he lay suffering; ,and on each ship embarked fifty oarsmen well skilled to fight amain with the bow. But Philoctetes lay suffering grievous pains in an island, even in sacred Lemnos, where the sons of the Achaeans had left him in anguish with an evil wound from a deadly water-snake. There he lay suffering; ,and on each ship embarked fifty oarsmen well skilled to fight amain with the bow. But Philoctetes lay suffering grievous pains in an island, even in sacred Lemnos, where the sons of the Achaeans had left him in anguish with an evil wound from a deadly water-snake. There he lay suffering; ,and on each ship embarked fifty oarsmen well skilled to fight amain with the bow. But Philoctetes lay suffering grievous pains in an island, even in sacred Lemnos, where the sons of the Achaeans had left him in anguish with an evil wound from a deadly water-snake. There he lay suffering; ,and on each ship embarked fifty oarsmen well skilled to fight amain with the bow. But Philoctetes lay suffering grievous pains in an island, even in sacred Lemnos, where the sons of the Achaeans had left him in anguish with an evil wound from a deadly water-snake. There he lay suffering; ,yet full soon were the Argives beside their ships to bethink them of king Philoctetes. Howbeit neither were these men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; but Medon marshalled them, the bastard son of Oïleus, whom Rhene bare to Oïleus, sacker of cities.And they that held Tricca and Ithome of the crags, ,yet full soon were the Argives beside their ships to bethink them of king Philoctetes. Howbeit neither were these men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; but Medon marshalled them, the bastard son of Oïleus, whom Rhene bare to Oïleus, sacker of cities.And they that held Tricca and Ithome of the crags, ,yet full soon were the Argives beside their ships to bethink them of king Philoctetes. Howbeit neither were these men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; but Medon marshalled them, the bastard son of Oïleus, whom Rhene bare to Oïleus, sacker of cities.And they that held Tricca and Ithome of the crags, ,yet full soon were the Argives beside their ships to bethink them of king Philoctetes. Howbeit neither were these men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; but Medon marshalled them, the bastard son of Oïleus, whom Rhene bare to Oïleus, sacker of cities.And they that held Tricca and Ithome of the crags, ,yet full soon were the Argives beside their ships to bethink them of king Philoctetes. Howbeit neither were these men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; but Medon marshalled them, the bastard son of Oïleus, whom Rhene bare to Oïleus, sacker of cities.And they that held Tricca and Ithome of the crags, ,and Oechalia, city of Oechalian Eurytus, these again were led by the two sons of Asclepius, the skilled leeches Podaleirius and Machaon. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships. ,and Oechalia, city of Oechalian Eurytus, these again were led by the two sons of Asclepius, the skilled leeches Podaleirius and Machaon. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships. ,and Oechalia, city of Oechalian Eurytus, these again were led by the two sons of Asclepius, the skilled leeches Podaleirius and Machaon. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships. ,and Oechalia, city of Oechalian Eurytus, these again were led by the two sons of Asclepius, the skilled leeches Podaleirius and Machaon. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships. ,and Oechalia, city of Oechalian Eurytus, these again were led by the two sons of Asclepius, the skilled leeches Podaleirius and Machaon. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships. And they that held Ormenius and the fountain Hypereia, ,and that held Asterium and the white crests of Titanus, these were led by Eurypylus, the glorious son of Euaemon. And with him there followed forty black ships.And they that held Argissa, and dwelt in Gyrtone, Orthe, and Elone, and the white city of Oloösson, ,and that held Asterium and the white crests of Titanus, these were led by Eurypylus, the glorious son of Euaemon. And with him there followed forty black ships.And they that held Argissa, and dwelt in Gyrtone, Orthe, and Elone, and the white city of Oloösson, ,and that held Asterium and the white crests of Titanus, these were led by Eurypylus, the glorious son of Euaemon. And with him there followed forty black ships.And they that held Argissa, and dwelt in Gyrtone, Orthe, and Elone, and the white city of Oloösson, ,and that held Asterium and the white crests of Titanus, these were led by Eurypylus, the glorious son of Euaemon. And with him there followed forty black ships.And they that held Argissa, and dwelt in Gyrtone, Orthe, and Elone, and the white city of Oloösson, ,and that held Asterium and the white crests of Titanus, these were led by Eurypylus, the glorious son of Euaemon. And with him there followed forty black ships.And they that held Argissa, and dwelt in Gyrtone, Orthe, and Elone, and the white city of Oloösson, ,these again had as leader Polypoetes, staunch in fight, son of Peirithous, whom immortal Zeus begat— even him whom glorious Hippodameia conceived to Peirithous on the day when he got him vengeance on the shaggy centaurs, and thrust them forth from Pelium, and drave them to the Aethices. ,these again had as leader Polypoetes, staunch in fight, son of Peirithous, whom immortal Zeus begat— even him whom glorious Hippodameia conceived to Peirithous on the day when he got him vengeance on the shaggy centaurs, and thrust them forth from Pelium, and drave them to the Aethices. ,these again had as leader Polypoetes, staunch in fight, son of Peirithous, whom immortal Zeus begat— even him whom glorious Hippodameia conceived to Peirithous on the day when he got him vengeance on the shaggy centaurs, and thrust them forth from Pelium, and drave them to the Aethices. ,these again had as leader Polypoetes, staunch in fight, son of Peirithous, whom immortal Zeus begat— even him whom glorious Hippodameia conceived to Peirithous on the day when he got him vengeance on the shaggy centaurs, and thrust them forth from Pelium, and drave them to the Aethices. ,these again had as leader Polypoetes, staunch in fight, son of Peirithous, whom immortal Zeus begat— even him whom glorious Hippodameia conceived to Peirithous on the day when he got him vengeance on the shaggy centaurs, and thrust them forth from Pelium, and drave them to the Aethices. ,Not alone was he, but with him was Leonteus, scion of Ares, the son of Caenus' son, Coronus, high of heart. And with them there followed forty black ships.And Gouneus led from Cyphus two and twenty ships, and with him followed the Enienes and the Peraebi, staunch in fight, ,Not alone was he, but with him was Leonteus, scion of Ares, the son of Caenus' son, Coronus, high of heart. And with them there followed forty black ships.And Gouneus led from Cyphus two and twenty ships, and with him followed the Enienes and the Peraebi, staunch in fight, ,Not alone was he, but with him was Leonteus, scion of Ares, the son of Caenus' son, Coronus, high of heart. And with them there followed forty black ships.And Gouneus led from Cyphus two and twenty ships, and with him followed the Enienes and the Peraebi, staunch in fight, ,Not alone was he, but with him was Leonteus, scion of Ares, the son of Caenus' son, Coronus, high of heart. And with them there followed forty black ships.And Gouneus led from Cyphus two and twenty ships, and with him followed the Enienes and the Peraebi, staunch in fight, ,Not alone was he, but with him was Leonteus, scion of Ares, the son of Caenus' son, Coronus, high of heart. And with them there followed forty black ships.And Gouneus led from Cyphus two and twenty ships, and with him followed the Enienes and the Peraebi, staunch in fight, ,that had set their dwellings about wintry Dodona, and dwelt in the ploughland about lovely Titaressus, that poureth his fair-flowing streams into Peneius; yet doth he not mingle with the silver eddies of Peneius, but floweth on over his waters like unto olive oil; ,that had set their dwellings about wintry Dodona, and dwelt in the ploughland about lovely Titaressus, that poureth his fair-flowing streams into Peneius; yet doth he not mingle with the silver eddies of Peneius, but floweth on over his waters like unto olive oil; ,that had set their dwellings about wintry Dodona, and dwelt in the ploughland about lovely Titaressus, that poureth his fair-flowing streams into Peneius; yet doth he not mingle with the silver eddies of Peneius, but floweth on over his waters like unto olive oil; ,that had set their dwellings about wintry Dodona, and dwelt in the ploughland about lovely Titaressus, that poureth his fair-flowing streams into Peneius; yet doth he not mingle with the silver eddies of Peneius, but floweth on over his waters like unto olive oil; ,that had set their dwellings about wintry Dodona, and dwelt in the ploughland about lovely Titaressus, that poureth his fair-flowing streams into Peneius; yet doth he not mingle with the silver eddies of Peneius, but floweth on over his waters like unto olive oil; ,for that he is a branch of the water of Styx, the dread river of oath.And the Magnetes had as captain Prothous, son of Tenthredon. These were they that dwelt about Peneius and Pelion, covered with waving forests. of these was swift Prothous captain; and with him there followed forty black ships. ,for that he is a branch of the water of Styx, the dread river of oath.And the Magnetes had as captain Prothous, son of Tenthredon. These were they that dwelt about Peneius and Pelion, covered with waving forests. of these was swift Prothous captain; and with him there followed forty black ships. ,for that he is a branch of the water of Styx, the dread river of oath.And the Magnetes had as captain Prothous, son of Tenthredon. These were they that dwelt about Peneius and Pelion, covered with waving forests. of these was swift Prothous captain; and with him there followed forty black ships. ,for that he is a branch of the water of Styx, the dread river of oath.And the Magnetes had as captain Prothous, son of Tenthredon. These were they that dwelt about Peneius and Pelion, covered with waving forests. of these was swift Prothous captain; and with him there followed forty black ships. ,for that he is a branch of the water of Styx, the dread river of oath.And the Magnetes had as captain Prothous, son of Tenthredon. These were they that dwelt about Peneius and Pelion, covered with waving forests. of these was swift Prothous captain; and with him there followed forty black ships. ,These were the leaders of the Danaans and their lords. But who was far the best among them do thou tell me, Muse—best of the warriors and of the horses that followed with the sons of Atreus.of horses best by far were the mares of the son of Pheres, those that Eumelas drave, swift as birds, ,These were the leaders of the Danaans and their lords. But who was far the best among them do thou tell me, Muse—best of the warriors and of the horses that followed with the sons of Atreus.of horses best by far were the mares of the son of Pheres, those that Eumelas drave, swift as birds, ,These were the leaders of the Danaans and their lords. But who was far the best among them do thou tell me, Muse—best of the warriors and of the horses that followed with the sons of Atreus.of horses best by far were the mares of the son of Pheres, those that Eumelas drave, swift as birds, ,These were the leaders of the Danaans and their lords. But who was far the best among them do thou tell me, Muse—best of the warriors and of the horses that followed with the sons of Atreus.of horses best by far were the mares of the son of Pheres, those that Eumelas drave, swift as birds, ,These were the leaders of the Danaans and their lords. But who was far the best among them do thou tell me, Muse—best of the warriors and of the horses that followed with the sons of Atreus.of horses best by far were the mares of the son of Pheres, those that Eumelas drave, swift as birds, ,like of coat, like of age, their backs as even as a levelling line could make. These had Apollo of the silver bow reared in Pereia, both of them mares, bearing with them the panic of war. And of warriors far best was Telamonian Aias, while yet Achilles cherished his wrath; for Achilles was far the mightiest, ,like of coat, like of age, their backs as even as a levelling line could make. These had Apollo of the silver bow reared in Pereia, both of them mares, bearing with them the panic of war. And of warriors far best was Telamonian Aias, while yet Achilles cherished his wrath; for Achilles was far the mightiest, ,like of coat, like of age, their backs as even as a levelling line could make. These had Apollo of the silver bow reared in Pereia, both of them mares, bearing with them the panic of war. And of warriors far best was Telamonian Aias, while yet Achilles cherished his wrath; for Achilles was far the mightiest, ,like of coat, like of age, their backs as even as a levelling line could make. These had Apollo of the silver bow reared in Pereia, both of them mares, bearing with them the panic of war. And of warriors far best was Telamonian Aias, while yet Achilles cherished his wrath; for Achilles was far the mightiest, ,like of coat, like of age, their backs as even as a levelling line could make. These had Apollo of the silver bow reared in Pereia, both of them mares, bearing with them the panic of war. And of warriors far best was Telamonian Aias, while yet Achilles cherished his wrath; for Achilles was far the mightiest, ,he and the horses that bare the peerless son of Peleus. Howbeit he abode amid his beaked, seafaring ships in utter wrath against Agamemnon, Atreus' son, shepherd of the host; and his people along the sea-shore took their joy in casting the discus and the javelin, and in archery; ,he and the horses that bare the peerless son of Peleus. Howbeit he abode amid his beaked, seafaring ships in utter wrath against Agamemnon, Atreus' son, shepherd of the host; and his people along the sea-shore took their joy in casting the discus and the javelin, and in archery; ,he and the horses that bare the peerless son of Peleus. Howbeit he abode amid his beaked, seafaring ships in utter wrath against Agamemnon, Atreus' son, shepherd of the host; and his people along the sea-shore took their joy in casting the discus and the javelin, and in archery; ,he and the horses that bare the peerless son of Peleus. Howbeit he abode amid his beaked, seafaring ships in utter wrath against Agamemnon, Atreus' son, shepherd of the host; and his people along the sea-shore took their joy in casting the discus and the javelin, and in archery; ,he and the horses that bare the peerless son of Peleus. Howbeit he abode amid his beaked, seafaring ships in utter wrath against Agamemnon, Atreus' son, shepherd of the host; and his people along the sea-shore took their joy in casting the discus and the javelin, and in archery; ,and their horses each beside his own car, eating lotus and parsley of the marsh, stood idle, while the chariots were set, well covered up, in the huts of their masters. But the men, longing for their captain, dear to Ares, roared hither and thither through the camp, and fought not. ,and their horses each beside his own car, eating lotus and parsley of the marsh, stood idle, while the chariots were set, well covered up, in the huts of their masters. But the men, longing for their captain, dear to Ares, roared hither and thither through the camp, and fought not. ,and their horses each beside his own car, eating lotus and parsley of the marsh, stood idle, while the chariots were set, well covered up, in the huts of their masters. But the men, longing for their captain, dear to Ares, roared hither and thither through the camp, and fought not. ,and their horses each beside his own car, eating lotus and parsley of the marsh, stood idle, while the chariots were set, well covered up, in the huts of their masters. But the men, longing for their captain, dear to Ares, roared hither and thither through the camp, and fought not. ,and their horses each beside his own car, eating lotus and parsley of the marsh, stood idle, while the chariots were set, well covered up, in the huts of their masters. But the men, longing for their captain, dear to Ares, roared hither and thither through the camp, and fought not. ,So marched they then as though all the land were swept with fire; and the earth groaned beneath them, as beneath Zeus that hurleth the thunderbolt in his wrath, when he scourgeth the land about Typhoeus in the country of the Arimi, where men say is the couch of Typhoeus. Even so the earth groaned greatly beneath their tread as they went; ,So marched they then as though all the land were swept with fire; and the earth groaned beneath them, as beneath Zeus that hurleth the thunderbolt in his wrath, when he scourgeth the land about Typhoeus in the country of the Arimi, where men say is the couch of Typhoeus. Even so the earth groaned greatly beneath their tread as they went; ,So marched they then as though all the land were swept with fire; and the earth groaned beneath them, as beneath Zeus that hurleth the thunderbolt in his wrath, when he scourgeth the land about Typhoeus in the country of the Arimi, where men say is the couch of Typhoeus. Even so the earth groaned greatly beneath their tread as they went; ,So marched they then as though all the land were swept with fire; and the earth groaned beneath them, as beneath Zeus that hurleth the thunderbolt in his wrath, when he scourgeth the land about Typhoeus in the country of the Arimi, where men say is the couch of Typhoeus. Even so the earth groaned greatly beneath their tread as they went; ,So marched they then as though all the land were swept with fire; and the earth groaned beneath them, as beneath Zeus that hurleth the thunderbolt in his wrath, when he scourgeth the land about Typhoeus in the country of the Arimi, where men say is the couch of Typhoeus. Even so the earth groaned greatly beneath their tread as they went; ,and full swiftly did they speed across the plain.And to the Trojans went, as a messenger from Zeus that beareth the aegis, wind-footed, swift Iris with a grievous message. These were holding assembly at Priam's gate, all gathered in one body, the young men alike and the elders. ,and full swiftly did they speed across the plain.And to the Trojans went, as a messenger from Zeus that beareth the aegis, wind-footed, swift Iris with a grievous message. These were holding assembly at Priam's gate, all gathered in one body, the young men alike and the elders. ,and full swiftly did they speed across the plain.And to the Trojans went, as a messenger from Zeus that beareth the aegis, wind-footed, swift Iris with a grievous message. These were holding assembly at Priam's gate, all gathered in one body, the young men alike and the elders. ,and full swiftly did they speed across the plain.And to the Trojans went, as a messenger from Zeus that beareth the aegis, wind-footed, swift Iris with a grievous message. These were holding assembly at Priam's gate, all gathered in one body, the young men alike and the elders. ,and full swiftly did they speed across the plain.And to the Trojans went, as a messenger from Zeus that beareth the aegis, wind-footed, swift Iris with a grievous message. These were holding assembly at Priam's gate, all gathered in one body, the young men alike and the elders. ,And swift-footed Iris stood near and spake to them; and she made her voice like to that of Polites, son of Priam, who was wont to sit as a sentinel of the Trojans, trusting in his fleetness of foot, on the topmost part of the barrow of aged Aesyetes, awaiting until the Achaeans should sally forth from their ships. ,And swift-footed Iris stood near and spake to them; and she made her voice like to that of Polites, son of Priam, who was wont to sit as a sentinel of the Trojans, trusting in his fleetness of foot, on the topmost part of the barrow of aged Aesyetes, awaiting until the Achaeans should sally forth from their ships. ,And swift-footed Iris stood near and spake to them; and she made her voice like to that of Polites, son of Priam, who was wont to sit as a sentinel of the Trojans, trusting in his fleetness of foot, on the topmost part of the barrow of aged Aesyetes, awaiting until the Achaeans should sally forth from their ships. ,And swift-footed Iris stood near and spake to them; and she made her voice like to that of Polites, son of Priam, who was wont to sit as a sentinel of the Trojans, trusting in his fleetness of foot, on the topmost part of the barrow of aged Aesyetes, awaiting until the Achaeans should sally forth from their ships. ,And swift-footed Iris stood near and spake to them; and she made her voice like to that of Polites, son of Priam, who was wont to sit as a sentinel of the Trojans, trusting in his fleetness of foot, on the topmost part of the barrow of aged Aesyetes, awaiting until the Achaeans should sally forth from their ships. ,Likening herself to him swifted-footed Iris spake to Priam, saying:Old sir, ever are endless words dear to thee, now even as of yore in time of peace; but war unabating is afoot. Verily full often have I entered ere now into battles of warriors, but never yet have I seen a host so goodly and so great; ,Likening herself to him swifted-footed Iris spake to Priam, saying:Old sir, ever are endless words dear to thee, now even as of yore in time of peace; but war unabating is afoot. Verily full often have I entered ere now into battles of warriors, but never yet have I seen a host so goodly and so great; ,Likening herself to him swifted-footed Iris spake to Priam, saying:Old sir, ever are endless words dear to thee, now even as of yore in time of peace; but war unabating is afoot. Verily full often have I entered ere now into battles of warriors, but never yet have I seen a host so goodly and so great; ,Likening herself to him swifted-footed Iris spake to Priam, saying:Old sir, ever are endless words dear to thee, now even as of yore in time of peace; but war unabating is afoot. Verily full often have I entered ere now into battles of warriors, but never yet have I seen a host so goodly and so great; ,Likening herself to him swifted-footed Iris spake to Priam, saying:Old sir, ever are endless words dear to thee, now even as of yore in time of peace; but war unabating is afoot. Verily full often have I entered ere now into battles of warriors, but never yet have I seen a host so goodly and so great; ,for most like to the leaves or the sands are they, as they march over the plain to fight against the city. Hector, to thee beyond all others do I give command, and do thou even according to my word. Inasmuch as there are allies full many throughout the great city of Priam, and tongue differs from tongue among men that are scattered abroad; ,for most like to the leaves or the sands are they, as they march over the plain to fight against the city. Hector, to thee beyond all others do I give command, and do thou even according to my word. Inasmuch as there are allies full many throughout the great city of Priam, and tongue differs from tongue among men that are scattered abroad; ,for most like to the leaves or the sands are they, as they march over the plain to fight against the city. Hector, to thee beyond all others do I give command, and do thou even according to my word. Inasmuch as there are allies full many throughout the great city of Priam, and tongue differs from tongue among men that are scattered abroad; ,for most like to the leaves or the sands are they, as they march over the plain to fight against the city. Hector, to thee beyond all others do I give command, and do thou even according to my word. Inasmuch as there are allies full many throughout the great city of Priam, and tongue differs from tongue among men that are scattered abroad; ,for most like to the leaves or the sands are they, as they march over the plain to fight against the city. Hector, to thee beyond all others do I give command, and do thou even according to my word. Inasmuch as there are allies full many throughout the great city of Priam, and tongue differs from tongue among men that are scattered abroad; ,let each one therefore give the word to those whose captain he is, and these let him lead forth, when he has marshalled the men of his own city. So spake she, and Hector in no wise failed to know the voice of the goddess, but forthwith brake up the gathering; and they rushed to arms. The gates one and all were opened wide, and forth the folk hasted, ,let each one therefore give the word to those whose captain he is, and these let him lead forth, when he has marshalled the men of his own city. So spake she, and Hector in no wise failed to know the voice of the goddess, but forthwith brake up the gathering; and they rushed to arms. The gates one and all were opened wide, and forth the folk hasted, ,let each one therefore give the word to those whose captain he is, and these let him lead forth, when he has marshalled the men of his own city. So spake she, and Hector in no wise failed to know the voice of the goddess, but forthwith brake up the gathering; and they rushed to arms. The gates one and all were opened wide, and forth the folk hasted, ,let each one therefore give the word to those whose captain he is, and these let him lead forth, when he has marshalled the men of his own city. So spake she, and Hector in no wise failed to know the voice of the goddess, but forthwith brake up the gathering; and they rushed to arms. The gates one and all were opened wide, and forth the folk hasted, ,let each one therefore give the word to those whose captain he is, and these let him lead forth, when he has marshalled the men of his own city. So spake she, and Hector in no wise failed to know the voice of the goddess, but forthwith brake up the gathering; and they rushed to arms. The gates one and all were opened wide, and forth the folk hasted, ,both footmen and charioteers; and a great din arose.Now there is before the city a steep mound afar out in the plain, with a clear space about it on this side and on that; this do men verily call Batieia, but the immortals call it the barrow of Myrine, light of step. ,both footmen and charioteers; and a great din arose.Now there is before the city a steep mound afar out in the plain, with a clear space about it on this side and on that; this do men verily call Batieia, but the immortals call it the barrow of Myrine, light of step. ,both footmen and charioteers; and a great din arose.Now there is before the city a steep mound afar out in the plain, with a clear space about it on this side and on that; this do men verily call Batieia, but the immortals call it the barrow of Myrine, light of step. ,both footmen and charioteers; and a great din arose.Now there is before the city a steep mound afar out in the plain, with a clear space about it on this side and on that; this do men verily call Batieia, but the immortals call it the barrow of Myrine, light of step. ,both footmen and charioteers; and a great din arose.Now there is before the city a steep mound afar out in the plain, with a clear space about it on this side and on that; this do men verily call Batieia, but the immortals call it the barrow of Myrine, light of step. ,There on this day did the Trojans and their allies separate their companies.The Trojans were led by great Hector of the flashing helm, the son of Priam, and with him were marshalled the greatest hosts by far and the goodliest, raging with the spear. ,There on this day did the Trojans and their allies separate their companies.The Trojans were led by great Hector of the flashing helm, the son of Priam, and with him were marshalled the greatest hosts by far and the goodliest, raging with the spear. ,There on this day did the Trojans and their allies separate their companies.The Trojans were led by great Hector of the flashing helm, the son of Priam, and with him were marshalled the greatest hosts by far and the goodliest, raging with the spear. ,There on this day did the Trojans and their allies separate their companies.The Trojans were led by great Hector of the flashing helm, the son of Priam, and with him were marshalled the greatest hosts by far and the goodliest, raging with the spear. ,There on this day did the Trojans and their allies separate their companies.The Trojans were led by great Hector of the flashing helm, the son of Priam, and with him were marshalled the greatest hosts by far and the goodliest, raging with the spear. of the Dardanians again the valiant son of Anchises was captain, ,even Aeneas, whom fair Aphrodite conceived to Anchises amid the spurs of Ida, a goddess couched with a mortal man. Not alone was he; with him were Antenor's two sons, Archelochus and Acamas, well skilled in all manner of fighting.And they that dwelt in Zeleia beneath the nethermost foot of Ida, ,even Aeneas, whom fair Aphrodite conceived to Anchises amid the spurs of Ida, a goddess couched with a mortal man. Not alone was he; with him were Antenor's two sons, Archelochus and Acamas, well skilled in all manner of fighting.And they that dwelt in Zeleia beneath the nethermost foot of Ida, ,even Aeneas, whom fair Aphrodite conceived to Anchises amid the spurs of Ida, a goddess couched with a mortal man. Not alone was he; with him were Antenor's two sons, Archelochus and Acamas, well skilled in all manner of fighting.And they that dwelt in Zeleia beneath the nethermost foot of Ida, ,even Aeneas, whom fair Aphrodite conceived to Anchises amid the spurs of Ida, a goddess couched with a mortal man. Not alone was he; with him were Antenor's two sons, Archelochus and Acamas, well skilled in all manner of fighting.And they that dwelt in Zeleia beneath the nethermost foot of Ida, ,even Aeneas, whom fair Aphrodite conceived to Anchises amid the spurs of Ida, a goddess couched with a mortal man. Not alone was he; with him were Antenor's two sons, Archelochus and Acamas, well skilled in all manner of fighting.And they that dwelt in Zeleia beneath the nethermost foot of Ida, ,men of wealth, that drink the dark water of Aesepus, even the Troes, these again were led by the glorious son of Lycaon, Pandarus, to whom Apollo himself gave the bow.And they that held Adrasteia and the land of Apaesus, and that held Pityeia and the steep mount of Tereia, ,men of wealth, that drink the dark water of Aesepus, even the Troes, these again were led by the glorious son of Lycaon, Pandarus, to whom Apollo himself gave the bow.And they that held Adrasteia and the land of Apaesus, and that held Pityeia and the steep mount of Tereia, ,men of wealth, that drink the dark water of Aesepus, even the Troes, these again were led by the glorious son of Lycaon, Pandarus, to whom Apollo himself gave the bow.And they that held Adrasteia and the land of Apaesus, and that held Pityeia and the steep mount of Tereia, ,men of wealth, that drink the dark water of Aesepus, even the Troes, these again were led by the glorious son of Lycaon, Pandarus, to whom Apollo himself gave the bow.And they that held Adrasteia and the land of Apaesus, and that held Pityeia and the steep mount of Tereia, ,men of wealth, that drink the dark water of Aesepus, even the Troes, these again were led by the glorious son of Lycaon, Pandarus, to whom Apollo himself gave the bow.And they that held Adrasteia and the land of Apaesus, and that held Pityeia and the steep mount of Tereia, ,these were led by Adrastus and Araphius, with corslet of linen, sons twain of Merops of Percote, that was above all men skilled in prophesying, and would not suffer his sons to go into war, the bane of men. But the twain would in no wise hearken, for the fates of black death were leading them on. ,these were led by Adrastus and Araphius, with corslet of linen, sons twain of Merops of Percote, that was above all men skilled in prophesying, and would not suffer his sons to go into war, the bane of men. But the twain would in no wise hearken, for the fates of black death were leading them on. ,these were led by Adrastus and Araphius, with corslet of linen, sons twain of Merops of Percote, that was above all men skilled in prophesying, and would not suffer his sons to go into war, the bane of men. But the twain would in no wise hearken, for the fates of black death were leading them on. ,these were led by Adrastus and Araphius, with corslet of linen, sons twain of Merops of Percote, that was above all men skilled in prophesying, and would not suffer his sons to go into war, the bane of men. But the twain would in no wise hearken, for the fates of black death were leading them on. ,these were led by Adrastus and Araphius, with corslet of linen, sons twain of Merops of Percote, that was above all men skilled in prophesying, and would not suffer his sons to go into war, the bane of men. But the twain would in no wise hearken, for the fates of black death were leading them on. ,And they that dwelt about Percote and Practius, and that held Sestus and Abydus and goodly Arisbe, these again were led by Hyrtacus' son Asius, a leader of men—Asius, son of Hyrtacus, whom his horses tawny and tall had borne from Arisbe, from the river Selleïs. ,And they that dwelt about Percote and Practius, and that held Sestus and Abydus and goodly Arisbe, these again were led by Hyrtacus' son Asius, a leader of men—Asius, son of Hyrtacus, whom his horses tawny and tall had borne from Arisbe, from the river Selleïs. ,And they that dwelt about Percote and Practius, and that held Sestus and Abydus and goodly Arisbe, these again were led by Hyrtacus' son Asius, a leader of men—Asius, son of Hyrtacus, whom his horses tawny and tall had borne from Arisbe, from the river Selleïs. ,And they that dwelt about Percote and Practius, and that held Sestus and Abydus and goodly Arisbe, these again were led by Hyrtacus' son Asius, a leader of men—Asius, son of Hyrtacus, whom his horses tawny and tall had borne from Arisbe, from the river Selleïs. ,And they that dwelt about Percote and Practius, and that held Sestus and Abydus and goodly Arisbe, these again were led by Hyrtacus' son Asius, a leader of men—Asius, son of Hyrtacus, whom his horses tawny and tall had borne from Arisbe, from the river Selleïs. ,And Hippothous led the tribes of the Pelasgi, that rage with the spear, even them that dwelt in deep-soiled Larisa; these were led by Hippothous and Pylaeus, scion of Ares, sons twain of Pelasgian Lethus, son of Teutamus.But the Thracians Acamas led and Peirous, the warrior, ,And Hippothous led the tribes of the Pelasgi, that rage with the spear, even them that dwelt in deep-soiled Larisa; these were led by Hippothous and Pylaeus, scion of Ares, sons twain of Pelasgian Lethus, son of Teutamus.But the Thracians Acamas led and Peirous, the warrior, ,And Hippothous led the tribes of the Pelasgi, that rage with the spear, even them that dwelt in deep-soiled Larisa; these were led by Hippothous and Pylaeus, scion of Ares, sons twain of Pelasgian Lethus, son of Teutamus.But the Thracians Acamas led and Peirous, the warrior, ,And Hippothous led the tribes of the Pelasgi, that rage with the spear, even them that dwelt in deep-soiled Larisa; these were led by Hippothous and Pylaeus, scion of Ares, sons twain of Pelasgian Lethus, son of Teutamus.But the Thracians Acamas led and Peirous, the warrior, ,And Hippothous led the tribes of the Pelasgi, that rage with the spear, even them that dwelt in deep-soiled Larisa; these were led by Hippothous and Pylaeus, scion of Ares, sons twain of Pelasgian Lethus, son of Teutamus.But the Thracians Acamas led and Peirous, the warrior, ,even all them that the strong stream of the Hellespont encloseth.And Euphemus was captain of the Ciconian spearmen, the son of Ceas' son Troezenus, nurtured of Zeus.But Pyraechmes led the Paeonians, with curved bows, from afar, out of Amydon from the wide-flowing Axius— ,even all them that the strong stream of the Hellespont encloseth.And Euphemus was captain of the Ciconian spearmen, the son of Ceas' son Troezenus, nurtured of Zeus.But Pyraechmes led the Paeonians, with curved bows, from afar, out of Amydon from the wide-flowing Axius— ,even all them that the strong stream of the Hellespont encloseth.And Euphemus was captain of the Ciconian spearmen, the son of Ceas' son Troezenus, nurtured of Zeus.But Pyraechmes led the Paeonians, with curved bows, from afar, out of Amydon from the wide-flowing Axius— ,even all them that the strong stream of the Hellespont encloseth.And Euphemus was captain of the Ciconian spearmen, the son of Ceas' son Troezenus, nurtured of Zeus.But Pyraechmes led the Paeonians, with curved bows, from afar, out of Amydon from the wide-flowing Axius— ,even all them that the strong stream of the Hellespont encloseth.And Euphemus was captain of the Ciconian spearmen, the son of Ceas' son Troezenus, nurtured of Zeus.But Pyraechmes led the Paeonians, with curved bows, from afar, out of Amydon from the wide-flowing Axius— ,Axius the water whereof floweth the fairest over the face of the earth.And the Paphlagonians did Pylaemenes of the shaggy heart lead from the land of the Eneti, whence is the race of wild she-mules. These were they that held Cytorus and dwelt about Sesamon, and had their famed dwellings around the river Parthenius ,Axius the water whereof floweth the fairest over the face of the earth.And the Paphlagonians did Pylaemenes of the shaggy heart lead from the land of the Eneti, whence is the race of wild she-mules. These were they that held Cytorus and dwelt about Sesamon, and had their famed dwellings around the river Parthenius ,Axius the water whereof floweth the fairest over the face of the earth.And the Paphlagonians did Pylaemenes of the shaggy heart lead from the land of the Eneti, whence is the race of wild she-mules. These were they that held Cytorus and dwelt about Sesamon, and had their famed dwellings around the river Parthenius ,Axius the water whereof floweth the fairest over the face of the earth.And the Paphlagonians did Pylaemenes of the shaggy heart lead from the land of the Eneti, whence is the race of wild she-mules. These were they that held Cytorus and dwelt about Sesamon, and had their famed dwellings around the river Parthenius ,Axius the water whereof floweth the fairest over the face of the earth.And the Paphlagonians did Pylaemenes of the shaggy heart lead from the land of the Eneti, whence is the race of wild she-mules. These were they that held Cytorus and dwelt about Sesamon, and had their famed dwellings around the river Parthenius ,and Cromna and Aegialus and lofty Erythini.But of the Halizones Odius and Epistrophus were captains from afar, from Alybe, where is the birth-place of silver. ,and Cromna and Aegialus and lofty Erythini.But of the Halizones Odius and Epistrophus were captains from afar, from Alybe, where is the birth-place of silver. ,and Cromna and Aegialus and lofty Erythini.But of the Halizones Odius and Epistrophus were captains from afar, from Alybe, where is the birth-place of silver. ,and Cromna and Aegialus and lofty Erythini.But of the Halizones Odius and Epistrophus were captains from afar, from Alybe, where is the birth-place of silver. ,and Cromna and Aegialus and lofty Erythini.But of the Halizones Odius and Epistrophus were captains from afar, from Alybe, where is the birth-place of silver. And of the Mysians the captains were Chromis and Ennomus the augur; howbeit with his auguries he warded not off black fate, ,but was slain beneath the hands of the son of Aeacus, swift of foot, in the river, where Achilles was making havoc of the Trojans and the others as well.And Phorcys and godlike Ascanius led the Phrygians from afar, from Ascania, and were eager to fight in the press of battle.And the Maeonians had captains twain, Mesthles and Antiphus, ,but was slain beneath the hands of the son of Aeacus, swift of foot, in the river, where Achilles was making havoc of the Trojans and the others as well.And Phorcys and godlike Ascanius led the Phrygians from afar, from Ascania, and were eager to fight in the press of battle.And the Maeonians had captains twain, Mesthles and Antiphus, ,but was slain beneath the hands of the son of Aeacus, swift of foot, in the river, where Achilles was making havoc of the Trojans and the others as well.And Phorcys and godlike Ascanius led the Phrygians from afar, from Ascania, and were eager to fight in the press of battle.And the Maeonians had captains twain, Mesthles and Antiphus, ,but was slain beneath the hands of the son of Aeacus, swift of foot, in the river, where Achilles was making havoc of the Trojans and the others as well.And Phorcys and godlike Ascanius led the Phrygians from afar, from Ascania, and were eager to fight in the press of battle.And the Maeonians had captains twain, Mesthles and Antiphus, ,but was slain beneath the hands of the son of Aeacus, swift of foot, in the river, where Achilles was making havoc of the Trojans and the others as well.And Phorcys and godlike Ascanius led the Phrygians from afar, from Ascania, and were eager to fight in the press of battle.And the Maeonians had captains twain, Mesthles and Antiphus, ,the two sons of TaIaemenes, whose mother was the nymph of the Gygaean lake; and they led the Maeonians, whose birth was beneath Tmolas.And Nastes again led the Carians, uncouth of speech, who held Miletus and the mountain of Phthires, dense with its leafage, and the streams of Maeander, and the steep crests of Mycale. ,the two sons of TaIaemenes, whose mother was the nymph of the Gygaean lake; and they led the Maeonians, whose birth was beneath Tmolas.And Nastes again led the Carians, uncouth of speech, who held Miletus and the mountain of Phthires, dense with its leafage, and the streams of Maeander, and the steep crests of Mycale. ,the two sons of TaIaemenes, whose mother was the nymph of the Gygaean lake; and they led the Maeonians, whose birth was beneath Tmolas.And Nastes again led the Carians, uncouth of speech, who held Miletus and the mountain of Phthires, dense with its leafage, and the streams of Maeander, and the steep crests of Mycale. ,the two sons of TaIaemenes, whose mother was the nymph of the Gygaean lake; and they led the Maeonians, whose birth was beneath Tmolas.And Nastes again led the Carians, uncouth of speech, who held Miletus and the mountain of Phthires, dense with its leafage, and the streams of Maeander, and the steep crests of Mycale. ,the two sons of TaIaemenes, whose mother was the nymph of the Gygaean lake; and they led the Maeonians, whose birth was beneath Tmolas.And Nastes again led the Carians, uncouth of speech, who held Miletus and the mountain of Phthires, dense with its leafage, and the streams of Maeander, and the steep crests of Mycale. ,These were led by captains twain, Amphimachus and Nastes—Nastes and Amphimachus, the glorious children of Nomion. And he came to the war all decked with gold, like a girl, fool that he was; but his gold in no wise availed to ward off woeful destruction; nay, he was slain in the river beneath the hands of the son of Aeacus, swift of foot; ,These were led by captains twain, Amphimachus and Nastes—Nastes and Amphimachus, the glorious children of Nomion. And he came to the war all decked with gold, like a girl, fool that he was; but his gold in no wise availed to ward off woeful destruction; nay, he was slain in the river beneath the hands of the son of Aeacus, swift of foot; ,These were led by captains twain, Amphimachus and Nastes—Nastes and Amphimachus, the glorious children of Nomion. And he came to the war all decked with gold, like a girl, fool that he was; but his gold in no wise availed to ward off woeful destruction; nay, he was slain in the river beneath the hands of the son of Aeacus, swift of foot; ,These were led by captains twain, Amphimachus and Nastes—Nastes and Amphimachus, the glorious children of Nomion. And he came to the war all decked with gold, like a girl, fool that he was; but his gold in no wise availed to ward off woeful destruction; nay, he was slain in the river beneath the hands of the son of Aeacus, swift of foot; ,These were led by captains twain, Amphimachus and Nastes—Nastes and Amphimachus, the glorious children of Nomion. And he came to the war all decked with gold, like a girl, fool that he was; but his gold in no wise availed to ward off woeful destruction; nay, he was slain in the river beneath the hands of the son of Aeacus, swift of foot; ,and Achilles, wise of heart, bare off the gold.And Sarpedon and peerless Glaucus were captains of the Lycians from afar out of Lycia, from the eddying Xanthus. ,and Achilles, wise of heart, bare off the gold.And Sarpedon and peerless Glaucus were captains of the Lycians from afar out of Lycia, from the eddying Xanthus. ,and Achilles, wise of heart, bare off the gold.And Sarpedon and peerless Glaucus were captains of the Lycians from afar out of Lycia, from the eddying Xanthus. ,and Achilles, wise of heart, bare off the gold.And Sarpedon and peerless Glaucus were captains of the Lycians from afar out of Lycia, from the eddying Xanthus. ,and Achilles, wise of heart, bare off the gold.And Sarpedon and peerless Glaucus were captains of the Lycians from afar out of Lycia, from the eddying Xanthus. " "2.644 ,Now all the other gods and men, lords of chariots, slumbered the whole night through, but Zeus was not holden of sweet sleep, for he was pondering in his heart how he might do honour to Achilles and lay many low beside the ships of the Achaeans. And this plan seemed to his mind the best, ,Now all the other gods and men, lords of chariots, slumbered the whole night through, but Zeus was not holden of sweet sleep, for he was pondering in his heart how he might do honour to Achilles and lay many low beside the ships of the Achaeans. And this plan seemed to his mind the best, ,Now all the other gods and men, lords of chariots, slumbered the whole night through, but Zeus was not holden of sweet sleep, for he was pondering in his heart how he might do honour to Achilles and lay many low beside the ships of the Achaeans. And this plan seemed to his mind the best, ,Now all the other gods and men, lords of chariots, slumbered the whole night through, but Zeus was not holden of sweet sleep, for he was pondering in his heart how he might do honour to Achilles and lay many low beside the ships of the Achaeans. And this plan seemed to his mind the best, ,Now all the other gods and men, lords of chariots, slumbered the whole night through, but Zeus was not holden of sweet sleep, for he was pondering in his heart how he might do honour to Achilles and lay many low beside the ships of the Achaeans. And this plan seemed to his mind the best, ,to send to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, a baneful dream. So he spake, and addressed him with winged words:Up, go, thou baneful Dream, unto the swift ships of the Achaeans, and when thou art come to the hut of Agamemnon, son of Atreus, ,to send to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, a baneful dream. So he spake, and addressed him with winged words:Up, go, thou baneful Dream, unto the swift ships of the Achaeans, and when thou art come to the hut of Agamemnon, son of Atreus, ,to send to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, a baneful dream. So he spake, and addressed him with winged words:Up, go, thou baneful Dream, unto the swift ships of the Achaeans, and when thou art come to the hut of Agamemnon, son of Atreus, ,to send to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, a baneful dream. So he spake, and addressed him with winged words:Up, go, thou baneful Dream, unto the swift ships of the Achaeans, and when thou art come to the hut of Agamemnon, son of Atreus, ,to send to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, a baneful dream. So he spake, and addressed him with winged words:Up, go, thou baneful Dream, unto the swift ships of the Achaeans, and when thou art come to the hut of Agamemnon, son of Atreus, ,tell him all my word truly, even as I charge thee. Bid him arm the long-haired Achaeans with all speed, since now he may take the broad-wayed city of the Trojans. For the immortals, that have homes upon Olympus, are no longer divided in counsel, ,tell him all my word truly, even as I charge thee. Bid him arm the long-haired Achaeans with all speed, since now he may take the broad-wayed city of the Trojans. For the immortals, that have homes upon Olympus, are no longer divided in counsel, ,tell him all my word truly, even as I charge thee. Bid him arm the long-haired Achaeans with all speed, since now he may take the broad-wayed city of the Trojans. For the immortals, that have homes upon Olympus, are no longer divided in counsel, ,tell him all my word truly, even as I charge thee. Bid him arm the long-haired Achaeans with all speed, since now he may take the broad-wayed city of the Trojans. For the immortals, that have homes upon Olympus, are no longer divided in counsel, ,tell him all my word truly, even as I charge thee. Bid him arm the long-haired Achaeans with all speed, since now he may take the broad-wayed city of the Trojans. For the immortals, that have homes upon Olympus, are no longer divided in counsel, ,since Hera hath Vent the minds of all by her supplication, and over the Trojans hang woes. So spake he, and the Dream went his way, when he had heard this saying. Forthwith he came to the swift ships of the Achaeans, and went his way to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, and found him sleeping in his hut, and over him was shed ambrosial slumber. ,since Hera hath Vent the minds of all by her supplication, and over the Trojans hang woes. So spake he, and the Dream went his way, when he had heard this saying. Forthwith he came to the swift ships of the Achaeans, and went his way to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, and found him sleeping in his hut, and over him was shed ambrosial slumber. ,since Hera hath Vent the minds of all by her supplication, and over the Trojans hang woes. So spake he, and the Dream went his way, when he had heard this saying. Forthwith he came to the swift ships of the Achaeans, and went his way to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, and found him sleeping in his hut, and over him was shed ambrosial slumber. ,since Hera hath Vent the minds of all by her supplication, and over the Trojans hang woes. So spake he, and the Dream went his way, when he had heard this saying. Forthwith he came to the swift ships of the Achaeans, and went his way to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, and found him sleeping in his hut, and over him was shed ambrosial slumber. ,since Hera hath Vent the minds of all by her supplication, and over the Trojans hang woes. So spake he, and the Dream went his way, when he had heard this saying. Forthwith he came to the swift ships of the Achaeans, and went his way to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, and found him sleeping in his hut, and over him was shed ambrosial slumber. ,So he took his stand above his head, in the likeness of the son of Neleus, even Nestor, whom above all the elders Agamemnon held in honour; likening himself to him, the Dream from heaven spake, saying:Thou sleepest, son of wise-hearted Atreus, the tamer of horses. To sleep the whole night through beseemeth not a man that is a counsellor, ,So he took his stand above his head, in the likeness of the son of Neleus, even Nestor, whom above all the elders Agamemnon held in honour; likening himself to him, the Dream from heaven spake, saying:Thou sleepest, son of wise-hearted Atreus, the tamer of horses. To sleep the whole night through beseemeth not a man that is a counsellor, ,So he took his stand above his head, in the likeness of the son of Neleus, even Nestor, whom above all the elders Agamemnon held in honour; likening himself to him, the Dream from heaven spake, saying:Thou sleepest, son of wise-hearted Atreus, the tamer of horses. To sleep the whole night through beseemeth not a man that is a counsellor, ,So he took his stand above his head, in the likeness of the son of Neleus, even Nestor, whom above all the elders Agamemnon held in honour; likening himself to him, the Dream from heaven spake, saying:Thou sleepest, son of wise-hearted Atreus, the tamer of horses. To sleep the whole night through beseemeth not a man that is a counsellor, ,So he took his stand above his head, in the likeness of the son of Neleus, even Nestor, whom above all the elders Agamemnon held in honour; likening himself to him, the Dream from heaven spake, saying:Thou sleepest, son of wise-hearted Atreus, the tamer of horses. To sleep the whole night through beseemeth not a man that is a counsellor, ,to whom a host is entrusted, and upon whom rest so many cares. But now, hearken thou quickly unto me, for I am a messenger to thee from Zeus, who, far away though he be, hath exceeding care for thee and pity. He biddeth thee arm the long-haired Achaeans with all speed, since now thou mayest take the broad-wayed city of the Trojans. ,to whom a host is entrusted, and upon whom rest so many cares. But now, hearken thou quickly unto me, for I am a messenger to thee from Zeus, who, far away though he be, hath exceeding care for thee and pity. He biddeth thee arm the long-haired Achaeans with all speed, since now thou mayest take the broad-wayed city of the Trojans. ,to whom a host is entrusted, and upon whom rest so many cares. But now, hearken thou quickly unto me, for I am a messenger to thee from Zeus, who, far away though he be, hath exceeding care for thee and pity. He biddeth thee arm the long-haired Achaeans with all speed, since now thou mayest take the broad-wayed city of the Trojans. ,to whom a host is entrusted, and upon whom rest so many cares. But now, hearken thou quickly unto me, for I am a messenger to thee from Zeus, who, far away though he be, hath exceeding care for thee and pity. He biddeth thee arm the long-haired Achaeans with all speed, since now thou mayest take the broad-wayed city of the Trojans. ,to whom a host is entrusted, and upon whom rest so many cares. But now, hearken thou quickly unto me, for I am a messenger to thee from Zeus, who, far away though he be, hath exceeding care for thee and pity. He biddeth thee arm the long-haired Achaeans with all speed, since now thou mayest take the broad-wayed city of the Trojans. ,For the immortals that have homes upon Olympus are no longer divided in counsel, since Hera hath bent the minds of all by her supplication, and over the Trojans hang woes by the will of Zeus. But do thou keep this in thy heart, nor let forgetfulness lay hold of thee, whenso honey-hearted sleep shall let thee go. ,For the immortals that have homes upon Olympus are no longer divided in counsel, since Hera hath bent the minds of all by her supplication, and over the Trojans hang woes by the will of Zeus. But do thou keep this in thy heart, nor let forgetfulness lay hold of thee, whenso honey-hearted sleep shall let thee go. ,For the immortals that have homes upon Olympus are no longer divided in counsel, since Hera hath bent the minds of all by her supplication, and over the Trojans hang woes by the will of Zeus. But do thou keep this in thy heart, nor let forgetfulness lay hold of thee, whenso honey-hearted sleep shall let thee go. ,For the immortals that have homes upon Olympus are no longer divided in counsel, since Hera hath bent the minds of all by her supplication, and over the Trojans hang woes by the will of Zeus. But do thou keep this in thy heart, nor let forgetfulness lay hold of thee, whenso honey-hearted sleep shall let thee go. ,For the immortals that have homes upon Olympus are no longer divided in counsel, since Hera hath bent the minds of all by her supplication, and over the Trojans hang woes by the will of Zeus. But do thou keep this in thy heart, nor let forgetfulness lay hold of thee, whenso honey-hearted sleep shall let thee go. ,So spoke the Dream, and departed, and left him there, pondering in his heart on things that were not to be brought to pass. For in sooth he deemed that he should take the city of Priam that very day, fool that he was! seeing he knew not what deeds Zeus was purposing, ,So spoke the Dream, and departed, and left him there, pondering in his heart on things that were not to be brought to pass. For in sooth he deemed that he should take the city of Priam that very day, fool that he was! seeing he knew not what deeds Zeus was purposing, ,So spoke the Dream, and departed, and left him there, pondering in his heart on things that were not to be brought to pass. For in sooth he deemed that he should take the city of Priam that very day, fool that he was! seeing he knew not what deeds Zeus was purposing, ,So spoke the Dream, and departed, and left him there, pondering in his heart on things that were not to be brought to pass. For in sooth he deemed that he should take the city of Priam that very day, fool that he was! seeing he knew not what deeds Zeus was purposing, ,So spoke the Dream, and departed, and left him there, pondering in his heart on things that were not to be brought to pass. For in sooth he deemed that he should take the city of Priam that very day, fool that he was! seeing he knew not what deeds Zeus was purposing, ,who was yet to bring woes and groanings on Trojans alike and Danaans throughout the course of stubborn fights. Then he awoke from sleep, and the divine voice was ringing in his ears. He sat upright and did on his soft tunic, fair and glistering, and about him cast his great cloak, and beneath his shining feet he bound his fair sandals, ,who was yet to bring woes and groanings on Trojans alike and Danaans throughout the course of stubborn fights. Then he awoke from sleep, and the divine voice was ringing in his ears. He sat upright and did on his soft tunic, fair and glistering, and about him cast his great cloak, and beneath his shining feet he bound his fair sandals, ,who was yet to bring woes and groanings on Trojans alike and Danaans throughout the course of stubborn fights. Then he awoke from sleep, and the divine voice was ringing in his ears. He sat upright and did on his soft tunic, fair and glistering, and about him cast his great cloak, and beneath his shining feet he bound his fair sandals, ,who was yet to bring woes and groanings on Trojans alike and Danaans throughout the course of stubborn fights. Then he awoke from sleep, and the divine voice was ringing in his ears. He sat upright and did on his soft tunic, fair and glistering, and about him cast his great cloak, and beneath his shining feet he bound his fair sandals, ,who was yet to bring woes and groanings on Trojans alike and Danaans throughout the course of stubborn fights. Then he awoke from sleep, and the divine voice was ringing in his ears. He sat upright and did on his soft tunic, fair and glistering, and about him cast his great cloak, and beneath his shining feet he bound his fair sandals, ,and about his shoulders flung his silver-studded sword; and he grasped the sceptre of his fathers, imperishable ever, and therewith took his way along the ships of the brazen-coated Achaeans.Now the goddess Dawn went up to high Olympus, to announce the light to Zeus and the other immortals, ,and about his shoulders flung his silver-studded sword; and he grasped the sceptre of his fathers, imperishable ever, and therewith took his way along the ships of the brazen-coated Achaeans.Now the goddess Dawn went up to high Olympus, to announce the light to Zeus and the other immortals, ,and about his shoulders flung his silver-studded sword; and he grasped the sceptre of his fathers, imperishable ever, and therewith took his way along the ships of the brazen-coated Achaeans.Now the goddess Dawn went up to high Olympus, to announce the light to Zeus and the other immortals, ,and about his shoulders flung his silver-studded sword; and he grasped the sceptre of his fathers, imperishable ever, and therewith took his way along the ships of the brazen-coated Achaeans.Now the goddess Dawn went up to high Olympus, to announce the light to Zeus and the other immortals, ,and about his shoulders flung his silver-studded sword; and he grasped the sceptre of his fathers, imperishable ever, and therewith took his way along the ships of the brazen-coated Achaeans.Now the goddess Dawn went up to high Olympus, to announce the light to Zeus and the other immortals, ,but Agamemnon bade the clear-voiced heralds summon to the place of gathering the long-haired Achaeans. And they made summons, and the men gathered full quickly.But the king first made the council of the great-souled elders to sit down beside the ship of Nestor, the king Pylos-born. ,but Agamemnon bade the clear-voiced heralds summon to the place of gathering the long-haired Achaeans. And they made summons, and the men gathered full quickly.But the king first made the council of the great-souled elders to sit down beside the ship of Nestor, the king Pylos-born. ,but Agamemnon bade the clear-voiced heralds summon to the place of gathering the long-haired Achaeans. And they made summons, and the men gathered full quickly.But the king first made the council of the great-souled elders to sit down beside the ship of Nestor, the king Pylos-born. ,but Agamemnon bade the clear-voiced heralds summon to the place of gathering the long-haired Achaeans. And they made summons, and the men gathered full quickly.But the king first made the council of the great-souled elders to sit down beside the ship of Nestor, the king Pylos-born. ,but Agamemnon bade the clear-voiced heralds summon to the place of gathering the long-haired Achaeans. And they made summons, and the men gathered full quickly.But the king first made the council of the great-souled elders to sit down beside the ship of Nestor, the king Pylos-born. ,And when he had called them together, he contrived a cunning plan, and said:Hearken, my friends, a Dream from heaven came to me in my sleep through the ambrosial night, and most like was it to goodly Nestor, in form and in stature and in build. It took its stand above my head, and spake to me, saying: ,And when he had called them together, he contrived a cunning plan, and said:Hearken, my friends, a Dream from heaven came to me in my sleep through the ambrosial night, and most like was it to goodly Nestor, in form and in stature and in build. It took its stand above my head, and spake to me, saying: ,And when he had called them together, he contrived a cunning plan, and said:Hearken, my friends, a Dream from heaven came to me in my sleep through the ambrosial night, and most like was it to goodly Nestor, in form and in stature and in build. It took its stand above my head, and spake to me, saying: ,And when he had called them together, he contrived a cunning plan, and said:Hearken, my friends, a Dream from heaven came to me in my sleep through the ambrosial night, and most like was it to goodly Nestor, in form and in stature and in build. It took its stand above my head, and spake to me, saying: ,And when he had called them together, he contrived a cunning plan, and said:Hearken, my friends, a Dream from heaven came to me in my sleep through the ambrosial night, and most like was it to goodly Nestor, in form and in stature and in build. It took its stand above my head, and spake to me, saying: ,‘Thou sleepest, son of wise-hearted Atreus, the tamer of horses. To sleep the whole night through beseemeth not a man that is a counsellor, to whom a host is entrusted, and upon whom rest so many cares. But now, hearken thou quickly unto me, for I am a messenger to thee from Zeus, who, far away though he be, hath exceeding care for thee and pity. ,‘Thou sleepest, son of wise-hearted Atreus, the tamer of horses. To sleep the whole night through beseemeth not a man that is a counsellor, to whom a host is entrusted, and upon whom rest so many cares. But now, hearken thou quickly unto me, for I am a messenger to thee from Zeus, who, far away though he be, hath exceeding care for thee and pity. ,‘Thou sleepest, son of wise-hearted Atreus, the tamer of horses. To sleep the whole night through beseemeth not a man that is a counsellor, to whom a host is entrusted, and upon whom rest so many cares. But now, hearken thou quickly unto me, for I am a messenger to thee from Zeus, who, far away though he be, hath exceeding care for thee and pity. ,‘Thou sleepest, son of wise-hearted Atreus, the tamer of horses. To sleep the whole night through beseemeth not a man that is a counsellor, to whom a host is entrusted, and upon whom rest so many cares. But now, hearken thou quickly unto me, for I am a messenger to thee from Zeus, who, far away though he be, hath exceeding care for thee and pity. ,‘Thou sleepest, son of wise-hearted Atreus, the tamer of horses. To sleep the whole night through beseemeth not a man that is a counsellor, to whom a host is entrusted, and upon whom rest so many cares. But now, hearken thou quickly unto me, for I am a messenger to thee from Zeus, who, far away though he be, hath exceeding care for thee and pity. ,He biddeth thee arm the long-haired Achaeans with all speed, since now thou mayest take the broad-wayed city of the Trojans. For the immortals that have homes upon Olympus are no longer divided in counsel, since Hera hath bent the minds of all by her supplication, and over the Trojans hang woes by the will of Zeus. ,He biddeth thee arm the long-haired Achaeans with all speed, since now thou mayest take the broad-wayed city of the Trojans. For the immortals that have homes upon Olympus are no longer divided in counsel, since Hera hath bent the minds of all by her supplication, and over the Trojans hang woes by the will of Zeus. ,He biddeth thee arm the long-haired Achaeans with all speed, since now thou mayest take the broad-wayed city of the Trojans. For the immortals that have homes upon Olympus are no longer divided in counsel, since Hera hath bent the minds of all by her supplication, and over the Trojans hang woes by the will of Zeus. ,He biddeth thee arm the long-haired Achaeans with all speed, since now thou mayest take the broad-wayed city of the Trojans. For the immortals that have homes upon Olympus are no longer divided in counsel, since Hera hath bent the minds of all by her supplication, and over the Trojans hang woes by the will of Zeus. ,He biddeth thee arm the long-haired Achaeans with all speed, since now thou mayest take the broad-wayed city of the Trojans. For the immortals that have homes upon Olympus are no longer divided in counsel, since Hera hath bent the minds of all by her supplication, and over the Trojans hang woes by the will of Zeus. ,But do thou keep this in thy heart.’ So spake he, and was flown away, and sweet sleep let me go. Nay, come now, if in any wise we may, let us arm the sons of the Achaeans; but first will I make trial of them in speech, as is right, and will bid them flee with their benched ships; ,But do thou keep this in thy heart.’ So spake he, and was flown away, and sweet sleep let me go. Nay, come now, if in any wise we may, let us arm the sons of the Achaeans; but first will I make trial of them in speech, as is right, and will bid them flee with their benched ships; ,But do thou keep this in thy heart.’ So spake he, and was flown away, and sweet sleep let me go. Nay, come now, if in any wise we may, let us arm the sons of the Achaeans; but first will I make trial of them in speech, as is right, and will bid them flee with their benched ships; ,But do thou keep this in thy heart.’ So spake he, and was flown away, and sweet sleep let me go. Nay, come now, if in any wise we may, let us arm the sons of the Achaeans; but first will I make trial of them in speech, as is right, and will bid them flee with their benched ships; ,But do thou keep this in thy heart.’ So spake he, and was flown away, and sweet sleep let me go. Nay, come now, if in any wise we may, let us arm the sons of the Achaeans; but first will I make trial of them in speech, as is right, and will bid them flee with their benched ships; ,but do you from this side and from that bespeak them, and strive to hold them back. ,but do you from this side and from that bespeak them, and strive to hold them back. ,but do you from this side and from that bespeak them, and strive to hold them back. ,but do you from this side and from that bespeak them, and strive to hold them back. ,but do you from this side and from that bespeak them, and strive to hold them back. So saying, he sate him down, and among them uprose Nestor, that was king of sandy Pylos. He with good intent addressed their gathering and spake among them:My friends, leaders and rulers of the Argives, ,were it any other of the Achaeans that told us this dream we might deem it a false thing, and turn away therefrom the more; but now hath he seen it who declares himself to be far the mightiest of the Achaeans. Nay, come then, if in any wise we may arm the sons of the Achaeans. He spake, and led the way forth from the council, ,were it any other of the Achaeans that told us this dream we might deem it a false thing, and turn away therefrom the more; but now hath he seen it who declares himself to be far the mightiest of the Achaeans. Nay, come then, if in any wise we may arm the sons of the Achaeans. He spake, and led the way forth from the council, ,were it any other of the Achaeans that told us this dream we might deem it a false thing, and turn away therefrom the more; but now hath he seen it who declares himself to be far the mightiest of the Achaeans. Nay, come then, if in any wise we may arm the sons of the Achaeans. He spake, and led the way forth from the council, ,were it any other of the Achaeans that told us this dream we might deem it a false thing, and turn away therefrom the more; but now hath he seen it who declares himself to be far the mightiest of the Achaeans. Nay, come then, if in any wise we may arm the sons of the Achaeans. He spake, and led the way forth from the council, ,were it any other of the Achaeans that told us this dream we might deem it a false thing, and turn away therefrom the more; but now hath he seen it who declares himself to be far the mightiest of the Achaeans. Nay, come then, if in any wise we may arm the sons of the Achaeans. He spake, and led the way forth from the council, ,and the other sceptred kings rose up thereat and obeyed the shepherd of the host; and the people the while were hastening on. Even as the tribes of thronging bees go forth from some hollow rock, ever coming on afresh, and in clusters over the flowers of spring fly in throngs, some here, some there; ,and the other sceptred kings rose up thereat and obeyed the shepherd of the host; and the people the while were hastening on. Even as the tribes of thronging bees go forth from some hollow rock, ever coming on afresh, and in clusters over the flowers of spring fly in throngs, some here, some there; ,and the other sceptred kings rose up thereat and obeyed the shepherd of the host; and the people the while were hastening on. Even as the tribes of thronging bees go forth from some hollow rock, ever coming on afresh, and in clusters over the flowers of spring fly in throngs, some here, some there; ,and the other sceptred kings rose up thereat and obeyed the shepherd of the host; and the people the while were hastening on. Even as the tribes of thronging bees go forth from some hollow rock, ever coming on afresh, and in clusters over the flowers of spring fly in throngs, some here, some there; ,and the other sceptred kings rose up thereat and obeyed the shepherd of the host; and the people the while were hastening on. Even as the tribes of thronging bees go forth from some hollow rock, ever coming on afresh, and in clusters over the flowers of spring fly in throngs, some here, some there; ,even so from the ships and huts before the low sea-beach marched forth in companies their many tribes to the place of gathering. And in their midst blazed forth Rumour, messenger of Zeus, urging them to go; and they were gathered. ,even so from the ships and huts before the low sea-beach marched forth in companies their many tribes to the place of gathering. And in their midst blazed forth Rumour, messenger of Zeus, urging them to go; and they were gathered. ,even so from the ships and huts before the low sea-beach marched forth in companies their many tribes to the place of gathering. And in their midst blazed forth Rumour, messenger of Zeus, urging them to go; and they were gathered. ,even so from the ships and huts before the low sea-beach marched forth in companies their many tribes to the place of gathering. And in their midst blazed forth Rumour, messenger of Zeus, urging them to go; and they were gathered. ,even so from the ships and huts before the low sea-beach marched forth in companies their many tribes to the place of gathering. And in their midst blazed forth Rumour, messenger of Zeus, urging them to go; and they were gathered. ,And the place of gathering was in a turmoil, and the earth groaned beneath them, as the people sate them down, and a din arose. Nine heralds with shouting sought to restrain them, if so be they might refrain from uproar and give ear to the kings, nurtured of Zeus. Hardly at the last were the people made to sit, and were stayed in their places, ,And the place of gathering was in a turmoil, and the earth groaned beneath them, as the people sate them down, and a din arose. Nine heralds with shouting sought to restrain them, if so be they might refrain from uproar and give ear to the kings, nurtured of Zeus. Hardly at the last were the people made to sit, and were stayed in their places, ,And the place of gathering was in a turmoil, and the earth groaned beneath them, as the people sate them down, and a din arose. Nine heralds with shouting sought to restrain them, if so be they might refrain from uproar and give ear to the kings, nurtured of Zeus. Hardly at the last were the people made to sit, and were stayed in their places, ,And the place of gathering was in a turmoil, and the earth groaned beneath them, as the people sate them down, and a din arose. Nine heralds with shouting sought to restrain them, if so be they might refrain from uproar and give ear to the kings, nurtured of Zeus. Hardly at the last were the people made to sit, and were stayed in their places, ,And the place of gathering was in a turmoil, and the earth groaned beneath them, as the people sate them down, and a din arose. Nine heralds with shouting sought to restrain them, if so be they might refrain from uproar and give ear to the kings, nurtured of Zeus. Hardly at the last were the people made to sit, and were stayed in their places, ,ceasing from their clamour. Then among them lord Agamemnon uprose, bearing in his hands the sceptre which Hephaestus had wrought with toil. Hephaestus gave it to king Zeus, son of Cronos, and Zeus gave it to the messenger Argeïphontes; and Hermes, the lord, gave it to Pelops, driver of horses, ,ceasing from their clamour. Then among them lord Agamemnon uprose, bearing in his hands the sceptre which Hephaestus had wrought with toil. Hephaestus gave it to king Zeus, son of Cronos, and Zeus gave it to the messenger Argeïphontes; and Hermes, the lord, gave it to Pelops, driver of horses, ,ceasing from their clamour. Then among them lord Agamemnon uprose, bearing in his hands the sceptre which Hephaestus had wrought with toil. Hephaestus gave it to king Zeus, son of Cronos, and Zeus gave it to the messenger Argeïphontes; and Hermes, the lord, gave it to Pelops, driver of horses, ,ceasing from their clamour. Then among them lord Agamemnon uprose, bearing in his hands the sceptre which Hephaestus had wrought with toil. Hephaestus gave it to king Zeus, son of Cronos, and Zeus gave it to the messenger Argeïphontes; and Hermes, the lord, gave it to Pelops, driver of horses, ,ceasing from their clamour. Then among them lord Agamemnon uprose, bearing in his hands the sceptre which Hephaestus had wrought with toil. Hephaestus gave it to king Zeus, son of Cronos, and Zeus gave it to the messenger Argeïphontes; and Hermes, the lord, gave it to Pelops, driver of horses, ,and Pelops in turn gave it to Atreus, shepherd of the host; and Atreus at his death left it to Thyestes, rich in flocks, and Thyestes again left it to Agamemnon to bear, that so he might be lord of many isles and of all Argos. ,and Pelops in turn gave it to Atreus, shepherd of the host; and Atreus at his death left it to Thyestes, rich in flocks, and Thyestes again left it to Agamemnon to bear, that so he might be lord of many isles and of all Argos. ,and Pelops in turn gave it to Atreus, shepherd of the host; and Atreus at his death left it to Thyestes, rich in flocks, and Thyestes again left it to Agamemnon to bear, that so he might be lord of many isles and of all Argos. ,and Pelops in turn gave it to Atreus, shepherd of the host; and Atreus at his death left it to Thyestes, rich in flocks, and Thyestes again left it to Agamemnon to bear, that so he might be lord of many isles and of all Argos. ,and Pelops in turn gave it to Atreus, shepherd of the host; and Atreus at his death left it to Thyestes, rich in flocks, and Thyestes again left it to Agamemnon to bear, that so he might be lord of many isles and of all Argos. Thereon he leaned, and spake his word among the Argives: , My friends, Danaan warriors, squires of Ares, great Zeus, son of Cronos, hath ensnared me in grievous blindness of heart, cruel god! seeing that of old he promised me, and bowed his head thereto, that not until I had sacked well-walled Ilios should I get me home; but now hath he planned cruel deceit, and bids me return inglorious to Argos, , My friends, Danaan warriors, squires of Ares, great Zeus, son of Cronos, hath ensnared me in grievous blindness of heart, cruel god! seeing that of old he promised me, and bowed his head thereto, that not until I had sacked well-walled Ilios should I get me home; but now hath he planned cruel deceit, and bids me return inglorious to Argos, , My friends, Danaan warriors, squires of Ares, great Zeus, son of Cronos, hath ensnared me in grievous blindness of heart, cruel god! seeing that of old he promised me, and bowed his head thereto, that not until I had sacked well-walled Ilios should I get me home; but now hath he planned cruel deceit, and bids me return inglorious to Argos, , My friends, Danaan warriors, squires of Ares, great Zeus, son of Cronos, hath ensnared me in grievous blindness of heart, cruel god! seeing that of old he promised me, and bowed his head thereto, that not until I had sacked well-walled Ilios should I get me home; but now hath he planned cruel deceit, and bids me return inglorious to Argos, , My friends, Danaan warriors, squires of Ares, great Zeus, son of Cronos, hath ensnared me in grievous blindness of heart, cruel god! seeing that of old he promised me, and bowed his head thereto, that not until I had sacked well-walled Ilios should I get me home; but now hath he planned cruel deceit, and bids me return inglorious to Argos, ,when I have lost much people. So, I ween, must be the good pleasure of Zeus, supreme in might, who hath laid low the heads of many cities, yea, and shall yet lay low, for his power is above all. A shameful thing is this even for the hearing of men that are yet to be, ,when I have lost much people. So, I ween, must be the good pleasure of Zeus, supreme in might, who hath laid low the heads of many cities, yea, and shall yet lay low, for his power is above all. A shameful thing is this even for the hearing of men that are yet to be, ,when I have lost much people. So, I ween, must be the good pleasure of Zeus, supreme in might, who hath laid low the heads of many cities, yea, and shall yet lay low, for his power is above all. A shameful thing is this even for the hearing of men that are yet to be, ,when I have lost much people. So, I ween, must be the good pleasure of Zeus, supreme in might, who hath laid low the heads of many cities, yea, and shall yet lay low, for his power is above all. A shameful thing is this even for the hearing of men that are yet to be, ,when I have lost much people. So, I ween, must be the good pleasure of Zeus, supreme in might, who hath laid low the heads of many cities, yea, and shall yet lay low, for his power is above all. A shameful thing is this even for the hearing of men that are yet to be, ,how that thus vainly so goodly and so great a host of the Achaeans warred a bootless war, and fought with men fewer than they, and no end thereof hath as yet been seen. For should we be minded, both Achaeans and Trojans, to swear a solemn oath with sacrifice, and to number ourselves, ,how that thus vainly so goodly and so great a host of the Achaeans warred a bootless war, and fought with men fewer than they, and no end thereof hath as yet been seen. For should we be minded, both Achaeans and Trojans, to swear a solemn oath with sacrifice, and to number ourselves, ,how that thus vainly so goodly and so great a host of the Achaeans warred a bootless war, and fought with men fewer than they, and no end thereof hath as yet been seen. For should we be minded, both Achaeans and Trojans, to swear a solemn oath with sacrifice, and to number ourselves, ,how that thus vainly so goodly and so great a host of the Achaeans warred a bootless war, and fought with men fewer than they, and no end thereof hath as yet been seen. For should we be minded, both Achaeans and Trojans, to swear a solemn oath with sacrifice, and to number ourselves, ,how that thus vainly so goodly and so great a host of the Achaeans warred a bootless war, and fought with men fewer than they, and no end thereof hath as yet been seen. For should we be minded, both Achaeans and Trojans, to swear a solemn oath with sacrifice, and to number ourselves, ,and should the Trojans be gathered together, even all they that have dwellings in the city, and we Achaeans be marshalled by tens, and choose, each company of us, a man of the Trojans to pour our wine, then would many tens lack a cup-bearer; so far, I deem, do the sons of the Achaeans outnumber the Trojans that dwell in the city. ,and should the Trojans be gathered together, even all they that have dwellings in the city, and we Achaeans be marshalled by tens, and choose, each company of us, a man of the Trojans to pour our wine, then would many tens lack a cup-bearer; so far, I deem, do the sons of the Achaeans outnumber the Trojans that dwell in the city. ,and should the Trojans be gathered together, even all they that have dwellings in the city, and we Achaeans be marshalled by tens, and choose, each company of us, a man of the Trojans to pour our wine, then would many tens lack a cup-bearer; so far, I deem, do the sons of the Achaeans outnumber the Trojans that dwell in the city. ,and should the Trojans be gathered together, even all they that have dwellings in the city, and we Achaeans be marshalled by tens, and choose, each company of us, a man of the Trojans to pour our wine, then would many tens lack a cup-bearer; so far, I deem, do the sons of the Achaeans outnumber the Trojans that dwell in the city. ,and should the Trojans be gathered together, even all they that have dwellings in the city, and we Achaeans be marshalled by tens, and choose, each company of us, a man of the Trojans to pour our wine, then would many tens lack a cup-bearer; so far, I deem, do the sons of the Achaeans outnumber the Trojans that dwell in the city. ,But allies there be out of many cities, men that wield the spear, who hinder me mightily, and for all that I am fain, suffer me not to sack the well-peopled citadel of Ilios. Already have nine years of great Zeus gone by, ,But allies there be out of many cities, men that wield the spear, who hinder me mightily, and for all that I am fain, suffer me not to sack the well-peopled citadel of Ilios. Already have nine years of great Zeus gone by, ,But allies there be out of many cities, men that wield the spear, who hinder me mightily, and for all that I am fain, suffer me not to sack the well-peopled citadel of Ilios. Already have nine years of great Zeus gone by, ,But allies there be out of many cities, men that wield the spear, who hinder me mightily, and for all that I am fain, suffer me not to sack the well-peopled citadel of Ilios. Already have nine years of great Zeus gone by, ,But allies there be out of many cities, men that wield the spear, who hinder me mightily, and for all that I am fain, suffer me not to sack the well-peopled citadel of Ilios. Already have nine years of great Zeus gone by, ,and lo, our ships' timbers are rotted, and the tackling loosed; and our wives, I ween, and little children sit in our halls awaiting us; yet is our task wholly unaccomplished in furtherance whereof we came hither. Nay, come, even as I shall bid, let us all obey: ,and lo, our ships' timbers are rotted, and the tackling loosed; and our wives, I ween, and little children sit in our halls awaiting us; yet is our task wholly unaccomplished in furtherance whereof we came hither. Nay, come, even as I shall bid, let us all obey: ,and lo, our ships' timbers are rotted, and the tackling loosed; and our wives, I ween, and little children sit in our halls awaiting us; yet is our task wholly unaccomplished in furtherance whereof we came hither. Nay, come, even as I shall bid, let us all obey: ,and lo, our ships' timbers are rotted, and the tackling loosed; and our wives, I ween, and little children sit in our halls awaiting us; yet is our task wholly unaccomplished in furtherance whereof we came hither. Nay, come, even as I shall bid, let us all obey: ,and lo, our ships' timbers are rotted, and the tackling loosed; and our wives, I ween, and little children sit in our halls awaiting us; yet is our task wholly unaccomplished in furtherance whereof we came hither. Nay, come, even as I shall bid, let us all obey: ,let us flee with our ships to our dear native land; for no more is there hope that we shall take broad-wayed Troy. So spake he, and roused the hearts in the breasts of all throughout the multitude, as many as had not heard the council. And the gathering was stirred like the long sea-waves of the Icarian main, ,let us flee with our ships to our dear native land; for no more is there hope that we shall take broad-wayed Troy. So spake he, and roused the hearts in the breasts of all throughout the multitude, as many as had not heard the council. And the gathering was stirred like the long sea-waves of the Icarian main, ,let us flee with our ships to our dear native land; for no more is there hope that we shall take broad-wayed Troy. So spake he, and roused the hearts in the breasts of all throughout the multitude, as many as had not heard the council. And the gathering was stirred like the long sea-waves of the Icarian main, ,let us flee with our ships to our dear native land; for no more is there hope that we shall take broad-wayed Troy. So spake he, and roused the hearts in the breasts of all throughout the multitude, as many as had not heard the council. And the gathering was stirred like the long sea-waves of the Icarian main, ,let us flee with our ships to our dear native land; for no more is there hope that we shall take broad-wayed Troy. So spake he, and roused the hearts in the breasts of all throughout the multitude, as many as had not heard the council. And the gathering was stirred like the long sea-waves of the Icarian main, ,which the East Wind or the South Wind has raised, rushing upon them from the clouds of father Zeus. And even as when the West Wind at its coming stirreth a deep cornfield with its violent blast, and the ears bow thereunder, even so was all their gathering stirred, and they with loud shouting rushed towards the ships; ,which the East Wind or the South Wind has raised, rushing upon them from the clouds of father Zeus. And even as when the West Wind at its coming stirreth a deep cornfield with its violent blast, and the ears bow thereunder, even so was all their gathering stirred, and they with loud shouting rushed towards the ships; ,which the East Wind or the South Wind has raised, rushing upon them from the clouds of father Zeus. And even as when the West Wind at its coming stirreth a deep cornfield with its violent blast, and the ears bow thereunder, even so was all their gathering stirred, and they with loud shouting rushed towards the ships; ,which the East Wind or the South Wind has raised, rushing upon them from the clouds of father Zeus. And even as when the West Wind at its coming stirreth a deep cornfield with its violent blast, and the ears bow thereunder, even so was all their gathering stirred, and they with loud shouting rushed towards the ships; ,which the East Wind or the South Wind has raised, rushing upon them from the clouds of father Zeus. And even as when the West Wind at its coming stirreth a deep cornfield with its violent blast, and the ears bow thereunder, even so was all their gathering stirred, and they with loud shouting rushed towards the ships; ,and from beneath their feet the dust arose on high. And they called each one to his fellow to lay hold of the ships and draw them into the bright sea, and they set themselves to clear the launching-ways, and their shouting went up to heaven, so fain were they of their return home; and they began to take the props from beneath the ships. ,and from beneath their feet the dust arose on high. And they called each one to his fellow to lay hold of the ships and draw them into the bright sea, and they set themselves to clear the launching-ways, and their shouting went up to heaven, so fain were they of their return home; and they began to take the props from beneath the ships. ,and from beneath their feet the dust arose on high. And they called each one to his fellow to lay hold of the ships and draw them into the bright sea, and they set themselves to clear the launching-ways, and their shouting went up to heaven, so fain were they of their return home; and they began to take the props from beneath the ships. ,and from beneath their feet the dust arose on high. And they called each one to his fellow to lay hold of the ships and draw them into the bright sea, and they set themselves to clear the launching-ways, and their shouting went up to heaven, so fain were they of their return home; and they began to take the props from beneath the ships. ,and from beneath their feet the dust arose on high. And they called each one to his fellow to lay hold of the ships and draw them into the bright sea, and they set themselves to clear the launching-ways, and their shouting went up to heaven, so fain were they of their return home; and they began to take the props from beneath the ships. ,Then would the Argives have accomplished their return even beyond what was ordained, had not Hera spoken a word to Athena, saying:Out upon it, child of Zeus that beareth the aegis, unwearied one! Is it thus indeed that the Argives are to flee to their dear native land over the broad back of the sea? ,Then would the Argives have accomplished their return even beyond what was ordained, had not Hera spoken a word to Athena, saying:Out upon it, child of Zeus that beareth the aegis, unwearied one! Is it thus indeed that the Argives are to flee to their dear native land over the broad back of the sea? ,Then would the Argives have accomplished their return even beyond what was ordained, had not Hera spoken a word to Athena, saying:Out upon it, child of Zeus that beareth the aegis, unwearied one! Is it thus indeed that the Argives are to flee to their dear native land over the broad back of the sea? ,Then would the Argives have accomplished their return even beyond what was ordained, had not Hera spoken a word to Athena, saying:Out upon it, child of Zeus that beareth the aegis, unwearied one! Is it thus indeed that the Argives are to flee to their dear native land over the broad back of the sea? ,Then would the Argives have accomplished their return even beyond what was ordained, had not Hera spoken a word to Athena, saying:Out upon it, child of Zeus that beareth the aegis, unwearied one! Is it thus indeed that the Argives are to flee to their dear native land over the broad back of the sea? ,Aye, and they would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the brazen-coated Achaeans; with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man, ,Aye, and they would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the brazen-coated Achaeans; with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man, ,Aye, and they would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the brazen-coated Achaeans; with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man, ,Aye, and they would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the brazen-coated Achaeans; with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man, ,Aye, and they would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the brazen-coated Achaeans; with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man, ,neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So spake she, and the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, failed not to hearken. Down from the peaks of Olympus she went darting, and speedily came to the swift ships of the Achaeans. There she found Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel, ,neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So spake she, and the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, failed not to hearken. Down from the peaks of Olympus she went darting, and speedily came to the swift ships of the Achaeans. There she found Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel, ,neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So spake she, and the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, failed not to hearken. Down from the peaks of Olympus she went darting, and speedily came to the swift ships of the Achaeans. There she found Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel, ,neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So spake she, and the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, failed not to hearken. Down from the peaks of Olympus she went darting, and speedily came to the swift ships of the Achaeans. There she found Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel, ,neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So spake she, and the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, failed not to hearken. Down from the peaks of Olympus she went darting, and speedily came to the swift ships of the Achaeans. There she found Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel, ,as he stood. He laid no hand upon his benched, black ship, for that grief had come upon his heart and soul; and flashing-eyed Athene stood near him, and said:Son of Laërtes, sprung from Zeus, Odysseus of many wiles, is it thus indeed that ye will fling yourselves ,as he stood. He laid no hand upon his benched, black ship, for that grief had come upon his heart and soul; and flashing-eyed Athene stood near him, and said:Son of Laërtes, sprung from Zeus, Odysseus of many wiles, is it thus indeed that ye will fling yourselves ,as he stood. He laid no hand upon his benched, black ship, for that grief had come upon his heart and soul; and flashing-eyed Athene stood near him, and said:Son of Laërtes, sprung from Zeus, Odysseus of many wiles, is it thus indeed that ye will fling yourselves ,as he stood. He laid no hand upon his benched, black ship, for that grief had come upon his heart and soul; and flashing-eyed Athene stood near him, and said:Son of Laërtes, sprung from Zeus, Odysseus of many wiles, is it thus indeed that ye will fling yourselves ,as he stood. He laid no hand upon his benched, black ship, for that grief had come upon his heart and soul; and flashing-eyed Athene stood near him, and said:Son of Laërtes, sprung from Zeus, Odysseus of many wiles, is it thus indeed that ye will fling yourselves ,on your benched ships to flee to your dear native land? Aye, and ye would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the Achaeans, and hold thee back no more; ,on your benched ships to flee to your dear native land? Aye, and ye would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the Achaeans, and hold thee back no more; ,on your benched ships to flee to your dear native land? Aye, and ye would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the Achaeans, and hold thee back no more; ,on your benched ships to flee to your dear native land? Aye, and ye would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the Achaeans, and hold thee back no more; ,on your benched ships to flee to your dear native land? Aye, and ye would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the Achaeans, and hold thee back no more; ,and with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man, neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So said she, and he knew the voice of the goddess as she spake, and set him to run, and cast from him his cloak, which his herald gathered up, even Eurybates of Ithaca, that waited on him. ,and with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man, neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So said she, and he knew the voice of the goddess as she spake, and set him to run, and cast from him his cloak, which his herald gathered up, even Eurybates of Ithaca, that waited on him. ,and with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man, neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So said she, and he knew the voice of the goddess as she spake, and set him to run, and cast from him his cloak, which his herald gathered up, even Eurybates of Ithaca, that waited on him. ,and with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man, neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So said she, and he knew the voice of the goddess as she spake, and set him to run, and cast from him his cloak, which his herald gathered up, even Eurybates of Ithaca, that waited on him. ,and with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man, neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So said she, and he knew the voice of the goddess as she spake, and set him to run, and cast from him his cloak, which his herald gathered up, even Eurybates of Ithaca, that waited on him. ,But himself he went straight to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, and received at his hand the staff of his fathers, imperishable ever, and therewith went his way along the ships of the brazen-coated Achaeans. ,But himself he went straight to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, and received at his hand the staff of his fathers, imperishable ever, and therewith went his way along the ships of the brazen-coated Achaeans. ,But himself he went straight to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, and received at his hand the staff of his fathers, imperishable ever, and therewith went his way along the ships of the brazen-coated Achaeans. ,But himself he went straight to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, and received at his hand the staff of his fathers, imperishable ever, and therewith went his way along the ships of the brazen-coated Achaeans. ,But himself he went straight to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, and received at his hand the staff of his fathers, imperishable ever, and therewith went his way along the ships of the brazen-coated Achaeans. Whomsoever he met that was a chieftain or man of note, to his side would he come and with gentle words seek to restrain him, saying: , Good Sir, it beseems not to seek to affright thee as if thou were a coward, but do thou thyself sit thee down, and make the rest of thy people to sit. For thou knowest not yet clearly what is the mind of the son of Atreus; now he does but make trial, whereas soon he will smite the sons of the Achaeans. Did we not all hear what he spake in the council? , Good Sir, it beseems not to seek to affright thee as if thou were a coward, but do thou thyself sit thee down, and make the rest of thy people to sit. For thou knowest not yet clearly what is the mind of the son of Atreus; now he does but make trial, whereas soon he will smite the sons of the Achaeans. Did we not all hear what he spake in the council? , Good Sir, it beseems not to seek to affright thee as if thou were a coward, but do thou thyself sit thee down, and make the rest of thy people to sit. For thou knowest not yet clearly what is the mind of the son of Atreus; now he does but make trial, whereas soon he will smite the sons of the Achaeans. Did we not all hear what he spake in the council? , Good Sir, it beseems not to seek to affright thee as if thou were a coward, but do thou thyself sit thee down, and make the rest of thy people to sit. For thou knowest not yet clearly what is the mind of the son of Atreus; now he does but make trial, whereas soon he will smite the sons of the Achaeans. Did we not all hear what he spake in the council? , Good Sir, it beseems not to seek to affright thee as if thou were a coward, but do thou thyself sit thee down, and make the rest of thy people to sit. For thou knowest not yet clearly what is the mind of the son of Atreus; now he does but make trial, whereas soon he will smite the sons of the Achaeans. Did we not all hear what he spake in the council? ,Beware lest waxing wroth he work mischief to the sons of the Achaeans. Proud is the heart of kings, fostered of heaven; for their honour is from Zeus, and Zeus, god of counsel, loveth them. But whatsoever man of the people he saw, and found brawling, him would he smite with his staff; and chide with words, saying, ,Beware lest waxing wroth he work mischief to the sons of the Achaeans. Proud is the heart of kings, fostered of heaven; for their honour is from Zeus, and Zeus, god of counsel, loveth them. But whatsoever man of the people he saw, and found brawling, him would he smite with his staff; and chide with words, saying, ,Beware lest waxing wroth he work mischief to the sons of the Achaeans. Proud is the heart of kings, fostered of heaven; for their honour is from Zeus, and Zeus, god of counsel, loveth them. But whatsoever man of the people he saw, and found brawling, him would he smite with his staff; and chide with words, saying, ,Beware lest waxing wroth he work mischief to the sons of the Achaeans. Proud is the heart of kings, fostered of heaven; for their honour is from Zeus, and Zeus, god of counsel, loveth them. But whatsoever man of the people he saw, and found brawling, him would he smite with his staff; and chide with words, saying, ,Beware lest waxing wroth he work mischief to the sons of the Achaeans. Proud is the heart of kings, fostered of heaven; for their honour is from Zeus, and Zeus, god of counsel, loveth them. But whatsoever man of the people he saw, and found brawling, him would he smite with his staff; and chide with words, saying, , Fellow, sit thou still, and hearken to the words of others that are better men than thou; whereas thou art unwarlike and a weakling, neither to be counted in war nor in counsel. In no wise shall we Achaeans all be kings here. No good thing is a multitude of lords; let there be one lord, , Fellow, sit thou still, and hearken to the words of others that are better men than thou; whereas thou art unwarlike and a weakling, neither to be counted in war nor in counsel. In no wise shall we Achaeans all be kings here. No good thing is a multitude of lords; let there be one lord, , Fellow, sit thou still, and hearken to the words of others that are better men than thou; whereas thou art unwarlike and a weakling, neither to be counted in war nor in counsel. In no wise shall we Achaeans all be kings here. No good thing is a multitude of lords; let there be one lord, , Fellow, sit thou still, and hearken to the words of others that are better men than thou; whereas thou art unwarlike and a weakling, neither to be counted in war nor in counsel. In no wise shall we Achaeans all be kings here. No good thing is a multitude of lords; let there be one lord, , Fellow, sit thou still, and hearken to the words of others that are better men than thou; whereas thou art unwarlike and a weakling, neither to be counted in war nor in counsel. In no wise shall we Achaeans all be kings here. No good thing is a multitude of lords; let there be one lord, ,one king, to whom the son of crooked-counselling Cronos hath vouchsafed the sceptre and judgments, that he may take counsel for his people. Thus masterfully did he range through the host, and they hasted back to the place of gathering from their ships and huts with noise, as when a wave of the loud-resounding sea ,one king, to whom the son of crooked-counselling Cronos hath vouchsafed the sceptre and judgments, that he may take counsel for his people. Thus masterfully did he range through the host, and they hasted back to the place of gathering from their ships and huts with noise, as when a wave of the loud-resounding sea ,one king, to whom the son of crooked-counselling Cronos hath vouchsafed the sceptre and judgments, that he may take counsel for his people. Thus masterfully did he range through the host, and they hasted back to the place of gathering from their ships and huts with noise, as when a wave of the loud-resounding sea ,one king, to whom the son of crooked-counselling Cronos hath vouchsafed the sceptre and judgments, that he may take counsel for his people. Thus masterfully did he range through the host, and they hasted back to the place of gathering from their ships and huts with noise, as when a wave of the loud-resounding sea ,one king, to whom the son of crooked-counselling Cronos hath vouchsafed the sceptre and judgments, that he may take counsel for his people. Thus masterfully did he range through the host, and they hasted back to the place of gathering from their ships and huts with noise, as when a wave of the loud-resounding sea ,thundereth on the long beach, and the deep roareth.Now the others sate them down and were stayed in their places, only there still kept chattering on Thersites of measureless speech, whose mind was full of great store of disorderly words, wherewith to utter revilings against the kings, idly, and in no orderly wise, ,thundereth on the long beach, and the deep roareth.Now the others sate them down and were stayed in their places, only there still kept chattering on Thersites of measureless speech, whose mind was full of great store of disorderly words, wherewith to utter revilings against the kings, idly, and in no orderly wise, ,thundereth on the long beach, and the deep roareth.Now the others sate them down and were stayed in their places, only there still kept chattering on Thersites of measureless speech, whose mind was full of great store of disorderly words, wherewith to utter revilings against the kings, idly, and in no orderly wise, ,thundereth on the long beach, and the deep roareth.Now the others sate them down and were stayed in their places, only there still kept chattering on Thersites of measureless speech, whose mind was full of great store of disorderly words, wherewith to utter revilings against the kings, idly, and in no orderly wise, ,thundereth on the long beach, and the deep roareth.Now the others sate them down and were stayed in their places, only there still kept chattering on Thersites of measureless speech, whose mind was full of great store of disorderly words, wherewith to utter revilings against the kings, idly, and in no orderly wise, ,but whatsoever he deemed would raise a laugh among the Argives. Evil-favoured was he beyond all men that came to Ilios: he was bandy-legged and lame in the one foot, and his two shoulders were rounded, stooping together over his chest, and above them his head was warped, and a scant stubble grew thereon. ,but whatsoever he deemed would raise a laugh among the Argives. Evil-favoured was he beyond all men that came to Ilios: he was bandy-legged and lame in the one foot, and his two shoulders were rounded, stooping together over his chest, and above them his head was warped, and a scant stubble grew thereon. ,but whatsoever he deemed would raise a laugh among the Argives. Evil-favoured was he beyond all men that came to Ilios: he was bandy-legged and lame in the one foot, and his two shoulders were rounded, stooping together over his chest, and above them his head was warped, and a scant stubble grew thereon. ,but whatsoever he deemed would raise a laugh among the Argives. Evil-favoured was he beyond all men that came to Ilios: he was bandy-legged and lame in the one foot, and his two shoulders were rounded, stooping together over his chest, and above them his head was warped, and a scant stubble grew thereon. ,but whatsoever he deemed would raise a laugh among the Argives. Evil-favoured was he beyond all men that came to Ilios: he was bandy-legged and lame in the one foot, and his two shoulders were rounded, stooping together over his chest, and above them his head was warped, and a scant stubble grew thereon. ,Hateful was he to Achilles above all, and to Odysseus, for it was they twain that he was wont to revile; but now again with shrill cries he uttered abuse against goodly Agamemnon. With him were the Achaeans exceeding wroth, and had indignation in their hearts. ,Hateful was he to Achilles above all, and to Odysseus, for it was they twain that he was wont to revile; but now again with shrill cries he uttered abuse against goodly Agamemnon. With him were the Achaeans exceeding wroth, and had indignation in their hearts. ,Hateful was he to Achilles above all, and to Odysseus, for it was they twain that he was wont to revile; but now again with shrill cries he uttered abuse against goodly Agamemnon. With him were the Achaeans exceeding wroth, and had indignation in their hearts. ,Hateful was he to Achilles above all, and to Odysseus, for it was they twain that he was wont to revile; but now again with shrill cries he uttered abuse against goodly Agamemnon. With him were the Achaeans exceeding wroth, and had indignation in their hearts. ,Hateful was he to Achilles above all, and to Odysseus, for it was they twain that he was wont to revile; but now again with shrill cries he uttered abuse against goodly Agamemnon. With him were the Achaeans exceeding wroth, and had indignation in their hearts. Howbeit with loud shoutings he spake and chid Agamemnon: , Son of Atreus, with what art thou now again discontent, or what lack is thine? Filled are thy huts with bronze, and women full many are in thy huts, chosen spoils that we Achaeans give thee first of all, whensoe'er we take a citadel. Or dost thou still want gold also, , Son of Atreus, with what art thou now again discontent, or what lack is thine? Filled are thy huts with bronze, and women full many are in thy huts, chosen spoils that we Achaeans give thee first of all, whensoe'er we take a citadel. Or dost thou still want gold also, , Son of Atreus, with what art thou now again discontent, or what lack is thine? Filled are thy huts with bronze, and women full many are in thy huts, chosen spoils that we Achaeans give thee first of all, whensoe'er we take a citadel. Or dost thou still want gold also, , Son of Atreus, with what art thou now again discontent, or what lack is thine? Filled are thy huts with bronze, and women full many are in thy huts, chosen spoils that we Achaeans give thee first of all, whensoe'er we take a citadel. Or dost thou still want gold also, , Son of Atreus, with what art thou now again discontent, or what lack is thine? Filled are thy huts with bronze, and women full many are in thy huts, chosen spoils that we Achaeans give thee first of all, whensoe'er we take a citadel. Or dost thou still want gold also, ,which some man of the horse-taming Trojans shall bring thee out of Ilios as a ransom for his son, whom I haply have bound and led away or some other of the Achaeans? Or is it some young girl for thee to know in love, whom thou wilt keep apart for thyself? Nay, it beseemeth not one that is their captain to bring to ill the sons of the Achaeans. ,which some man of the horse-taming Trojans shall bring thee out of Ilios as a ransom for his son, whom I haply have bound and led away or some other of the Achaeans? Or is it some young girl for thee to know in love, whom thou wilt keep apart for thyself? Nay, it beseemeth not one that is their captain to bring to ill the sons of the Achaeans. ,which some man of the horse-taming Trojans shall bring thee out of Ilios as a ransom for his son, whom I haply have bound and led away or some other of the Achaeans? Or is it some young girl for thee to know in love, whom thou wilt keep apart for thyself? Nay, it beseemeth not one that is their captain to bring to ill the sons of the Achaeans. ,which some man of the horse-taming Trojans shall bring thee out of Ilios as a ransom for his son, whom I haply have bound and led away or some other of the Achaeans? Or is it some young girl for thee to know in love, whom thou wilt keep apart for thyself? Nay, it beseemeth not one that is their captain to bring to ill the sons of the Achaeans. ,which some man of the horse-taming Trojans shall bring thee out of Ilios as a ransom for his son, whom I haply have bound and led away or some other of the Achaeans? Or is it some young girl for thee to know in love, whom thou wilt keep apart for thyself? Nay, it beseemeth not one that is their captain to bring to ill the sons of the Achaeans. ,Soft fools! base things of shame, ye women of Achaea, men no more, homeward let us go with our ships, and leave this fellow here in the land of Troy to digest his prizes, that so he may learn whether in us too there is aught of aid for him or no—for him that hath now done dishonour to Achilles, a man better far than he; ,Soft fools! base things of shame, ye women of Achaea, men no more, homeward let us go with our ships, and leave this fellow here in the land of Troy to digest his prizes, that so he may learn whether in us too there is aught of aid for him or no—for him that hath now done dishonour to Achilles, a man better far than he; ,Soft fools! base things of shame, ye women of Achaea, men no more, homeward let us go with our ships, and leave this fellow here in the land of Troy to digest his prizes, that so he may learn whether in us too there is aught of aid for him or no—for him that hath now done dishonour to Achilles, a man better far than he; ,Soft fools! base things of shame, ye women of Achaea, men no more, homeward let us go with our ships, and leave this fellow here in the land of Troy to digest his prizes, that so he may learn whether in us too there is aught of aid for him or no—for him that hath now done dishonour to Achilles, a man better far than he; ,Soft fools! base things of shame, ye women of Achaea, men no more, homeward let us go with our ships, and leave this fellow here in the land of Troy to digest his prizes, that so he may learn whether in us too there is aught of aid for him or no—for him that hath now done dishonour to Achilles, a man better far than he; ,for he hath taken away, and keepeth his prize by his own arrogant act. of a surety there is naught of wrath in the heart of Achilles; nay, he heedeth not at all; else, son of Atreus, wouldest thou now work insolence for the last time. So spake Thersites, railing at Agamemnon, shepherd of the host. But quickly to his side came goodly Odysseus, ,for he hath taken away, and keepeth his prize by his own arrogant act. of a surety there is naught of wrath in the heart of Achilles; nay, he heedeth not at all; else, son of Atreus, wouldest thou now work insolence for the last time. So spake Thersites, railing at Agamemnon, shepherd of the host. But quickly to his side came goodly Odysseus, ,for he hath taken away, and keepeth his prize by his own arrogant act. of a surety there is naught of wrath in the heart of Achilles; nay, he heedeth not at all; else, son of Atreus, wouldest thou now work insolence for the last time. So spake Thersites, railing at Agamemnon, shepherd of the host. But quickly to his side came goodly Odysseus, ,for he hath taken away, and keepeth his prize by his own arrogant act. of a surety there is naught of wrath in the heart of Achilles; nay, he heedeth not at all; else, son of Atreus, wouldest thou now work insolence for the last time. So spake Thersites, railing at Agamemnon, shepherd of the host. But quickly to his side came goodly Odysseus, ,for he hath taken away, and keepeth his prize by his own arrogant act. of a surety there is naught of wrath in the heart of Achilles; nay, he heedeth not at all; else, son of Atreus, wouldest thou now work insolence for the last time. So spake Thersites, railing at Agamemnon, shepherd of the host. But quickly to his side came goodly Odysseus, ,and with an angry glance from beneath his brows, chid him with harsh words, saying:Thersites of reckless speech, clear-voiced talker though thou art, refrain thee, and be not minded to strive singly against kings. For I deem that there is no viler mortal than thou amongst all those that with the sons of Atreus came beneath Ilios. ,and with an angry glance from beneath his brows, chid him with harsh words, saying:Thersites of reckless speech, clear-voiced talker though thou art, refrain thee, and be not minded to strive singly against kings. For I deem that there is no viler mortal than thou amongst all those that with the sons of Atreus came beneath Ilios. ,and with an angry glance from beneath his brows, chid him with harsh words, saying:Thersites of reckless speech, clear-voiced talker though thou art, refrain thee, and be not minded to strive singly against kings. For I deem that there is no viler mortal than thou amongst all those that with the sons of Atreus came beneath Ilios. ,and with an angry glance from beneath his brows, chid him with harsh words, saying:Thersites of reckless speech, clear-voiced talker though thou art, refrain thee, and be not minded to strive singly against kings. For I deem that there is no viler mortal than thou amongst all those that with the sons of Atreus came beneath Ilios. ,and with an angry glance from beneath his brows, chid him with harsh words, saying:Thersites of reckless speech, clear-voiced talker though thou art, refrain thee, and be not minded to strive singly against kings. For I deem that there is no viler mortal than thou amongst all those that with the sons of Atreus came beneath Ilios. ,Wherefore 'twere well thou shouldst not take the name of kings in thy mouth as thou protest, to cast reproaches upon them, and to watch for home-going. In no wise do we know clearly as yet how these things are to be, whether it be for good or ill that we sons of the Achaeans shall return. Therefore dost thou now continually utter revilings against Atreus' son, Agamemnon, shepherd of the host, ,Wherefore 'twere well thou shouldst not take the name of kings in thy mouth as thou protest, to cast reproaches upon them, and to watch for home-going. In no wise do we know clearly as yet how these things are to be, whether it be for good or ill that we sons of the Achaeans shall return. Therefore dost thou now continually utter revilings against Atreus' son, Agamemnon, shepherd of the host, ,Wherefore 'twere well thou shouldst not take the name of kings in thy mouth as thou protest, to cast reproaches upon them, and to watch for home-going. In no wise do we know clearly as yet how these things are to be, whether it be for good or ill that we sons of the Achaeans shall return. Therefore dost thou now continually utter revilings against Atreus' son, Agamemnon, shepherd of the host, ,Wherefore 'twere well thou shouldst not take the name of kings in thy mouth as thou protest, to cast reproaches upon them, and to watch for home-going. In no wise do we know clearly as yet how these things are to be, whether it be for good or ill that we sons of the Achaeans shall return. Therefore dost thou now continually utter revilings against Atreus' son, Agamemnon, shepherd of the host, ,Wherefore 'twere well thou shouldst not take the name of kings in thy mouth as thou protest, to cast reproaches upon them, and to watch for home-going. In no wise do we know clearly as yet how these things are to be, whether it be for good or ill that we sons of the Achaeans shall return. Therefore dost thou now continually utter revilings against Atreus' son, Agamemnon, shepherd of the host, ,for that the Danaan warriors give him gifts full many; whereas thou pratest on with railings. But I will speak out to thee, and this word shall verily be brought to pass: if I find thee again playing the fool, even as now thou dost, then may the head of Odysseus abide no more upon his shoulders, ,for that the Danaan warriors give him gifts full many; whereas thou pratest on with railings. But I will speak out to thee, and this word shall verily be brought to pass: if I find thee again playing the fool, even as now thou dost, then may the head of Odysseus abide no more upon his shoulders, ,for that the Danaan warriors give him gifts full many; whereas thou pratest on with railings. But I will speak out to thee, and this word shall verily be brought to pass: if I find thee again playing the fool, even as now thou dost, then may the head of Odysseus abide no more upon his shoulders, ,for that the Danaan warriors give him gifts full many; whereas thou pratest on with railings. But I will speak out to thee, and this word shall verily be brought to pass: if I find thee again playing the fool, even as now thou dost, then may the head of Odysseus abide no more upon his shoulders, ,for that the Danaan warriors give him gifts full many; whereas thou pratest on with railings. But I will speak out to thee, and this word shall verily be brought to pass: if I find thee again playing the fool, even as now thou dost, then may the head of Odysseus abide no more upon his shoulders, ,nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. ,nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. ,nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. ,nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. ,nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. ,So spake Odysseus, and with his staff smote his back and shoulders; and Thersites cowered down, and a big tear fell from him, and a bloody weal rose up on his back beneath the staff of gold. Then he sate him down, and fear came upon him, and stung by pain with helpless looks he wiped away the tear. ,So spake Odysseus, and with his staff smote his back and shoulders; and Thersites cowered down, and a big tear fell from him, and a bloody weal rose up on his back beneath the staff of gold. Then he sate him down, and fear came upon him, and stung by pain with helpless looks he wiped away the tear. ,So spake Odysseus, and with his staff smote his back and shoulders; and Thersites cowered down, and a big tear fell from him, and a bloody weal rose up on his back beneath the staff of gold. Then he sate him down, and fear came upon him, and stung by pain with helpless looks he wiped away the tear. ,So spake Odysseus, and with his staff smote his back and shoulders; and Thersites cowered down, and a big tear fell from him, and a bloody weal rose up on his back beneath the staff of gold. Then he sate him down, and fear came upon him, and stung by pain with helpless looks he wiped away the tear. ,So spake Odysseus, and with his staff smote his back and shoulders; and Thersites cowered down, and a big tear fell from him, and a bloody weal rose up on his back beneath the staff of gold. Then he sate him down, and fear came upon him, and stung by pain with helpless looks he wiped away the tear. ,But the Achaeans, sore vexed at heart though they were, broke into a merry laugh at him, and thus would one speak with a glance at his neighbour:Out upon it! verily hath Odysseus ere now wrought good deeds without number as leader in good counsel and setting battle in army, but now is this deed far the best that he hath wrought among the Argives, ,But the Achaeans, sore vexed at heart though they were, broke into a merry laugh at him, and thus would one speak with a glance at his neighbour:Out upon it! verily hath Odysseus ere now wrought good deeds without number as leader in good counsel and setting battle in army, but now is this deed far the best that he hath wrought among the Argives, ,But the Achaeans, sore vexed at heart though they were, broke into a merry laugh at him, and thus would one speak with a glance at his neighbour:Out upon it! verily hath Odysseus ere now wrought good deeds without number as leader in good counsel and setting battle in army, but now is this deed far the best that he hath wrought among the Argives, ,But the Achaeans, sore vexed at heart though they were, broke into a merry laugh at him, and thus would one speak with a glance at his neighbour:Out upon it! verily hath Odysseus ere now wrought good deeds without number as leader in good counsel and setting battle in army, but now is this deed far the best that he hath wrought among the Argives, ,But the Achaeans, sore vexed at heart though they were, broke into a merry laugh at him, and thus would one speak with a glance at his neighbour:Out upon it! verily hath Odysseus ere now wrought good deeds without number as leader in good counsel and setting battle in army, but now is this deed far the best that he hath wrought among the Argives, ,seeing he hath made this scurrilous babbler to cease from his prating. Never again, I ween, will his proud spirit henceforth set him on to rail at kings with words of reviling. So spake the multitude; but up rose Odysseus, sacker of cities, the sceptre in his hand, and by his side flashing-eyed Athene, ,seeing he hath made this scurrilous babbler to cease from his prating. Never again, I ween, will his proud spirit henceforth set him on to rail at kings with words of reviling. So spake the multitude; but up rose Odysseus, sacker of cities, the sceptre in his hand, and by his side flashing-eyed Athene, ,seeing he hath made this scurrilous babbler to cease from his prating. Never again, I ween, will his proud spirit henceforth set him on to rail at kings with words of reviling. So spake the multitude; but up rose Odysseus, sacker of cities, the sceptre in his hand, and by his side flashing-eyed Athene, ,seeing he hath made this scurrilous babbler to cease from his prating. Never again, I ween, will his proud spirit henceforth set him on to rail at kings with words of reviling. So spake the multitude; but up rose Odysseus, sacker of cities, the sceptre in his hand, and by his side flashing-eyed Athene, ,seeing he hath made this scurrilous babbler to cease from his prating. Never again, I ween, will his proud spirit henceforth set him on to rail at kings with words of reviling. So spake the multitude; but up rose Odysseus, sacker of cities, the sceptre in his hand, and by his side flashing-eyed Athene, ,in the likeness of a herald, bade the host keep silence, that the sons of the Achaeans, both the nearest and the farthest, might hear his words, and lay to heart his counsel. He with good intent addressed their gathering and spake among them:Son of Atreus, now verily are the Achaeans minded to make thee, O king, ,in the likeness of a herald, bade the host keep silence, that the sons of the Achaeans, both the nearest and the farthest, might hear his words, and lay to heart his counsel. He with good intent addressed their gathering and spake among them:Son of Atreus, now verily are the Achaeans minded to make thee, O king, ,in the likeness of a herald, bade the host keep silence, that the sons of the Achaeans, both the nearest and the farthest, might hear his words, and lay to heart his counsel. He with good intent addressed their gathering and spake among them:Son of Atreus, now verily are the Achaeans minded to make thee, O king, ,in the likeness of a herald, bade the host keep silence, that the sons of the Achaeans, both the nearest and the farthest, might hear his words, and lay to heart his counsel. He with good intent addressed their gathering and spake among them:Son of Atreus, now verily are the Achaeans minded to make thee, O king, ,in the likeness of a herald, bade the host keep silence, that the sons of the Achaeans, both the nearest and the farthest, might hear his words, and lay to heart his counsel. He with good intent addressed their gathering and spake among them:Son of Atreus, now verily are the Achaeans minded to make thee, O king, ,the most despised among all mortal men, nor will they fulfill the promise that they made to thee, while faring hitherward from Argos, the pasture-land of horses, that not until thou hadst sacked well-walled Ilios shouldest thou get thee home. For like little children or widow women ,the most despised among all mortal men, nor will they fulfill the promise that they made to thee, while faring hitherward from Argos, the pasture-land of horses, that not until thou hadst sacked well-walled Ilios shouldest thou get thee home. For like little children or widow women ,the most despised among all mortal men, nor will they fulfill the promise that they made to thee, while faring hitherward from Argos, the pasture-land of horses, that not until thou hadst sacked well-walled Ilios shouldest thou get thee home. For like little children or widow women ,the most despised among all mortal men, nor will they fulfill the promise that they made to thee, while faring hitherward from Argos, the pasture-land of horses, that not until thou hadst sacked well-walled Ilios shouldest thou get thee home. For like little children or widow women ,the most despised among all mortal men, nor will they fulfill the promise that they made to thee, while faring hitherward from Argos, the pasture-land of horses, that not until thou hadst sacked well-walled Ilios shouldest thou get thee home. For like little children or widow women ,do they wail each to the other in longing to return home. Verily there is toil enough to make a man return disheartened. For he that abideth but one single month far from his wife in his benched ship hath vexation of heart, even he whom winter blasts and surging seas keep afar; ,do they wail each to the other in longing to return home. Verily there is toil enough to make a man return disheartened. For he that abideth but one single month far from his wife in his benched ship hath vexation of heart, even he whom winter blasts and surging seas keep afar; ,do they wail each to the other in longing to return home. Verily there is toil enough to make a man return disheartened. For he that abideth but one single month far from his wife in his benched ship hath vexation of heart, even he whom winter blasts and surging seas keep afar; ,do they wail each to the other in longing to return home. Verily there is toil enough to make a man return disheartened. For he that abideth but one single month far from his wife in his benched ship hath vexation of heart, even he whom winter blasts and surging seas keep afar; ,do they wail each to the other in longing to return home. Verily there is toil enough to make a man return disheartened. For he that abideth but one single month far from his wife in his benched ship hath vexation of heart, even he whom winter blasts and surging seas keep afar; ,but for us is the ninth year at its turn, while we abide here; wherefore I count it not shame that the Achaeans have vexation of heart beside their beaked ships; yet even so it is a shameful thing to tarry long, and return empty. Endure, my friends, and abide for a time, that we may know ,but for us is the ninth year at its turn, while we abide here; wherefore I count it not shame that the Achaeans have vexation of heart beside their beaked ships; yet even so it is a shameful thing to tarry long, and return empty. Endure, my friends, and abide for a time, that we may know ,but for us is the ninth year at its turn, while we abide here; wherefore I count it not shame that the Achaeans have vexation of heart beside their beaked ships; yet even so it is a shameful thing to tarry long, and return empty. Endure, my friends, and abide for a time, that we may know ,but for us is the ninth year at its turn, while we abide here; wherefore I count it not shame that the Achaeans have vexation of heart beside their beaked ships; yet even so it is a shameful thing to tarry long, and return empty. Endure, my friends, and abide for a time, that we may know ,but for us is the ninth year at its turn, while we abide here; wherefore I count it not shame that the Achaeans have vexation of heart beside their beaked ships; yet even so it is a shameful thing to tarry long, and return empty. Endure, my friends, and abide for a time, that we may know ,whether the prophecies of Calchas be true, or no. ,whether the prophecies of Calchas be true, or no. ,whether the prophecies of Calchas be true, or no. ,whether the prophecies of Calchas be true, or no. ,whether the prophecies of Calchas be true, or no. For this in truth do we know well in our hearts, and ye are all witnesses thereto, even as many as the fates of death have not borne away. It was but as yesterday or the day before, when the ships of the Achaeans were gathering in Aulis, laden with woes for Priam and the Trojans; ,and we round about a spring were offering to the immortals upon the holy altars hecatombs that bring fulfillment, beneath a fair plane-tree from whence flowed the bright water; then appeared a great portent: a serpent, blood-red on the back, terrible, whom the Olympian himself had sent forth to the light, ,and we round about a spring were offering to the immortals upon the holy altars hecatombs that bring fulfillment, beneath a fair plane-tree from whence flowed the bright water; then appeared a great portent: a serpent, blood-red on the back, terrible, whom the Olympian himself had sent forth to the light, ,and we round about a spring were offering to the immortals upon the holy altars hecatombs that bring fulfillment, beneath a fair plane-tree from whence flowed the bright water; then appeared a great portent: a serpent, blood-red on the back, terrible, whom the Olympian himself had sent forth to the light, ,and we round about a spring were offering to the immortals upon the holy altars hecatombs that bring fulfillment, beneath a fair plane-tree from whence flowed the bright water; then appeared a great portent: a serpent, blood-red on the back, terrible, whom the Olympian himself had sent forth to the light, ,and we round about a spring were offering to the immortals upon the holy altars hecatombs that bring fulfillment, beneath a fair plane-tree from whence flowed the bright water; then appeared a great portent: a serpent, blood-red on the back, terrible, whom the Olympian himself had sent forth to the light, ,glided from beneath the altar and darted to the plane-tree. Now upon this were the younglings of a sparrow, tender little ones, on the topmost bough, cowering beneath the leaves, eight in all, and the mother that bare them was the ninth, Then the serpent devoured them as they twittered piteously, ,glided from beneath the altar and darted to the plane-tree. Now upon this were the younglings of a sparrow, tender little ones, on the topmost bough, cowering beneath the leaves, eight in all, and the mother that bare them was the ninth, Then the serpent devoured them as they twittered piteously, ,glided from beneath the altar and darted to the plane-tree. Now upon this were the younglings of a sparrow, tender little ones, on the topmost bough, cowering beneath the leaves, eight in all, and the mother that bare them was the ninth, Then the serpent devoured them as they twittered piteously, ,glided from beneath the altar and darted to the plane-tree. Now upon this were the younglings of a sparrow, tender little ones, on the topmost bough, cowering beneath the leaves, eight in all, and the mother that bare them was the ninth, Then the serpent devoured them as they twittered piteously, ,glided from beneath the altar and darted to the plane-tree. Now upon this were the younglings of a sparrow, tender little ones, on the topmost bough, cowering beneath the leaves, eight in all, and the mother that bare them was the ninth, Then the serpent devoured them as they twittered piteously, ,and the mother fluttered around them, wailing for her dear little ones; howbeit he coiled himself and caught her by the wing as she screamed about him. But when he had devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them, the god, who had brought him to the light, made him to be unseen; for the son of crooked-counselling Cronos turned him to stone; ,and the mother fluttered around them, wailing for her dear little ones; howbeit he coiled himself and caught her by the wing as she screamed about him. But when he had devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them, the god, who had brought him to the light, made him to be unseen; for the son of crooked-counselling Cronos turned him to stone; ,and the mother fluttered around them, wailing for her dear little ones; howbeit he coiled himself and caught her by the wing as she screamed about him. But when he had devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them, the god, who had brought him to the light, made him to be unseen; for the son of crooked-counselling Cronos turned him to stone; ,and the mother fluttered around them, wailing for her dear little ones; howbeit he coiled himself and caught her by the wing as she screamed about him. But when he had devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them, the god, who had brought him to the light, made him to be unseen; for the son of crooked-counselling Cronos turned him to stone; ,and the mother fluttered around them, wailing for her dear little ones; howbeit he coiled himself and caught her by the wing as she screamed about him. But when he had devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them, the god, who had brought him to the light, made him to be unseen; for the son of crooked-counselling Cronos turned him to stone; ,and we stood there and marveled at what was wrought. So, when the dread portent brake in upon the hecatombs of the gods, then straightway did Calchas prophesy, and address our gathering, saying: 'Why are ye thus silent, ye long-haired Achaeans? To us hath Zeus the counsellor shewed this great sign, ,and we stood there and marveled at what was wrought. So, when the dread portent brake in upon the hecatombs of the gods, then straightway did Calchas prophesy, and address our gathering, saying: 'Why are ye thus silent, ye long-haired Achaeans? To us hath Zeus the counsellor shewed this great sign, ,and we stood there and marveled at what was wrought. So, when the dread portent brake in upon the hecatombs of the gods, then straightway did Calchas prophesy, and address our gathering, saying: 'Why are ye thus silent, ye long-haired Achaeans? To us hath Zeus the counsellor shewed this great sign, ,and we stood there and marveled at what was wrought. So, when the dread portent brake in upon the hecatombs of the gods, then straightway did Calchas prophesy, and address our gathering, saying: 'Why are ye thus silent, ye long-haired Achaeans? To us hath Zeus the counsellor shewed this great sign, ,and we stood there and marveled at what was wrought. So, when the dread portent brake in upon the hecatombs of the gods, then straightway did Calchas prophesy, and address our gathering, saying: 'Why are ye thus silent, ye long-haired Achaeans? To us hath Zeus the counsellor shewed this great sign, ,late in coming, late in fulfillment, the fame whereof shall never perish. Even as this serpent devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them—the eight, and the mother that bare them was the ninth—so shall we war there for so many years, but in the tenth shall we take the broad-wayed city.' On this wise spake Calchas, ,late in coming, late in fulfillment, the fame whereof shall never perish. Even as this serpent devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them—the eight, and the mother that bare them was the ninth—so shall we war there for so many years, but in the tenth shall we take the broad-wayed city.' On this wise spake Calchas, ,late in coming, late in fulfillment, the fame whereof shall never perish. Even as this serpent devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them—the eight, and the mother that bare them was the ninth—so shall we war there for so many years, but in the tenth shall we take the broad-wayed city.' On this wise spake Calchas, ,late in coming, late in fulfillment, the fame whereof shall never perish. Even as this serpent devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them—the eight, and the mother that bare them was the ninth—so shall we war there for so many years, but in the tenth shall we take the broad-wayed city.' On this wise spake Calchas, ,late in coming, late in fulfillment, the fame whereof shall never perish. Even as this serpent devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them—the eight, and the mother that bare them was the ninth—so shall we war there for so many years, but in the tenth shall we take the broad-wayed city.' On this wise spake Calchas, ,and now all this is verily being brought to pass. Nay, come, abide ye all, ye well-greaved Achaeans, even where ye are, until we take the great city of Priam. So spake he, and the Argives shouted aloud, and all round about them the ships echoed wondrously beneath the shouting of the Achaeans, ,and now all this is verily being brought to pass. Nay, come, abide ye all, ye well-greaved Achaeans, even where ye are, until we take the great city of Priam. So spake he, and the Argives shouted aloud, and all round about them the ships echoed wondrously beneath the shouting of the Achaeans, ,and now all this is verily being brought to pass. Nay, come, abide ye all, ye well-greaved Achaeans, even where ye are, until we take the great city of Priam. So spake he, and the Argives shouted aloud, and all round about them the ships echoed wondrously beneath the shouting of the Achaeans, ,and now all this is verily being brought to pass. Nay, come, abide ye all, ye well-greaved Achaeans, even where ye are, until we take the great city of Priam. So spake he, and the Argives shouted aloud, and all round about them the ships echoed wondrously beneath the shouting of the Achaeans, ,and now all this is verily being brought to pass. Nay, come, abide ye all, ye well-greaved Achaeans, even where ye are, until we take the great city of Priam. So spake he, and the Argives shouted aloud, and all round about them the ships echoed wondrously beneath the shouting of the Achaeans, ,/as they praised the words of godlike Odysseus. ,/as they praised the words of godlike Odysseus. ,/as they praised the words of godlike Odysseus. ,/as they praised the words of godlike Odysseus. ,as they praised the words of godlike Odysseus. And there spake among them the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia:Now look you; in very truth are ye holding assembly after the manner of silly boys that care no whit for deeds of war. What then is to be the end of our compacts and our oaths? ,Nay, into the fire let us cast all counsels and plans of warriors, the drink-offerings of unmixed wine, and the hand-clasps wherein we put our trust. For vainly do we wrangle with words, nor can we find any device at all, for all our long-tarrying here. Son of Atreus, do thou as of old keep unbending purpose, ,Nay, into the fire let us cast all counsels and plans of warriors, the drink-offerings of unmixed wine, and the hand-clasps wherein we put our trust. For vainly do we wrangle with words, nor can we find any device at all, for all our long-tarrying here. Son of Atreus, do thou as of old keep unbending purpose, ,Nay, into the fire let us cast all counsels and plans of warriors, the drink-offerings of unmixed wine, and the hand-clasps wherein we put our trust. For vainly do we wrangle with words, nor can we find any device at all, for all our long-tarrying here. Son of Atreus, do thou as of old keep unbending purpose, ,Nay, into the fire let us cast all counsels and plans of warriors, the drink-offerings of unmixed wine, and the hand-clasps wherein we put our trust. For vainly do we wrangle with words, nor can we find any device at all, for all our long-tarrying here. Son of Atreus, do thou as of old keep unbending purpose, ,Nay, into the fire let us cast all counsels and plans of warriors, the drink-offerings of unmixed wine, and the hand-clasps wherein we put our trust. For vainly do we wrangle with words, nor can we find any device at all, for all our long-tarrying here. Son of Atreus, do thou as of old keep unbending purpose, ,and be leader of the Argives throughout stubborn fights; and for these, let them perish, the one or two of the Achaeans, that take secret counsel apart—yet no accomplishment shall come therefrom—to depart first to Argos or ever we have learned whether the promise of Zeus that beareth the aegis be a lie or no. ,and be leader of the Argives throughout stubborn fights; and for these, let them perish, the one or two of the Achaeans, that take secret counsel apart—yet no accomplishment shall come therefrom—to depart first to Argos or ever we have learned whether the promise of Zeus that beareth the aegis be a lie or no. ,and be leader of the Argives throughout stubborn fights; and for these, let them perish, the one or two of the Achaeans, that take secret counsel apart—yet no accomplishment shall come therefrom—to depart first to Argos or ever we have learned whether the promise of Zeus that beareth the aegis be a lie or no. ,and be leader of the Argives throughout stubborn fights; and for these, let them perish, the one or two of the Achaeans, that take secret counsel apart—yet no accomplishment shall come therefrom—to depart first to Argos or ever we have learned whether the promise of Zeus that beareth the aegis be a lie or no. ,and be leader of the Argives throughout stubborn fights; and for these, let them perish, the one or two of the Achaeans, that take secret counsel apart—yet no accomplishment shall come therefrom—to depart first to Argos or ever we have learned whether the promise of Zeus that beareth the aegis be a lie or no. ,For I declare that Cronos' son, supreme in might, gave promise with his nod on that day when the Argives went on board their swift-faring ships, bearing unto the Trojans death and fate; for he lightened on our right and shewed forth signs of good. Wherefore let no man make haste to depart homewards until each have lain with the wife of some Trojan, ,For I declare that Cronos' son, supreme in might, gave promise with his nod on that day when the Argives went on board their swift-faring ships, bearing unto the Trojans death and fate; for he lightened on our right and shewed forth signs of good. Wherefore let no man make haste to depart homewards until each have lain with the wife of some Trojan, ,For I declare that Cronos' son, supreme in might, gave promise with his nod on that day when the Argives went on board their swift-faring ships, bearing unto the Trojans death and fate; for he lightened on our right and shewed forth signs of good. Wherefore let no man make haste to depart homewards until each have lain with the wife of some Trojan, ,For I declare that Cronos' son, supreme in might, gave promise with his nod on that day when the Argives went on board their swift-faring ships, bearing unto the Trojans death and fate; for he lightened on our right and shewed forth signs of good. Wherefore let no man make haste to depart homewards until each have lain with the wife of some Trojan, ,For I declare that Cronos' son, supreme in might, gave promise with his nod on that day when the Argives went on board their swift-faring ships, bearing unto the Trojans death and fate; for he lightened on our right and shewed forth signs of good. Wherefore let no man make haste to depart homewards until each have lain with the wife of some Trojan, ,and have got him requital for his strivings and groanings for Helen's sake. Howbeit, if any man is exceeding fain to depart homewards, let him lay his hand upon his black, well-benched ship, that before the face of all he may meet death and fate. ,and have got him requital for his strivings and groanings for Helen's sake. Howbeit, if any man is exceeding fain to depart homewards, let him lay his hand upon his black, well-benched ship, that before the face of all he may meet death and fate. ,and have got him requital for his strivings and groanings for Helen's sake. Howbeit, if any man is exceeding fain to depart homewards, let him lay his hand upon his black, well-benched ship, that before the face of all he may meet death and fate. ,and have got him requital for his strivings and groanings for Helen's sake. Howbeit, if any man is exceeding fain to depart homewards, let him lay his hand upon his black, well-benched ship, that before the face of all he may meet death and fate. ,and have got him requital for his strivings and groanings for Helen's sake. Howbeit, if any man is exceeding fain to depart homewards, let him lay his hand upon his black, well-benched ship, that before the face of all he may meet death and fate. ,But do thou, O King, thyself take good counsel, and hearken to another; the word whatsoever I speak, shalt thou not lightly cast aside. Separate thy men by tribes, by clans, Agamemnon, that clan may bear aid to clan and tribe to tribe. If thou do thus, and the Achaeans obey thee, ,But do thou, O King, thyself take good counsel, and hearken to another; the word whatsoever I speak, shalt thou not lightly cast aside. Separate thy men by tribes, by clans, Agamemnon, that clan may bear aid to clan and tribe to tribe. If thou do thus, and the Achaeans obey thee, ,But do thou, O King, thyself take good counsel, and hearken to another; the word whatsoever I speak, shalt thou not lightly cast aside. Separate thy men by tribes, by clans, Agamemnon, that clan may bear aid to clan and tribe to tribe. If thou do thus, and the Achaeans obey thee, ,But do thou, O King, thyself take good counsel, and hearken to another; the word whatsoever I speak, shalt thou not lightly cast aside. Separate thy men by tribes, by clans, Agamemnon, that clan may bear aid to clan and tribe to tribe. If thou do thus, and the Achaeans obey thee, ,But do thou, O King, thyself take good counsel, and hearken to another; the word whatsoever I speak, shalt thou not lightly cast aside. Separate thy men by tribes, by clans, Agamemnon, that clan may bear aid to clan and tribe to tribe. If thou do thus, and the Achaeans obey thee, ,thou wilt know then who among thy captains is a coward, and who among thy men, and who too is brave; for they will fight each clan for itself. So shalt thou know whether it is even by the will of heaven that thou shalt not take the city, or by the cowardice of thy folk and their witlessness in war. ,thou wilt know then who among thy captains is a coward, and who among thy men, and who too is brave; for they will fight each clan for itself. So shalt thou know whether it is even by the will of heaven that thou shalt not take the city, or by the cowardice of thy folk and their witlessness in war. ,thou wilt know then who among thy captains is a coward, and who among thy men, and who too is brave; for they will fight each clan for itself. So shalt thou know whether it is even by the will of heaven that thou shalt not take the city, or by the cowardice of thy folk and their witlessness in war. ,thou wilt know then who among thy captains is a coward, and who among thy men, and who too is brave; for they will fight each clan for itself. So shalt thou know whether it is even by the will of heaven that thou shalt not take the city, or by the cowardice of thy folk and their witlessness in war. ,thou wilt know then who among thy captains is a coward, and who among thy men, and who too is brave; for they will fight each clan for itself. So shalt thou know whether it is even by the will of heaven that thou shalt not take the city, or by the cowardice of thy folk and their witlessness in war. Then in answer to him spake the king, Agamemnon: , Aye verily once more, old sir, art thou pre-eminent in speech above the sons of the Achaeans. I would, O father Zeus and Athene and Apollo, that I had ten such counsellors; then would the city of king Priam forthwith bow her head, taken and laid waste beneath our hands. , Aye verily once more, old sir, art thou pre-eminent in speech above the sons of the Achaeans. I would, O father Zeus and Athene and Apollo, that I had ten such counsellors; then would the city of king Priam forthwith bow her head, taken and laid waste beneath our hands. , Aye verily once more, old sir, art thou pre-eminent in speech above the sons of the Achaeans. I would, O father Zeus and Athene and Apollo, that I had ten such counsellors; then would the city of king Priam forthwith bow her head, taken and laid waste beneath our hands. , Aye verily once more, old sir, art thou pre-eminent in speech above the sons of the Achaeans. I would, O father Zeus and Athene and Apollo, that I had ten such counsellors; then would the city of king Priam forthwith bow her head, taken and laid waste beneath our hands. , Aye verily once more, old sir, art thou pre-eminent in speech above the sons of the Achaeans. I would, O father Zeus and Athene and Apollo, that I had ten such counsellors; then would the city of king Priam forthwith bow her head, taken and laid waste beneath our hands. ,But the son of Cronos, even Zeus that beareth the aegis, hath brought sorrows upon me, in that he casteth me into the midst of fruitless strifes and wranglings. For verily I and Achilles fought about a girl with violent words, and it was I that waxed wroth the first; but if e'er we shall be at one in counsel, ,But the son of Cronos, even Zeus that beareth the aegis, hath brought sorrows upon me, in that he casteth me into the midst of fruitless strifes and wranglings. For verily I and Achilles fought about a girl with violent words, and it was I that waxed wroth the first; but if e'er we shall be at one in counsel, ,But the son of Cronos, even Zeus that beareth the aegis, hath brought sorrows upon me, in that he casteth me into the midst of fruitless strifes and wranglings. For verily I and Achilles fought about a girl with violent words, and it was I that waxed wroth the first; but if e'er we shall be at one in counsel, ,But the son of Cronos, even Zeus that beareth the aegis, hath brought sorrows upon me, in that he casteth me into the midst of fruitless strifes and wranglings. For verily I and Achilles fought about a girl with violent words, and it was I that waxed wroth the first; but if e'er we shall be at one in counsel, ,But the son of Cronos, even Zeus that beareth the aegis, hath brought sorrows upon me, in that he casteth me into the midst of fruitless strifes and wranglings. For verily I and Achilles fought about a girl with violent words, and it was I that waxed wroth the first; but if e'er we shall be at one in counsel, ,then shall there no more be any putting off of evil for the Trojans, no not for an instant. But for this present go ye to your meal, that we may join battle. Let every man whet well his spear and bestow well his shield, and let him well give to his swift-footed horses their food, and look well to his chariot on every side, and bethink him of fighting; ,then shall there no more be any putting off of evil for the Trojans, no not for an instant. But for this present go ye to your meal, that we may join battle. Let every man whet well his spear and bestow well his shield, and let him well give to his swift-footed horses their food, and look well to his chariot on every side, and bethink him of fighting; ,then shall there no more be any putting off of evil for the Trojans, no not for an instant. But for this present go ye to your meal, that we may join battle. Let every man whet well his spear and bestow well his shield, and let him well give to his swift-footed horses their food, and look well to his chariot on every side, and bethink him of fighting; ,then shall there no more be any putting off of evil for the Trojans, no not for an instant. But for this present go ye to your meal, that we may join battle. Let every man whet well his spear and bestow well his shield, and let him well give to his swift-footed horses their food, and look well to his chariot on every side, and bethink him of fighting; ,then shall there no more be any putting off of evil for the Trojans, no not for an instant. But for this present go ye to your meal, that we may join battle. Let every man whet well his spear and bestow well his shield, and let him well give to his swift-footed horses their food, and look well to his chariot on every side, and bethink him of fighting; ,that the whole day through we may contend in hateful war. For of respite shall there intervene, no, not a whit, until night at its coming shall part the fury of warriors. Wet with sweat about the breast of many a man shall be the baldric of his sheltering shield, and about the spear shall his hand grow weary, ,that the whole day through we may contend in hateful war. For of respite shall there intervene, no, not a whit, until night at its coming shall part the fury of warriors. Wet with sweat about the breast of many a man shall be the baldric of his sheltering shield, and about the spear shall his hand grow weary, ,that the whole day through we may contend in hateful war. For of respite shall there intervene, no, not a whit, until night at its coming shall part the fury of warriors. Wet with sweat about the breast of many a man shall be the baldric of his sheltering shield, and about the spear shall his hand grow weary, ,that the whole day through we may contend in hateful war. For of respite shall there intervene, no, not a whit, until night at its coming shall part the fury of warriors. Wet with sweat about the breast of many a man shall be the baldric of his sheltering shield, and about the spear shall his hand grow weary, ,that the whole day through we may contend in hateful war. For of respite shall there intervene, no, not a whit, until night at its coming shall part the fury of warriors. Wet with sweat about the breast of many a man shall be the baldric of his sheltering shield, and about the spear shall his hand grow weary, ,and wet with sweat shall a man's horse be, as he tugs at the polished car. But whomsoever I shall see minded to tarry apart from the fight beside the beaked ships, for him shall there be no hope thereafter to escape the dogs and birds. So spake he, and the Argives shouted aloud as a wave against a high headland, ,and wet with sweat shall a man's horse be, as he tugs at the polished car. But whomsoever I shall see minded to tarry apart from the fight beside the beaked ships, for him shall there be no hope thereafter to escape the dogs and birds. So spake he, and the Argives shouted aloud as a wave against a high headland, ,and wet with sweat shall a man's horse be, as he tugs at the polished car. But whomsoever I shall see minded to tarry apart from the fight beside the beaked ships, for him shall there be no hope thereafter to escape the dogs and birds. So spake he, and the Argives shouted aloud as a wave against a high headland, ,and wet with sweat shall a man's horse be, as he tugs at the polished car. But whomsoever I shall see minded to tarry apart from the fight beside the beaked ships, for him shall there be no hope thereafter to escape the dogs and birds. So spake he, and the Argives shouted aloud as a wave against a high headland, ,and wet with sweat shall a man's horse be, as he tugs at the polished car. But whomsoever I shall see minded to tarry apart from the fight beside the beaked ships, for him shall there be no hope thereafter to escape the dogs and birds. So spake he, and the Argives shouted aloud as a wave against a high headland, ,when the South Wind cometh and maketh it to swell—even against a jutting crag that is never left by the waves of all the winds that come from this side or from that. And they arose and hasted to scatter among the ships, and made fires in the huts, and took their meal. ,when the South Wind cometh and maketh it to swell—even against a jutting crag that is never left by the waves of all the winds that come from this side or from that. And they arose and hasted to scatter among the ships, and made fires in the huts, and took their meal. ,when the South Wind cometh and maketh it to swell—even against a jutting crag that is never left by the waves of all the winds that come from this side or from that. And they arose and hasted to scatter among the ships, and made fires in the huts, and took their meal. ,when the South Wind cometh and maketh it to swell—even against a jutting crag that is never left by the waves of all the winds that come from this side or from that. And they arose and hasted to scatter among the ships, and made fires in the huts, and took their meal. ,when the South Wind cometh and maketh it to swell—even against a jutting crag that is never left by the waves of all the winds that come from this side or from that. And they arose and hasted to scatter among the ships, and made fires in the huts, and took their meal. ,And they made sacrifice one to one of the gods that are for ever, and one to another, with the prayer that they might escape from death and the toil of war. But Agamemnon, king of men, slew a fat bull of five years to the son of Cronos, supreme in might, and let call the elders, the chieftains of the Achaean host, ,And they made sacrifice one to one of the gods that are for ever, and one to another, with the prayer that they might escape from death and the toil of war. But Agamemnon, king of men, slew a fat bull of five years to the son of Cronos, supreme in might, and let call the elders, the chieftains of the Achaean host, ,And they made sacrifice one to one of the gods that are for ever, and one to another, with the prayer that they might escape from death and the toil of war. But Agamemnon, king of men, slew a fat bull of five years to the son of Cronos, supreme in might, and let call the elders, the chieftains of the Achaean host, ,And they made sacrifice one to one of the gods that are for ever, and one to another, with the prayer that they might escape from death and the toil of war. But Agamemnon, king of men, slew a fat bull of five years to the son of Cronos, supreme in might, and let call the elders, the chieftains of the Achaean host, ,And they made sacrifice one to one of the gods that are for ever, and one to another, with the prayer that they might escape from death and the toil of war. But Agamemnon, king of men, slew a fat bull of five years to the son of Cronos, supreme in might, and let call the elders, the chieftains of the Achaean host, ,Nestor, first of all, and king Idomeneus, and thereafter the twain Aiantes and the son of Tydeus, and as the sixth Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel. And unbidden came to him Menelaus, good at the war-cry, for he knew in his heart wherewith his brother was busied. ,Nestor, first of all, and king Idomeneus, and thereafter the twain Aiantes and the son of Tydeus, and as the sixth Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel. And unbidden came to him Menelaus, good at the war-cry, for he knew in his heart wherewith his brother was busied. ,Nestor, first of all, and king Idomeneus, and thereafter the twain Aiantes and the son of Tydeus, and as the sixth Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel. And unbidden came to him Menelaus, good at the war-cry, for he knew in his heart wherewith his brother was busied. ,Nestor, first of all, and king Idomeneus, and thereafter the twain Aiantes and the son of Tydeus, and as the sixth Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel. And unbidden came to him Menelaus, good at the war-cry, for he knew in his heart wherewith his brother was busied. ,Nestor, first of all, and king Idomeneus, and thereafter the twain Aiantes and the son of Tydeus, and as the sixth Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel. And unbidden came to him Menelaus, good at the war-cry, for he knew in his heart wherewith his brother was busied. ,About the bull they stood and took up the barley grains, and in prayer lord Agamemnon spake among them, saying.Zeus, most glorious, most great, lord of the dark clouds, that dwellest in the heaven, grant that the sun set not, neither darkness come upon us, until I have cast down in headlong ruin the hall of Priam, blackened with smoke, ,About the bull they stood and took up the barley grains, and in prayer lord Agamemnon spake among them, saying.Zeus, most glorious, most great, lord of the dark clouds, that dwellest in the heaven, grant that the sun set not, neither darkness come upon us, until I have cast down in headlong ruin the hall of Priam, blackened with smoke, ,About the bull they stood and took up the barley grains, and in prayer lord Agamemnon spake among them, saying.Zeus, most glorious, most great, lord of the dark clouds, that dwellest in the heaven, grant that the sun set not, neither darkness come upon us, until I have cast down in headlong ruin the hall of Priam, blackened with smoke, ,About the bull they stood and took up the barley grains, and in prayer lord Agamemnon spake among them, saying.Zeus, most glorious, most great, lord of the dark clouds, that dwellest in the heaven, grant that the sun set not, neither darkness come upon us, until I have cast down in headlong ruin the hall of Priam, blackened with smoke, ,About the bull they stood and took up the barley grains, and in prayer lord Agamemnon spake among them, saying.Zeus, most glorious, most great, lord of the dark clouds, that dwellest in the heaven, grant that the sun set not, neither darkness come upon us, until I have cast down in headlong ruin the hall of Priam, blackened with smoke, ,and have burned with consuming fire the portals thereof, and cloven about the breast of Hector his tunic, rent with the bronze; and in throngs may his comrades round about him fall headlong in the dust, and bite the earth. ,and have burned with consuming fire the portals thereof, and cloven about the breast of Hector his tunic, rent with the bronze; and in throngs may his comrades round about him fall headlong in the dust, and bite the earth. ,and have burned with consuming fire the portals thereof, and cloven about the breast of Hector his tunic, rent with the bronze; and in throngs may his comrades round about him fall headlong in the dust, and bite the earth. ,and have burned with consuming fire the portals thereof, and cloven about the breast of Hector his tunic, rent with the bronze; and in throngs may his comrades round about him fall headlong in the dust, and bite the earth. ,and have burned with consuming fire the portals thereof, and cloven about the breast of Hector his tunic, rent with the bronze; and in throngs may his comrades round about him fall headlong in the dust, and bite the earth. So spake he; but not as yet would the son of Cronos grant him fulfillment; ,nay, he accepted the sacrifice, but toil he made to wax unceasingly. Then, when they had prayed and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads and cut their throats, and flayed them; and they cut out the thigh-pieces and covered them with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. ,nay, he accepted the sacrifice, but toil he made to wax unceasingly. Then, when they had prayed and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads and cut their throats, and flayed them; and they cut out the thigh-pieces and covered them with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. ,nay, he accepted the sacrifice, but toil he made to wax unceasingly. Then, when they had prayed and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads and cut their throats, and flayed them; and they cut out the thigh-pieces and covered them with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. ,nay, he accepted the sacrifice, but toil he made to wax unceasingly. Then, when they had prayed and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads and cut their throats, and flayed them; and they cut out the thigh-pieces and covered them with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. ,nay, he accepted the sacrifice, but toil he made to wax unceasingly. Then, when they had prayed and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads and cut their throats, and flayed them; and they cut out the thigh-pieces and covered them with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. ,These they burned on billets of wood stripped of leaves, and the inner parts they pierced with spits, and held them over the flame of Hephaestus. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned and they had tasted of the inner parts, they cut up the rest and spitted it, and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. ,These they burned on billets of wood stripped of leaves, and the inner parts they pierced with spits, and held them over the flame of Hephaestus. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned and they had tasted of the inner parts, they cut up the rest and spitted it, and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. ,These they burned on billets of wood stripped of leaves, and the inner parts they pierced with spits, and held them over the flame of Hephaestus. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned and they had tasted of the inner parts, they cut up the rest and spitted it, and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. ,These they burned on billets of wood stripped of leaves, and the inner parts they pierced with spits, and held them over the flame of Hephaestus. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned and they had tasted of the inner parts, they cut up the rest and spitted it, and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. ,These they burned on billets of wood stripped of leaves, and the inner parts they pierced with spits, and held them over the flame of Hephaestus. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned and they had tasted of the inner parts, they cut up the rest and spitted it, and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. ,Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack aught of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire of food and drink, among them the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia, was first to speak, saying:Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men, ,Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack aught of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire of food and drink, among them the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia, was first to speak, saying:Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men, ,Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack aught of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire of food and drink, among them the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia, was first to speak, saying:Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men, ,Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack aught of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire of food and drink, among them the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia, was first to speak, saying:Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men, ,Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack aught of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire of food and drink, among them the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia, was first to speak, saying:Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men, ,let us now not any more remain gathered here, nor any more put off the work which verily the god vouchsafeth us. Nay, come, let the heralds of the brazen-coated Achaeans make proclamation, and gather together the host throughout the ships, and let us go thus in a body through the broad camp of the Achaeans, ,let us now not any more remain gathered here, nor any more put off the work which verily the god vouchsafeth us. Nay, come, let the heralds of the brazen-coated Achaeans make proclamation, and gather together the host throughout the ships, and let us go thus in a body through the broad camp of the Achaeans, ,let us now not any more remain gathered here, nor any more put off the work which verily the god vouchsafeth us. Nay, come, let the heralds of the brazen-coated Achaeans make proclamation, and gather together the host throughout the ships, and let us go thus in a body through the broad camp of the Achaeans, ,let us now not any more remain gathered here, nor any more put off the work which verily the god vouchsafeth us. Nay, come, let the heralds of the brazen-coated Achaeans make proclamation, and gather together the host throughout the ships, and let us go thus in a body through the broad camp of the Achaeans, ,let us now not any more remain gathered here, nor any more put off the work which verily the god vouchsafeth us. Nay, come, let the heralds of the brazen-coated Achaeans make proclamation, and gather together the host throughout the ships, and let us go thus in a body through the broad camp of the Achaeans, ,that we may with the more speed stir up sharp battle. So spake he, and the king of men, Agamemnon, failed not to hearken. Straightway he bade the clear-voiced heralds summon to battle the long-haired Achaeans. And they made summons, and the host gathered full quickly. ,that we may with the more speed stir up sharp battle. So spake he, and the king of men, Agamemnon, failed not to hearken. Straightway he bade the clear-voiced heralds summon to battle the long-haired Achaeans. And they made summons, and the host gathered full quickly. ,that we may with the more speed stir up sharp battle. So spake he, and the king of men, Agamemnon, failed not to hearken. Straightway he bade the clear-voiced heralds summon to battle the long-haired Achaeans. And they made summons, and the host gathered full quickly. ,that we may with the more speed stir up sharp battle. So spake he, and the king of men, Agamemnon, failed not to hearken. Straightway he bade the clear-voiced heralds summon to battle the long-haired Achaeans. And they made summons, and the host gathered full quickly. ,that we may with the more speed stir up sharp battle. So spake he, and the king of men, Agamemnon, failed not to hearken. Straightway he bade the clear-voiced heralds summon to battle the long-haired Achaeans. And they made summons, and the host gathered full quickly. ,The kings, nurtured of Zeus, that were about Atreus' son, sped swiftly, marshalling the host, and in their midst was the flashing-eyed Athene, bearing the priceless aegis, that knoweth neither age nor death, wherefrom are hung an hundred tassels all of gold, all of them cunningly woven, and each one of the worth of an hundred oxen. ,The kings, nurtured of Zeus, that were about Atreus' son, sped swiftly, marshalling the host, and in their midst was the flashing-eyed Athene, bearing the priceless aegis, that knoweth neither age nor death, wherefrom are hung an hundred tassels all of gold, all of them cunningly woven, and each one of the worth of an hundred oxen. ,The kings, nurtured of Zeus, that were about Atreus' son, sped swiftly, marshalling the host, and in their midst was the flashing-eyed Athene, bearing the priceless aegis, that knoweth neither age nor death, wherefrom are hung an hundred tassels all of gold, all of them cunningly woven, and each one of the worth of an hundred oxen. ,The kings, nurtured of Zeus, that were about Atreus' son, sped swiftly, marshalling the host, and in their midst was the flashing-eyed Athene, bearing the priceless aegis, that knoweth neither age nor death, wherefrom are hung an hundred tassels all of gold, all of them cunningly woven, and each one of the worth of an hundred oxen. ,The kings, nurtured of Zeus, that were about Atreus' son, sped swiftly, marshalling the host, and in their midst was the flashing-eyed Athene, bearing the priceless aegis, that knoweth neither age nor death, wherefrom are hung an hundred tassels all of gold, all of them cunningly woven, and each one of the worth of an hundred oxen. ,Therewith she sped dazzling throughout the host of the Achaeans, urging them to go forth; and in the heart of each man she roused strength to war and to battle without ceasing. And to them forthwith war became sweeter than to return in their hollow ships to their dear native land. ,Therewith she sped dazzling throughout the host of the Achaeans, urging them to go forth; and in the heart of each man she roused strength to war and to battle without ceasing. And to them forthwith war became sweeter than to return in their hollow ships to their dear native land. ,Therewith she sped dazzling throughout the host of the Achaeans, urging them to go forth; and in the heart of each man she roused strength to war and to battle without ceasing. And to them forthwith war became sweeter than to return in their hollow ships to their dear native land. ,Therewith she sped dazzling throughout the host of the Achaeans, urging them to go forth; and in the heart of each man she roused strength to war and to battle without ceasing. And to them forthwith war became sweeter than to return in their hollow ships to their dear native land. ,Therewith she sped dazzling throughout the host of the Achaeans, urging them to go forth; and in the heart of each man she roused strength to war and to battle without ceasing. And to them forthwith war became sweeter than to return in their hollow ships to their dear native land. ,Even as a consuming fire maketh a boundless forest to blaze on the peaks of a mountain, and from afar is the glare thereof to be seen, even so from their innumerable bronze, as they marched forth, went the dazzling gleam up through the sky unto the heavens. ,Even as a consuming fire maketh a boundless forest to blaze on the peaks of a mountain, and from afar is the glare thereof to be seen, even so from their innumerable bronze, as they marched forth, went the dazzling gleam up through the sky unto the heavens. ,Even as a consuming fire maketh a boundless forest to blaze on the peaks of a mountain, and from afar is the glare thereof to be seen, even so from their innumerable bronze, as they marched forth, went the dazzling gleam up through the sky unto the heavens. ,Even as a consuming fire maketh a boundless forest to blaze on the peaks of a mountain, and from afar is the glare thereof to be seen, even so from their innumerable bronze, as they marched forth, went the dazzling gleam up through the sky unto the heavens. ,Even as a consuming fire maketh a boundless forest to blaze on the peaks of a mountain, and from afar is the glare thereof to be seen, even so from their innumerable bronze, as they marched forth, went the dazzling gleam up through the sky unto the heavens. And as the many tribes of winged fowl, ,wild geese or cranes or long-necked swans on the Asian mead by the streams of Caystrius, fly this way and that, glorying in their strength of wing, and with loud cries settle ever onwards, and the mead resoundeth; even so their many tribes poured forth from ships and huts ,wild geese or cranes or long-necked swans on the Asian mead by the streams of Caystrius, fly this way and that, glorying in their strength of wing, and with loud cries settle ever onwards, and the mead resoundeth; even so their many tribes poured forth from ships and huts ,wild geese or cranes or long-necked swans on the Asian mead by the streams of Caystrius, fly this way and that, glorying in their strength of wing, and with loud cries settle ever onwards, and the mead resoundeth; even so their many tribes poured forth from ships and huts ,wild geese or cranes or long-necked swans on the Asian mead by the streams of Caystrius, fly this way and that, glorying in their strength of wing, and with loud cries settle ever onwards, and the mead resoundeth; even so their many tribes poured forth from ships and huts ,wild geese or cranes or long-necked swans on the Asian mead by the streams of Caystrius, fly this way and that, glorying in their strength of wing, and with loud cries settle ever onwards, and the mead resoundeth; even so their many tribes poured forth from ships and huts ,into the plain of Scamander, and the earth echoed wondrously beneath the tread of men and horses. So they took their stand in the flowery mead of Scamander, numberless, as are the leaves and the flowers in their season.Even as the many tribes of swarming flies ,into the plain of Scamander, and the earth echoed wondrously beneath the tread of men and horses. So they took their stand in the flowery mead of Scamander, numberless, as are the leaves and the flowers in their season.Even as the many tribes of swarming flies ,into the plain of Scamander, and the earth echoed wondrously beneath the tread of men and horses. So they took their stand in the flowery mead of Scamander, numberless, as are the leaves and the flowers in their season.Even as the many tribes of swarming flies ,into the plain of Scamander, and the earth echoed wondrously beneath the tread of men and horses. So they took their stand in the flowery mead of Scamander, numberless, as are the leaves and the flowers in their season.Even as the many tribes of swarming flies ,into the plain of Scamander, and the earth echoed wondrously beneath the tread of men and horses. So they took their stand in the flowery mead of Scamander, numberless, as are the leaves and the flowers in their season.Even as the many tribes of swarming flies ,that buzz to and fro throughout the herdsman's farmstead in the season of spring, when the milk drenches the pails, even in such numbers stood the long-haired Achaeans upon the plain in the face of the men of Troy, eager to rend them asunder.And even as goatherds separate easily the wide-scattered flocks of goats, ,that buzz to and fro throughout the herdsman's farmstead in the season of spring, when the milk drenches the pails, even in such numbers stood the long-haired Achaeans upon the plain in the face of the men of Troy, eager to rend them asunder.And even as goatherds separate easily the wide-scattered flocks of goats, ,that buzz to and fro throughout the herdsman's farmstead in the season of spring, when the milk drenches the pails, even in such numbers stood the long-haired Achaeans upon the plain in the face of the men of Troy, eager to rend them asunder.And even as goatherds separate easily the wide-scattered flocks of goats, ,that buzz to and fro throughout the herdsman's farmstead in the season of spring, when the milk drenches the pails, even in such numbers stood the long-haired Achaeans upon the plain in the face of the men of Troy, eager to rend them asunder.And even as goatherds separate easily the wide-scattered flocks of goats, ,that buzz to and fro throughout the herdsman's farmstead in the season of spring, when the milk drenches the pails, even in such numbers stood the long-haired Achaeans upon the plain in the face of the men of Troy, eager to rend them asunder.And even as goatherds separate easily the wide-scattered flocks of goats, ,when they mingle in the pasture, so did their leaders marshal them on this side and on that to enter into the battle, and among them lord Agamemnon, his eyes and head like unto Zeus that hurleth the thunderbolt, his waist like unto Ares, and his breast unto Poseidon. ,when they mingle in the pasture, so did their leaders marshal them on this side and on that to enter into the battle, and among them lord Agamemnon, his eyes and head like unto Zeus that hurleth the thunderbolt, his waist like unto Ares, and his breast unto Poseidon. ,when they mingle in the pasture, so did their leaders marshal them on this side and on that to enter into the battle, and among them lord Agamemnon, his eyes and head like unto Zeus that hurleth the thunderbolt, his waist like unto Ares, and his breast unto Poseidon. ,when they mingle in the pasture, so did their leaders marshal them on this side and on that to enter into the battle, and among them lord Agamemnon, his eyes and head like unto Zeus that hurleth the thunderbolt, his waist like unto Ares, and his breast unto Poseidon. ,when they mingle in the pasture, so did their leaders marshal them on this side and on that to enter into the battle, and among them lord Agamemnon, his eyes and head like unto Zeus that hurleth the thunderbolt, his waist like unto Ares, and his breast unto Poseidon. ,Even as a bull among the herd stands forth far the chiefest over all, for that he is pre-eminent among the gathering kine, even such did Zeus make Agamemnon on that day, pre-eminent among many, and chiefest amid warriors.Tell me now, ye Muses that have dwellings on Olympus— ,Even as a bull among the herd stands forth far the chiefest over all, for that he is pre-eminent among the gathering kine, even such did Zeus make Agamemnon on that day, pre-eminent among many, and chiefest amid warriors.Tell me now, ye Muses that have dwellings on Olympus— ,Even as a bull among the herd stands forth far the chiefest over all, for that he is pre-eminent among the gathering kine, even such did Zeus make Agamemnon on that day, pre-eminent among many, and chiefest amid warriors.Tell me now, ye Muses that have dwellings on Olympus— ,Even as a bull among the herd stands forth far the chiefest over all, for that he is pre-eminent among the gathering kine, even such did Zeus make Agamemnon on that day, pre-eminent among many, and chiefest amid warriors.Tell me now, ye Muses that have dwellings on Olympus— ,Even as a bull among the herd stands forth far the chiefest over all, for that he is pre-eminent among the gathering kine, even such did Zeus make Agamemnon on that day, pre-eminent among many, and chiefest amid warriors.Tell me now, ye Muses that have dwellings on Olympus— ,for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths ,for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths ,for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths ,for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths ,for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths ,and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains, ,and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains, ,and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains, ,and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains, ,and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains, ,and Arcesilaus and Prothoënor and Clonius; these were they that dwelt in Hyria and rocky Aulis and Schoenus and Scolus and Eteonus with its many ridges, Thespeia, Graea, and spacious Mycalessus; and that dwelt about Harma and Eilesium and Erythrae; ,and Arcesilaus and Prothoënor and Clonius; these were they that dwelt in Hyria and rocky Aulis and Schoenus and Scolus and Eteonus with its many ridges, Thespeia, Graea, and spacious Mycalessus; and that dwelt about Harma and Eilesium and Erythrae; ,and Arcesilaus and Prothoënor and Clonius; these were they that dwelt in Hyria and rocky Aulis and Schoenus and Scolus and Eteonus with its many ridges, Thespeia, Graea, and spacious Mycalessus; and that dwelt about Harma and Eilesium and Erythrae; ,and Arcesilaus and Prothoënor and Clonius; these were they that dwelt in Hyria and rocky Aulis and Schoenus and Scolus and Eteonus with its many ridges, Thespeia, Graea, and spacious Mycalessus; and that dwelt about Harma and Eilesium and Erythrae; ,and Arcesilaus and Prothoënor and Clonius; these were they that dwelt in Hyria and rocky Aulis and Schoenus and Scolus and Eteonus with its many ridges, Thespeia, Graea, and spacious Mycalessus; and that dwelt about Harma and Eilesium and Erythrae; ,and that held Eleon and Hyle and Peteon, Ocalea and Medeon, the well-built citadel, Copae, Eutresis, and Thisbe, the haunt of doves; that dwelt in Coroneia and grassy Haliartus, and that held Plataea and dwelt in Glisas; ,and that held Eleon and Hyle and Peteon, Ocalea and Medeon, the well-built citadel, Copae, Eutresis, and Thisbe, the haunt of doves; that dwelt in Coroneia and grassy Haliartus, and that held Plataea and dwelt in Glisas; ,and that held Eleon and Hyle and Peteon, Ocalea and Medeon, the well-built citadel, Copae, Eutresis, and Thisbe, the haunt of doves; that dwelt in Coroneia and grassy Haliartus, and that held Plataea and dwelt in Glisas; ,and that held Eleon and Hyle and Peteon, Ocalea and Medeon, the well-built citadel, Copae, Eutresis, and Thisbe, the haunt of doves; that dwelt in Coroneia and grassy Haliartus, and that held Plataea and dwelt in Glisas; ,and that held Eleon and Hyle and Peteon, Ocalea and Medeon, the well-built citadel, Copae, Eutresis, and Thisbe, the haunt of doves; that dwelt in Coroneia and grassy Haliartus, and that held Plataea and dwelt in Glisas; ,that held lower Thebe, the well-built citadel, and holy Onchestus, the bright grove of Poseidon; and that held Arne, rich in vines, and Mideia and sacred Nisa and Anthedon on the seaboard. of these there came fifty ships, and on board of each ,that held lower Thebe, the well-built citadel, and holy Onchestus, the bright grove of Poseidon; and that held Arne, rich in vines, and Mideia and sacred Nisa and Anthedon on the seaboard. of these there came fifty ships, and on board of each ,that held lower Thebe, the well-built citadel, and holy Onchestus, the bright grove of Poseidon; and that held Arne, rich in vines, and Mideia and sacred Nisa and Anthedon on the seaboard. of these there came fifty ships, and on board of each ,that held lower Thebe, the well-built citadel, and holy Onchestus, the bright grove of Poseidon; and that held Arne, rich in vines, and Mideia and sacred Nisa and Anthedon on the seaboard. of these there came fifty ships, and on board of each ,that held lower Thebe, the well-built citadel, and holy Onchestus, the bright grove of Poseidon; and that held Arne, rich in vines, and Mideia and sacred Nisa and Anthedon on the seaboard. of these there came fifty ships, and on board of each ,/went young men of the Boeotians an hundred and twenty. ,/went young men of the Boeotians an hundred and twenty. ,/went young men of the Boeotians an hundred and twenty. ,/went young men of the Boeotians an hundred and twenty. ,went young men of the Boeotians an hundred and twenty. And they that dwelt in Aspledon and Orchomenus of the Minyae were led by Ascalaphus and Ialmenus, sons of Ares, whom, in the palace of Actor, son of Azeus, Astyoche, the honoured maiden, conceived of mighty Ares, when she had entered into her upper chamber; ,for he lay with her in secret. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships.And of the Phocians Schedius and Epistrophus were captains, sons of great-souled Iphitus, son of Naubolus; these were they that held Cyparissus and rocky Pytho, ,for he lay with her in secret. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships.And of the Phocians Schedius and Epistrophus were captains, sons of great-souled Iphitus, son of Naubolus; these were they that held Cyparissus and rocky Pytho, ,for he lay with her in secret. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships.And of the Phocians Schedius and Epistrophus were captains, sons of great-souled Iphitus, son of Naubolus; these were they that held Cyparissus and rocky Pytho, ,for he lay with her in secret. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships.And of the Phocians Schedius and Epistrophus were captains, sons of great-souled Iphitus, son of Naubolus; these were they that held Cyparissus and rocky Pytho, ,for he lay with her in secret. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships.And of the Phocians Schedius and Epistrophus were captains, sons of great-souled Iphitus, son of Naubolus; these were they that held Cyparissus and rocky Pytho, ,and sacred Crisa and Daulis and Panopeus; and that dwelt about Anemoreia and Hyampolis, and that lived beside the goodly river Cephisus, and that held Lilaea by the springs of Cephisus. With these followed forty black ships. ,and sacred Crisa and Daulis and Panopeus; and that dwelt about Anemoreia and Hyampolis, and that lived beside the goodly river Cephisus, and that held Lilaea by the springs of Cephisus. With these followed forty black ships. ,and sacred Crisa and Daulis and Panopeus; and that dwelt about Anemoreia and Hyampolis, and that lived beside the goodly river Cephisus, and that held Lilaea by the springs of Cephisus. With these followed forty black ships. ,and sacred Crisa and Daulis and Panopeus; and that dwelt about Anemoreia and Hyampolis, and that lived beside the goodly river Cephisus, and that held Lilaea by the springs of Cephisus. With these followed forty black ships. ,and sacred Crisa and Daulis and Panopeus; and that dwelt about Anemoreia and Hyampolis, and that lived beside the goodly river Cephisus, and that held Lilaea by the springs of Cephisus. With these followed forty black ships. ,And their leaders busily marshalled the ranks of the Phocians, and made ready for battle hard by the Boeotians on the left.And the Loerians had as leader the swift son of Oïleus, Aias the less, in no wise as great as Telamonian Aias, but far less. Small of stature was he, with corselet of linen, ,And their leaders busily marshalled the ranks of the Phocians, and made ready for battle hard by the Boeotians on the left.And the Loerians had as leader the swift son of Oïleus, Aias the less, in no wise as great as Telamonian Aias, but far less. Small of stature was he, with corselet of linen, ,And their leaders busily marshalled the ranks of the Phocians, and made ready for battle hard by the Boeotians on the left.And the Loerians had as leader the swift son of Oïleus, Aias the less, in no wise as great as Telamonian Aias, but far less. Small of stature was he, with corselet of linen, ,And their leaders busily marshalled the ranks of the Phocians, and made ready for battle hard by the Boeotians on the left.And the Loerians had as leader the swift son of Oïleus, Aias the less, in no wise as great as Telamonian Aias, but far less. Small of stature was he, with corselet of linen, ,And their leaders busily marshalled the ranks of the Phocians, and made ready for battle hard by the Boeotians on the left.And the Loerians had as leader the swift son of Oïleus, Aias the less, in no wise as great as Telamonian Aias, but far less. Small of stature was he, with corselet of linen, ,/but with the spear he far excelled the whole host of Hellenes and Achaeans. These were they that dwelt in Cynus and Opus and Calliarus and Bessa and Scarphe and lovely Augeiae and Tarphe and Thronium about the streams of Boagrius. With Aias followed forty black ships of ,/but with the spear he far excelled the whole host of Hellenes and Achaeans. These were they that dwelt in Cynus and Opus and Calliarus and Bessa and Scarphe and lovely Augeiae and Tarphe and Thronium about the streams of Boagrius. With Aias followed forty black ships of ,/but with the spear he far excelled the whole host of Hellenes and Achaeans. These were they that dwelt in Cynus and Opus and Calliarus and Bessa and Scarphe and lovely Augeiae and Tarphe and Thronium about the streams of Boagrius. With Aias followed forty black ships of ,/but with the spear he far excelled the whole host of Hellenes and Achaeans. These were they that dwelt in Cynus and Opus and Calliarus and Bessa and Scarphe and lovely Augeiae and Tarphe and Thronium about the streams of Boagrius. With Aias followed forty black ships of ,/but with the spear he far excelled the whole host of Hellenes and Achaeans. These were they that dwelt in Cynus and Opus and Calliarus and Bessa and Scarphe and lovely Augeiae and Tarphe and Thronium about the streams of Boagrius. With Aias followed forty black ships of ,the Locrians that dwell over against sacred Euboea.And the Abantes, breathing fury, that held Euboea and Chalcis and Eretria and Histiaea, rich in vines, and Cerinthus, hard by the sea, and the steep citadel of Dios; and that held Carystus and dwelt in Styra,— ,the Locrians that dwell over against sacred Euboea.And the Abantes, breathing fury, that held Euboea and Chalcis and Eretria and Histiaea, rich in vines, and Cerinthus, hard by the sea, and the steep citadel of Dios; and that held Carystus and dwelt in Styra,— ,the Locrians that dwell over against sacred Euboea.And the Abantes, breathing fury, that held Euboea and Chalcis and Eretria and Histiaea, rich in vines, and Cerinthus, hard by the sea, and the steep citadel of Dios; and that held Carystus and dwelt in Styra,— ,the Locrians that dwell over against sacred Euboea.And the Abantes, breathing fury, that held Euboea and Chalcis and Eretria and Histiaea, rich in vines, and Cerinthus, hard by the sea, and the steep citadel of Dios; and that held Carystus and dwelt in Styra,— ,the Locrians that dwell over against sacred Euboea.And the Abantes, breathing fury, that held Euboea and Chalcis and Eretria and Histiaea, rich in vines, and Cerinthus, hard by the sea, and the steep citadel of Dios; and that held Carystus and dwelt in Styra,— ,all these again had as leader Elephenor, scion of Ares, him that was son of Chalcodon and captain of the great-souled Abantes. And with him followed the swift Abantes, with hair long at the back, spearmen eager with outstretched ashen spears to rend the corselets about the breasts of the foemen. ,all these again had as leader Elephenor, scion of Ares, him that was son of Chalcodon and captain of the great-souled Abantes. And with him followed the swift Abantes, with hair long at the back, spearmen eager with outstretched ashen spears to rend the corselets about the breasts of the foemen. ,all these again had as leader Elephenor, scion of Ares, him that was son of Chalcodon and captain of the great-souled Abantes. And with him followed the swift Abantes, with hair long at the back, spearmen eager with outstretched ashen spears to rend the corselets about the breasts of the foemen. ,all these again had as leader Elephenor, scion of Ares, him that was son of Chalcodon and captain of the great-souled Abantes. And with him followed the swift Abantes, with hair long at the back, spearmen eager with outstretched ashen spears to rend the corselets about the breasts of the foemen. ,all these again had as leader Elephenor, scion of Ares, him that was son of Chalcodon and captain of the great-souled Abantes. And with him followed the swift Abantes, with hair long at the back, spearmen eager with outstretched ashen spears to rend the corselets about the breasts of the foemen. ,/And with him there followed forty black ships. ,/And with him there followed forty black ships. ,/And with him there followed forty black ships. ,/And with him there followed forty black ships. ,And with him there followed forty black ships. And they that held Athens, the well-built citadel, the land of great-hearted Erechtheus, whom of old Athene, daughter of Zeus, fostered, when the earth, the giver of grain, had borne him; and she made him to dwell in Athens, in her own rich sanctuary, ,and there the youths of the Athenians, as the years roll on in their courses, seek to win his favour with sacrifices of bulls and rams;—these again had as leader Menestheus, son of Peteos. Like unto him was none other man upon the face of the earth for the marshalling of chariots and of warriors that bear the shield. ,and there the youths of the Athenians, as the years roll on in their courses, seek to win his favour with sacrifices of bulls and rams;—these again had as leader Menestheus, son of Peteos. Like unto him was none other man upon the face of the earth for the marshalling of chariots and of warriors that bear the shield. ,and there the youths of the Athenians, as the years roll on in their courses, seek to win his favour with sacrifices of bulls and rams;—these again had as leader Menestheus, son of Peteos. Like unto him was none other man upon the face of the earth for the marshalling of chariots and of warriors that bear the shield. ,and there the youths of the Athenians, as the years roll on in their courses, seek to win his favour with sacrifices of bulls and rams;—these again had as leader Menestheus, son of Peteos. Like unto him was none other man upon the face of the earth for the marshalling of chariots and of warriors that bear the shield. ,and there the youths of the Athenians, as the years roll on in their courses, seek to win his favour with sacrifices of bulls and rams;—these again had as leader Menestheus, son of Peteos. Like unto him was none other man upon the face of the earth for the marshalling of chariots and of warriors that bear the shield. ,Only Nestor could vie with him, for he was the elder. And with him there followed fifty black ships.And Aias led from Salamis twelve ships, and stationed them where the battalions of the Athenians stood.And they that held Argos and Tiryns, famed for its walls, ,Only Nestor could vie with him, for he was the elder. And with him there followed fifty black ships.And Aias led from Salamis twelve ships, and stationed them where the battalions of the Athenians stood.And they that held Argos and Tiryns, famed for its walls, ,Only Nestor could vie with him, for he was the elder. And with him there followed fifty black ships.And Aias led from Salamis twelve ships, and stationed them where the battalions of the Athenians stood.And they that held Argos and Tiryns, famed for its walls, ,Only Nestor could vie with him, for he was the elder. And with him there followed fifty black ships.And Aias led from Salamis twelve ships, and stationed them where the battalions of the Athenians stood.And they that held Argos and Tiryns, famed for its walls, ,Only Nestor could vie with him, for he was the elder. And with him there followed fifty black ships.And Aias led from Salamis twelve ships, and stationed them where the battalions of the Athenians stood.And they that held Argos and Tiryns, famed for its walls, ,and Hermione and Asine, that enfold the deep gulf, Troezen and Eïonae and vine-clad Epidaurus, and the youths of the Achaeans that held Aegina and Mases,—these again had as leaders Diomedes, good at the war-cry, and Sthenelus, dear son of glorious Capaneus. ,and Hermione and Asine, that enfold the deep gulf, Troezen and Eïonae and vine-clad Epidaurus, and the youths of the Achaeans that held Aegina and Mases,—these again had as leaders Diomedes, good at the war-cry, and Sthenelus, dear son of glorious Capaneus. ,and Hermione and Asine, that enfold the deep gulf, Troezen and Eïonae and vine-clad Epidaurus, and the youths of the Achaeans that held Aegina and Mases,—these again had as leaders Diomedes, good at the war-cry, and Sthenelus, dear son of glorious Capaneus. ,and Hermione and Asine, that enfold the deep gulf, Troezen and Eïonae and vine-clad Epidaurus, and the youths of the Achaeans that held Aegina and Mases,—these again had as leaders Diomedes, good at the war-cry, and Sthenelus, dear son of glorious Capaneus. ,and Hermione and Asine, that enfold the deep gulf, Troezen and Eïonae and vine-clad Epidaurus, and the youths of the Achaeans that held Aegina and Mases,—these again had as leaders Diomedes, good at the war-cry, and Sthenelus, dear son of glorious Capaneus. ,And with them came a third, Euryalus, a godlike warrior, son of king Mecisteus, son of Talaus; but leader over them all was Diomedes, good at the war-cry. And with these there followed eighty black ships.And they that held Mycenae, the well-built citadel, ,And with them came a third, Euryalus, a godlike warrior, son of king Mecisteus, son of Talaus; but leader over them all was Diomedes, good at the war-cry. And with these there followed eighty black ships.And they that held Mycenae, the well-built citadel, ,And with them came a third, Euryalus, a godlike warrior, son of king Mecisteus, son of Talaus; but leader over them all was Diomedes, good at the war-cry. And with these there followed eighty black ships.And they that held Mycenae, the well-built citadel, ,And with them came a third, Euryalus, a godlike warrior, son of king Mecisteus, son of Talaus; but leader over them all was Diomedes, good at the war-cry. And with these there followed eighty black ships.And they that held Mycenae, the well-built citadel, ,And with them came a third, Euryalus, a godlike warrior, son of king Mecisteus, son of Talaus; but leader over them all was Diomedes, good at the war-cry. And with these there followed eighty black ships.And they that held Mycenae, the well-built citadel, ,and wealthy Corinth, and well-built Cleonae, and dwelt in Orneiae and lovely Araethyrea and Sicyon, wherein at the first Adrastus was king; and they that held Hyperesia and steep Gonoessa and Pellene, ,and wealthy Corinth, and well-built Cleonae, and dwelt in Orneiae and lovely Araethyrea and Sicyon, wherein at the first Adrastus was king; and they that held Hyperesia and steep Gonoessa and Pellene, ,and wealthy Corinth, and well-built Cleonae, and dwelt in Orneiae and lovely Araethyrea and Sicyon, wherein at the first Adrastus was king; and they that held Hyperesia and steep Gonoessa and Pellene, ,and wealthy Corinth, and well-built Cleonae, and dwelt in Orneiae and lovely Araethyrea and Sicyon, wherein at the first Adrastus was king; and they that held Hyperesia and steep Gonoessa and Pellene, ,and wealthy Corinth, and well-built Cleonae, and dwelt in Orneiae and lovely Araethyrea and Sicyon, wherein at the first Adrastus was king; and they that held Hyperesia and steep Gonoessa and Pellene, ,and that dwelt about Aegium and throughout all Aegialus, and about broad Helice,—of these was the son of Atreus, lord Agamemnon, captain, with an hundred ships. With him followed most people by far and goodliest; and among them he himself did on his gleaming bronze, a king all-glorious, and was pre-eminent among all the warriors, ,and that dwelt about Aegium and throughout all Aegialus, and about broad Helice,—of these was the son of Atreus, lord Agamemnon, captain, with an hundred ships. With him followed most people by far and goodliest; and among them he himself did on his gleaming bronze, a king all-glorious, and was pre-eminent among all the warriors, ,and that dwelt about Aegium and throughout all Aegialus, and about broad Helice,—of these was the son of Atreus, lord Agamemnon, captain, with an hundred ships. With him followed most people by far and goodliest; and among them he himself did on his gleaming bronze, a king all-glorious, and was pre-eminent among all the warriors, ,and that dwelt about Aegium and throughout all Aegialus, and about broad Helice,—of these was the son of Atreus, lord Agamemnon, captain, with an hundred ships. With him followed most people by far and goodliest; and among them he himself did on his gleaming bronze, a king all-glorious, and was pre-eminent among all the warriors, ,and that dwelt about Aegium and throughout all Aegialus, and about broad Helice,—of these was the son of Atreus, lord Agamemnon, captain, with an hundred ships. With him followed most people by far and goodliest; and among them he himself did on his gleaming bronze, a king all-glorious, and was pre-eminent among all the warriors, ,for that he was noblest, and led a people far the most in number. ,for that he was noblest, and led a people far the most in number. ,for that he was noblest, and led a people far the most in number. ,for that he was noblest, and led a people far the most in number. ,for that he was noblest, and led a people far the most in number. And they that held the hollow land of Lacedaemon with its many ravines, and Pharis and Sparta and Messe, the haunt of doves, and that dwelt in Bryseiae and lovely Augeiae, and that held Amyclae and Helus, a citadel hard by the sea, ,and that held Laas, and dwelt about Oetylus,—these were led by Agamemnon's brother, even Menelaus, good at the war-cry, with sixty ships; and they were marshalled apart. And himself he moved among them, confident in his zeal, urging his men to battle; and above all others was his heart fain ,and that held Laas, and dwelt about Oetylus,—these were led by Agamemnon's brother, even Menelaus, good at the war-cry, with sixty ships; and they were marshalled apart. And himself he moved among them, confident in his zeal, urging his men to battle; and above all others was his heart fain ,and that held Laas, and dwelt about Oetylus,—these were led by Agamemnon's brother, even Menelaus, good at the war-cry, with sixty ships; and they were marshalled apart. And himself he moved among them, confident in his zeal, urging his men to battle; and above all others was his heart fain ,and that held Laas, and dwelt about Oetylus,—these were led by Agamemnon's brother, even Menelaus, good at the war-cry, with sixty ships; and they were marshalled apart. And himself he moved among them, confident in his zeal, urging his men to battle; and above all others was his heart fain ,and that held Laas, and dwelt about Oetylus,—these were led by Agamemnon's brother, even Menelaus, good at the war-cry, with sixty ships; and they were marshalled apart. And himself he moved among them, confident in his zeal, urging his men to battle; and above all others was his heart fain ,to get him requital for his strivings and groanings for Helen's sake.And they that dwelt in Pylos and lovely Arene and Thryum, the ford of Alpheius, and fair-founded Aepy, and that had their abodes in Cyparisseïs and Amphigeneia and Pteleos and Helus and Dorium, ,to get him requital for his strivings and groanings for Helen's sake.And they that dwelt in Pylos and lovely Arene and Thryum, the ford of Alpheius, and fair-founded Aepy, and that had their abodes in Cyparisseïs and Amphigeneia and Pteleos and Helus and Dorium, ,to get him requital for his strivings and groanings for Helen's sake.And they that dwelt in Pylos and lovely Arene and Thryum, the ford of Alpheius, and fair-founded Aepy, and that had their abodes in Cyparisseïs and Amphigeneia and Pteleos and Helus and Dorium, ,to get him requital for his strivings and groanings for Helen's sake.And they that dwelt in Pylos and lovely Arene and Thryum, the ford of Alpheius, and fair-founded Aepy, and that had their abodes in Cyparisseïs and Amphigeneia and Pteleos and Helus and Dorium, ,to get him requital for his strivings and groanings for Helen's sake.And they that dwelt in Pylos and lovely Arene and Thryum, the ford of Alpheius, and fair-founded Aepy, and that had their abodes in Cyparisseïs and Amphigeneia and Pteleos and Helus and Dorium, ,where the Muses met Thamyris the Thracian and made an end of his singing, even as he was journeying from Oechalia, from the house of Eurytus the Oechalian: for he vaunted with boasting that he would conquer, were the Muses themselves to sing against him, the daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis; but they in their wrath maimed him, ,where the Muses met Thamyris the Thracian and made an end of his singing, even as he was journeying from Oechalia, from the house of Eurytus the Oechalian: for he vaunted with boasting that he would conquer, were the Muses themselves to sing against him, the daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis; but they in their wrath maimed him, ,where the Muses met Thamyris the Thracian and made an end of his singing, even as he was journeying from Oechalia, from the house of Eurytus the Oechalian: for he vaunted with boasting that he would conquer, were the Muses themselves to sing against him, the daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis; but they in their wrath maimed him, ,where the Muses met Thamyris the Thracian and made an end of his singing, even as he was journeying from Oechalia, from the house of Eurytus the Oechalian: for he vaunted with boasting that he would conquer, were the Muses themselves to sing against him, the daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis; but they in their wrath maimed him, ,where the Muses met Thamyris the Thracian and made an end of his singing, even as he was journeying from Oechalia, from the house of Eurytus the Oechalian: for he vaunted with boasting that he would conquer, were the Muses themselves to sing against him, the daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis; but they in their wrath maimed him, ,and took from him his wondrous song, and made him forget his minstrelsy;—all these folk again had as leader the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia. And with him were ranged ninety hollow ships.And they that held Arcadia beneath the steep mountain of Cyllene, beside the tomb of Aepytus, where are warriors that fight in close combat; ,and took from him his wondrous song, and made him forget his minstrelsy;—all these folk again had as leader the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia. And with him were ranged ninety hollow ships.And they that held Arcadia beneath the steep mountain of Cyllene, beside the tomb of Aepytus, where are warriors that fight in close combat; ,and took from him his wondrous song, and made him forget his minstrelsy;—all these folk again had as leader the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia. And with him were ranged ninety hollow ships.And they that held Arcadia beneath the steep mountain of Cyllene, beside the tomb of Aepytus, where are warriors that fight in close combat; ,and took from him his wondrous song, and made him forget his minstrelsy;—all these folk again had as leader the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia. And with him were ranged ninety hollow ships.And they that held Arcadia beneath the steep mountain of Cyllene, beside the tomb of Aepytus, where are warriors that fight in close combat; ,and took from him his wondrous song, and made him forget his minstrelsy;—all these folk again had as leader the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia. And with him were ranged ninety hollow ships.And they that held Arcadia beneath the steep mountain of Cyllene, beside the tomb of Aepytus, where are warriors that fight in close combat; ,and they that dwelt in Pheneos and Orchomenus, rich in flocks, and Rhipe and Stratia and wind-swept Enispe; and that held Tegea and lovely Mantineia; and that held Stymphalus and dwelt in Parrhasia, —all these were led by the son of Ancaeus, Lord Agapenor, ,and they that dwelt in Pheneos and Orchomenus, rich in flocks, and Rhipe and Stratia and wind-swept Enispe; and that held Tegea and lovely Mantineia; and that held Stymphalus and dwelt in Parrhasia, —all these were led by the son of Ancaeus, Lord Agapenor, ,and they that dwelt in Pheneos and Orchomenus, rich in flocks, and Rhipe and Stratia and wind-swept Enispe; and that held Tegea and lovely Mantineia; and that held Stymphalus and dwelt in Parrhasia, —all these were led by the son of Ancaeus, Lord Agapenor, ,and they that dwelt in Pheneos and Orchomenus, rich in flocks, and Rhipe and Stratia and wind-swept Enispe; and that held Tegea and lovely Mantineia; and that held Stymphalus and dwelt in Parrhasia, —all these were led by the son of Ancaeus, Lord Agapenor, ,and they that dwelt in Pheneos and Orchomenus, rich in flocks, and Rhipe and Stratia and wind-swept Enispe; and that held Tegea and lovely Mantineia; and that held Stymphalus and dwelt in Parrhasia, —all these were led by the son of Ancaeus, Lord Agapenor, ,with sixty ships; and on each ship embarked full many Arcadian warriors well-skilled in fight. For of himself had the king of men, Agamemnon, given them benched ships wherewith to cross over the wine-dark sea, even the son of Atreus, for with matters of seafaring had they naught to do. ,with sixty ships; and on each ship embarked full many Arcadian warriors well-skilled in fight. For of himself had the king of men, Agamemnon, given them benched ships wherewith to cross over the wine-dark sea, even the son of Atreus, for with matters of seafaring had they naught to do. ,with sixty ships; and on each ship embarked full many Arcadian warriors well-skilled in fight. For of himself had the king of men, Agamemnon, given them benched ships wherewith to cross over the wine-dark sea, even the son of Atreus, for with matters of seafaring had they naught to do. ,with sixty ships; and on each ship embarked full many Arcadian warriors well-skilled in fight. For of himself had the king of men, Agamemnon, given them benched ships wherewith to cross over the wine-dark sea, even the son of Atreus, for with matters of seafaring had they naught to do. ,with sixty ships; and on each ship embarked full many Arcadian warriors well-skilled in fight. For of himself had the king of men, Agamemnon, given them benched ships wherewith to cross over the wine-dark sea, even the son of Atreus, for with matters of seafaring had they naught to do. ,And they that dwelt in Buprasium and goodly Elis, all that part thereof that Hyrmine and Myrsinus on the seaboard and the rock of Olen and Alesium enclose between them—these again had four leaders, and ten swift ships followed each one, and many Epeians embarked thereon. ,And they that dwelt in Buprasium and goodly Elis, all that part thereof that Hyrmine and Myrsinus on the seaboard and the rock of Olen and Alesium enclose between them—these again had four leaders, and ten swift ships followed each one, and many Epeians embarked thereon. ,And they that dwelt in Buprasium and goodly Elis, all that part thereof that Hyrmine and Myrsinus on the seaboard and the rock of Olen and Alesium enclose between them—these again had four leaders, and ten swift ships followed each one, and many Epeians embarked thereon. ,And they that dwelt in Buprasium and goodly Elis, all that part thereof that Hyrmine and Myrsinus on the seaboard and the rock of Olen and Alesium enclose between them—these again had four leaders, and ten swift ships followed each one, and many Epeians embarked thereon. ,And they that dwelt in Buprasium and goodly Elis, all that part thereof that Hyrmine and Myrsinus on the seaboard and the rock of Olen and Alesium enclose between them—these again had four leaders, and ten swift ships followed each one, and many Epeians embarked thereon. ,of these some were led by Amphimachus and Thalpius, of the blood of Actor, sons, the one of Cteatus and the other of Eurytus; and of some was the son of Amarynceus captain, even mighty Diores; and of the fourth company godlike Polyxeinus was captain, son of king Agasthenes, Augeias' son. ,of these some were led by Amphimachus and Thalpius, of the blood of Actor, sons, the one of Cteatus and the other of Eurytus; and of some was the son of Amarynceus captain, even mighty Diores; and of the fourth company godlike Polyxeinus was captain, son of king Agasthenes, Augeias' son. ,of these some were led by Amphimachus and Thalpius, of the blood of Actor, sons, the one of Cteatus and the other of Eurytus; and of some was the son of Amarynceus captain, even mighty Diores; and of the fourth company godlike Polyxeinus was captain, son of king Agasthenes, Augeias' son. ,of these some were led by Amphimachus and Thalpius, of the blood of Actor, sons, the one of Cteatus and the other of Eurytus; and of some was the son of Amarynceus captain, even mighty Diores; and of the fourth company godlike Polyxeinus was captain, son of king Agasthenes, Augeias' son. ,of these some were led by Amphimachus and Thalpius, of the blood of Actor, sons, the one of Cteatus and the other of Eurytus; and of some was the son of Amarynceus captain, even mighty Diores; and of the fourth company godlike Polyxeinus was captain, son of king Agasthenes, Augeias' son. ,And those from Dulichiuni and the Echinae, the holy isles, that lie across the sea, over against Elis, these again had as leader Meges, the peer of Ares, even the son of Phyleus, whom the horseman Phyleus, dear to Zeus, begat—he that of old had gone to dwell in Dulichium in wrath against his father. ,And those from Dulichiuni and the Echinae, the holy isles, that lie across the sea, over against Elis, these again had as leader Meges, the peer of Ares, even the son of Phyleus, whom the horseman Phyleus, dear to Zeus, begat—he that of old had gone to dwell in Dulichium in wrath against his father. ,And those from Dulichiuni and the Echinae, the holy isles, that lie across the sea, over against Elis, these again had as leader Meges, the peer of Ares, even the son of Phyleus, whom the horseman Phyleus, dear to Zeus, begat—he that of old had gone to dwell in Dulichium in wrath against his father. ,And those from Dulichiuni and the Echinae, the holy isles, that lie across the sea, over against Elis, these again had as leader Meges, the peer of Ares, even the son of Phyleus, whom the horseman Phyleus, dear to Zeus, begat—he that of old had gone to dwell in Dulichium in wrath against his father. ,And those from Dulichiuni and the Echinae, the holy isles, that lie across the sea, over against Elis, these again had as leader Meges, the peer of Ares, even the son of Phyleus, whom the horseman Phyleus, dear to Zeus, begat—he that of old had gone to dwell in Dulichium in wrath against his father. ,And with Meges there followed forty black ships.And Odysseus led the great-souled Cephallenians that held Ithaca and Neritum, covered with waving forests, and that dwelt in Crocyleia and rugged Aegilips; and them that held Zacynthus, and that dwelt about Samos, ,And with Meges there followed forty black ships.And Odysseus led the great-souled Cephallenians that held Ithaca and Neritum, covered with waving forests, and that dwelt in Crocyleia and rugged Aegilips; and them that held Zacynthus, and that dwelt about Samos, ,And with Meges there followed forty black ships.And Odysseus led the great-souled Cephallenians that held Ithaca and Neritum, covered with waving forests, and that dwelt in Crocyleia and rugged Aegilips; and them that held Zacynthus, and that dwelt about Samos, ,And with Meges there followed forty black ships.And Odysseus led the great-souled Cephallenians that held Ithaca and Neritum, covered with waving forests, and that dwelt in Crocyleia and rugged Aegilips; and them that held Zacynthus, and that dwelt about Samos, ,And with Meges there followed forty black ships.And Odysseus led the great-souled Cephallenians that held Ithaca and Neritum, covered with waving forests, and that dwelt in Crocyleia and rugged Aegilips; and them that held Zacynthus, and that dwelt about Samos, ,and held the mainland and dwelt on the shores over against the isles. of these was Odysseus captain, the peer of Zeus in counsel. And with him there followed twelve ships with vermilion prows.And the Aetolians were led by Thoas, Andraemon's son, even they that dwelt in Pleuron and Olenus and Pylene and Chalcis, hard by the sea, and rocky Calydon. For the sons of great-hearted Oeneus were no more, neither did he himself still live, and fair-haired Meleager was dead, to whom had commands been given that he should bear full sway among the Aetolians. And with Thoas there followed forty black ships. ,and held the mainland and dwelt on the shores over against the isles. of these was Odysseus captain, the peer of Zeus in counsel. And with him there followed twelve ships with vermilion prows.And the Aetolians were led by Thoas, Andraemon's son, even they that dwelt in Pleuron and Olenus and Pylene and Chalcis, hard by the sea, and rocky Calydon. For the sons of great-hearted Oeneus were no more, neither did he himself still live, and fair-haired Meleager was dead, to whom had commands been given that he should bear full sway among the Aetolians. And with Thoas there followed forty black ships. ,and held the mainland and dwelt on the shores over against the isles. of these was Odysseus captain, the peer of Zeus in counsel. And with him there followed twelve ships with vermilion prows.And the Aetolians were led by Thoas, Andraemon's son, even they that dwelt in Pleuron and Olenus and Pylene and Chalcis, hard by the sea, and rocky Calydon. For the sons of great-hearted Oeneus were no more, neither did he himself still live, and fair-haired Meleager was dead, to whom had commands been given that he should bear full sway among the Aetolians. And with Thoas there followed forty black ships. ,and held the mainland and dwelt on the shores over against the isles. of these was Odysseus captain, the peer of Zeus in counsel. And with him there followed twelve ships with vermilion prows.And the Aetolians were led by Thoas, Andraemon's son, even they that dwelt in Pleuron and Olenus and Pylene and Chalcis, hard by the sea, and rocky Calydon. For the sons of great-hearted Oeneus were no more, neither did he himself still live, and fair-haired Meleager was dead, to whom had commands been given that he should bear full sway among the Aetolians. And with Thoas there followed forty black ships. ,and held the mainland and dwelt on the shores over against the isles. of these was Odysseus captain, the peer of Zeus in counsel. And with him there followed twelve ships with vermilion prows.And the Aetolians were led by Thoas, Andraemon's son, even they that dwelt in Pleuron and Olenus and Pylene and Chalcis, hard by the sea, and rocky Calydon. For the sons of great-hearted Oeneus were no more, neither did he himself still live, and fair-haired Meleager was dead, to whom had commands been given that he should bear full sway among the Aetolians. And with Thoas there followed forty black ships. ,And the Cretans had as leader Idomeneus, famed for his spear, even they that held Cnosus and Gortys, famed for its walls, Lyctus and Miletus and Lycastus, white with chalk, and Phaestus and Rhytium, well-peopled cities; and all they beside that dwelt in Crete of the hundred cities. ,And the Cretans had as leader Idomeneus, famed for his spear, even they that held Cnosus and Gortys, famed for its walls, Lyctus and Miletus and Lycastus, white with chalk, and Phaestus and Rhytium, well-peopled cities; and all they beside that dwelt in Crete of the hundred cities. ,And the Cretans had as leader Idomeneus, famed for his spear, even they that held Cnosus and Gortys, famed for its walls, Lyctus and Miletus and Lycastus, white with chalk, and Phaestus and Rhytium, well-peopled cities; and all they beside that dwelt in Crete of the hundred cities. ,And the Cretans had as leader Idomeneus, famed for his spear, even they that held Cnosus and Gortys, famed for its walls, Lyctus and Miletus and Lycastus, white with chalk, and Phaestus and Rhytium, well-peopled cities; and all they beside that dwelt in Crete of the hundred cities. ,And the Cretans had as leader Idomeneus, famed for his spear, even they that held Cnosus and Gortys, famed for its walls, Lyctus and Miletus and Lycastus, white with chalk, and Phaestus and Rhytium, well-peopled cities; and all they beside that dwelt in Crete of the hundred cities. ,of all these was Idomeneus, famed for his spear, captain, and Meriones, the peer of Enyalius, slayer of men. And with these there followed eighty black ships. ,of all these was Idomeneus, famed for his spear, captain, and Meriones, the peer of Enyalius, slayer of men. And with these there followed eighty black ships. ,of all these was Idomeneus, famed for his spear, captain, and Meriones, the peer of Enyalius, slayer of men. And with these there followed eighty black ships. ,of all these was Idomeneus, famed for his spear, captain, and Meriones, the peer of Enyalius, slayer of men. And with these there followed eighty black ships. ,of all these was Idomeneus, famed for his spear, captain, and Meriones, the peer of Enyalius, slayer of men. And with these there followed eighty black ships. And Tlepolemus, son of Heracles, a valiant man and tall, led from Rhodes nine ships of the lordly Rhodians, ,that dwelt in Rhodes sundered in three divisions—in Lindos and Ialysus and Cameirus, white with chalk. These were led by Tlepolemus, famed for his spear, he that was born to mighty Heracles by Astyocheia, whom he had led forth out of Ephyre from the river Selleïs, ,that dwelt in Rhodes sundered in three divisions—in Lindos and Ialysus and Cameirus, white with chalk. These were led by Tlepolemus, famed for his spear, he that was born to mighty Heracles by Astyocheia, whom he had led forth out of Ephyre from the river Selleïs, ,that dwelt in Rhodes sundered in three divisions—in Lindos and Ialysus and Cameirus, white with chalk. These were led by Tlepolemus, famed for his spear, he that was born to mighty Heracles by Astyocheia, whom he had led forth out of Ephyre from the river Selleïs, ,that dwelt in Rhodes sundered in three divisions—in Lindos and Ialysus and Cameirus, white with chalk. These were led by Tlepolemus, famed for his spear, he that was born to mighty Heracles by Astyocheia, whom he had led forth out of Ephyre from the river Selleïs, ,that dwelt in Rhodes sundered in three divisions—in Lindos and Ialysus and Cameirus, white with chalk. These were led by Tlepolemus, famed for his spear, he that was born to mighty Heracles by Astyocheia, whom he had led forth out of Ephyre from the river Selleïs, ,when he had laid waste many cities of warriors fostered of Zeus. But when Tlepolemus had grown to manhood in the well-fenced palace, forthwith he slew his own father's dear uncle, Licymnius, scion of Ares, who was then waxing old. So he straightway built him ships, and when he had gathered together much people, ,when he had laid waste many cities of warriors fostered of Zeus. But when Tlepolemus had grown to manhood in the well-fenced palace, forthwith he slew his own father's dear uncle, Licymnius, scion of Ares, who was then waxing old. So he straightway built him ships, and when he had gathered together much people, ,when he had laid waste many cities of warriors fostered of Zeus. But when Tlepolemus had grown to manhood in the well-fenced palace, forthwith he slew his own father's dear uncle, Licymnius, scion of Ares, who was then waxing old. So he straightway built him ships, and when he had gathered together much people, ,when he had laid waste many cities of warriors fostered of Zeus. But when Tlepolemus had grown to manhood in the well-fenced palace, forthwith he slew his own father's dear uncle, Licymnius, scion of Ares, who was then waxing old. So he straightway built him ships, and when he had gathered together much people, ,when he had laid waste many cities of warriors fostered of Zeus. But when Tlepolemus had grown to manhood in the well-fenced palace, forthwith he slew his own father's dear uncle, Licymnius, scion of Ares, who was then waxing old. So he straightway built him ships, and when he had gathered together much people, ,went forth in flight over the sea, for that the other sons and grandsons of mighty Heracles threatened him. But he came to Rhodes in his wanderings, suffering woes, and there his people settled in three divisions by tribes, and were loved of Zeus that is king among gods and men; ,went forth in flight over the sea, for that the other sons and grandsons of mighty Heracles threatened him. But he came to Rhodes in his wanderings, suffering woes, and there his people settled in three divisions by tribes, and were loved of Zeus that is king among gods and men; ,went forth in flight over the sea, for that the other sons and grandsons of mighty Heracles threatened him. But he came to Rhodes in his wanderings, suffering woes, and there his people settled in three divisions by tribes, and were loved of Zeus that is king among gods and men; ,went forth in flight over the sea, for that the other sons and grandsons of mighty Heracles threatened him. But he came to Rhodes in his wanderings, suffering woes, and there his people settled in three divisions by tribes, and were loved of Zeus that is king among gods and men; ,went forth in flight over the sea, for that the other sons and grandsons of mighty Heracles threatened him. But he came to Rhodes in his wanderings, suffering woes, and there his people settled in three divisions by tribes, and were loved of Zeus that is king among gods and men; ,and upon them was wondrous wealth poured by the son of Cronos.Moreover Nireus led three shapely ships from Syme, Nireus that was son of Aglaïa and Charops the king, Nireus the comeliest man that came beneath Ilios of all the Danaans after the fearless son of Peleus. ,and upon them was wondrous wealth poured by the son of Cronos.Moreover Nireus led three shapely ships from Syme, Nireus that was son of Aglaïa and Charops the king, Nireus the comeliest man that came beneath Ilios of all the Danaans after the fearless son of Peleus. ,and upon them was wondrous wealth poured by the son of Cronos.Moreover Nireus led three shapely ships from Syme, Nireus that was son of Aglaïa and Charops the king, Nireus the comeliest man that came beneath Ilios of all the Danaans after the fearless son of Peleus. ,and upon them was wondrous wealth poured by the son of Cronos.Moreover Nireus led three shapely ships from Syme, Nireus that was son of Aglaïa and Charops the king, Nireus the comeliest man that came beneath Ilios of all the Danaans after the fearless son of Peleus. ,and upon them was wondrous wealth poured by the son of Cronos.Moreover Nireus led three shapely ships from Syme, Nireus that was son of Aglaïa and Charops the king, Nireus the comeliest man that came beneath Ilios of all the Danaans after the fearless son of Peleus. ,Howbeit he was a weakling, and but few people followed with him.And they that held Nisyrus and Crapathus and Casus and Cos, the city of Eurypylus, and the Calydnian isles, these again were led by Pheidippus and Antiphus, the two sons of king Thessalus, son of Heracles. ,Howbeit he was a weakling, and but few people followed with him.And they that held Nisyrus and Crapathus and Casus and Cos, the city of Eurypylus, and the Calydnian isles, these again were led by Pheidippus and Antiphus, the two sons of king Thessalus, son of Heracles. ,Howbeit he was a weakling, and but few people followed with him.And they that held Nisyrus and Crapathus and Casus and Cos, the city of Eurypylus, and the Calydnian isles, these again were led by Pheidippus and Antiphus, the two sons of king Thessalus, son of Heracles. ,Howbeit he was a weakling, and but few people followed with him.And they that held Nisyrus and Crapathus and Casus and Cos, the city of Eurypylus, and the Calydnian isles, these again were led by Pheidippus and Antiphus, the two sons of king Thessalus, son of Heracles. ,Howbeit he was a weakling, and but few people followed with him.And they that held Nisyrus and Crapathus and Casus and Cos, the city of Eurypylus, and the Calydnian isles, these again were led by Pheidippus and Antiphus, the two sons of king Thessalus, son of Heracles. ,And with them were ranged thirty hollow ships.Now all those again that inhabited Pelasgian Argos, and dwelt in Alos and Alope and Trachis, and that held Phthia and Hellas, the land of fair women, and were called Myrmidons and Hellenes and Achaeans— ,And with them were ranged thirty hollow ships.Now all those again that inhabited Pelasgian Argos, and dwelt in Alos and Alope and Trachis, and that held Phthia and Hellas, the land of fair women, and were called Myrmidons and Hellenes and Achaeans— ,And with them were ranged thirty hollow ships.Now all those again that inhabited Pelasgian Argos, and dwelt in Alos and Alope and Trachis, and that held Phthia and Hellas, the land of fair women, and were called Myrmidons and Hellenes and Achaeans— ,And with them were ranged thirty hollow ships.Now all those again that inhabited Pelasgian Argos, and dwelt in Alos and Alope and Trachis, and that held Phthia and Hellas, the land of fair women, and were called Myrmidons and Hellenes and Achaeans— ,And with them were ranged thirty hollow ships.Now all those again that inhabited Pelasgian Argos, and dwelt in Alos and Alope and Trachis, and that held Phthia and Hellas, the land of fair women, and were called Myrmidons and Hellenes and Achaeans— ,of the fifty ships of these men was Achilles captain. Howbeit they bethought them not of dolorous war, since there was no man to lead them forth into the ranks. For he lay in idleness among the ships, the swift-footed, goodly Achilles, in wrath because of the fair-haired girl Briseïs, ,of the fifty ships of these men was Achilles captain. Howbeit they bethought them not of dolorous war, since there was no man to lead them forth into the ranks. For he lay in idleness among the ships, the swift-footed, goodly Achilles, in wrath because of the fair-haired girl Briseïs, ,of the fifty ships of these men was Achilles captain. Howbeit they bethought them not of dolorous war, since there was no man to lead them forth into the ranks. For he lay in idleness among the ships, the swift-footed, goodly Achilles, in wrath because of the fair-haired girl Briseïs, ,of the fifty ships of these men was Achilles captain. Howbeit they bethought them not of dolorous war, since there was no man to lead them forth into the ranks. For he lay in idleness among the ships, the swift-footed, goodly Achilles, in wrath because of the fair-haired girl Briseïs, ,of the fifty ships of these men was Achilles captain. Howbeit they bethought them not of dolorous war, since there was no man to lead them forth into the ranks. For he lay in idleness among the ships, the swift-footed, goodly Achilles, in wrath because of the fair-haired girl Briseïs, ,whom he had taken out of Lyrnessus after sore toil, when he wasted Lyrnessus and the walls of Thebe, and laid low Mynes and Epistrophus, warriors that raged with the spear, sons of king Evenus, Selepus' son. In sore grief for her lay Achilles idle; but soon was he to arise again. ,whom he had taken out of Lyrnessus after sore toil, when he wasted Lyrnessus and the walls of Thebe, and laid low Mynes and Epistrophus, warriors that raged with the spear, sons of king Evenus, Selepus' son. In sore grief for her lay Achilles idle; but soon was he to arise again. ,whom he had taken out of Lyrnessus after sore toil, when he wasted Lyrnessus and the walls of Thebe, and laid low Mynes and Epistrophus, warriors that raged with the spear, sons of king Evenus, Selepus' son. In sore grief for her lay Achilles idle; but soon was he to arise again. ,whom he had taken out of Lyrnessus after sore toil, when he wasted Lyrnessus and the walls of Thebe, and laid low Mynes and Epistrophus, warriors that raged with the spear, sons of king Evenus, Selepus' son. In sore grief for her lay Achilles idle; but soon was he to arise again. ,whom he had taken out of Lyrnessus after sore toil, when he wasted Lyrnessus and the walls of Thebe, and laid low Mynes and Epistrophus, warriors that raged with the spear, sons of king Evenus, Selepus' son. In sore grief for her lay Achilles idle; but soon was he to arise again. ,And they that held Phylace and flowery Pyrasus, the sanctuary of Demeter, and Iton, mother of flocks, and Antron, hard by the sea, and Pteleos, couched in grass, these again had as leader warlike Protesilaus, while yet he lived; howbeit ere now the black earth held him fast. ,And they that held Phylace and flowery Pyrasus, the sanctuary of Demeter, and Iton, mother of flocks, and Antron, hard by the sea, and Pteleos, couched in grass, these again had as leader warlike Protesilaus, while yet he lived; howbeit ere now the black earth held him fast. ,And they that held Phylace and flowery Pyrasus, the sanctuary of Demeter, and Iton, mother of flocks, and Antron, hard by the sea, and Pteleos, couched in grass, these again had as leader warlike Protesilaus, while yet he lived; howbeit ere now the black earth held him fast. ,And they that held Phylace and flowery Pyrasus, the sanctuary of Demeter, and Iton, mother of flocks, and Antron, hard by the sea, and Pteleos, couched in grass, these again had as leader warlike Protesilaus, while yet he lived; howbeit ere now the black earth held him fast. ,And they that held Phylace and flowery Pyrasus, the sanctuary of Demeter, and Iton, mother of flocks, and Antron, hard by the sea, and Pteleos, couched in grass, these again had as leader warlike Protesilaus, while yet he lived; howbeit ere now the black earth held him fast. ,His wife, her two cheeks torn in wailing, was left in Phylace and his house but half established, while, for himself, a Dardanian warrior slew him as he leapt forth from his ship by far the first of the Achaeans. Yet neither were his men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; for Podarces, scion of Ares, marshalled them, ,His wife, her two cheeks torn in wailing, was left in Phylace and his house but half established, while, for himself, a Dardanian warrior slew him as he leapt forth from his ship by far the first of the Achaeans. Yet neither were his men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; for Podarces, scion of Ares, marshalled them, ,His wife, her two cheeks torn in wailing, was left in Phylace and his house but half established, while, for himself, a Dardanian warrior slew him as he leapt forth from his ship by far the first of the Achaeans. Yet neither were his men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; for Podarces, scion of Ares, marshalled them, ,His wife, her two cheeks torn in wailing, was left in Phylace and his house but half established, while, for himself, a Dardanian warrior slew him as he leapt forth from his ship by far the first of the Achaeans. Yet neither were his men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; for Podarces, scion of Ares, marshalled them, ,His wife, her two cheeks torn in wailing, was left in Phylace and his house but half established, while, for himself, a Dardanian warrior slew him as he leapt forth from his ship by far the first of the Achaeans. Yet neither were his men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; for Podarces, scion of Ares, marshalled them, ,he that was son of Phylacus' son, Iphiclus, rich in flocks, own brother to great-souled Protesilaus, and younger-born; but the other was the elder and the better man, even the warrior, valiant Protesilaus. So the host in no wise lacked a leader, though they longed for the noble man they had lost. ,he that was son of Phylacus' son, Iphiclus, rich in flocks, own brother to great-souled Protesilaus, and younger-born; but the other was the elder and the better man, even the warrior, valiant Protesilaus. So the host in no wise lacked a leader, though they longed for the noble man they had lost. ,he that was son of Phylacus' son, Iphiclus, rich in flocks, own brother to great-souled Protesilaus, and younger-born; but the other was the elder and the better man, even the warrior, valiant Protesilaus. So the host in no wise lacked a leader, though they longed for the noble man they had lost. ,he that was son of Phylacus' son, Iphiclus, rich in flocks, own brother to great-souled Protesilaus, and younger-born; but the other was the elder and the better man, even the warrior, valiant Protesilaus. So the host in no wise lacked a leader, though they longed for the noble man they had lost. ,he that was son of Phylacus' son, Iphiclus, rich in flocks, own brother to great-souled Protesilaus, and younger-born; but the other was the elder and the better man, even the warrior, valiant Protesilaus. So the host in no wise lacked a leader, though they longed for the noble man they had lost. ,And with him there followed forty black ships.And they that dwelt in Pherae beside the lake Boebeïs, and in Boebe, and Glaphyrae, and well-built Iolcus, these were led by the dear son of Admetus with eleven ships, even by Eumelus, whom Alcestis, queenly among women, bare to Admetus, ,And with him there followed forty black ships.And they that dwelt in Pherae beside the lake Boebeïs, and in Boebe, and Glaphyrae, and well-built Iolcus, these were led by the dear son of Admetus with eleven ships, even by Eumelus, whom Alcestis, queenly among women, bare to Admetus, ,And with him there followed forty black ships.And they that dwelt in Pherae beside the lake Boebeïs, and in Boebe, and Glaphyrae, and well-built Iolcus, these were led by the dear son of Admetus with eleven ships, even by Eumelus, whom Alcestis, queenly among women, bare to Admetus, ,And with him there followed forty black ships.And they that dwelt in Pherae beside the lake Boebeïs, and in Boebe, and Glaphyrae, and well-built Iolcus, these were led by the dear son of Admetus with eleven ships, even by Eumelus, whom Alcestis, queenly among women, bare to Admetus, ,And with him there followed forty black ships.And they that dwelt in Pherae beside the lake Boebeïs, and in Boebe, and Glaphyrae, and well-built Iolcus, these were led by the dear son of Admetus with eleven ships, even by Eumelus, whom Alcestis, queenly among women, bare to Admetus, ,even she, the comeliest of the daughters of Pelias.And they that dwelt in Methone and Thaumacia, and that held Meliboea and rugged Olizon, these with their seven ships were led by Philoctetes, well-skilled in archery, ,even she, the comeliest of the daughters of Pelias.And they that dwelt in Methone and Thaumacia, and that held Meliboea and rugged Olizon, these with their seven ships were led by Philoctetes, well-skilled in archery, ,even she, the comeliest of the daughters of Pelias.And they that dwelt in Methone and Thaumacia, and that held Meliboea and rugged Olizon, these with their seven ships were led by Philoctetes, well-skilled in archery, ,even she, the comeliest of the daughters of Pelias.And they that dwelt in Methone and Thaumacia, and that held Meliboea and rugged Olizon, these with their seven ships were led by Philoctetes, well-skilled in archery, ,even she, the comeliest of the daughters of Pelias.And they that dwelt in Methone and Thaumacia, and that held Meliboea and rugged Olizon, these with their seven ships were led by Philoctetes, well-skilled in archery, ,and on each ship embarked fifty oarsmen well skilled to fight amain with the bow. But Philoctetes lay suffering grievous pains in an island, even in sacred Lemnos, where the sons of the Achaeans had left him in anguish with an evil wound from a deadly water-snake. There he lay suffering; ,and on each ship embarked fifty oarsmen well skilled to fight amain with the bow. But Philoctetes lay suffering grievous pains in an island, even in sacred Lemnos, where the sons of the Achaeans had left him in anguish with an evil wound from a deadly water-snake. There he lay suffering; ,and on each ship embarked fifty oarsmen well skilled to fight amain with the bow. But Philoctetes lay suffering grievous pains in an island, even in sacred Lemnos, where the sons of the Achaeans had left him in anguish with an evil wound from a deadly water-snake. There he lay suffering; ,and on each ship embarked fifty oarsmen well skilled to fight amain with the bow. But Philoctetes lay suffering grievous pains in an island, even in sacred Lemnos, where the sons of the Achaeans had left him in anguish with an evil wound from a deadly water-snake. There he lay suffering; ,and on each ship embarked fifty oarsmen well skilled to fight amain with the bow. But Philoctetes lay suffering grievous pains in an island, even in sacred Lemnos, where the sons of the Achaeans had left him in anguish with an evil wound from a deadly water-snake. There he lay suffering; ,yet full soon were the Argives beside their ships to bethink them of king Philoctetes. Howbeit neither were these men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; but Medon marshalled them, the bastard son of Oïleus, whom Rhene bare to Oïleus, sacker of cities.And they that held Tricca and Ithome of the crags, ,yet full soon were the Argives beside their ships to bethink them of king Philoctetes. Howbeit neither were these men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; but Medon marshalled them, the bastard son of Oïleus, whom Rhene bare to Oïleus, sacker of cities.And they that held Tricca and Ithome of the crags, ,yet full soon were the Argives beside their ships to bethink them of king Philoctetes. Howbeit neither were these men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; but Medon marshalled them, the bastard son of Oïleus, whom Rhene bare to Oïleus, sacker of cities.And they that held Tricca and Ithome of the crags, ,yet full soon were the Argives beside their ships to bethink them of king Philoctetes. Howbeit neither were these men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; but Medon marshalled them, the bastard son of Oïleus, whom Rhene bare to Oïleus, sacker of cities.And they that held Tricca and Ithome of the crags, ,yet full soon were the Argives beside their ships to bethink them of king Philoctetes. Howbeit neither were these men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; but Medon marshalled them, the bastard son of Oïleus, whom Rhene bare to Oïleus, sacker of cities.And they that held Tricca and Ithome of the crags, ,and Oechalia, city of Oechalian Eurytus, these again were led by the two sons of Asclepius, the skilled leeches Podaleirius and Machaon. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships. ,and Oechalia, city of Oechalian Eurytus, these again were led by the two sons of Asclepius, the skilled leeches Podaleirius and Machaon. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships. ,and Oechalia, city of Oechalian Eurytus, these again were led by the two sons of Asclepius, the skilled leeches Podaleirius and Machaon. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships. ,and Oechalia, city of Oechalian Eurytus, these again were led by the two sons of Asclepius, the skilled leeches Podaleirius and Machaon. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships. ,and Oechalia, city of Oechalian Eurytus, these again were led by the two sons of Asclepius, the skilled leeches Podaleirius and Machaon. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships. And they that held Ormenius and the fountain Hypereia, ,and that held Asterium and the white crests of Titanus, these were led by Eurypylus, the glorious son of Euaemon. And with him there followed forty black ships.And they that held Argissa, and dwelt in Gyrtone, Orthe, and Elone, and the white city of Oloösson, ,and that held Asterium and the white crests of Titanus, these were led by Eurypylus, the glorious son of Euaemon. And with him there followed forty black ships.And they that held Argissa, and dwelt in Gyrtone, Orthe, and Elone, and the white city of Oloösson, ,and that held Asterium and the white crests of Titanus, these were led by Eurypylus, the glorious son of Euaemon. And with him there followed forty black ships.And they that held Argissa, and dwelt in Gyrtone, Orthe, and Elone, and the white city of Oloösson, ,and that held Asterium and the white crests of Titanus, these were led by Eurypylus, the glorious son of Euaemon. And with him there followed forty black ships.And they that held Argissa, and dwelt in Gyrtone, Orthe, and Elone, and the white city of Oloösson, ,and that held Asterium and the white crests of Titanus, these were led by Eurypylus, the glorious son of Euaemon. And with him there followed forty black ships.And they that held Argissa, and dwelt in Gyrtone, Orthe, and Elone, and the white city of Oloösson, ,these again had as leader Polypoetes, staunch in fight, son of Peirithous, whom immortal Zeus begat— even him whom glorious Hippodameia conceived to Peirithous on the day when he got him vengeance on the shaggy centaurs, and thrust them forth from Pelium, and drave them to the Aethices. ,these again had as leader Polypoetes, staunch in fight, son of Peirithous, whom immortal Zeus begat— even him whom glorious Hippodameia conceived to Peirithous on the day when he got him vengeance on the shaggy centaurs, and thrust them forth from Pelium, and drave them to the Aethices. ,these again had as leader Polypoetes, staunch in fight, son of Peirithous, whom immortal Zeus begat— even him whom glorious Hippodameia conceived to Peirithous on the day when he got him vengeance on the shaggy centaurs, and thrust them forth from Pelium, and drave them to the Aethices. ,these again had as leader Polypoetes, staunch in fight, son of Peirithous, whom immortal Zeus begat— even him whom glorious Hippodameia conceived to Peirithous on the day when he got him vengeance on the shaggy centaurs, and thrust them forth from Pelium, and drave them to the Aethices. ,these again had as leader Polypoetes, staunch in fight, son of Peirithous, whom immortal Zeus begat— even him whom glorious Hippodameia conceived to Peirithous on the day when he got him vengeance on the shaggy centaurs, and thrust them forth from Pelium, and drave them to the Aethices. ,Not alone was he, but with him was Leonteus, scion of Ares, the son of Caenus' son, Coronus, high of heart. And with them there followed forty black ships.And Gouneus led from Cyphus two and twenty ships, and with him followed the Enienes and the Peraebi, staunch in fight, ,Not alone was he, but with him was Leonteus, scion of Ares, the son of Caenus' son, Coronus, high of heart. And with them there followed forty black ships.And Gouneus led from Cyphus two and twenty ships, and with him followed the Enienes and the Peraebi, staunch in fight, ,Not alone was he, but with him was Leonteus, scion of Ares, the son of Caenus' son, Coronus, high of heart. And with them there followed forty black ships.And Gouneus led from Cyphus two and twenty ships, and with him followed the Enienes and the Peraebi, staunch in fight, ,Not alone was he, but with him was Leonteus, scion of Ares, the son of Caenus' son, Coronus, high of heart. And with them there followed forty black ships.And Gouneus led from Cyphus two and twenty ships, and with him followed the Enienes and the Peraebi, staunch in fight, ,Not alone was he, but with him was Leonteus, scion of Ares, the son of Caenus' son, Coronus, high of heart. And with them there followed forty black ships.And Gouneus led from Cyphus two and twenty ships, and with him followed the Enienes and the Peraebi, staunch in fight, ,that had set their dwellings about wintry Dodona, and dwelt in the ploughland about lovely Titaressus, that poureth his fair-flowing streams into Peneius; yet doth he not mingle with the silver eddies of Peneius, but floweth on over his waters like unto olive oil; ,that had set their dwellings about wintry Dodona, and dwelt in the ploughland about lovely Titaressus, that poureth his fair-flowing streams into Peneius; yet doth he not mingle with the silver eddies of Peneius, but floweth on over his waters like unto olive oil; ,that had set their dwellings about wintry Dodona, and dwelt in the ploughland about lovely Titaressus, that poureth his fair-flowing streams into Peneius; yet doth he not mingle with the silver eddies of Peneius, but floweth on over his waters like unto olive oil; ,that had set their dwellings about wintry Dodona, and dwelt in the ploughland about lovely Titaressus, that poureth his fair-flowing streams into Peneius; yet doth he not mingle with the silver eddies of Peneius, but floweth on over his waters like unto olive oil; ,that had set their dwellings about wintry Dodona, and dwelt in the ploughland about lovely Titaressus, that poureth his fair-flowing streams into Peneius; yet doth he not mingle with the silver eddies of Peneius, but floweth on over his waters like unto olive oil; ,for that he is a branch of the water of Styx, the dread river of oath.And the Magnetes had as captain Prothous, son of Tenthredon. These were they that dwelt about Peneius and Pelion, covered with waving forests. of these was swift Prothous captain; and with him there followed forty black ships. ,for that he is a branch of the water of Styx, the dread river of oath.And the Magnetes had as captain Prothous, son of Tenthredon. These were they that dwelt about Peneius and Pelion, covered with waving forests. of these was swift Prothous captain; and with him there followed forty black ships. ,for that he is a branch of the water of Styx, the dread river of oath.And the Magnetes had as captain Prothous, son of Tenthredon. These were they that dwelt about Peneius and Pelion, covered with waving forests. of these was swift Prothous captain; and with him there followed forty black ships. ,for that he is a branch of the water of Styx, the dread river of oath.And the Magnetes had as captain Prothous, son of Tenthredon. These were they that dwelt about Peneius and Pelion, covered with waving forests. of these was swift Prothous captain; and with him there followed forty black ships. ,for that he is a branch of the water of Styx, the dread river of oath.And the Magnetes had as captain Prothous, son of Tenthredon. These were they that dwelt about Peneius and Pelion, covered with waving forests. of these was swift Prothous captain; and with him there followed forty black ships. ,These were the leaders of the Danaans and their lords. But who was far the best among them do thou tell me, Muse—best of the warriors and of the horses that followed with the sons of Atreus.of horses best by far were the mares of the son of Pheres, those that Eumelas drave, swift as birds, ,These were the leaders of the Danaans and their lords. But who was far the best among them do thou tell me, Muse—best of the warriors and of the horses that followed with the sons of Atreus.of horses best by far were the mares of the son of Pheres, those that Eumelas drave, swift as birds, ,These were the leaders of the Danaans and their lords. But who was far the best among them do thou tell me, Muse—best of the warriors and of the horses that followed with the sons of Atreus.of horses best by far were the mares of the son of Pheres, those that Eumelas drave, swift as birds, ,These were the leaders of the Danaans and their lords. But who was far the best among them do thou tell me, Muse—best of the warriors and of the horses that followed with the sons of Atreus.of horses best by far were the mares of the son of Pheres, those that Eumelas drave, swift as birds, ,These were the leaders of the Danaans and their lords. But who was far the best among them do thou tell me, Muse—best of the warriors and of the horses that followed with the sons of Atreus.of horses best by far were the mares of the son of Pheres, those that Eumelas drave, swift as birds, ,like of coat, like of age, their backs as even as a levelling line could make. These had Apollo of the silver bow reared in Pereia, both of them mares, bearing with them the panic of war. And of warriors far best was Telamonian Aias, while yet Achilles cherished his wrath; for Achilles was far the mightiest, ,like of coat, like of age, their backs as even as a levelling line could make. These had Apollo of the silver bow reared in Pereia, both of them mares, bearing with them the panic of war. And of warriors far best was Telamonian Aias, while yet Achilles cherished his wrath; for Achilles was far the mightiest, ,like of coat, like of age, their backs as even as a levelling line could make. These had Apollo of the silver bow reared in Pereia, both of them mares, bearing with them the panic of war. And of warriors far best was Telamonian Aias, while yet Achilles cherished his wrath; for Achilles was far the mightiest, ,like of coat, like of age, their backs as even as a levelling line could make. These had Apollo of the silver bow reared in Pereia, both of them mares, bearing with them the panic of war. And of warriors far best was Telamonian Aias, while yet Achilles cherished his wrath; for Achilles was far the mightiest, ,like of coat, like of age, their backs as even as a levelling line could make. These had Apollo of the silver bow reared in Pereia, both of them mares, bearing with them the panic of war. And of warriors far best was Telamonian Aias, while yet Achilles cherished his wrath; for Achilles was far the mightiest, ,he and the horses that bare the peerless son of Peleus. Howbeit he abode amid his beaked, seafaring ships in utter wrath against Agamemnon, Atreus' son, shepherd of the host; and his people along the sea-shore took their joy in casting the discus and the javelin, and in archery; ,he and the horses that bare the peerless son of Peleus. Howbeit he abode amid his beaked, seafaring ships in utter wrath against Agamemnon, Atreus' son, shepherd of the host; and his people along the sea-shore took their joy in casting the discus and the javelin, and in archery; ,he and the horses that bare the peerless son of Peleus. Howbeit he abode amid his beaked, seafaring ships in utter wrath against Agamemnon, Atreus' son, shepherd of the host; and his people along the sea-shore took their joy in casting the discus and the javelin, and in archery; ,he and the horses that bare the peerless son of Peleus. Howbeit he abode amid his beaked, seafaring ships in utter wrath against Agamemnon, Atreus' son, shepherd of the host; and his people along the sea-shore took their joy in casting the discus and the javelin, and in archery; ,he and the horses that bare the peerless son of Peleus. Howbeit he abode amid his beaked, seafaring ships in utter wrath against Agamemnon, Atreus' son, shepherd of the host; and his people along the sea-shore took their joy in casting the discus and the javelin, and in archery; ,and their horses each beside his own car, eating lotus and parsley of the marsh, stood idle, while the chariots were set, well covered up, in the huts of their masters. But the men, longing for their captain, dear to Ares, roared hither and thither through the camp, and fought not. ,and their horses each beside his own car, eating lotus and parsley of the marsh, stood idle, while the chariots were set, well covered up, in the huts of their masters. But the men, longing for their captain, dear to Ares, roared hither and thither through the camp, and fought not. ,and their horses each beside his own car, eating lotus and parsley of the marsh, stood idle, while the chariots were set, well covered up, in the huts of their masters. But the men, longing for their captain, dear to Ares, roared hither and thither through the camp, and fought not. ,and their horses each beside his own car, eating lotus and parsley of the marsh, stood idle, while the chariots were set, well covered up, in the huts of their masters. But the men, longing for their captain, dear to Ares, roared hither and thither through the camp, and fought not. ,and their horses each beside his own car, eating lotus and parsley of the marsh, stood idle, while the chariots were set, well covered up, in the huts of their masters. But the men, longing for their captain, dear to Ares, roared hither and thither through the camp, and fought not. ,So marched they then as though all the land were swept with fire; and the earth groaned beneath them, as beneath Zeus that hurleth the thunderbolt in his wrath, when he scourgeth the land about Typhoeus in the country of the Arimi, where men say is the couch of Typhoeus. Even so the earth groaned greatly beneath their tread as they went; ,So marched they then as though all the land were swept with fire; and the earth groaned beneath them, as beneath Zeus that hurleth the thunderbolt in his wrath, when he scourgeth the land about Typhoeus in the country of the Arimi, where men say is the couch of Typhoeus. Even so the earth groaned greatly beneath their tread as they went; ,So marched they then as though all the land were swept with fire; and the earth groaned beneath them, as beneath Zeus that hurleth the thunderbolt in his wrath, when he scourgeth the land about Typhoeus in the country of the Arimi, where men say is the couch of Typhoeus. Even so the earth groaned greatly beneath their tread as they went; ,So marched they then as though all the land were swept with fire; and the earth groaned beneath them, as beneath Zeus that hurleth the thunderbolt in his wrath, when he scourgeth the land about Typhoeus in the country of the Arimi, where men say is the couch of Typhoeus. Even so the earth groaned greatly beneath their tread as they went; ,So marched they then as though all the land were swept with fire; and the earth groaned beneath them, as beneath Zeus that hurleth the thunderbolt in his wrath, when he scourgeth the land about Typhoeus in the country of the Arimi, where men say is the couch of Typhoeus. Even so the earth groaned greatly beneath their tread as they went; ,and full swiftly did they speed across the plain.And to the Trojans went, as a messenger from Zeus that beareth the aegis, wind-footed, swift Iris with a grievous message. These were holding assembly at Priam's gate, all gathered in one body, the young men alike and the elders. ,and full swiftly did they speed across the plain.And to the Trojans went, as a messenger from Zeus that beareth the aegis, wind-footed, swift Iris with a grievous message. These were holding assembly at Priam's gate, all gathered in one body, the young men alike and the elders. ,and full swiftly did they speed across the plain.And to the Trojans went, as a messenger from Zeus that beareth the aegis, wind-footed, swift Iris with a grievous message. These were holding assembly at Priam's gate, all gathered in one body, the young men alike and the elders. ,and full swiftly did they speed across the plain.And to the Trojans went, as a messenger from Zeus that beareth the aegis, wind-footed, swift Iris with a grievous message. These were holding assembly at Priam's gate, all gathered in one body, the young men alike and the elders. ,and full swiftly did they speed across the plain.And to the Trojans went, as a messenger from Zeus that beareth the aegis, wind-footed, swift Iris with a grievous message. These were holding assembly at Priam's gate, all gathered in one body, the young men alike and the elders. ,And swift-footed Iris stood near and spake to them; and she made her voice like to that of Polites, son of Priam, who was wont to sit as a sentinel of the Trojans, trusting in his fleetness of foot, on the topmost part of the barrow of aged Aesyetes, awaiting until the Achaeans should sally forth from their ships. ,And swift-footed Iris stood near and spake to them; and she made her voice like to that of Polites, son of Priam, who was wont to sit as a sentinel of the Trojans, trusting in his fleetness of foot, on the topmost part of the barrow of aged Aesyetes, awaiting until the Achaeans should sally forth from their ships. ,And swift-footed Iris stood near and spake to them; and she made her voice like to that of Polites, son of Priam, who was wont to sit as a sentinel of the Trojans, trusting in his fleetness of foot, on the topmost part of the barrow of aged Aesyetes, awaiting until the Achaeans should sally forth from their ships. ,And swift-footed Iris stood near and spake to them; and she made her voice like to that of Polites, son of Priam, who was wont to sit as a sentinel of the Trojans, trusting in his fleetness of foot, on the topmost part of the barrow of aged Aesyetes, awaiting until the Achaeans should sally forth from their ships. ,And swift-footed Iris stood near and spake to them; and she made her voice like to that of Polites, son of Priam, who was wont to sit as a sentinel of the Trojans, trusting in his fleetness of foot, on the topmost part of the barrow of aged Aesyetes, awaiting until the Achaeans should sally forth from their ships. ,Likening herself to him swifted-footed Iris spake to Priam, saying:Old sir, ever are endless words dear to thee, now even as of yore in time of peace; but war unabating is afoot. Verily full often have I entered ere now into battles of warriors, but never yet have I seen a host so goodly and so great; ,Likening herself to him swifted-footed Iris spake to Priam, saying:Old sir, ever are endless words dear to thee, now even as of yore in time of peace; but war unabating is afoot. Verily full often have I entered ere now into battles of warriors, but never yet have I seen a host so goodly and so great; ,Likening herself to him swifted-footed Iris spake to Priam, saying:Old sir, ever are endless words dear to thee, now even as of yore in time of peace; but war unabating is afoot. Verily full often have I entered ere now into battles of warriors, but never yet have I seen a host so goodly and so great; ,Likening herself to him swifted-footed Iris spake to Priam, saying:Old sir, ever are endless words dear to thee, now even as of yore in time of peace; but war unabating is afoot. Verily full often have I entered ere now into battles of warriors, but never yet have I seen a host so goodly and so great; ,Likening herself to him swifted-footed Iris spake to Priam, saying:Old sir, ever are endless words dear to thee, now even as of yore in time of peace; but war unabating is afoot. Verily full often have I entered ere now into battles of warriors, but never yet have I seen a host so goodly and so great; ,for most like to the leaves or the sands are they, as they march over the plain to fight against the city. Hector, to thee beyond all others do I give command, and do thou even according to my word. Inasmuch as there are allies full many throughout the great city of Priam, and tongue differs from tongue among men that are scattered abroad; ,for most like to the leaves or the sands are they, as they march over the plain to fight against the city. Hector, to thee beyond all others do I give command, and do thou even according to my word. Inasmuch as there are allies full many throughout the great city of Priam, and tongue differs from tongue among men that are scattered abroad; ,for most like to the leaves or the sands are they, as they march over the plain to fight against the city. Hector, to thee beyond all others do I give command, and do thou even according to my word. Inasmuch as there are allies full many throughout the great city of Priam, and tongue differs from tongue among men that are scattered abroad; ,for most like to the leaves or the sands are they, as they march over the plain to fight against the city. Hector, to thee beyond all others do I give command, and do thou even according to my word. Inasmuch as there are allies full many throughout the great city of Priam, and tongue differs from tongue among men that are scattered abroad; ,for most like to the leaves or the sands are they, as they march over the plain to fight against the city. Hector, to thee beyond all others do I give command, and do thou even according to my word. Inasmuch as there are allies full many throughout the great city of Priam, and tongue differs from tongue among men that are scattered abroad; ,let each one therefore give the word to those whose captain he is, and these let him lead forth, when he has marshalled the men of his own city. So spake she, and Hector in no wise failed to know the voice of the goddess, but forthwith brake up the gathering; and they rushed to arms. The gates one and all were opened wide, and forth the folk hasted, ,let each one therefore give the word to those whose captain he is, and these let him lead forth, when he has marshalled the men of his own city. So spake she, and Hector in no wise failed to know the voice of the goddess, but forthwith brake up the gathering; and they rushed to arms. The gates one and all were opened wide, and forth the folk hasted, ,let each one therefore give the word to those whose captain he is, and these let him lead forth, when he has marshalled the men of his own city. So spake she, and Hector in no wise failed to know the voice of the goddess, but forthwith brake up the gathering; and they rushed to arms. The gates one and all were opened wide, and forth the folk hasted, ,let each one therefore give the word to those whose captain he is, and these let him lead forth, when he has marshalled the men of his own city. So spake she, and Hector in no wise failed to know the voice of the goddess, but forthwith brake up the gathering; and they rushed to arms. The gates one and all were opened wide, and forth the folk hasted, ,let each one therefore give the word to those whose captain he is, and these let him lead forth, when he has marshalled the men of his own city. So spake she, and Hector in no wise failed to know the voice of the goddess, but forthwith brake up the gathering; and they rushed to arms. The gates one and all were opened wide, and forth the folk hasted, ,both footmen and charioteers; and a great din arose.Now there is before the city a steep mound afar out in the plain, with a clear space about it on this side and on that; this do men verily call Batieia, but the immortals call it the barrow of Myrine, light of step. ,both footmen and charioteers; and a great din arose.Now there is before the city a steep mound afar out in the plain, with a clear space about it on this side and on that; this do men verily call Batieia, but the immortals call it the barrow of Myrine, light of step. ,both footmen and charioteers; and a great din arose.Now there is before the city a steep mound afar out in the plain, with a clear space about it on this side and on that; this do men verily call Batieia, but the immortals call it the barrow of Myrine, light of step. ,both footmen and charioteers; and a great din arose.Now there is before the city a steep mound afar out in the plain, with a clear space about it on this side and on that; this do men verily call Batieia, but the immortals call it the barrow of Myrine, light of step. ,both footmen and charioteers; and a great din arose.Now there is before the city a steep mound afar out in the plain, with a clear space about it on this side and on that; this do men verily call Batieia, but the immortals call it the barrow of Myrine, light of step. ,There on this day did the Trojans and their allies separate their companies.The Trojans were led by great Hector of the flashing helm, the son of Priam, and with him were marshalled the greatest hosts by far and the goodliest, raging with the spear. ,There on this day did the Trojans and their allies separate their companies.The Trojans were led by great Hector of the flashing helm, the son of Priam, and with him were marshalled the greatest hosts by far and the goodliest, raging with the spear. ,There on this day did the Trojans and their allies separate their companies.The Trojans were led by great Hector of the flashing helm, the son of Priam, and with him were marshalled the greatest hosts by far and the goodliest, raging with the spear. ,There on this day did the Trojans and their allies separate their companies.The Trojans were led by great Hector of the flashing helm, the son of Priam, and with him were marshalled the greatest hosts by far and the goodliest, raging with the spear. ,There on this day did the Trojans and their allies separate their companies.The Trojans were led by great Hector of the flashing helm, the son of Priam, and with him were marshalled the greatest hosts by far and the goodliest, raging with the spear. of the Dardanians again the valiant son of Anchises was captain, ,even Aeneas, whom fair Aphrodite conceived to Anchises amid the spurs of Ida, a goddess couched with a mortal man. Not alone was he; with him were Antenor's two sons, Archelochus and Acamas, well skilled in all manner of fighting.And they that dwelt in Zeleia beneath the nethermost foot of Ida, ,even Aeneas, whom fair Aphrodite conceived to Anchises amid the spurs of Ida, a goddess couched with a mortal man. Not alone was he; with him were Antenor's two sons, Archelochus and Acamas, well skilled in all manner of fighting.And they that dwelt in Zeleia beneath the nethermost foot of Ida, ,even Aeneas, whom fair Aphrodite conceived to Anchises amid the spurs of Ida, a goddess couched with a mortal man. Not alone was he; with him were Antenor's two sons, Archelochus and Acamas, well skilled in all manner of fighting.And they that dwelt in Zeleia beneath the nethermost foot of Ida, ,even Aeneas, whom fair Aphrodite conceived to Anchises amid the spurs of Ida, a goddess couched with a mortal man. Not alone was he; with him were Antenor's two sons, Archelochus and Acamas, well skilled in all manner of fighting.And they that dwelt in Zeleia beneath the nethermost foot of Ida, ,even Aeneas, whom fair Aphrodite conceived to Anchises amid the spurs of Ida, a goddess couched with a mortal man. Not alone was he; with him were Antenor's two sons, Archelochus and Acamas, well skilled in all manner of fighting.And they that dwelt in Zeleia beneath the nethermost foot of Ida, ,men of wealth, that drink the dark water of Aesepus, even the Troes, these again were led by the glorious son of Lycaon, Pandarus, to whom Apollo himself gave the bow.And they that held Adrasteia and the land of Apaesus, and that held Pityeia and the steep mount of Tereia, ,men of wealth, that drink the dark water of Aesepus, even the Troes, these again were led by the glorious son of Lycaon, Pandarus, to whom Apollo himself gave the bow.And they that held Adrasteia and the land of Apaesus, and that held Pityeia and the steep mount of Tereia, ,men of wealth, that drink the dark water of Aesepus, even the Troes, these again were led by the glorious son of Lycaon, Pandarus, to whom Apollo himself gave the bow.And they that held Adrasteia and the land of Apaesus, and that held Pityeia and the steep mount of Tereia, ,men of wealth, that drink the dark water of Aesepus, even the Troes, these again were led by the glorious son of Lycaon, Pandarus, to whom Apollo himself gave the bow.And they that held Adrasteia and the land of Apaesus, and that held Pityeia and the steep mount of Tereia, ,men of wealth, that drink the dark water of Aesepus, even the Troes, these again were led by the glorious son of Lycaon, Pandarus, to whom Apollo himself gave the bow.And they that held Adrasteia and the land of Apaesus, and that held Pityeia and the steep mount of Tereia, ,these were led by Adrastus and Araphius, with corslet of linen, sons twain of Merops of Percote, that was above all men skilled in prophesying, and would not suffer his sons to go into war, the bane of men. But the twain would in no wise hearken, for the fates of black death were leading them on. ,these were led by Adrastus and Araphius, with corslet of linen, sons twain of Merops of Percote, that was above all men skilled in prophesying, and would not suffer his sons to go into war, the bane of men. But the twain would in no wise hearken, for the fates of black death were leading them on. ,these were led by Adrastus and Araphius, with corslet of linen, sons twain of Merops of Percote, that was above all men skilled in prophesying, and would not suffer his sons to go into war, the bane of men. But the twain would in no wise hearken, for the fates of black death were leading them on. ,these were led by Adrastus and Araphius, with corslet of linen, sons twain of Merops of Percote, that was above all men skilled in prophesying, and would not suffer his sons to go into war, the bane of men. But the twain would in no wise hearken, for the fates of black death were leading them on. ,these were led by Adrastus and Araphius, with corslet of linen, sons twain of Merops of Percote, that was above all men skilled in prophesying, and would not suffer his sons to go into war, the bane of men. But the twain would in no wise hearken, for the fates of black death were leading them on. ,And they that dwelt about Percote and Practius, and that held Sestus and Abydus and goodly Arisbe, these again were led by Hyrtacus' son Asius, a leader of men—Asius, son of Hyrtacus, whom his horses tawny and tall had borne from Arisbe, from the river Selleïs. ,And they that dwelt about Percote and Practius, and that held Sestus and Abydus and goodly Arisbe, these again were led by Hyrtacus' son Asius, a leader of men—Asius, son of Hyrtacus, whom his horses tawny and tall had borne from Arisbe, from the river Selleïs. ,And they that dwelt about Percote and Practius, and that held Sestus and Abydus and goodly Arisbe, these again were led by Hyrtacus' son Asius, a leader of men—Asius, son of Hyrtacus, whom his horses tawny and tall had borne from Arisbe, from the river Selleïs. ,And they that dwelt about Percote and Practius, and that held Sestus and Abydus and goodly Arisbe, these again were led by Hyrtacus' son Asius, a leader of men—Asius, son of Hyrtacus, whom his horses tawny and tall had borne from Arisbe, from the river Selleïs. ,And they that dwelt about Percote and Practius, and that held Sestus and Abydus and goodly Arisbe, these again were led by Hyrtacus' son Asius, a leader of men—Asius, son of Hyrtacus, whom his horses tawny and tall had borne from Arisbe, from the river Selleïs. ,And Hippothous led the tribes of the Pelasgi, that rage with the spear, even them that dwelt in deep-soiled Larisa; these were led by Hippothous and Pylaeus, scion of Ares, sons twain of Pelasgian Lethus, son of Teutamus.But the Thracians Acamas led and Peirous, the warrior, ,And Hippothous led the tribes of the Pelasgi, that rage with the spear, even them that dwelt in deep-soiled Larisa; these were led by Hippothous and Pylaeus, scion of Ares, sons twain of Pelasgian Lethus, son of Teutamus.But the Thracians Acamas led and Peirous, the warrior, ,And Hippothous led the tribes of the Pelasgi, that rage with the spear, even them that dwelt in deep-soiled Larisa; these were led by Hippothous and Pylaeus, scion of Ares, sons twain of Pelasgian Lethus, son of Teutamus.But the Thracians Acamas led and Peirous, the warrior, ,And Hippothous led the tribes of the Pelasgi, that rage with the spear, even them that dwelt in deep-soiled Larisa; these were led by Hippothous and Pylaeus, scion of Ares, sons twain of Pelasgian Lethus, son of Teutamus.But the Thracians Acamas led and Peirous, the warrior, ,And Hippothous led the tribes of the Pelasgi, that rage with the spear, even them that dwelt in deep-soiled Larisa; these were led by Hippothous and Pylaeus, scion of Ares, sons twain of Pelasgian Lethus, son of Teutamus.But the Thracians Acamas led and Peirous, the warrior, ,even all them that the strong stream of the Hellespont encloseth.And Euphemus was captain of the Ciconian spearmen, the son of Ceas' son Troezenus, nurtured of Zeus.But Pyraechmes led the Paeonians, with curved bows, from afar, out of Amydon from the wide-flowing Axius— ,even all them that the strong stream of the Hellespont encloseth.And Euphemus was captain of the Ciconian spearmen, the son of Ceas' son Troezenus, nurtured of Zeus.But Pyraechmes led the Paeonians, with curved bows, from afar, out of Amydon from the wide-flowing Axius— ,even all them that the strong stream of the Hellespont encloseth.And Euphemus was captain of the Ciconian spearmen, the son of Ceas' son Troezenus, nurtured of Zeus.But Pyraechmes led the Paeonians, with curved bows, from afar, out of Amydon from the wide-flowing Axius— ,even all them that the strong stream of the Hellespont encloseth.And Euphemus was captain of the Ciconian spearmen, the son of Ceas' son Troezenus, nurtured of Zeus.But Pyraechmes led the Paeonians, with curved bows, from afar, out of Amydon from the wide-flowing Axius— ,even all them that the strong stream of the Hellespont encloseth.And Euphemus was captain of the Ciconian spearmen, the son of Ceas' son Troezenus, nurtured of Zeus.But Pyraechmes led the Paeonians, with curved bows, from afar, out of Amydon from the wide-flowing Axius— ,Axius the water whereof floweth the fairest over the face of the earth.And the Paphlagonians did Pylaemenes of the shaggy heart lead from the land of the Eneti, whence is the race of wild she-mules. These were they that held Cytorus and dwelt about Sesamon, and had their famed dwellings around the river Parthenius ,Axius the water whereof floweth the fairest over the face of the earth.And the Paphlagonians did Pylaemenes of the shaggy heart lead from the land of the Eneti, whence is the race of wild she-mules. These were they that held Cytorus and dwelt about Sesamon, and had their famed dwellings around the river Parthenius ,Axius the water whereof floweth the fairest over the face of the earth.And the Paphlagonians did Pylaemenes of the shaggy heart lead from the land of the Eneti, whence is the race of wild she-mules. These were they that held Cytorus and dwelt about Sesamon, and had their famed dwellings around the river Parthenius ,Axius the water whereof floweth the fairest over the face of the earth.And the Paphlagonians did Pylaemenes of the shaggy heart lead from the land of the Eneti, whence is the race of wild she-mules. These were they that held Cytorus and dwelt about Sesamon, and had their famed dwellings around the river Parthenius ,Axius the water whereof floweth the fairest over the face of the earth.And the Paphlagonians did Pylaemenes of the shaggy heart lead from the land of the Eneti, whence is the race of wild she-mules. These were they that held Cytorus and dwelt about Sesamon, and had their famed dwellings around the river Parthenius ,and Cromna and Aegialus and lofty Erythini.But of the Halizones Odius and Epistrophus were captains from afar, from Alybe, where is the birth-place of silver. ,and Cromna and Aegialus and lofty Erythini.But of the Halizones Odius and Epistrophus were captains from afar, from Alybe, where is the birth-place of silver. ,and Cromna and Aegialus and lofty Erythini.But of the Halizones Odius and Epistrophus were captains from afar, from Alybe, where is the birth-place of silver. ,and Cromna and Aegialus and lofty Erythini.But of the Halizones Odius and Epistrophus were captains from afar, from Alybe, where is the birth-place of silver. ,and Cromna and Aegialus and lofty Erythini.But of the Halizones Odius and Epistrophus were captains from afar, from Alybe, where is the birth-place of silver. And of the Mysians the captains were Chromis and Ennomus the augur; howbeit with his auguries he warded not off black fate, ,but was slain beneath the hands of the son of Aeacus, swift of foot, in the river, where Achilles was making havoc of the Trojans and the others as well.And Phorcys and godlike Ascanius led the Phrygians from afar, from Ascania, and were eager to fight in the press of battle.And the Maeonians had captains twain, Mesthles and Antiphus, ,but was slain beneath the hands of the son of Aeacus, swift of foot, in the river, where Achilles was making havoc of the Trojans and the others as well.And Phorcys and godlike Ascanius led the Phrygians from afar, from Ascania, and were eager to fight in the press of battle.And the Maeonians had captains twain, Mesthles and Antiphus, ,but was slain beneath the hands of the son of Aeacus, swift of foot, in the river, where Achilles was making havoc of the Trojans and the others as well.And Phorcys and godlike Ascanius led the Phrygians from afar, from Ascania, and were eager to fight in the press of battle.And the Maeonians had captains twain, Mesthles and Antiphus, ,but was slain beneath the hands of the son of Aeacus, swift of foot, in the river, where Achilles was making havoc of the Trojans and the others as well.And Phorcys and godlike Ascanius led the Phrygians from afar, from Ascania, and were eager to fight in the press of battle.And the Maeonians had captains twain, Mesthles and Antiphus, ,but was slain beneath the hands of the son of Aeacus, swift of foot, in the river, where Achilles was making havoc of the Trojans and the others as well.And Phorcys and godlike Ascanius led the Phrygians from afar, from Ascania, and were eager to fight in the press of battle.And the Maeonians had captains twain, Mesthles and Antiphus, ,the two sons of TaIaemenes, whose mother was the nymph of the Gygaean lake; and they led the Maeonians, whose birth was beneath Tmolas.And Nastes again led the Carians, uncouth of speech, who held Miletus and the mountain of Phthires, dense with its leafage, and the streams of Maeander, and the steep crests of Mycale. ,the two sons of TaIaemenes, whose mother was the nymph of the Gygaean lake; and they led the Maeonians, whose birth was beneath Tmolas.And Nastes again led the Carians, uncouth of speech, who held Miletus and the mountain of Phthires, dense with its leafage, and the streams of Maeander, and the steep crests of Mycale. ,the two sons of TaIaemenes, whose mother was the nymph of the Gygaean lake; and they led the Maeonians, whose birth was beneath Tmolas.And Nastes again led the Carians, uncouth of speech, who held Miletus and the mountain of Phthires, dense with its leafage, and the streams of Maeander, and the steep crests of Mycale. ,the two sons of TaIaemenes, whose mother was the nymph of the Gygaean lake; and they led the Maeonians, whose birth was beneath Tmolas.And Nastes again led the Carians, uncouth of speech, who held Miletus and the mountain of Phthires, dense with its leafage, and the streams of Maeander, and the steep crests of Mycale. ,the two sons of TaIaemenes, whose mother was the nymph of the Gygaean lake; and they led the Maeonians, whose birth was beneath Tmolas.And Nastes again led the Carians, uncouth of speech, who held Miletus and the mountain of Phthires, dense with its leafage, and the streams of Maeander, and the steep crests of Mycale. ,These were led by captains twain, Amphimachus and Nastes—Nastes and Amphimachus, the glorious children of Nomion. And he came to the war all decked with gold, like a girl, fool that he was; but his gold in no wise availed to ward off woeful destruction; nay, he was slain in the river beneath the hands of the son of Aeacus, swift of foot; ,These were led by captains twain, Amphimachus and Nastes—Nastes and Amphimachus, the glorious children of Nomion. And he came to the war all decked with gold, like a girl, fool that he was; but his gold in no wise availed to ward off woeful destruction; nay, he was slain in the river beneath the hands of the son of Aeacus, swift of foot; ,These were led by captains twain, Amphimachus and Nastes—Nastes and Amphimachus, the glorious children of Nomion. And he came to the war all decked with gold, like a girl, fool that he was; but his gold in no wise availed to ward off woeful destruction; nay, he was slain in the river beneath the hands of the son of Aeacus, swift of foot; ,These were led by captains twain, Amphimachus and Nastes—Nastes and Amphimachus, the glorious children of Nomion. And he came to the war all decked with gold, like a girl, fool that he was; but his gold in no wise availed to ward off woeful destruction; nay, he was slain in the river beneath the hands of the son of Aeacus, swift of foot; ,These were led by captains twain, Amphimachus and Nastes—Nastes and Amphimachus, the glorious children of Nomion. And he came to the war all decked with gold, like a girl, fool that he was; but his gold in no wise availed to ward off woeful destruction; nay, he was slain in the river beneath the hands of the son of Aeacus, swift of foot; ,and Achilles, wise of heart, bare off the gold.And Sarpedon and peerless Glaucus were captains of the Lycians from afar out of Lycia, from the eddying Xanthus. ,and Achilles, wise of heart, bare off the gold.And Sarpedon and peerless Glaucus were captains of the Lycians from afar out of Lycia, from the eddying Xanthus. ,and Achilles, wise of heart, bare off the gold.And Sarpedon and peerless Glaucus were captains of the Lycians from afar out of Lycia, from the eddying Xanthus. ,and Achilles, wise of heart, bare off the gold.And Sarpedon and peerless Glaucus were captains of the Lycians from afar out of Lycia, from the eddying Xanthus. ,and Achilles, wise of heart, bare off the gold.And Sarpedon and peerless Glaucus were captains of the Lycians from afar out of Lycia, from the eddying Xanthus. " '2.645 And the Cretans had as leader Idomeneus, famed for his spear, even they that held Cnosus and Gortys, famed for its walls, Lyctus and Miletus and Lycastus, white with chalk, and Phaestus and Rhytium, well-peopled cities; and all they beside that dwelt in Crete of the hundred cities. 2.650 of all these was Idomeneus, famed for his spear, captain, and Meriones, the peer of Enyalius, slayer of men. And with these there followed eighty black ships. 2.654 of all these was Idomeneus, famed for his spear, captain, and Meriones, the peer of Enyalius, slayer of men. And with these there followed eighty black ships. And Tlepolemus, son of Heracles, a valiant man and tall, led from Rhodes nine ships of the lordly Rhodians, 2.655 that dwelt in Rhodes sundered in three divisions—in Lindos and Ialysus and Cameirus, white with chalk. These were led by Tlepolemus, famed for his spear, he that was born to mighty Heracles by Astyocheia, whom he had led forth out of Ephyre from the river Selleïs, 2.659 that dwelt in Rhodes sundered in three divisions—in Lindos and Ialysus and Cameirus, white with chalk. These were led by Tlepolemus, famed for his spear, he that was born to mighty Heracles by Astyocheia, whom he had led forth out of Ephyre from the river Selleïs, ' "2.660 when he had laid waste many cities of warriors fostered of Zeus. But when Tlepolemus had grown to manhood in the well-fenced palace, forthwith he slew his own father's dear uncle, Licymnius, scion of Ares, who was then waxing old. So he straightway built him ships, and when he had gathered together much people, " "2.664 when he had laid waste many cities of warriors fostered of Zeus. But when Tlepolemus had grown to manhood in the well-fenced palace, forthwith he slew his own father's dear uncle, Licymnius, scion of Ares, who was then waxing old. So he straightway built him ships, and when he had gathered together much people, " '2.665 went forth in flight over the sea, for that the other sons and grandsons of mighty Heracles threatened him. But he came to Rhodes in his wanderings, suffering woes, and there his people settled in three divisions by tribes, and were loved of Zeus that is king among gods and men; 2.670 and upon them was wondrous wealth poured by the son of Cronos.Moreover Nireus led three shapely ships from Syme, Nireus that was son of Aglaïa and Charops the king, Nireus the comeliest man that came beneath Ilios of all the Danaans after the fearless son of Peleus. 2.675 Howbeit he was a weakling, and but few people followed with him.And they that held Nisyrus and Crapathus and Casus and Cos, the city of Eurypylus, and the Calydnian isles, these again were led by Pheidippus and Antiphus, the two sons of king Thessalus, son of Heracles. 2.680 And with them were ranged thirty hollow ships.Now all those again that inhabited Pelasgian Argos, and dwelt in Alos and Alope and Trachis, and that held Phthia and Hellas, the land of fair women, and were called Myrmidons and Hellenes and Achaeans— 2.685 of the fifty ships of these men was Achilles captain. Howbeit they bethought them not of dolorous war, since there was no man to lead them forth into the ranks. For he lay in idleness among the ships, the swift-footed, goodly Achilles, in wrath because of the fair-haired girl Briseïs, 2.689 of the fifty ships of these men was Achilles captain. Howbeit they bethought them not of dolorous war, since there was no man to lead them forth into the ranks. For he lay in idleness among the ships, the swift-footed, goodly Achilles, in wrath because of the fair-haired girl Briseïs, ' "2.690 whom he had taken out of Lyrnessus after sore toil, when he wasted Lyrnessus and the walls of Thebe, and laid low Mynes and Epistrophus, warriors that raged with the spear, sons of king Evenus, Selepus' son. In sore grief for her lay Achilles idle; but soon was he to arise again. " "2.694 whom he had taken out of Lyrnessus after sore toil, when he wasted Lyrnessus and the walls of Thebe, and laid low Mynes and Epistrophus, warriors that raged with the spear, sons of king Evenus, Selepus' son. In sore grief for her lay Achilles idle; but soon was he to arise again. " '2.695 And they that held Phylace and flowery Pyrasus, the sanctuary of Demeter, and Iton, mother of flocks, and Antron, hard by the sea, and Pteleos, couched in grass, these again had as leader warlike Protesilaus, while yet he lived; howbeit ere now the black earth held him fast. 2.700 His wife, her two cheeks torn in wailing, was left in Phylace and his house but half established, while, for himself, a Dardanian warrior slew him as he leapt forth from his ship by far the first of the Achaeans. Yet neither were his men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; for Podarces, scion of Ares, marshalled them, 2.704 His wife, her two cheeks torn in wailing, was left in Phylace and his house but half established, while, for himself, a Dardanian warrior slew him as he leapt forth from his ship by far the first of the Achaeans. Yet neither were his men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; for Podarces, scion of Ares, marshalled them, ' "2.705 he that was son of Phylacus' son, Iphiclus, rich in flocks, own brother to great-souled Protesilaus, and younger-born; but the other was the elder and the better man, even the warrior, valiant Protesilaus. So the host in no wise lacked a leader, though they longed for the noble man they had lost. " "2.709 he that was son of Phylacus' son, Iphiclus, rich in flocks, own brother to great-souled Protesilaus, and younger-born; but the other was the elder and the better man, even the warrior, valiant Protesilaus. So the host in no wise lacked a leader, though they longed for the noble man they had lost. " '2.710 And with him there followed forty black ships.And they that dwelt in Pherae beside the lake Boebeïs, and in Boebe, and Glaphyrae, and well-built Iolcus, these were led by the dear son of Admetus with eleven ships, even by Eumelus, whom Alcestis, queenly among women, bare to Admetus, 2.715 even she, the comeliest of the daughters of Pelias.And they that dwelt in Methone and Thaumacia, and that held Meliboea and rugged Olizon, these with their seven ships were led by Philoctetes, well-skilled in archery, 2.720 and on each ship embarked fifty oarsmen well skilled to fight amain with the bow. But Philoctetes lay suffering grievous pains in an island, even in sacred Lemnos, where the sons of the Achaeans had left him in anguish with an evil wound from a deadly water-snake. There he lay suffering; 2.720 yet full soon were the Argives beside their ships to bethink them of king Philoctetes. Howbeit neither were these men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; but Medon marshalled them, the bastard son of Oïleus, whom Rhene bare to Oïleus, sacker of cities.And they that held Tricca and Ithome of the crags, 2.724 yet full soon were the Argives beside their ships to bethink them of king Philoctetes. Howbeit neither were these men leaderless, though they longed for their leader; but Medon marshalled them, the bastard son of Oïleus, whom Rhene bare to Oïleus, sacker of cities.And they that held Tricca and Ithome of the crags, ' "2.730 and Oechalia, city of Oechalian Eurytus, these again were led by the two sons of Asclepius, the skilled leeches Podaleirius and Machaon. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships. 2.734 and Oechalia, city of Oechalian Eurytus, these again were led by the two sons of Asclepius, the skilled leeches Podaleirius and Machaon. And with these were ranged thirty hollow ships. And they that held Ormenius and the fountain Hypereia, 2.735 and that held Asterium and the white crests of Titanus, these were led by Eurypylus, the glorious son of Euaemon. And with him there followed forty black ships.And they that held Argissa, and dwelt in Gyrtone, Orthe, and Elone, and the white city of Oloösson, 2.740 these again had as leader Polypoetes, staunch in fight, son of Peirithous, whom immortal Zeus begat— even him whom glorious Hippodameia conceived to Peirithous on the day when he got him vengeance on the shaggy centaurs, and thrust them forth from Pelium, and drave them to the Aethices. 2.744 these again had as leader Polypoetes, staunch in fight, son of Peirithous, whom immortal Zeus begat— even him whom glorious Hippodameia conceived to Peirithous on the day when he got him vengeance on the shaggy centaurs, and thrust them forth from Pelium, and drave them to the Aethices. ' "2.745 Not alone was he, but with him was Leonteus, scion of Ares, the son of Caenus' son, Coronus, high of heart. And with them there followed forty black ships.And Gouneus led from Cyphus two and twenty ships, and with him followed the Enienes and the Peraebi, staunch in fight, " "2.749 Not alone was he, but with him was Leonteus, scion of Ares, the son of Caenus' son, Coronus, high of heart. And with them there followed forty black ships.And Gouneus led from Cyphus two and twenty ships, and with him followed the Enienes and the Peraebi, staunch in fight, " '2.750 that had set their dwellings about wintry Dodona, and dwelt in the ploughland about lovely Titaressus, that poureth his fair-flowing streams into Peneius; yet doth he not mingle with the silver eddies of Peneius, but floweth on over his waters like unto olive oil; 2.755 for that he is a branch of the water of Styx, the dread river of oath.And the Magnetes had as captain Prothous, son of Tenthredon. These were they that dwelt about Peneius and Pelion, covered with waving forests. of these was swift Prothous captain; and with him there followed forty black ships.
2.867
the two sons of TaIaemenes, whose mother was the nymph of the Gygaean lake; and they led the Maeonians, whose birth was beneath Tmolas.And Nastes again led the Carians, uncouth of speech, who held Miletus and the mountain of Phthires, dense with its leafage, and the streams of Maeander, and the steep crests of Mycale. 2.870 These were led by captains twain, Amphimachus and Nastes—Nastes and Amphimachus, the glorious children of Nomion. And he came to the war all decked with gold, like a girl, fool that he was; but his gold in no wise availed to ward off woeful destruction; nay, he was slain in the river beneath the hands of the son of Aeacus, swift of foot; 2.875 and Achilles, wise of heart, bare off the gold.And Sarpedon and peerless Glaucus were captains of the Lycians from afar out of Lycia, from the eddying Xanthus.
18.478
and precious gold and silver; and thereafter he set on the anvil-block a great anvil, and took in one hand a massive hammer, and in the other took he the tongs.First fashioned he a shield, great and sturdy, adorning it cunningly in every part, and round about it set a bright rim, 18.480 threefold and glittering, and therefrom made fast a silver baldric. Five were the layers of the shield itself; and on it he wrought many curious devices with cunning skill.Therein he wrought the earth, therein the heavens therein the sea, and the unwearied sun, and the moon at the full, 18.485 and therein all the constellations wherewith heaven is crowned—the Pleiades, and the Hyades and the mighty Orion, and the Bear, that men call also the Wain, that circleth ever in her place, and watcheth Orion, and alone hath no part in the baths of Ocean. 18.490 Therein fashioned he also two cities of mortal men exceeding fair. In the one there were marriages and feastings, and by the light of the blazing torches they were leading the brides from their bowers through the city, and loud rose the bridal song. And young men were whirling in the dance, and in their midst 18.495 flutes and lyres sounded continually; and there the women stood each before her door and marvelled. But the folk were gathered in the place of assembly; for there a strife had arisen, and two men were striving about the blood-price of a man slain; the one avowed that he had paid all, 18.500 declaring his cause to the people, but the other refused to accept aught; and each was fain to win the issue on the word of a daysman. Moreover, the folk were cheering both, shewing favour to this side and to that. And heralds held back the folk, and the elders were sitting upon polished stones in the sacred circle, 18.505 holding in their hands the staves of the loud-voiced heralds. Therewith then would they spring up and give judgment, each in turn. And in the midst lay two talents of gold, to be given to him whoso among them should utter the most righteous judgment.But around the other city lay in leaguer two hosts of warriors 18.510 gleaming in armour. And twofold plans found favour with them, either to lay waste the town or to divide in portions twain all the substance that the lovely city contained within. Howbeit the besieged would nowise hearken thereto, but were arming to meet the foe in an ambush. The wall were their dear wives and little children guarding, 18.515 as they stood thereon, and therewithal the men that were holden of old age; but the rest were faring forth, led of Ares and Pallas Athene, both fashioned in gold, and of gold was the raiment wherewith they were clad. Goodly were they and tall in their harness, as beseemeth gods, clear to view amid the rest, and the folk at their feet were smaller. 18.520 But when they were come to the place where it seemed good unto them to set their ambush, in a river-bed where was a watering-place for all herds alike, there they sate them down, clothed about with flaming bronze. Thereafter were two scouts set by them apart from the host, waiting till they should have sight of the sheep and sleek cattle. 18.525 And these came presently, and two herdsmen followed with them playing upon pipes; and of the guile wist they not at all. 18.529 And these came presently, and two herdsmen followed with them playing upon pipes; and of the guile wist they not at all. But the liers-in-wait, when they saw these coming on, rushed forth against them and speedily cut off the herds of cattle and fair flocks of white-fleeced sheep, and slew the herdsmen withal. 18.530 But the besiegers, as they sat before the places of gathering and heard much tumult among the kine, mounted forthwith behind their high-stepping horses, and set out thitherward, and speedily came upon them. Then set they their battle in array and fought beside the river banks, and were ever smiting one another with bronze-tipped spears. 18.535 And amid them Strife and Tumult joined in the fray, and deadly Fate, grasping one man alive, fresh-wounded, another without a wound, and another she dragged dead through the mellay by the feet; and the raiment that she had about her shoulders was red with the blood of men. Even as living mortals joined they in the fray and fought; 18.539 And amid them Strife and Tumult joined in the fray, and deadly Fate, grasping one man alive, fresh-wounded, another without a wound, and another she dragged dead through the mellay by the feet; and the raiment that she had about her shoulders was red with the blood of men. Even as living mortals joined they in the fray and fought; ' "18.540 and they were haling away each the bodies of the others' slain.Therein he set also soft fallow-land, rich tilth and wide, that was three times ploughed; and ploughers full many therein were wheeling their yokes and driving them this way and that. And whensoever after turning they came to the headland of the field, " "18.544 and they were haling away each the bodies of the others' slain.Therein he set also soft fallow-land, rich tilth and wide, that was three times ploughed; and ploughers full many therein were wheeling their yokes and driving them this way and that. And whensoever after turning they came to the headland of the field, " '18.545 then would a man come forth to each and give into his hands a cup of honey-sweet wine; and the ploughmen would turn them in the furrows, eager to reach the headland of the deep tilth. And the field grew black behind and seemed verily as it had been ploughed, for all that it was of gold; herein was the great marvel of the work. 18.549 then would a man come forth to each and give into his hands a cup of honey-sweet wine; and the ploughmen would turn them in the furrows, eager to reach the headland of the deep tilth. And the field grew black behind and seemed verily as it had been ploughed, for all that it was of gold; herein was the great marvel of the work. ' "18.550 Therein he set also a king's demesne-land, wherein labourers were reaping, bearing sharp sickles in their hands. Some handfuls were falling in rows to the ground along the swathe, while others the binders of sheaves were binding with twisted ropes of straw. Three binders stood hard by them, while behind them " "18.554 Therein he set also a king's demesne-land, wherein labourers were reaping, bearing sharp sickles in their hands. Some handfuls were falling in rows to the ground along the swathe, while others the binders of sheaves were binding with twisted ropes of straw. Three binders stood hard by them, while behind them " '18.555 boys would gather the handfuls, and bearing them in their arms would busily give them to the binders; and among them the king, staff in hand, was standing in silence at the swathe, joying in his heart. And heralds apart beneath an oak were making ready a feast, and were dressing a great ox they had slain for sacrifice; and the women 18.559 boys would gather the handfuls, and bearing them in their arms would busily give them to the binders; and among them the king, staff in hand, was standing in silence at the swathe, joying in his heart. And heralds apart beneath an oak were making ready a feast, and were dressing a great ox they had slain for sacrifice; and the women ' "18.560 prinkled the flesh with white barley in abundance, for the workers' mid-day meal. " "18.564 prinkled the flesh with white barley in abundance, for the workers' mid-day meal. Therein he set also a vineyard heavily laden with clusters, a vineyard fair and wrought of gold; black were the grapes, and the vines were set up throughout on silver poles. And around it he drave a trench of cyanus, and about that a fence of tin; " '18.565 and one single path led thereto, whereby the vintagers went and came, whensoever they gathered the vintage. And maidens and youths in childish glee were bearing the honey-sweet fruit in wicker baskets. And in their midst a boy made pleasant music with a clear-toned lyre, 18.570 and thereto sang sweetly the Linos-song with his delicate voice; and his fellows beating the earth in unison therewith followed on with bounding feet mid dance and shoutings.And therein he wrought a herd of straight-horned kine: the kine were fashioned of gold and tin, 18.575 and with lowing hasted they forth from byre to pasture beside the sounding river, beside the waving reed. And golden were the herdsmen that walked beside the kine, four in number, and nine dogs swift of foot followed after them. But two dread lions amid the foremost kine 18.580 were holding a loud-lowing bull, and he, bellowing mightily, was haled of them, while after him pursued the dogs and young men. The lions twain had rent the hide of the great bull, and were devouring the inward parts and the black blood, while the herdsmen vainly sought to fright them, tarring on the swift hounds. 18.585 Howbeit these shrank from fastening on the lions, but stood hard by and barked and sprang aside.Therein also the famed god of the two strong arms wrought a pasture in a fair dell, a great pasture of white-fleeced sheep, and folds, and roofed huts, and pens. 18.590 Therein furthermore the famed god of the two strong arms cunningly wrought a dancing-floor like unto that which in wide Cnosus Daedalus fashioned of old for fair-tressed Ariadne. There were youths dancing and maidens of the price of many cattle, holding their hands upon the wrists one of the other. 18.595 of these the maidens were clad in fine linen, while the youths wore well-woven tunics faintly glistening with oil; and the maidens had fair chaplets, and the youths had daggers of gold hanging from silver baldrics. Now would they run round with cunning feet 18.600 exceeding lightly, as when a potter sitteth by his wheel that is fitted between his hands and maketh trial of it whether it will run; and now again would they run in rows toward each other. And a great company stood around the lovely dance, taking joy therein; 18.605 and two tumblers whirled up and down through the midst of them as leaders in the dance.Therein he set also the great might of the river Oceanus, around the uttermost rim of the strongly-wrought shield.But when he had wrought the shield, great and sturdy, 18.608 and two tumblers whirled up and down through the midst of them as leaders in the dance.Therein he set also the great might of the river Oceanus, around the uttermost rim of the strongly-wrought shield.But when he had wrought the shield, great and sturdy, '' None
4. None, None, nan (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Naxos, Naxians, trade-ship • ship,

 Found in books: Bowie (2021), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, 741; Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 113

5. None, None, nan (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Catalog of Ships • Catalogue of Ships (Homer, Iliad • Iliad (Homer), and the Catalog of Ships

 Found in books: Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 150; Laemmle (2021), Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration, 309

6. None, None, nan (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • ship, • ships

 Found in books: Bowie (2021), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, 525; Gygax and Zuiderhoek (2021), Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity, 58

7. Euripides, Medea, 1-13 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Argo, as first ship

 Found in books: Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 123; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 123

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1 Εἴθ' ὤφελ' ̓Αργοῦς μὴ διαπτάσθαι σκάφος"2 Κόλχων ἐς αἶαν κυανέας Συμπληγάδας,' "3 μηδ' ἐν νάπαισι Πηλίου πεσεῖν ποτε" "4 τμηθεῖσα πεύκη, μηδ' ἐρετμῶσαι χέρας" '5 ἀνδρῶν ἀριστέων οἳ τὸ πάγχρυσον δέρος' "6 Πελίᾳ μετῆλθον. οὐ γὰρ ἂν δέσποιν' ἐμὴ" "7 Μήδεια πύργους γῆς ἔπλευς' ̓Ιωλκίας" "8 ἔρωτι θυμὸν ἐκπλαγεῖς' ̓Ιάσονος:" "9 οὐδ' ἂν κτανεῖν πείσασα Πελιάδας κόρας" "
10
πατέρα κατῴκει τήνδε γῆν Κορινθίαν
1
1
&λτ;φίλων τε τῶν πρὶν ἀμπλακοῦσα καὶ πάτρας.&γτ;' "
12
&λτ;καὶ πρὶν μὲν εἶχε κἀνθάδ' οὐ μεμπτὸν βίον&γτ;" 13 ξὺν ἀνδρὶ καὶ τέκνοισιν, ἁνδάνουσα μὲν ' None
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1 Ah! would to Heaven the good ship Argo ne’er had sped its course to the Colchian land through the misty blue Symplegades, nor ever in the glens of Pelion the pine been felled to furnish with oars the chieftain’s hands,'2 Ah! would to Heaven the good ship Argo ne’er had sped its course to the Colchian land through the misty blue Symplegades, nor ever in the glens of Pelion the pine been felled to furnish with oars the chieftain’s hands, 5 who went to fetch the golden fleece for Pelias; for then would my own mistress Medea never have sailed to the turrets of Iolcos, her soul with love for Jason smitten, nor would she have beguiled the daughters of Pelia
10
to slay their father and come to live here in the land of Corinth with her husband and children, where her exile found favour with the citizens to whose land she had come, and in all things of her own accord was she at one with Jason, the greatest safeguard thi ' None
8. Herodotus, Histories, 5.82-5.88, 5.92-5.95 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Catalogue of Ships • Xerxes, watching grain ships • ships

 Found in books: Finkelberg (2019), Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays, 295; Gygax and Zuiderhoek (2021), Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity, 58; Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 667; Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 212, 213

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5.82 ἡ δὲ ἔχθρη ἡ προοφειλομένη ἐς Ἀθηναίους ἐκ τῶν Αἰγινητέων ἐγένετο ἐξ ἀρχῆς τοιῆσδε. Ἐπιδαυρίοισι ἡ γῆ καρπὸν οὐδένα ἀνεδίδου. περὶ ταύτης ὦν τῆς συμφορῆς οἱ Ἐπιδαύριοι ἐχρέωντο ἐν Δελφοῖσι· ἡ δὲ Πυθίη σφέας ἐκέλευε Δαμίης τε καὶ Αὐξησίης ἀγάλματα ἱδρύσασθαι καί σφι ἱδρυσαμένοισι ἄμεινον συνοίσεσθαι. ἐπειρώτεον ὦν οἱ Ἐπιδαύριοι κότερα χαλκοῦ ποιέωνται τὰ ἀγάλματα ἢ λίθου· ἡ δὲ Πυθίη οὐδέτερα τούτων ἔα, ἀλλὰ ξύλου ἡμέρης ἐλαίης. ἐδέοντο ὦν οἱ Ἐπιδαύριοι Ἀθηναίων ἐλαίην σφι δοῦναι ταμέσθαι, ἱρωτάτας δὴ κείνας νομίζοντες εἶναι. λέγεται δὲ καὶ ὡς ἐλαῖαι ἦσαν ἄλλοθι γῆς οὐδαμοῦ κατὰ χρόνον ἐκεῖνον ἢ ἐν Ἀθήνῃσι. οἳ δὲ ἐπὶ τοῖσιδε δώσειν ἔφασαν ἐπʼ ᾧ ἀπάξουσι ἔτεος ἑκάστου τῇ Ἀθηναίῃ τε τῇ Πολιάδι ἱρὰ καὶ τῷ Ἐρεχθέι. καταινέσαντες δὲ ἐπὶ τούτοισι οἱ Ἐπιδαύριοι τῶν τε ἐδέοντο ἔτυχον καὶ ἀγάλματα ἐκ τῶν ἐλαιέων τουτέων ποιησάμενοι ἱδρύσαντο· καὶ ἥ τε γῆ σφι ἔφερε καρπὸν καὶ Ἀθηναίοισι ἐπετέλεον τὰ συνέθεντο. 5.83 τοῦτον δʼ ἔτι τὸν χρόνον καὶ πρὸ τοῦ Αἰγινῆται Ἐπιδαυρίων ἤκουον τά τε ἄλλα καὶ δίκας διαβαίνοντες ἐς Ἐπίδαυρον ἐδίδοσάν τε καὶ ἐλάμβανον παρʼ ἀλλήλων οἱ Αἰγινῆται· τὸ δὲ ἀπὸ τοῦδε νέας τε πηξάμενοι καὶ ἀγνωμοσύνῃ χρησάμενοι ἀπέστησαν ἀπὸ τῶν Ἐπιδαυρίων. ἅτε δὲ ἐόντες διάφοροι ἐδηλέοντο αὐτούς, ὥστε θαλασσοκράτορες ἐόντες, καὶ δὴ καὶ τὰ ἀγάλματα ταῦτα τῆς τε Δαμίης καὶ τῆς Αὐξησίης ὑπαιρέονται αὐτῶν, καί σφεα ἐκόμισάν τε καὶ ἱδρύσαντο τῆς σφετέρης χώρης ἐς τὴν μεσόγαιαν, τῇ Οἴη μὲν ἐστὶ οὔνομα, στάδια δὲ μάλιστά κῃ ἀπὸ τῆς πόλιος ὡς εἴκοσι ἀπέχει. ἱδρυσάμενοι δὲ ἐν τούτῳ τῷ χώρῳ θυσίῃσί τε σφέα καὶ χοροῖσι γυναικηίοισι κερτομίοισι ἱλάσκοντο, χορηγῶν ἀποδεικνυμένων ἑκατέρῃ τῶν δαιμόνων δέκα ἀνδρῶν· κακῶς δὲ ἠγόρευον οἱ χοροὶ ἄνδρα μὲν οὐδένα, τὰς δὲ ἐπιχωρίας γυναῖκας. ἦσαν δὲ καὶ τοῖσι Ἐπιδαυρίοισι αἱ αὐταὶ ἱροεργίαι· εἰσὶ δέ σφι καὶ ἄρρητοι ἱρουργίαι. 5.84 κλεφθέντων δὲ τῶνδε τῶν ἀγαλμάτων οἱ Ἐπιδαύριοι τοῖσι Ἀθηναίοισι τὰ συνέθεντο οὐκ ἐπετέλεον. πέμψαντες δὲ οἱ Ἀθηναῖοι ἐμήνιον τοῖσι Ἐπιδαυρίοισι· οἳ δὲ ἀπέφαινον λόγῳ ὡς οὐκ ἀδικέοιεν· ὅσον μὲν γὰρ χρόνον εἶχον τὰ ἀγάλματα ἐν τῇ χώρῃ, ἐπιτελέειν τὰ συνέθεντο, ἐπεὶ δὲ ἐστερῆσθαι αὐτῶν, οὐ δίκαιον εἶναι ἀποφέρειν ἔτι, ἀλλὰ τοὺς ἔχοντας αὐτὰ Αἰγινήτας πρήσσεσθαι ἐκέλευον. πρὸς ταῦτα οἱ Ἀθηναῖοι ἐς Αἴγιναν πέμψαντες ἀπαίτεον τὰ ἀγάλματα· οἱ δὲ Αἰγινῆται ἔφασαν σφίσι τε καὶ Ἀθηναίοισι εἶναι οὐδὲν πρῆγμα. 5.85 Ἀθηναῖοι μέν νυν λέγουσι μετὰ τὴν ἀπαίτησιν ἀποσταλῆναι τριήρεϊ μιῇ τῶν ἀστῶν τούτους οἳ ἀποπεμφθέντες ἀπὸ τοῦ κοινοῦ καὶ ἀπικόμενοι ἐς Αἴγιναν τὰ ἀγάλματα ταῦτα ὡς σφετέρων ξύλων ἐόντα ἐπειρῶντο ἐκ τῶν βάθρων ἐξανασπᾶν, ἵνα σφέα ἀνακομίσωνται. οὐ δυναμένους δὲ τούτῳ τῷ τρόπῳ αὐτῶν κρατῆσαι, περιβαλόντας σχοινία ἕλκειν τὰ ἀγάλματα, καί σφι ἕλκουσι βροντήν τε καὶ ἅμα τῇ βροντῇ σεισμὸν ἐπιγενέσθαι· τοὺς δὲ τριηρίτας τοὺς ἕλκοντας ὑπὸ τούτων ἀλλοφρονῆσαι, παθόντας δὲ τοῦτο κτείνειν ἀλλήλους ἅτε πολεμίους, ἐς ὃ ἐκ πάντων ἕνα λειφθέντα ἀνακομισθῆναι αὐτὸν ἐς Φάληρον. 5.86 Ἀθηναῖοι μὲν οὕτω γενέσθαι λέγουσι, Αἰγινῆται δὲ οὐ μιῇ νηὶ ἀπικέσθαι Ἀθηναίους· μίαν μὲν γὰρ καὶ ὀλίγῳ πλεῦνας μιῆς, καὶ εἰ σφίσι μὴ ἔτυχον ἐοῦσαι νέες, ἀπαμύνεσθαι ἂν εὐπετέως· ἀλλὰ πολλῇσι νηυσὶ ἐπιπλέειν σφίσι ἐπὶ τὴν χώρην, αὐτοὶ δέ σφι εἶξαι καὶ οὐ ναυμαχῆσαι. οὐκ ἔχουσι δὲ τοῦτο διασημῆναι ἀτρεκέως, οὔτε εἰ ἥσσονες συγγινωσκόμενοι εἶναι τῇ ναυμαχίῃ κατὰ τοῦτο εἶξαν, οὔτε εἰ βουλόμενοι ποιῆσαι οἷόν τι καὶ ἐποίησαν. Ἀθηναίους μέν νυν, ἐπείτε σφι οὐδεὶς ἐς μάχην κατίστατο, ἀποβάντας ἀπὸ τῶν νεῶν τραπέσθαι πρὸς τὰ ἀγάλματα, οὐ δυναμένους δὲ ἀνασπάσαι ἐκ τῶν βάθρων αὐτὰ οὕτω δὴ περιβαλομένους σχοινία ἕλκειν, ἐς οὗ ἑλκόμενα τὰ ἀγάλματα ἀμφότερα τὠυτὸ ποιῆσαι, ἐμοὶ μὲν οὐ πιστὰ λέγοντες, ἄλλῳ δὲ τεῷ· ἐς γούνατα γάρ σφι αὐτὰ πεσεῖν, καὶ τὸν ἀπὸ τούτου χρόνον διατελέειν οὕτω ἔχοντα. Ἀθηναίους μὲν δὴ ταῦτα ποιέειν· σφέας δὲ Αἰγινῆται λέγουσι πυθομένους τοὺς Ἀθηναίους ὡς μέλλοιεν ἐπὶ σφέας στρατεύεσθαι, ἑτοίμους Ἀργείους ποιέεσθαι. τούς τε δὴ Ἀθηναίους ἀποβεβάναι ἐς τὴν Αἰγιναίην, καὶ ἥκειν βοηθέοντας σφίσι τοὺς Ἀργείους καὶ λαθεῖν τε ἐξ Ἐπιδαύρου διαβάντας ἐς τὴν νῆσον καὶ οὐ προακηκοόσι τοῖσι Ἀθηναίοισι ἐπιπεσεῖν ὑποταμομένους τὸ ἀπὸ τῶν νεῶν, ἅμα τε ἐν τούτῳ τὴν βροντήν τε γενέσθαι καὶ τὸν σεισμὸν αὐτοῖσι. 5.87 λέγεται μέν νυν ὑπʼ Ἀργείων τε καὶ Αἰγινητέων τάδε, ὁμολογέεται δὲ καὶ ὑπʼ Ἀθηναίων ἕνα μοῦνον τὸν ἀποσωθέντα αὐτῶν ἐς τὴν Ἀττικὴν γενέσθαι· πλὴν Ἀργεῖοι μὲν λέγουσι αὐτῶν τὸ Ἀττικὸν στρατόπεδον διαφθειράντων τὸν ἕνα τοῦτον περιγενέσθαι, Ἀθηναῖοι δὲ τοῦ δαιμονίου· περιγενέσθαι μέντοι οὐδὲ τοῦτον τὸν ἕνα, ἀλλʼ ἀπολέσθαι τρόπῳ τοιῷδε. κομισθεὶς ἄρα ἐς τὰς Ἀθήνας ἀπήγγελλε τὸ πάθος· πυθομένας δὲ τὰς γυναῖκας τῶν ἐπʼ Αἴγιναν στρατευσαμένων ἀνδρῶν, δεινόν τι ποιησαμένας κεῖνον μοῦνον ἐξ ἁπάντων σωθῆναι, πέριξ τὸν ἄνθρωπον τοῦτον λαβούσας καὶ κεντεύσας τῇσι περόνῃσι τῶν ἱματίων εἰρωτᾶν ἑκάστην αὐτέων ὅκου εἴη ὁ ἑωυτῆς ἀνήρ. καὶ τοῦτον μὲν οὕτω διαφθαρῆναι, Ἀθηναίοισι δὲ ἔτι τοῦ πάθεος δεινότερόν τι δόξαι εἶναι τὸ τῶν γυναικῶν ἔργον. ἄλλῳ μὲν δὴ οὐκ ἔχειν ὅτεῳ ζημιώσωσι τὰς γυναῖκας, τὴν δὲ ἐσθῆτα μετέβαλον αὐτέων ἐς τὴν Ἰάδα· ἐφόρεον γὰρ δὴ πρὸ τοῦ αἱ τῶν Ἀθηναίων γυναῖκες ἐσθῆτα Δωρίδα, τῇ Κορινθίῃ παραπλησιωτάτην· μετέβαλον ὦν ἐς τὸν λίνεον κιθῶνα, ἵνα δὴ περόνῃσι μὴ χρέωνται. 5.88 ἔστι δὲ ἀληθέι λόγῳ χρεωμένοισι οὐκ Ἰὰς αὕτη ἡ ἐσθὴς τὸ παλαιὸν ἀλλὰ Κάειρα, ἐπεὶ ἥ γε Ἑλληνικὴ ἐσθὴς πᾶσα ἡ ἀρχαίη τῶν γυναικῶν ἡ αὐτὴ ἦν τὴν νῦν Δωρίδα καλέομεν. τοῖσι δὲ Ἀργείοισι καὶ τοῖσι Αἰγινήτῃσι καὶ πρὸς ταῦτα ἔτι τόδε ποιῆσαι 1 νόμον εἶναι παρὰ σφίσι ἑκατέροισι τὰς περόνας ἡμιολίας ποιέεσθαι τοῦ τότε κατεστεῶτος μέτρου, καὶ ἐς τὸ ἱρὸν τῶν θεῶν τουτέων περόνας μάλιστα ἀνατιθέναι τὰς γυναῖκας, Ἀττικὸν δὲ μήτε τι ἄλλο προσφέρειν πρὸς τὸ ἱρὸν μήτε κέραμον, ἀλλʼ ἐκ χυτρίδων ἐπιχωριέων νόμον τὸ λοιπὸν αὐτόθι εἶναι πίνειν.
5.92
Ἠετίωνι δὲ μετὰ ταῦτα ὁ παῖς ηὐξάνετο, καί οἱ διαφυγόντι τοῦτον τὸν κίνδυνον ἀπὸ τῆς κυψέλης ἐπωνυμίην Κύψελος οὔνομα ἐτέθη. ἀνδρωθέντι δὲ καὶ μαντευομένῳ Κυψέλῳ ἐγένετο ἀμφιδέξιον χρηστήριον ἐν Δελφοῖσι, τῷ πίσυνος γενόμενος ἐπεχείρησέ τε καὶ ἔσχε Κόρινθον. ὁ δὲ χρησμὸς ὅδε ἦν. ὄλβιος οὗτος ἀνὴρ ὃς ἐμὸν δόμον ἐσκαταβαίνει, Κύψελος Ἠετίδης, βασιλεὺς κλειτοῖο Κορίνθου αὐτὸς καὶ παῖδες, παίδων γε μὲν οὐκέτι παῖδες. τὸ μὲν δὴ χρηστήριον τοῦτο ἦν, τυραννεύσας δὲ ὁ Κύψελος τοιοῦτος δή τις ἀνὴρ ἐγένετο· πολλοὺς μὲν Κορινθίων ἐδίωξε, πολλοὺς δὲ χρημάτων ἀπεστέρησε, πολλῷ δέ τι πλείστους τῆς ψυχῆς.
5.92
Κορινθίοισι γὰρ ἦν πόλιος κατάστασις τοιήδε· ἦν ὀλιγαρχίη, καὶ οὗτοι Βακχιάδαι καλεόμενοι ἔνεμον τὴν πόλιν, ἐδίδοσαν δὲ καὶ ἤγοντο ἐξ ἀλλήλων. Ἀμφίονι δὲ ἐόντι τούτων τῶν ἀνδρῶν γίνεται θυγάτηρ χωλή· οὔνομα δέ οἱ ἦν Λάβδα. ταύτην Βακχιαδέων γὰρ οὐδεὶς ἤθελε γῆμαι, ἴσχει Ἠετίων ὁ Ἐχεκράτεος, δήμου μὲν ἐὼν ἐκ Πέτρης, ἀτὰρ τὰ ἀνέκαθεν Λαπίθης τε καὶ Καινείδης. ἐκ δέ οἱ ταύτης τῆς γυναικὸς οὐδʼ ἐξ ἄλλης παῖδες ἐγίνοντο. ἐστάλη ὦν ἐς Δελφοὺς περὶ γόνου. ἐσιόντα δὲ αὐτὸν ἰθέως ἡ Πυθίη προσαγορεύει τοῖσιδε τοῖσι ἔπεσι. Ἠετίων, οὔτις σε τίει πολύτιτον ἐόντα. Λάβδα κύει, τέξει δʼ ὀλοοίτροχον· ἐν δὲ πεσεῖται ἀνδράσι μουνάρχοισι, δικαιώσει δὲ Κόρινθον. ταῦτα χρησθέντα τῷ Ἠετίωνι ἐξαγγέλλεταί κως τοῖσι Βακχιάδῃσι, τοῖσι τὸ μὲν πρότερον γενόμενον χρηστήριον ἐς Κόρινθον ἦν ἄσημον, φέρον τε ἐς τὠυτὸ καὶ τὸ τοῦ Ἠετίωνος καὶ λέγον ὧδε. αἰετὸς ἐν πέτρῃσι κύει, τέξει δὲ λέοντα καρτερὸν ὠμηστήν· πολλῶν δʼ ὑπὸ γούνατα λύσει. ταῦτά νυν εὖ φράζεσθε, Κορίνθιοι, οἳ περὶ καλήν Πειρήνην οἰκεῖτε καὶ ὀφρυόεντα Κόρινθον.
5.92
Περίανδρος δὲ συνιεὶς τὸ ποιηθὲν καὶ νόῳ ἴσχων ὥς οἱ ὑπετίθετο Θρασύβουλος τοὺς ὑπειρόχους τῶν ἀστῶν φονεύειν, ἐνθαῦτα δὴ πᾶσαν κακότητα ἐξέφαινε ἐς τοὺς πολιήτας. ὅσα γὰρ Κύψελος ἀπέλιπε κτείνων τε καὶ διώκων, Περίανδρος σφέα ἀπετέλεσε, μιῇ δὲ ἡμέρῃ ἀπέδυσε πάσας τὰς Κορινθίων γυναῖκας διὰ τὴν ἑωυτοῦ γυναῖκα Μέλισσαν. πέμψαντι γάρ οἱ ἐς Θεσπρωτοὺς ἐπʼ Ἀχέροντα ποταμὸν ἀγγέλους ἐπὶ τὸ νεκυομαντήιον παρακαταθήκης πέρι ξεινικῆς οὔτε σημανέειν ἔφη ἡ Μέλισσα ἐπιφανεῖσα οὔτε κατερέειν ἐν τῷ κέεται χώρῳ ἡ παρακαταθήκη· ῥιγοῦν τε γὰρ καὶ εἶναι γυμνή· τῶν γάρ οἱ συγκατέθαψε ἱματίων ὄφελος εἶναι οὐδὲν οὐ κατακαυθέντων· μαρτύριον δέ οἱ εἶναι ὡς ἀληθέα ταῦτα λέγει, ὅτι ἐπὶ ψυχρὸν τὸν ἰπνὸν Περίανδρος τοὺς ἄρτους ἐπέβαλε. ταῦτα δὲ ὡς ὀπίσω ἀπηγγέλθη τῷ Περιάνδρῳ, πιστὸν γάρ οἱ ἦν τὸ συμβόλαιον ὃς νεκρῷ ἐούσῃ Μελίσσῃ ἐμίγη, ἰθέως δὴ μετὰ τὴν ἀγγελίην κήρυγμα ἐποιήσατο ἐς τὸ Ἥραιον ἐξιέναι πάσας τὰς Κορινθίων γυναῖκας. αἳ μὲν δὴ ὡς ἐς ὁρτὴν ἤισαν κόσμῳ τῷ καλλίστῳ χρεώμεναι, ὃ δʼ ὑποστήσας τοὺς δορυφόρους ἀπέδυσε σφέας πάσας ὁμοίως, τάς τε ἐλευθέρας καὶ τὰς ἀμφιπόλους, συμφορήσας δὲ ἐς ὄρυγμα Μελίσσῃ ἐπευχόμενος κατέκαιε. ταῦτα δέ οἱ ποιήσαντι καὶ τὸ δεύτερον πέμψαντι ἔφρασε τὸ εἴδωλον τὸ Μελίσσης ἐς τὸν κατέθηκε χῶρον τοῦ ξείνου τὴν παρακαταθήκην. τοιοῦτο μὲν ὑμῖν ἐστὶ ἡ τυραννίς, ὦ Λακεδαιμόνιοι, καὶ τοιούτων ἔργων. ἡμέας δὲ τοὺς Κορινθίους τότε αὐτίκα θῶμα μέγα εἶχε ὅτε ὑμέας εἴδομεν μεταπεμπομένους Ἱππίην, νῦν τε δὴ καὶ μεζόνως θωμάζομεν λέγοντας ταῦτα, ἐπιμαρτυρόμεθά τε ἐπικαλεόμενοι ὑμῖν θεοὺς τοὺς Ἑλληνίους μὴ κατιστάναι τυραννίδας ἐς τὰς πόλις. οὔκων παύσεσθε ἀλλὰ πειρήσεσθε παρὰ τὸ δίκαιον κατάγοντες Ἱππίην· ἴστε ὑμῖν Κορινθίους γε οὐ συναινέοντας.”
5.92
ἄρξαντος δὲ τούτου ἐπὶ τριήκοντα ἔτεα καὶ διαπλέξαντος τὸν βίον εὖ, διάδοχός οἱ τῆς τυραννίδος ὁ παῖς Περίανδρος γίνεται. ὁ τοίνυν Περίανδρος κατʼ ἀρχὰς μὲν ἦν ἠπιώτερος τοῦ πατρός, ἐπείτε δὲ ὡμίλησε διʼ ἀγγέλων Θρασυβούλῳ τῷ Μιλήτου τυράννῳ, πολλῷ ἔτι ἐγένετο Κυψέλου μιαιφονώτερος. πέμψας γὰρ παρὰ Θρασύβουλον κήρυκα ἐπυνθάνετο ὅντινα ἂν τρόπον ἀσφαλέστατον καταστησάμενος τῶν πρηγμάτων κάλλιστα τὴν πόλιν ἐπιτροπεύοι. Θρασύβουλος δὲ τὸν ἐλθόντα παρὰ τοῦ Περιάνδρου ἐξῆγε ἔξω τοῦ ἄστεος, ἐσβὰς δὲ ἐς ἄρουραν ἐσπαρμένην ἅμα τε διεξήιε τὸ λήιον ἐπειρωτῶν τε καὶ ἀναποδίζων τὸν κήρυκα κατὰ τὴν ἀπὸ Κορίνθου ἄπιξιν, καὶ ἐκόλουε αἰεὶ ὅκως τινὰ ἴδοι τῶν ἀσταχύων ὑπερέχοντα, κολούων δὲ ἔρριπτε, ἐς ὃ τοῦ ληίου τὸ κάλλιστόν τε καὶ βαθύτατον διέφθειρε τρόπῳ τοιούτω· διεξελθὼν δὲ τὸ χωρίον καὶ ὑποθέμενος ἔπος οὐδὲν ἀποπέμπει τὸν κήρυκα. νοστήσαντος δὲ τοῦ κήρυκος ἐς τὴν Κόρινθον ἦν πρόθυμος πυνθάνεσθαι τὴν ὑποθήκην ὁ Περίανδρος· ὁ δὲ οὐδέν οἱ ἔφη Θρασύβουλον ὑποθέσθαι, θωμάζειν τε αὐτοῦ παρʼ οἷόν μιν ἄνδρα ἀποπέμψειε, ὡς παραπλῆγά τε καὶ τῶν ἑωυτοῦ σινάμωρον, ἀπηγεόμενος τά περ πρὸς Θρασυβούλου ὀπώπεε.
5.92
ἔδει δὲ ἐκ τοῦ Ἠετίωνος γόνου Κορίνθῳ κακὰ ἀναβλαστεῖν. ἡ Λάβδα γὰρ πάντα ταῦτα ἤκουε ἑστεῶσα πρὸς αὐτῇσι τῇσι θύρῃσι· δείσασα δὲ μή σφι μεταδόξῃ καὶ τὸ δεύτερον λαβόντες τὸ παιδίον ἀποκτείνωσι, φέρουσα κατακρύπτει ἐς τὸ ἀφραστότατόν οἱ ἐφαίνετο εἶναι, ἐς κυψέλην, ἐπισταμένη ὡς εἰ ὑποστρέψαντες ἐς ζήτησιν ἀπικνεοίατο πάντα ἐρευνήσειν μέλλοιεν· τὰ δὴ καὶ ἐγίνετο. ἐλθοῦσι δὲ καὶ διζημένοισι αὐτοῖσι ὡς οὐκ ἐφαίνετο, ἐδόκεε ἀπαλλάσσεσθαι καὶ λέγειν πρὸς τοὺς ἀποπέμψαντας ὡς πάντα ποιήσειαν τὰ ἐκεῖνοι ἐνετείλαντο. οἳ μὲν δὴ ἀπελθόντες ἔλεγον ταῦτα.
5.92
οἳ μὲν ταῦτα ἔλεγον, τῶν δὲ συμμάχων τὸ πλῆθος οὐκ ἐνεδέκετο τοὺς λόγους. οἱ μέν νυν ἄλλοι ἡσυχίην ἦγον, Κορίνθιος δὲ Σωκλέης ἔλεξε τάδε.
5.92
τοῦτο μὲν δὴ τοῖσι Βακχιάδῃσι πρότερον γενόμενον ἦν ἀτέκμαρτον· τότε δὲ τὸ Ἠετίωνι γενόμενον ὡς ἐπύθοντο, αὐτίκα καὶ τὸ πρότερον συνῆκαν ἐὸν συνῳδὸν τῷ Ἠετίωνος. συνέντες δὲ καὶ τοῦτο εἶχον ἐν ἡσυχίῃ, ἐθέλοντες τὸν μέλλοντα Ἠετίωνι γίνεσθαι γόνον διαφθεῖραι. ὡς δʼ ἔτεκε ἡ γυνὴ τάχιστα, πέμπουσι σφέων αὐτῶν δέκα ἐς τὸν δῆμον ἐν τῷ κατοίκητο ὁ Ἠετίων ἀποκτενέοντας τὸ παιδίον. ἀπικόμενοι δὲ οὗτοι ἐς τὴν Πέτρην καὶ παρελθόντες ἐς τὴν αὐλὴν τὴν Ἠετίωνος αἴτεον τὸ παιδίον· ἡ δὲ Λάβδα εἰδυῖά τε οὐδὲν τῶν εἵνεκα ἐκεῖνοι ἀπικοίατο, καὶ δοκέουσα σφέας φιλοφροσύνης τοῦ πατρὸς εἵνεκα αἰτέειν, φέρουσα ἐνεχείρισε αὐτῶν ἑνί. τοῖσι δὲ ἄρα ἐβεβούλευτο κατʼ ὁδὸν τὸν πρῶτον αὐτῶν λαβόντα τὸ παιδίον προσουδίσαι. ἐπεὶ ὦν ἔδωκε φέρουσα ἡ Λάβδα, τὸν λαβόντα τῶν ἀνδρῶν θείῃ τύχῃ προσεγέλασε τὸ παιδίον, καὶ τὸν φρασθέντα τοῦτο οἶκτός τις ἴσχει ἀποκτεῖναι, κατοικτείρας δὲ παραδιδοῖ τῷ δευτέρῳ, ὁ δὲ τῷ τρίτῳ. οὕτω δὴ διεξῆλθε διὰ πάντων τῶν δέκα παραδιδόμενον, οὐδενὸς βουλομένου διεργάσασθαι. ἀποδόντες ὦν ὀπίσω τῇ τεκούσῃ τὸ παιδίον καὶ ἐξελθόντες ἔξω, ἑστεῶτες ἐπὶ τῶν θυρέων ἀλλήλων ἅπτοντο καταιτιώμενοι, καὶ μάλιστα τοῦ πρώτου λαβόντος, ὅτι οὐκ ἐποίησε κατὰ τὰ δεδογμένα, ἐς ὃ δή σφι χρόνου ἐγγινομένου ἔδοξε αὖτις παρελθόντας πάντας τοῦ φόνου μετίσχειν.
5.92
‘ἦ δὴ ὅ τε οὐρανὸς ἔνερθε ἔσται τῆς γῆς καὶ ἡ γῆ μετέωρος ὑπὲρ τοῦ οὐρανοῦ, καὶ ἄνθρωποι νομὸν ἐν θαλάσσῃ ἕξουσι καὶ ἰχθύες τὸν πρότερον ἄνθρωποι, ὅτε γε ὑμεῖς ὦ Λακεδαιμόνιοι ἰσοκρατίας καταλύοντες τυραννίδας ἐς τὰς πόλις κατάγειν παρασκευάζεσθε, τοῦ οὔτε ἀδικώτερον ἐστὶ οὐδὲν κατʼ ἀνθρώπους οὔτε μιαιφονώτερον. εἰ γὰρ δὴ τοῦτό γε δοκέει ὑμῖν εἶναι χρηστὸν ὥστε τυραννεύεσθαι τὰς πόλις, αὐτοὶ πρῶτοι τύραννον καταστησάμενοι παρὰ σφίσι αὐτοῖσι οὕτω καὶ τοῖσι ἄλλοισι δίζησθε κατιστάναι· νῦν δὲ αὐτοὶ τυράννων ἄπειροι ἐόντες, καὶ φυλάσσοντες τοῦτο δεινότατα ἐν τῇ Σπάρτῃ μὴ γενέσθαι, παραχρᾶσθε ἐς τοὺς συμμάχους. εἰ δὲ αὐτοῦ ἔμπειροι ἔατε κατά περ ἡμεῖς, εἴχετε ἂν περὶ αὐτοῦ γνώμας ἀμείνονας συμβαλέσθαι ἤ περ νῦν. 5.93 Σωκλέης μὲν ἀπὸ Κορίνθου πρεσβεύων ἔλεξε τάδε, Ἱππίης δὲ αὐτὸν ἀμείβετο τοὺς αὐτοὺς ἐπικαλέσας θεοὺς ἐκείνῳ, ἦ μὲν Κορινθίους μάλιστα πάντων ἐπιποθήσειν Πεισιστρατίδας, ὅταν σφι ἥκωσι ἡμέραι αἱ κύριαι ἀνιᾶσθαι ὑπʼ Ἀθηναίων. Ἱππίης μὲν τούτοισι ἀμείψατο οἷα τοὺς χρησμοὺς ἀτρεκέστατα ἀνδρῶν ἐξεπιστάμενος· οἱ δὲ λοιποὶ τῶν συμμάχων τέως μὲν εἶχον ἐν ἡσυχίῃ σφέας αὐτούς, ἐπείτε δὲ Σωκλέος ἤκουσαν εἴπαντος ἐλευθέρως, ἅπας τις αὐτῶν φωνὴν ῥήξας αἱρέετο τοῦ Κορινθίου τὴν γνώμην, Λακεδαιμονίοισί τε ἐπεμαρτυρέοντο μὴ ποιέειν μηδὲν νεώτερον περὶ πόλιν Ἑλλάδα. 5.94 οὕτω μὲν τοῦτο ἐπαύσθη. Ἱππίῃ δὲ ἐνθεῦτεν ἀπελαυνομένῳ ἐδίδου μὲν Ἀμύντης ὁ Μακεδόνων βασιλεὺς Ἀνθεμοῦντα, ἐδίδοσαν δὲ Θεσσαλοὶ Ἰωλκόν. ὁ δὲ τούτων μὲν οὐδέτερα αἱρέετο, ἀνεχώρεε δὲ ὀπίσω ἐς Σίγειον, τὸ εἷλε Πεισίστρατος αἰχμῇ παρὰ Μυτιληναίων, κρατήσας δὲ αὐτοῦ κατέστησε τύραννον εἶναι παῖδα τὸν ἑωυτοῦ νόθον Ἡγησίστρατον, γεγονότα ἐξ Ἀργείης γυναικός, ὃς οὐκ ἀμαχητὶ εἶχε τὰ παρέλαβε παρὰ Πεισιστράτου. ἐπολέμεον γὰρ ἔκ τε Ἀχιλληίου πόλιος ὁρμώμενοι καὶ Σιγείου ἐπὶ χρόνον συχνὸν Μυτιληναῖοί τε καὶ Ἀθηναῖοι, οἳ μὲν ἀπαιτέοντες τὴν χώρην, Ἀθηναῖοι δὲ οὔτε συγγινωσκόμενοι ἀποδεικνύντες τε λόγῳ οὐδὲν μᾶλλον Αἰολεῦσι μετεὸν τῆς Ἰλιάδος χώρης ἢ οὐ καὶ σφίσι καὶ τοῖσι ἄλλοισι, ὅσοι Ἑλλήνων συνεπρήξαντο Μενέλεῳ τὰς Ἑλένης ἁρπαγάς. 5.95 πολεμεόντων δὲ σφέων παντοῖα καὶ ἄλλα ἐγένετο ἐν τῇσι μάχῃσι, ἐν δὲ δὴ καὶ Ἀλκαῖος ὁ ποιητὴς συμβολῆς γενομένης καὶ νικώντων Ἀθηναίων αὐτὸς μὲν φεύγων ἐκφεύγει, τὰ δέ οἱ ὅπλα ἴσχουσι Ἀθηναῖοι, καί σφεα ἀνεκρέμασαν πρὸς τὸ Ἀθήναιον τὸ ἐν Σιγείῳ. ταῦτα δὲ Ἀλκαῖος ἐν μέλεϊ ποιήσας ἐπιτιθεῖ ἐς Μυτιλήνην, ἐξαγγελλόμενος τὸ ἑωυτοῦ πάθος Μελανίππῳ ἀνδρὶ ἑταίρῳ. Μυτιληναίους δὲ καὶ Ἀθηναίους κατήλλαξε Περίανδρος ὁ Κυψέλου· τούτῳ γὰρ διαιτητῇ ἐπετράποντο· κατήλλαξε δὲ ὧδε, νέμεσθαι ἑκατέρους τὴν ἔχουσι.'' None
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5.82 This was the beginning of the Aeginetans' long-standing debt of enmity against the Athenians. The Epidaurians' land bore no produce. For this reason they inquired at Delphi concerning this calamity, and the priestess bade them set up images of Damia and Auxesia, saying that if they so did their luck would be better. The Epidaurians then asked in addition whether they should make the images of bronze or of stone, and the priestess bade them do neither, but make them of the wood of the cultivated olive. ,So the men of Epidaurus asked the Athenians to permit them to cut down some olive trees, supposing the olives there to be the holiest. Indeed it is said that at that time there were no olives anywhere save at Athens. ,The Athenians consented to give the trees, if the Epidaurians would pay yearly sacred dues to Athena, the city's goddess, and to Erechtheus. The Epidaurians agreed to this condition, and their request was granted. When they set up images made of these olive trees, their land brought forth fruit, and they fulfilled their agreement with the Athenians." "
5.82
This was the beginning of the Aeginetans' long-standing debt of enmity against the Athenians. The Epidaurians' land bore no produce. For this reason they inquired at Delphi concerning this calamity, and the priestess bade them set up images of Damia and Auxesia, saying that if they so did their luck would be better. The Epidaurians then asked in addition whether they should make the images of bronze or of stone, and the priestess bade them do neither, but make them of the wood of the cultivated olive. ,So the men of Epidaurus asked the Athenians to permit them to cut down some olive trees, supposing the olives there to be the holiest. Indeed it is said that at that time there were no olives anywhere save at Athens. ,The Athenians consented to give the trees, if the Epidaurians would pay yearly sacred dues to Athena, the city's goddess, and to Erechtheus. The Epidaurians agreed to this condition, and their request was granted. When they set up images made of these olive trees, their land brought forth fruit, and they fulfilled their agreement with the Athenians." '5.83 Now at this time, as before it, the Aeginetans were in all matters still subject to the Epidaurians and even crossed to Epidaurus for the hearing of their own private lawsuits. From this time, however, they began to build ships, and stubbornly revolted from the Epidaurians. ,In the course of this struggle, they did the Epidaurians much damage and stole their images of Damia and Auxesia. These they took away and set them up in the middle of their own country at a place called Oea, about twenty furlongs distant from their city. ,Having set them up in this place they sought their favor with sacrifices and female choruses in the satirical and abusive mode. Ten men were appointed providers of a chorus for each of the deities, and the choruses aimed their raillery not at any men but at the women of the country. The Epidaurians too had the same rites, and they have certain secret rites as well. 5.83 Now at this time, as before it, the Aeginetans were in all matters still subject to the Epidaurians and even crossed to Epidaurus for the hearing of their own private lawsuits. From this time, however, they began to build ships, and stubbornly revolted from the Epidaurians. ,In the course of this struggle, they did the Epidaurians much damage and stole their images of Damia and Auxesia. These they took away and set them up in the middle of their own country at a place called Oea, about twenty furlongs distant from their city. ,Having set them up in this place they sought their favor with sacrifices and female choruses in the satirical and abusive mode. Ten men were appointed providers of a chorus for each of the deities, and the choruses aimed their raillery not at any men but at the women of the country. The Epidaurians too had the same rites, and they have certain secret rites as well. 5.84 When these images were stolen, the Epidaurians ceased from fulfilling their agreement with the Athenians. Then the Athenians sent an angry message to the Epidaurians who pleaded in turn that they were doing no wrong. “For as long,” they said, “as we had the images in our country, we fulfilled our agreement. Now that we are deprived of them, it is not just that we should still be paying. Ask your dues of the men of Aegina, who have the images.” ,The Athenians therefore sent to Aegina and demanded that the images be restored, but the Aeginetans answered that they had nothing to do with the Athenians. 5.84 When these images were stolen, the Epidaurians ceased from fulfilling their agreement with the Athenians. Then the Athenians sent an angry message to the Epidaurians who pleaded in turn that they were doing no wrong. “For as long,” they said, “as we had the images in our country, we fulfilled our agreement. Now that we are deprived of them, it is not just that we should still be paying. Ask your dues of the men of Aegina, who have the images.” ,The Athenians therefore sent to Aegina and demanded that the images be restored, but the Aeginetans answered that they had nothing to do with the Athenians. ' "5.85 The Athenians report that after making this demand, they despatched one trireme with certain of their citizens who, coming in the name of the whole people to Aegina, attempted to tear the images, as being made of Attic wood, from their bases so that they might carry them away. ,When they could not obtain possession of them in this manner, they tied cords around the images with which they could be dragged. While they were attempting to drag them off, they were overtaken both by a thunderstorm and an earthquake. This drove the trireme's crew to such utter madness that they began to slay each other as if they were enemies. At last only one of all was left, who returned by himself to Phalerum." "5.85 The Athenians report that after making this demand, they despatched one trireme with certain of their citizens who, coming in the name of the whole people to Aegina, attempted to tear the images, as being made of Attic wood, from their bases so that they might carry them away. ,When they could not obtain possession of them in this manner, they tied cords around the images with which they could be dragged. While they were attempting to drag them off, they were overtaken both by a thunderstorm and an earthquake. This drove the trireme's crew to such utter madness that they began to slay each other as if they were enemies. At last only one of all was left, who returned by himself to Phalerum." '5.86 This is the Athenian version of the matter, but the Aeginetans say that the Athenians came not in one ship only, for they could easily have kept off a single ship, or several, for that matter, even if they had no navy themselves. The truth was, they said, that the Athenians descended upon their coasts with many ships and that they yielded to them without making a fight of it at sea. ,They are not able to determine clearly whether it was because they admitted to being weaker at sea-fighting that they yielded, or because they were planning what they then actually did. ,When, as the Aeginetans say, no man came out to fight with them, the Athenians disembarked from their ships and turned their attention to the images. Unable to drag them from the bases, they fastened cords on them and dragged them until they both—this I cannot believe, but another might—fell on their knees. Both have remained in this position ever since. ,This is what the Athenians did, but the Aeginetans say that they discovered that the Athenians were about to make war upon them and therefore assured themselves of help from the Argives. So when the Athenians disembarked on the land of Aegina, the Argives came to aid the Aeginetans, crossing over from Epidaurus to the island secretly. They then fell upon the Athenians unaware and cut them off from their ships. It was at this moment that the thunderstorm and earthquake came upon them 5.86 This is the Athenian version of the matter, but the Aeginetans say that the Athenians came not in one ship only, for they could easily have kept off a single ship, or several, for that matter, even if they had no navy themselves. The truth was, they said, that the Athenians descended upon their coasts with many ships and that they yielded to them without making a fight of it at sea. ,They are not able to determine clearly whether it was because they admitted to being weaker at sea-fighting that they yielded, or because they were planning what they then actually did. ,When, as the Aeginetans say, no man came out to fight with them, the Athenians disembarked from their ships and turned their attention to the images. Unable to drag them from the bases, they fastened cords on them and dragged them until they both—this I cannot believe, but another might—fell on their knees. Both have remained in this position ever since. ,This is what the Athenians did, but the Aeginetans say that they discovered that the Athenians were about to make war upon them and therefore assured themselves of help from the Argives. So when the Athenians disembarked on the land of Aegina, the Argives came to aid the Aeginetans, crossing over from Epidaurus to the island secretly. They then fell upon the Athenians unaware and cut them off from their ships. It was at this moment that the thunderstorm and earthquake came upon them 5.87 This, then, is the story told by the Argives and Aeginetans, and the Athenians too acknowledge that only one man of their number returned safely to Attica. ,The Argives, however, say that he escaped after they had destroyed the rest of the Athenian force, while the Athenians claim that the whole thing was to be attributed to divine power. This one man did not survive but perished in the following manner. It would seem that he made his way to Athens and told of the mishap. When the wives of the men who had gone to attack Aegina heard this, they were very angry that he alone should be safe. They gathered round him and stabbed him with the brooch-pins of their garments, each asking him where her husband was. ,This is how this man met his end, and the Athenians found the action of their women to be more dreadful than their own misfortune. They could find, it is said, no other way to punish the women than changing their dress to the Ionian fashion. Until then the Athenian women had worn Dorian dress, which is very like the Corinthian. It was changed, therefore, to the linen tunic, so that they might have no brooch-pins to use. 5.87 This, then, is the story told by the Argives and Aeginetans, and the Athenians too acknowledge that only one man of their number returned safely to Attica. ,The Argives, however, say that he escaped after they had destroyed the rest of the Athenian force, while the Athenians claim that the whole thing was to be attributed to divine power. This one man did not survive but perished in the following manner. It would seem that he made his way to Athens and told of the mishap. When the wives of the men who had gone to attack Aegina heard this, they were very angry that he alone should be safe. They gathered round him and stabbed him with the brooch-pins of their garments, each asking him where her husband was. ,This is how this man met his end, and the Athenians found the action of their women to be more dreadful than their own misfortune. They could find, it is said, no other way to punish the women than changing their dress to the Ionian fashion. Until then the Athenian women had worn Dorian dress, which is very like the Corinthian. It was changed, therefore, to the linen tunic, so that they might have no brooch-pins to use. 5.88 The truth of the matter, however, is that this form of dress is not in its origin Ionian, but Carian, for in ancient times all women in Greece wore the costume now known as Dorian. ,As for the Argives and Aeginetans, this was the reason of their passing a law in both their countries that brooch-pins should be made half as long as they used to be and that brooches should be the principal things offered by women in the shrines of these two goddesses. Furthermore, nothing else Attic should be brought to the temple, not even pottery, and from that time on only drinking vessels made in the country should be used. 5.88 The truth of the matter, however, is that this form of dress is not in its origin Ionian, but Carian, for in ancient times all women in Greece wore the costume now known as Dorian. ,As for the Argives and Aeginetans, this was the reason of their passing a law in both their countries that brooch-pins should be made half as long as they used to be and that brooches should be the principal things offered by women in the shrines of these two goddesses. Furthermore, nothing else Attic should be brought to the temple, not even pottery, and from that time on only drinking vessels made in the country should be used.
5.92
These were the words of the Lacedaemonians, but their words were ill-received by the greater part of their allies. The rest then keeping silence, Socles, a Corinthian, said, ,“In truth heaven will be beneath the earth and the earth aloft above the heaven, and men will dwell in the sea and fishes where men dwelt before, now that you, Lacedaemonians, are destroying the rule of equals and making ready to bring back tyranny into the cities, tyranny, a thing more unrighteous and bloodthirsty than anything else on this earth. ,If indeed it seems to you to be a good thing that the cities be ruled by tyrants, set up a tyrant among yourselves first and then seek to set up such for the rest. As it is, however, you, who have never made trial of tyrants and take the greatest precautions that none will arise at Sparta, deal wrongfully with your allies. If you had such experience of that thing as we have, you would be more prudent advisers concerning it than you are now.” ,The Corinthian state was ordered in such manner as I will show.There was an oligarchy, and this group of men, called the Bacchiadae, held sway in the city, marrying and giving in marriage among themselves. Now Amphion, one of these men, had a crippled daughter, whose name was Labda. Since none of the Bacchiadae would marry her, she was wedded to Eetion son of Echecrates, of the township of Petra, a Lapith by lineage and of the posterity of Caeneus. ,When no sons were born to him by this wife or any other, he set out to Delphi to enquire concerning the matter of acquiring offspring. As soon as he entered, the Pythian priestess spoke these verses to him:
5.92 These were the words of the Lacedaemonians, but their words were ill-received by the greater part of their allies. The rest then keeping silence, Socles, a Corinthian, said, ,“In truth heaven will be beneath the earth and the earth aloft above the heaven, and men will dwell in the sea and fishes where men dwelt before, now that you, Lacedaemonians, are destroying the rule of equals and making ready to bring back tyranny into the cities, tyranny, a thing more unrighteous and bloodthirsty than anything else on this earth. ,If indeed it seems to you to be a good thing that the cities be ruled by tyrants, set up a tyrant among yourselves first and then seek to set up such for the rest. As it is, however, you, who have never made trial of tyrants and take the greatest precautions that none will arise at Sparta, deal wrongfully with your allies. If you had such experience of that thing as we have, you would be more prudent advisers concerning it than you are now.” ,The Corinthian state was ordered in such manner as I will show.There was an oligarchy, and this group of men, called the Bacchiadae, held sway in the city, marrying and giving in marriage among themselves. Now Amphion, one of these men, had a crippled daughter, whose name was Labda. Since none of the Bacchiadae would marry her, she was wedded to Eetion son of Echecrates, of the township of Petra, a Lapith by lineage and of the posterity of Caeneus. ,When no sons were born to him by this wife or any other, he set out to Delphi to enquire concerning the matter of acquiring offspring. As soon as he entered, the Pythian priestess spoke these verses to him: 5.93 These were the words of Socles, the envoy from Corinth, and Hippias answered, calling the same gods as Socles had invoked to witness, that the Corinthians would be the first to wish the Pisistratidae back, when the time appointed should come for them to be vexed by the Athenians. ,Hippias made this answer, inasmuch as he had more exact knowledge of the oracles than any man, but the rest of the allies, who had till now kept silence, spoke out when they heard the free speech of Socles and sided with the opinion of the Corinthians, entreating the Lacedaemonians not to harm a Greek city. 5.93 These were the words of Socles, the envoy from Corinth, and Hippias answered, calling the same gods as Socles had invoked to witness, that the Corinthians would be the first to wish the Pisistratidae back, when the time appointed should come for them to be vexed by the Athenians. ,Hippias made this answer, inasmuch as he had more exact knowledge of the oracles than any man, but the rest of the allies, who had till now kept silence, spoke out when they heard the free speech of Socles and sided with the opinion of the Corinthians, entreating the Lacedaemonians not to harm a Greek city. ' "5.94 His plan, then, came to nothing, and Hippias was forced to depart. Amyntas king of the Macedonians offered him Anthemus, and the Thessalians Iolcus, but he would have neither. He withdrew to Sigeum, which Pisistratus had taken at the spear's point from the Mytilenaeans and where he then established as tyrant Hegesistratus, his own bastard son by an Argive woman. Hegesistratus, however, could not keep what Pisistratus had given him without fighting, ,for there was constant war over a long period of time between the Athenians at Sigeum and the Mytilenaeans at Achilleum. The Mytilenaeans were demanding the place back, and the Athenians, bringing proof to show that the Aeolians had no more part or lot in the land of Ilium than they themselves and all the other Greeks who had aided Menelaus to avenge the rape of Helen, would not consent. " "5.94 His plan, then, came to nothing, and Hippias was forced to depart. Amyntas king of the Macedonians offered him Anthemus, and the Thessalians Iolcus, but he would have neither. He withdrew to Sigeum, which Pisistratus had taken at the spear's point from the Mytilenaeans and where he then established as tyrant Hegesistratus, his own bastard son by an Argive woman. Hegesistratus, however, could not keep what Pisistratus had given him without fighting, ,for there was constant war over a long period of time between the Athenians at Sigeum and the Mytilenaeans at Achilleum. The Mytilenaeans were demanding the place back, and the Athenians, bringing proof to show that the Aeolians had no more part or lot in the land of Ilium than they themselves and all the other Greeks who had aided Menelaus to avenge the rape of Helen, would not consent. " '5.95 Among the various incidents of this war, one in particular is worth mention; In the course of a battle in which the Athenians had the upper hand, Alcaeus the poet took to flight and escaped, but his armor was taken by the Athenians and hung up in the temple of Athena at Sigeum. ,Alcaeus wrote a poem about this and sent it to Mytilene. In it he relates his own misfortune to his friend Melanippus. As for the Mytilenaeans and Athenians, however, peace was made between them by Periander son of Cypselus, to whose arbitration they committed the matter, and the terms of peace were that each party should keep what it had. 5.95 Among the various incidents of this war, one in particular is worth mention; In the course of a battle in which the Athenians had the upper hand, Alcaeus the poet took to flight and escaped, but his armor was taken by the Athenians and hung up in the temple of Athena at Sigeum. ,Alcaeus wrote a poem about this and sent it to Mytilene. In it he relates his own misfortune to his friend Melanippus. As for the Mytilenaeans and Athenians, however, peace was made between them by Periander son of Cypselus, to whose arbitration they committed the matter, and the terms of peace were that each party should keep what it had. '" None
9. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • leader(ship) • ships, crews

 Found in books: Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 227; Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 821

10. None, None, nan (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Argo, as first ship

 Found in books: Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 120; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 120

11. Anon., 1 Enoch, 96.4, 100.10-100.13, 101.1-101.6 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Ships • ship captain • ship(s)

 Found in books: Mathews (2013), Riches, Poverty, and the Faithful: Perspectives on Wealth in the Second Temple Period and the Apocalypse of John, 58, 205, 212; Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 205, 320, 463, 470, 477, 478, 482

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96.4 Woe unto you, ye sinners, for your riches make you appear like the righteous, But your hearts convict you of being sinners, And this fact shall be a testimony against you for a memorial of (your) evil deeds.
100.10
And in those days in one place the fathers together with their sons shall be smitten And brothers one with another shall fall in death Till the streams flow with their blood.",For a man shall not withhold his hand from slaying his sons and his sons\' sons, And the sinner shall not withhold his hand from his honoured brother: From dawn till sunset they shall slay one another.,And the horse shall walk up to the breast in the blood of sinners, And the chariot shall be submerged to its height.,In those days the angels shall descend into the secret places And gather together into one place all those who brought down sin And the Most High will arise on that day of judgement To execute great judgement amongst sinners.",And over all the righteous and holy He will appoint guardians from amongst the holy angels To guard them as the apple of an eye, Until He makes an end of all wickedness and all sin, And though the righteous sleep a long sleep, they have nought to fear.,And (then) the children of the earth shall see the wise in security, And shall understand all the words of this book, And recognize that their riches shall not be able to save them In the overthrow of their sins.,Woe to you, Sinners, on the day of strong anguish, Ye who afflict the righteous and burn them with fire: Ye shall be requited according to your works.,Woe to you, ye obstinate of heart, Who watch in order to devise wickedness: Therefore shall fear come upon you And there shall be none to help you.,Woe to you, ye sinners, on account of the words of your mouth, And on account of the deeds of your hands which your godlessness as wrought, In blazing flames burning worse than fire shall ye burn.,And now, know ye that from the angels He will inquire as to your deeds in heaven, from the sun and from the moon and from the stars in reference to your sins because upon the earth ye execute,judgement on the righteous. And He will summon to testify against you every cloud and mist and dew and rain; for they shall all be withheld because of you from descending upon you, and they,shall be mindful of your sins. And now give presents to the rain that it be not withheld from descending upon you, nor yet the dew, when it has received gold and silver from you that it may descend. When the hoar-frost and snow with their chilliness, and all the snow-storms with all their plagues fall upon you, in those days ye shall not be able to stand before them. 100.11 judgement on the righteous. And He will summon to testify against you every cloud and mist and dew and rain; for they shall all be withheld because of you from descending upon you, and they 100.12 hall be mindful of your sins. And now give presents to the rain that it be not withheld from descending upon you, nor yet the dew, when it has received gold and silver from you that it may descend. When the hoar-frost and snow with their chilliness, and all the snow-storms with all their plagues fall upon you, in those days ye shall not be able to stand before them.
101.1
Observe the heaven, ye children of heaven, and every work of the Most High, and fear ye Him 101.2 and work no evil in His presence. If He closes the windows of heaven, and withholds the rain and 101.3 the dew from descending on the earth on your account, what will ye do then And if He sends His anger upon you because of your deeds, ye cannot petition Him; for ye spake proud and insolent 101.4 words against His righteousness: therefore ye shall have no peace. And see ye not the sailors of the ships, how their ships are tossed to and fro by the waves, and are shaken by the winds, and are 101.5 in sore trouble And therefore do they fear because all their goodly possessions go upon the sea with them, and they have evil forebodings of heart that the sea will swallow them and they will 101.6 perish therein. Are not the entire sea and all its waters, and all its movements, the work of the Most'' None
12. None, None, nan (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Argo, as first ship

 Found in books: Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 114, 118, 119, 123, 125, 126, 127, 130, 132, 133, 154; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 114, 118, 119, 123, 125, 126, 127, 130, 132, 133, 154

13. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 2.89 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Argo, as first ship

 Found in books: Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 115; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 115

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2.89 Just as the shield in Accius who had never seen a ship before, on descrying in the distance from his mountain‑top the strange vessel of the Argonauts, built by the gods, in his first amazement and alarm cries out: so huge a bulk Glides from the deep with the roar of a whistling wind: Waves roll before, and eddies surge and swirl; Hurtling headlong, it snort and sprays the foam. Now might one deem a bursting storm-cloud rolled, Now that a rock flew skyward, flung aloft By wind and storm, or whirling waterspout Rose from the clash of wave with warring wave; Save 'twere land-havoc wrought by ocean-flood, Or Triton's trident, heaving up the roots of cavernous vaults beneath the billowy sea, Hurled from the depth heaven-high a massy crag. At first he wonders what the unknown creature that he beholds may be. Then when he sees the warriors and hears the singing of the sailors, he goes on: the sportive dolphins swift Forge snorting through the foam — and so on and so on — Brings to my ears and hearing such a tune As old Silvanus piped. "" None
14. Catullus, Poems, 64.1-64.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Argo, as first ship

 Found in books: Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 115; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 115

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64.1 Pine-trees gendered whilome upon soaring Peliac summit 64.2 Swam (as the tale is told) through liquid surges of Neptune 64.3 Far as the Phasis-flood and frontier-land Aeetean; 64.4 Whenas the youths elect, of Argive vigour the oak-heart, 64.5 Longing the Golden Fleece of the Colchis-region to harry, 64.6 Dared in a poop swift-paced to span salt seas and their shallows, 64.7 Sweeping the deep blue seas with sweeps a-carven of fir-wood.'' None
15. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 4.41, 4.45 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Argo, as first ship

 Found in books: Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 114, 117; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 114, 117

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4.41 1. \xa0First of all, in the vicinity of Mount Pelion he built a ship which far surpassed in its size and in its equipment in general any vessel known in those days, since the men of that time put to sea on rafts or in very small boats. Consequently those who saw the ship at the time were greatly astonished, and when the report was noised about throughout Greece both of the exploit of the enterprise of building the ship, no small number of the youths of prominence were eager to take part in the expedition.,2. \xa0Jason, then, after he had launched the ship and fitted it out in brilliant fashion with everything which would astonish the mind, picked out the most renowned chieftains from those who were eager to share his plan, with the result that the whole number of those in his company amounted to fifty-four. of these the most famous were Castor and Polydeuces, Heracles and Telamon, Orpheus and Atalantê the daughter of Schoeneus, and the sons of Thespius, and the leader himself who was setting out on the voyage to Colchis.,3. \xa0The vessel was called Argo after Argus, as some writers of myths record, who was the master-builder of the ship and went along on the voyage in order to repair the parts of the vessel as they were strained from time to time, but, as some say, after its exceeding great swiftness, since the ancients called what is swift Argos. Now after the chieftains had gathered together they chose Heracles to be their general, preferring him because of his courage.
4.41
\xa0First of all, in the vicinity of Mount Pelion he built a ship which far surpassed in its size and in its equipment in general any vessel known in those days, since the men of that time put to sea on rafts or in very small boats. Consequently those who saw the ship at the time were greatly astonished, and when the report was noised about throughout Greece both of the exploit of the enterprise of building the ship, no small number of the youths of prominence were eager to take part in the expedition.,\xa0Jason, then, after he had launched the ship and fitted it out in brilliant fashion with everything which would astonish the mind, picked out the most renowned chieftains from those who were eager to share his plan, with the result that the whole number of those in his company amounted to fifty-four. of these the most famous were Castor and Polydeuces, Heracles and Telamon, Orpheus and Atalantê the daughter of Schoeneus, and the sons of Thespius, and the leader himself who was setting out on the voyage to Colchis.,\xa0The vessel was called Argo after Argus, as some writers of myths record, who was the master-builder of the ship and went along on the voyage in order to repair the parts of the vessel as they were strained from time to time, but, as some say, after its exceeding great swiftness, since the ancients called what is swift Argos. Now after the chieftains had gathered together they chose Heracles to be their general, preferring him because of his courage.
4.45
1. \xa0Since it is the task of history to inquire into the reasons for this slaying of strangers, we must discuss these reasons briefly, especially since the digression on this subject will be appropriate in connection with the deeds of the Argonauts. We are told, that is, that Helius had two sons, Aeëtes and Perses, Aeëtes being king of Colchis and the other king of the Tauric Chersonese, and that both of them were exceedingly cruel.,2. \xa0And Perses had a daughter Hecatê, who surpassed her father in boldness and lawlessness; she was also fond of hunting, and with she had no luck she would turn her arrows upon human beings instead of the beasts.,3. \xa0Being likewise ingenious in the mixing of deadly poisons she discovered the drug called aconite and tried out the strength of each poison by mixing it in the food given to the strangers.,4. \xa0And since she possessed great experience in such matters she first of all poisoned her father and so succeeded to the throne, and then, founding a temple of Artemis and commanding that strangers who landed there should be sacrificed to the goddess, she became known far and wide for her cruelty.,5. \xa0After this she married Aeëtes and bore two daughters, Circê and Medea, and a son Aegialeus.,6. \xa0Although Circê also, it is said, devoted herself to the devising of all kinds of drugs and discovered roots of all manner of natures and potencies such as are difficult to credit, yet, notwithstanding that she was taught by her mother Hecatê about not a\xa0few drugs, she discovered by her own study a far greater number, so that she left to the other woman no superiority whatever in the matter of devising uses of drugs.,7. \xa0She was given in marriage to the king of the Sarmatians, whom some call Scythians, and first she poisoned her husband and after that, succeeding to the throne, she committed many cruel and violent acts against her subjects.,8. \xa0For this reason she was deposed from her throne and, according to some writers of myths, fled to the ocean, where she seized a desert island, and there established herself with the women who had fled with her, though according to some historians she left the Pontus and settled in Italy on a promontory which to this day bears after her the name Circaeum.4.45 \xa0Since it is the task of history to inquire into the reasons for this slaying of strangers, we must discuss these reasons briefly, especially since the digression on this subject will be appropriate in connection with the deeds of the Argonauts. We are told, that is, that Helius had two sons, Aeëtes and Perses, Aeëtes being king of Colchis and the other king of the Tauric Chersonese, and that both of them were exceedingly cruel.,\xa0And Perses had a daughter Hecatê, who surpassed her father in boldness and lawlessness; she was also fond of hunting, and with she had no luck she would turn her arrows upon human beings instead of the beasts.,\xa0Being likewise ingenious in the mixing of deadly poisons she discovered the drug called aconite and tried out the strength of each poison by mixing it in the food given to the strangers. <,\xa0And since she possessed great experience in such matters she first of all poisoned her father and so succeeded to the throne, and then, founding a temple of Artemis and commanding that strangers who landed there should be sacrificed to the goddess, she became known far and wide for her cruelty.,\xa0After this she married Aeëtes and bore two daughters, Circê and Medea, and a son Aegialeus.,\xa0Although Circê also, it is said, devoted herself to the devising of all kinds of drugs and discovered roots of all manner of natures and potencies such as are difficult to credit, yet, notwithstanding that she was taught by her mother Hecatê about not a\xa0few drugs, she discovered by her own study a far greater number, so that she left to the other woman no superiority whatever in the matter of devising uses of drugs.,\xa0She was given in marriage to the king of the Sarmatians, whom some call Scythians, and first she poisoned her husband and after that, succeeding to the throne, she committed many cruel and violent acts against her subjects.,\xa0For this reason she was deposed from her throne and, according to some writers of myths, fled to the ocean, where she seized a desert island, and there established herself with the women who had fled with her, though according to some historians she left the Pontus and settled in Italy on a promontory which to this day bears after her the name Circaeum. ' None
16. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.89-1.150, 6.721 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Argo, as first ship

 Found in books: Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 115, 121, 123; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 115, 121, 123

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1.89 Aurea prima sata est aetas, quae vindice nullo, 1.90 sponte sua, sine lege fidem rectumque colebat. 1.91 Poena metusque aberant, nec verba mitia fixo 1.92 aere legebantur, nec supplex turba timebat' '1.94 Nondum caesa suis, peregrinum ut viseret orbem, 1.95 montibus in liquidas pinus descenderat undas, 1.96 nullaque mortales praeter sua litora norant. 1.97 Nondum praecipites cingebant oppida fossae; 1.98 non tuba directi, non aeris cornua flexi, 1.99 non galeae, non ensis erat: sine militis usu 1.100 mollia securae peragebant otia gentes. 1.101 ipsa quoque inmunis rastroque intacta nec ullis 1.103 contentique cibis nullo cogente creatis 1.104 arbuteos fetus montanaque fraga legebant 1.105 cornaque et in duris haerentia mora rubetis 1.106 et quae deciderant patula Iovis arbore glandes. 1.107 Ver erat aeternum, placidique tepentibus auris 1.108 mulcebant zephyri natos sine semine flores. 1.109 Mox etiam fruges tellus inarata ferebat, 1.110 nec renovatus ager gravidis canebat aristis; 1.111 flumina iam lactis, iam flumina nectaris ibant, 1.112 flavaque de viridi stillabant ilice mella. 1.113 Postquam, Saturno tenebrosa in Tartara misso, 1.114 sub Iove mundus erat, subiit argentea proles, 1.115 auro deterior, fulvo pretiosior aere. 1.116 Iuppiter antiqui contraxit tempora veris 1.117 perque hiemes aestusque et inaequalis autumnos 1.118 et breve ver spatiis exegit quattuor annum. 1.119 Tum primum siccis aer fervoribus ustus 1.120 canduit, et ventis glacies adstricta pependit. 1.121 Tum primum subiere domus (domus antra fuerunt 1.122 et densi frutices et vinctae cortice virgae). 1.123 Semina tum primum longis Cerealia sulcis 1.124 obruta sunt, pressique iugo gemuere iuvenci. 1.125 Tertia post illam successit aenea proles, 1.126 saevior ingeniis et ad horrida promptior arma, 1.127 non scelerata tamen. De duro est ultima ferro. 1.128 Protinus inrupit venae peioris in aevum 1.129 omne nefas: fugere pudor verumque fidesque; 1.130 In quorum subiere locum fraudesque dolique 1.131 insidiaeque et vis et amor sceleratus habendi. 1.132 Vela dabat ventis (nec adhuc bene noverat illos) 1.133 navita; quaeque diu steterant in montibus altis, 1.134 fluctibus ignotis insultavere carinae, 1.135 communemque prius ceu lumina solis et auras 1.136 cautus humum longo signavit limite mensor. 1.138 poscebatur humus, sed itum est in viscera terrae: 1.139 quasque recondiderat Stygiisque admoverat umbris, 1.140 effodiuntur opes, inritamenta malorum. 1.141 Iamque nocens ferrum ferroque nocentius aurum 1.142 prodierat: prodit bellum, quod pugnat utroque, 1.143 sanguineaque manu crepitantia concutit arma. 1.144 Vivitur ex rapto: non hospes ab hospite tutus, 1.145 non socer a genero; fratrum quoque gratia rara est. 1.146 Inminet exitio vir coniugis, illa mariti; 1.147 lurida terribiles miscent aconita novercae; 1.148 filius ante diem patrios inquirit in annos. 1.149 Victa iacet pietas, et virgo caede madentis, 1.150 ultima caelestum terras Astraea reliquit.'' None
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1.89 and Auster wafted to the distant south 1.90 where clouds and rain encompass his abode.— 1.91 and over these He fixed the liquid sky, 1.92 devoid of weight and free from earthly dross.' "1.93 My soul is wrought to sing of forms transformed,to bodies new and strange! Immortal Gods,inspire my heart, for ye have changed yourselves,and all things you have changed! Oh lead my song,in smooth and measured strains, from olden days,when earth began to this completed time!,Before the ocean and the earth appeared—,before the skies had overspread them all—,the face of Nature in a vast expanse,was naught but Chaos uniformly waste.,It was a rude and undeveloped mass,,that nothing made except a ponderous weight;,and all discordant elements confused,,were there congested in a shapeless heap.,nor did the moon renew her crescent horns;,the earth was not suspended in the air,exactly balanced by her heavy weight.,Not far along the margin of the shores,had Amphitrite stretched her lengthened arms,—,for all the land was mixed with sea and air.,The land was soft, the sea unfit to sail,,the atmosphere opaque, to naught was given,a proper form, in everything was strife,,and all was mingled in a seething mass—,with hot the cold parts strove, and wet with dry,and soft with hard, and weight with empty void.,he cut the land from skies, the sea from land,,the heavens ethereal from material air;,and when were all evolved from that dark mass,he bound the fractious parts in tranquil peace.,The fiery element of convex heaven,leaped from the mass devoid of dragging weight,,and chose the summit arch to which the air,as next in quality was next in place.,The earth more dense attracted grosser parts,and moved by gravity sank underneath;,and last of all the wide surrounding waves,in deeper channels rolled around the globe.,had carved asunder that discordant mass,,had thus reduced it to its elements,,that every part should equally combine,,when time began He rounded out the earth,and moulded it to form a mighty globe.,Then poured He forth the deeps and gave command,that they should billow in the rapid winds,,that they should compass every shore of earth.,he also added fountains, pools and lakes,,and bound with shelving banks the slanting streams,,which partly are absorbed and partly join,the boundless ocean. Thus received amid,the wide expanse of uncontrolled waves,,they beat the shores instead of crooked banks.,the valleys are depressed, the woods are clothed,in green, the stony mountains rise. And as,the heavens are intersected on the right,by two broad zones, by two that cut the left,,and by a fifth consumed with ardent heat,,with such a number did the careful God,mark off the compassed weight, and thus the earth,received as many climes.—Such heat consumes,the middle zone that none may dwell therein;,and two extremes are covered with deep snow;,and two are placed betwixt the hot and cold,,which mixed together give a temperate clime;,and over all the atmosphere suspends,with weight proportioned to the fiery sky,,exactly as the weight of earth compares,with weight of water.,to gather in the air and spread the clouds.,He fixed the thunders that disturb our souls,,and brought the lightning on destructive winds,that also waft the cold. Nor did the great,Artificer permit these mighty winds,to blow unbounded in the pathless skies,,but each discordant brother fixed in space,,although His power can scarce restrain their rage,to rend the universe. At His command,to far Aurora, Eurus took his way,,to Nabath, Persia , and that mountain range,first gilded by the dawn; and Zephyr's flight,was towards the evening star and peaceful shores,,warm with the setting sun; and Boreas,invaded Scythia and the northern snows;,and Auster wafted to the distant south,where clouds and rain encompass his abode.—,and over these He fixed the liquid sky,,devoid of weight and free from earthly dross.,and fixed their certain bounds, when all the stars,,which long were pressed and hidden in the mass,,began to gleam out from the plains of heaven,,and traversed, with the Gods, bright ether fields:,and lest some part might be bereft of life,the gleaming waves were filled with twinkling fish;,the earth was covered with wild animals;,the agitated air was filled with birds.,a being capable of lofty thought,,intelligent to rule, was wanting still,man was created! Did the Unknown God,designing then a better world make man,of seed divine? or did Prometheus,take the new soil of earth (that still contained,ome godly element of Heaven's Life),and use it to create the race of man;,first mingling it with water of new streams;,o that his new creation, upright man,,was made in image of commanding Gods?,On earth the brute creation bends its gaze,,but man was given a lofty countece,and was commanded to behold the skies;,and with an upright face may view the stars:—,and so it was that shapeless clay put on,the form of man till then unknown to earth.,First was the Golden Age. Then rectitude,pontaneous in the heart prevailed, and faith.,Avengers were not seen, for laws unframed,were all unknown and needless. Punishment,and fear of penalties existed not.,No harsh decrees were fixed on brazen plates.,No suppliant multitude the countece,of Justice feared, averting, for they dwelt,without a judge in peace. Descended not,the steeps, shorn from its height, the lofty pine,,cleaving the trackless waves of alien shores,,nor distant realms were known to wandering men.,The towns were not entrenched for time of war;,they had no brazen trumpets, straight, nor horns,of curving brass, nor helmets, shields nor swords.,There was no thought of martial pomp —secure,a happy multitude enjoyed repose.,a store of every fruit. The harrow touched,her not, nor did the plowshare wound,her fields. And man content with given food,,and none compelling, gathered arbute fruits,and wild strawberries on the mountain sides,,and ripe blackberries clinging to the bush,,and corners and sweet acorns on the ground,,down fallen from the spreading tree of Jove.,Eternal Spring! Soft breathing zephyrs soothed,and warmly cherished buds and blooms, produced,without a seed. The valleys though unplowed,gave many fruits; the fields though not renewed,white glistened with the heavy bearded wheat:,rivers flowed milk and nectar, and the trees,,the very oak trees, then gave honey of themselves.,and all the world was ruled by Jove supreme,,the Silver Age, though not so good as gold,but still surpassing yellow brass, prevailed.,by him divided into periods four,,unequal,—summer, autumn, winter, spring.—,then glowed with tawny heat the parched air,,or pendent icicles in winter froze,and man stopped crouching in crude caverns, while,he built his homes of tree rods, bark entwined.,Then were the cereals planted in long rows,,and bullocks groaned beneath the heavy yoke.,when cruel people were inclined to arms,but not to impious crimes. And last of all,the ruthless and hard Age of Iron prevailed,,from which maligt vein great evil sprung;,and modesty and faith and truth took flight,,and in their stead deceits and snares and frauds,and violence and wicked love of gain,,ucceeded.—Then the sailor spread his sails,to winds unknown, and keels that long had stood,on lofty mountains pierced uncharted waves.,Surveyors anxious marked with metes and bounds,the lands, created free as light and air:,nor need the rich ground furnish only crops,,and give due nourishment by right required,—,they penetrated to the bowels of earth,and dug up wealth, bad cause of all our ills,—,rich ores which long ago the earth had hid,and deep removed to gloomy Stygian caves:,and soon destructive iron and harmful gold,were brought to light; and War, which uses both,,came forth and shook with sanguinary grip,his clashing arms. Rapacity broke forth—,the guest was not protected from his host,,the father in law from his own son in law;,even brothers seldom could abide in peace.,The husband threatened to destroy his wife,,and she her husband: horrid step dames mixed,the deadly henbane: eager sons inquired,their fathers, ages. Piety was slain:,and last of all the virgin deity,,Astraea vanished from the blood-stained earth.,And lest ethereal heights should long remain,less troubled than the earth, the throne of Heaven,was threatened by the Giants; and they piled,mountain on mountain to the lofty stars.,But Jove, omnipotent, shot thunderbolts,through Mount Olympus , and he overturned,from Ossa huge, enormous Pelion.,And while these dreadful bodies lay overwhelmed,in their tremendous bulk, (so fame reports),the Earth was reeking with the copious blood,of her gigantic sons; and thus replete,with moisture she infused the steaming gore,with life renewed. So that a monument,of such ferocious stock should be retained,,he made that offspring in the shape of man;,but this new race alike despised the Gods,,and by the greed of savage slaughter proved,a sanguinary birth.,When, from his throne,upreme, the Son of Saturn viewed their deeds,,he deeply groaned: and calling to his mind,the loathsome feast Lycaon had prepared,,a recent deed not common to report,,his soul conceived great anger —worthy Jove—,and he convened a council. No delay,detained the chosen Gods.,a path is well defined on high, which men,,because so white, have named the Milky Way.,It makes a passage for the deities,and leads to mansions of the Thunder God,,to Jove's imperial home. On either side,of its wide way the noble Gods are seen,,but there the potent and renowned of Heaven,have fixed their homes.—It is a glorious place,,our most audacious verse might designate,the “Palace of High Heaven.” When the Gods,were seated, therefore, in its marble halls,the King of all above the throng sat high,,and leaning on his ivory scepter, thrice,,and once again he shook his awful locks,,wherewith he moved the earth, and seas and stars,—,and thus indigtly began to speak;,“The time when serpent footed giants strove,to fix their hundred arms on captive Heaven,,not more than this event could cause alarm,for my dominion of the universe.,Although it was a savage enemy,,yet warred we with a single source derived,of one. Now must I utterly destroy,this mortal race wherever Nereus roars,around the world. Yea, by the Infernal Streams,that glide through Stygian groves beneath the world,,I swear it. Every method has been tried.,The knife must cut immedicable wounds,,lest maladies infect untainted parts.,“Beneath my sway are demi gods and fauns,,nymphs, rustic deities, sylvans of the hills,,atyrs;—all these, unworthy Heaven's abodes,,we should at least permit to dwell on earth,which we to them bequeathed. What think ye, Gods,,is safety theirs when I, your sovereign lord,,the Thunder-bolt Controller, am ensnared,by fierce Lycaon?” Ardent in their wrath,,the astonished Gods demand revenge overtake,this miscreant; he who dared commit such crimes.,'Twas even thus when raged that impious band,to blot the Roman name in sacred blood,of Caesar, sudden apprehensive fears,of ruin absolute astonished man,,and all the world convulsed. Nor is the love,thy people bear to thee, Augustus, less,than these displayed to Jupiter whose voice,and gesture all the murmuring host restrained:,and as indigt clamour ceased, suppressed,by regt majesty, Jove once again,broke the deep silence with imperial words;,“Dismiss your cares; he paid the penalty,however all the crime and punishment,now learn from this:—An infamous report,of this unholy age had reached my ears,,and wishing it were false, I sloped my course,from high Olympus , and—although a God—,disguised in human form I viewed the world.,It would delay us to recount the crimes,unnumbered, for reports were less than truth.,“I traversed Maenalus where fearful dens,abound, over Lycaeus, wintry slopes,of pine tree groves, across Cyllene steep;,and as the twilight warned of night's approach,,I stopped in that Arcadian tyrant's realms,and entered his inhospitable home:—,and when I showed his people that a God,had come, the lowly prayed and worshiped me,,but this Lycaon mocked their pious vows,and scoffing said; ‘A fair experiment,will prove the truth if this be god or man.’,and he prepared to slay me in the night,—,to end my slumbers in the sleep of death.,So made he merry with his impious proof;,but not content with this he cut the throat,of a Molossian hostage sent to him,,and partly softened his still quivering limbs,in boiling water, partly roasted them,on fires that burned beneath. And when this flesh,was served to me on tables, I destroyed,his dwelling and his worthless Household Gods,,with thunder bolts avenging. Terror struck,he took to flight, and on the silent plains,is howling in his vain attempts to speak;,he raves and rages and his greedy jaws,,desiring their accustomed slaughter, turn,against the sheep—still eager for their blood.,His vesture separates in shaggy hair,,his arms are changed to legs; and as a wolf,he has the same grey locks, the same hard face,,the same bright eyes, the same ferocious look.,“Thus fell one house, but not one house alone,deserved to perish; over all the earth,ferocious deeds prevail,—all men conspire,in evil. Let them therefore feel the weight,of dreadful penalties so justly earned,,for such hath my unchanging will ordained.”,of Jove and added fuel to his wrath,,while others gave assent: but all deplored,and questioned the estate of earth deprived,of mortals. Who could offer frankincense,upon the altars? Would he suffer earth,to be despoiled by hungry beasts of prey?,Such idle questions of the state of man,the King of Gods forbade, but granted soon,to people earth with race miraculous,,unlike the first.,And now his thunder bolts,would Jove wide scatter, but he feared the flames,,unnumbered, sacred ether might ignite,and burn the axle of the universe:,and he remembered in the scroll of fate,,there is a time appointed when the sea,and earth and Heavens shall melt, and fire destroy,the universe of mighty labour wrought.,Such weapons by the skill of Cyclops forged,,for different punishment he laid aside—,for straightway he preferred to overwhelm,the mortal race beneath deep waves and storms,from every raining sky. And instantly,he shut the Northwind in Aeolian caves,,and every other wind that might dispel,the gathering clouds. He bade the Southwind blow:—,concealing in the gloom his awful face:,the drenching rain descends from his wet beard,and hoary locks; dark clouds are on his brows,and from his wings and garments drip the dews:,his great hands press the overhanging clouds;,loudly the thunders roll; the torrents pour;,Iris, the messenger of Juno , clad,in many coloured raiment, upward draws,the steaming moisture to renew the clouds.,the rustic's crops are scattered in the mire,,and he bewails the long year's fruitless toil.,that emanate from Heaven; he brought to aid,his azure brother, lord of flowing waves,,who called upon the Rivers and the Streams:,and when they entered his impearled abode,,Neptune , their ancient ruler, thus began;,“A long appeal is needless; pour ye forth,in rage of power; open up your fountains;,rush over obstacles; let every stream,pour forth in boundless floods.” Thus he commands,,and none dissenting all the River Gods,return, and opening up their fountains roll,tumultuous to the deep unfruitful sea.,which trembling with unwonted throes heaved up,the sources of her waters bare; and through,her open plains the rapid rivers rushed,resistless, onward bearing the waving grain,,and holy temples, and their sacred urns.,The mansions that remained, resisting vast,and total ruin, deepening waves concealed,and whelmed their tottering turrets in the flood,and whirling gulf. And now one vast expanse,,the land and sea were mingled in the waste,of endless waves—a sea without a shore.,another sitting in his curved boat,,plied the long oar where he was wont to plow;,another sailed above his grain, above,his hidden dwelling; and another hooked,a fish that sported in a leafy elm.,Perchance an anchor dropped in verdant fields,,or curving keels were pushed through tangled vines;,and where the gracile goat enjoyed the green,,unsightly seals reposed. Beneath the waves,were wondering Nereids, viewing cities, groves,and houses. Dolphins darting mid the trees,,meshed in the twisted branches, beat against,the shaken oak trees. There the sheep, affrayed,,wim with the frightened wolf, the surging waves,float tigers and lions: availeth naught,his lightning shock the wild boar, nor avails,the stag's fleet footed speed. The wandering bird,,eeking umbrageous groves and hidden vales,,with wearied pinion droops into the sea.,The waves increasing surge above the hills,,and rising waters dash on mountain tops.,Myriads by the waves are swept away,,and those the waters spare, for lack of food,,tarvation slowly overcomes at last.,beneath a wilderness of rising waves,,'Twixt Oeta and Aonia , Phocis lies,,where through the clouds Parnassus ' summits twain,point upward to the stars, unmeasured height,,ave which the rolling billows covered all:,there in a small and fragile boat, arrived,,Deucalion and the consort of his couch,,prepared to worship the Corycian Nymphs,,the mountain deities, and Themis kind,,who in that age revealed in oracles,the voice of fate. As he no other lived,o good and just, as she no other feared,the Gods.,in ruin covered, swept with wasting waves,,and when he saw one man of myriads left,,one helpless woman left of myriads lone,,both innocent and worshiping the Gods,,he scattered all the clouds; he blew away,the great storms by the cold northwind.,the earth appeared to heaven and the skies,appeared to earth. The fury of the main,abated, for the Ocean ruler laid,his trident down and pacified the waves,,and called on azure Triton.—Triton arose,above the waving seas, his shoulders mailed,in purple shells.—He bade the Triton blow,,blow in his sounding shell, the wandering streams,and rivers to recall with signal known:,a hollow wreathed trumpet, tapering wide,and slender stemmed, the Triton took amain,and wound the pearly shell at midmost sea.,Betwixt the rising and the setting suns,the wildered notes resounded shore to shore,,and as it touched his lips, wet with the brine,beneath his dripping beard, sounded retreat:,and all the waters of the land and sea,obeyed. Their fountains heard and ceased to flow;,their waves subsided; hidden hills uprose;,emerged the shores of ocean; channels filled,with flowing streams; the soil appeared; the land,increased its surface as the waves decreased:,and after length of days the trees put forth,,with ooze on bending boughs, their naked tops.,but as he viewed the vast and silent world,Deucalion wept and thus to Pyrrha spoke;,“O sister! wife! alone of woman left!,My kindred in descent and origin!,Dearest companion of my marriage bed,,doubly endeared by deepening dangers borne,—,of all the dawn and eve behold of earth,,but you and I are left—for the deep sea,has kept the rest! And what prevents the tide,from overwhelming us? Remaining clouds,affright us. How could you endure your fears,if you alone were rescued by this fate,,and who would then console your bitter grief?,Oh be assured, if you were buried in the waves,,that I would follow you and be with you!,Oh would that by my father's art I might,restore the people, and inspire this clay,to take the form of man. Alas, the Gods,decreed and only we are living!”, Thus,Deucalion's plaint to Pyrrha ;—and they wept.,to ask the aid of sacred oracles,—,and so they hastened to Cephissian waves,which rolled a turbid flood in channels known.,Thence when their robes and brows were sprinkled well,,they turned their footsteps to the goddess' fane:,its gables were befouled with reeking moss,and on its altars every fire was cold.,But when the twain had reached the temple steps,they fell upon the earth, inspired with awe,,and kissed the cold stone with their trembling lips,,and said; “If righteous prayers appease the Gods,,and if the wrath of high celestial powers,may thus be turned, declare, O Themis! whence,and what the art may raise humanity?,O gentle goddess help the dying world!”,“Depart from me and veil your brows; ungird,your robes, and cast behind you as you go,,the bones of your great mother.” Long they stood,in dumb amazement: Pyrrha , first of voice,,refused the mandate and with trembling lips,implored the goddess to forgive—she feared,to violate her mother's bones and vex,her sacred spirit. often pondered they,the words involved in such obscurity,,repeating oft: and thus Deucalion,to Epimetheus' daughter uttered speech,of soothing import; “ Oracles are just,and urge not evil deeds, or naught avails,the skill of thought. Our mother is the Earth,,and I may judge the stones of earth are bones,that we should cast behind us as we go.”,he hesitated to comply; and both amazed,doubted the purpose of the oracle,,but deemed no harm to come of trial. They,,descending from the temple, veiled their heads,and loosed their robes and threw some stones,behind them. It is much beyond belief,,were not receding ages witness, hard,and rigid stones assumed a softer form,,enlarging as their brittle nature changed,to milder substance,—till the shape of man,appeared, imperfect, faintly outlined first,,as marble statue chiseled in the rough.,The soft moist parts were changed to softer flesh,,the hard and brittle substance into bones,,the veins retained their ancient name. And now,the Gods supreme ordained that every stone,Deucalion threw should take the form of man,,and those by Pyrrha cast should woman's form,assume: so are we hardy to endure,and prove by toil and deeds from what we sprung.,And after this the Earth spontaneous,produced the world of animals, when all,remaining moistures of the mirey fens,fermented in the sun, and fruitful seeds,in soils nutritious grew to shapes ordained.,So when the seven streamed Nile from oozy fields,returneth duly to her ancient bed,,the sun's ethereal rays impregn the slime,,that haply as the peasants turn the soil,they find strange animals unknown before:,ome in the moment of their birth, and some,deprived of limbs, imperfect; often part,alive and part of slime iimate,are fashioned in one body. Heat combined,with moisture so conceives and life results,from these two things. For though the flames may be,the foes of water, everything that lives,begins in humid vapour, and it seems,discordant concord is the means of life.,felt heat ethereal from the glowing sun,,unnumbered species to the light she gave,,and gave to being many an ancient form,,or monster new created. Unwilling she,created thus enormous Python.—Thou,unheard of serpent spread so far athwart,the side of a vast mountain, didst fill with fear,the race of new created man. The God,that bears the bow (a weapon used till then,only to hunt the deer and agile goat),destroyed the monster with a myriad darts,,and almost emptied all his quiver, till,envenomed gore oozed forth from livid wounds.,the fame of this achievement, sacred sports,he instituted, from the Python called,“The Pythian Games.” In these the happy youth,who proved victorious in the chariot race,,running and boxing, with an honoured crown,of oak leaves was enwreathed. The laurel then,was not created, wherefore Phoebus, bright,and godlike, beauteous with his flowing hair,,was wont to wreathe his brows with various leaves.,Daphne , the daughter of a River God,was first beloved by Phoebus, the great God,of glorious light. 'Twas not a cause of chance,but out of Cupid's vengeful spite that she,was fated to torment the lord of light.,For Phoebus, proud of Python's death, beheld,that impish god of Love upon a time,when he was bending his diminished bow,,and voicing his contempt in anger said;,“What, wanton boy, are mighty arms to thee,,great weapons suited to the needs of war?,The bow is only for the use of those,large deities of heaven whose strength may deal,wounds, mortal, to the savage beasts of prey;,and who courageous overcome their foes.—,it is a proper weapon to the use,of such as slew with arrows Python, huge,,whose pestilential carcase vast extent,covered. Content thee with the flames thy torch,enkindles (fires too subtle for my thought),and leave to me the glory that is mine.”,“O Phoebus, thou canst conquer all the world,with thy strong bow and arrows, but with this,mall arrow I shall pierce thy vaunting breast!,And by the measure that thy might exceeds,the broken powers of thy defeated foes,,o is thy glory less than mine.” No more,he said, but with his wings expanded thence,flew lightly to Parnassus , lofty peak.,There, from his quiver he plucked arrows twain,,most curiously wrought of different art;,one love exciting, one repelling love.,The dart of love was glittering, gold and sharp,,the other had a blunted tip of lead;,and with that dull lead dart he shot the Nymph,,but with the keen point of the golden dart,he pierced the bone and marrow of the God.,the other, scouting at the thought of love,,rejoiced in the deep shadow of the woods,,and as the virgin Phoebe (who denies,the joys of love and loves the joys of chase),a maiden's fillet bound her flowing hair,—,and her pure mind denied the love of man.,Beloved and wooed she wandered silent paths,,for never could her modesty endure,the glance of man or listen to his love.,my daughter, I have wished a son in law,,and now you owe a grandchild to the joy,of my old age.” But Daphne only hung,her head to hide her shame. The nuptial torch,eemed criminal to her. She even clung,,caressing, with her arms around his neck,,and pled, “My dearest father let me live,a virgin always, for remember Jove,did grant it to Diana at her birth.”,her loveliness prevailed against their will;,for, Phoebus when he saw her waxed distraught,,and filled with wonder his sick fancy raised,delusive hopes, and his own oracles,deceived him.—As the stubble in the field,flares up, or as the stacked wheat is consumed,by flames, enkindled from a spark or torch,the chance pedestrian may neglect at dawn;,o was the bosom of the god consumed,,and so desire flamed in his stricken heart.,“How beautiful if properly arranged! ”,He saw her eyes like stars of sparkling fire,,her lips for kissing sweetest, and her hands,and fingers and her arms; her shoulders white,as ivory;—and whatever was not seen,more beautiful must be.,from his pursuing feet the virgin fled,,and neither stopped nor heeded as he called;,“O Nymph! O Daphne ! I entreat thee stay,,it is no enemy that follows thee—,why, so the lamb leaps from the raging wolf,,and from the lion runs the timid faun,,and from the eagle flies the trembling dove,,all hasten from their natural enemy,but I alone pursue for my dear love.,Alas, if thou shouldst fall and mar thy face,,or tear upon the bramble thy soft thighs,,or should I prove unwilling cause of pain!,“The wilderness is rough and dangerous,,and I beseech thee be more careful—I,will follow slowly.—Ask of whom thou wilt,,and thou shalt learn that I am not a churl—,I am no mountain dweller of rude caves,,nor clown compelled to watch the sheep and goats;,and neither canst thou know from whom thy feet,fly fearful, or thou wouldst not leave me thus.,“The Delphic Land, the Pataraean Realm,,Claros and Tenedos revere my name,,and my immortal sire is Jupiter.,The present, past and future are through me,in sacred oracles revealed to man,,and from my harp the harmonies of sound,are borrowed by their bards to praise the Gods.,My bow is certain, but a flaming shaft,urpassing mine has pierced my heart—,untouched before. The art of medicine,is my invention, and the power of herbs;,but though the world declare my useful works,there is no herb to medicate my wound,,and all the arts that save have failed their lord.,”,with timid footsteps fled from his approach,,and left him to his murmurs and his pain.,exposed her limbs, and as the zephyrs fond,fluttered amid her garments, and the breeze,fanned lightly in her flowing hair. She seemed,most lovely to his fancy in her flight;,and mad with love he followed in her steps,,and silent hastened his increasing speed.,flit over the plain:—With eager nose outstretched,,impetuous, he rushes on his prey,,and gains upon her till he treads her feet,,and almost fastens in her side his fangs;,is suddenly delivered from her fright;,o was it with the god and virgin: one,with hope pursued, the other fled in fear;,and he who followed, borne on wings of love,,permitted her no rest and gained on her,,until his warm breath mingled in her hair.,he gazed upon her father's waves and prayed,,“Help me my father, if thy flowing streams,have virtue! Cover me, O mother Earth!,Destroy the beauty that has injured me,,or change the body that destroys my life.”,on all her body, and a thin bark closed,around her gentle bosom, and her hair,became as moving leaves; her arms were changed,to waving branches, and her active feet,as clinging roots were fastened to the ground—,her face was hidden with encircling leaves.—,(For still, though changed, her slender form remained),and with his right hand lingering on the trunk,he felt her bosom throbbing in the bark.,He clung to trunk and branch as though to twine.,His form with hers, and fondly kissed the wood,that shrank from every kiss.,“Although thou canst not be my bride, thou shalt,be called my chosen tree, and thy green leaves,,O Laurel! shall forever crown my brows,,be wreathed around my quiver and my lyre;,the Roman heroes shall be crowned with thee,,as long processions climb the Capitol,and chanting throngs proclaim their victories;,and as a faithful warden thou shalt guard,the civic crown of oak leaves fixed between,thy branches, and before Augustan gates.,And as my youthful head is never shorn,,o, also, shalt thou ever bear thy leaves,unchanging to thy glory.,”,Phoebus Apollo, ended his lament,,and unto him the Laurel bent her boughs,,o lately fashioned; and it seemed to him,her graceful nod gave answer to his love.,There is a grove in Thessaly , enclosed,on every side with crags, precipitous,—,on which a forest grows—and this is called,the Vale of Tempe—through this valley flows,the River Peneus, white with foaming waves,,that issue from the foot of Pindus, whence,with sudden fall up gather steamy clouds,that sprinkle mist upon the circling trees,,and far away with mighty roar resound.,It is the abode, the solitary home,,that mighty River loves, where deep in gloom,of rocky cavern, he resides and rules,the flowing waters and the water nymphs,abiding there. All rivers of that land,now hasten thither, doubtful to console,or flatter Daphne 's parent: poplar crowned,Sperchios, swift Enipeus and the wild,Amphrysos, old Apidanus and Aeas,,with all their kindred streams that wandering maze,and wearied seek the ocean. Inachus,alone is absent, hidden in his cave,obscure, deepening his waters with his tears—,most wretchedly bewailing, for he deems,his daughter Io lost. If she may live,or roam a spirit in the nether shades,he dares not even guess but dreads,returning from her father's stream, and said;,“O virgin, worthy of immortal Jove,,although some happy mortal's chosen bride,—,behold these shades of overhanging trees,,and seek their cool recesses while the sun,is glowing in the height of middle skies—”,and as he spoke he pointed out the groves—,“But should the dens of wild beasts frighten you,,with safety you may enter the deep woods,,conducted by a God—not with a God,of small repute, but in the care of him,who holds the heavenly scepter in his hand,and fulminates the trackless thunder bolts.—,forsake me not! ” For while he spoke she fled,,and swiftly left behind the pasture fields,of Lerna , and Lyrcea's arbours, where,the trees are planted thickly. But the God,called forth a heavy shadow which involved,the wide extended earth, and stopped her flight,and ravished in that cloud her chastity.,on earth's expanse, with wonder saw the clouds,as dark as night enfold those middle fields,while day was bright above. She was convinced,the clouds were none composed of river mist,nor raised from marshy fens. Suspicious now,,from oft detected amours of her spouse,,he glanced around to find her absent lord,,and quite convinced that he was far from heaven,,he thus exclaimed; “This cloud deceives my mind,,or Jove has wronged me.” From the dome of heaven,he glided down and stood upon the earth,,and bade the clouds recede. But Jove had known,the coming of his queen. He had transformed,the lovely Io, so that she appeared,a milk white heifer—formed so beautiful,and fair that envious Juno gazed on her.,She queried: “Whose? what herd? what pasture fields?”,As if she guessed no knowledge of the truth.,And Jupiter , false hearted, said the cow,was earth begotten, for he feared his queen,might make inquiry of the owner's name.,Juno implored the heifer as a gift.—,what then was left the Father of the Gods?,'Twould be a cruel thing to sacrifice,his own beloved to a rival's wrath.,Although refusal must imply his guilt,the shame and love of her almost prevailed;,but if a present of such little worth,were now denied the sharer of his couch,,the partner of his birth, 'twould prove indeed,the earth born heifer other than she seemed—,and so he gave his mistress up to her.,lest he might change her to her human form,,gave the unhappy heifer to the charge,of Argus , Aristorides, whose head,was circled with a hundred glowing eyes;,of which but two did slumber in their turn,whilst all the others kept on watch and guard.,on Io—even if he turned away,his watchful eyes on Io still remained.,He let her feed by day; but when the sun,was under the deep world he shut her up,,and tied a rope around her tender neck.,and on the cold ground slept—too often bare,,he could not rest upon a cushioned couch.,She drank the troubled waters. Hoping aid,he tried to stretch imploring arms to Argus ,,but all in vain for now no arms remained;,the sound of bellowing was all she heard,,and she was frightened with her proper voice.,he wandered by the banks of Inachus:,there imaged in the stream she saw her horns,and, startled, turned and fled. And Inachus,and all her sister Naiads knew her not,,although she followed them, they knew her not,,although she suffered them to touch her sides,and praise her.,gathered sweet herbs and offered them to her,,he licked his hands, kissing her father's palms,,nor could she more restrain her falling tears.,If only words as well as tears would flow,,he might implore his aid and tell her name,and all her sad misfortune; but, instead,,he traced in dust the letters of her name,with cloven hoof; and thus her sad estate,was known.,“Ah wretched me! ” her father cried;,and as he clung around her horns and neck,repeated while she groaned, “Ah wretched me!,Art thou my daughter sought in every clime?,When lost I could not grieve for thee as now,that thou art found; thy sighs instead of words,heave up from thy deep breast, thy longings give,me answer. I prepared the nuptial torch,and bridal chamber, in my ignorance,,ince my first hope was for a son in law;,and then I dreamed of children from the match:,but now the herd may furnish thee a mate,,and all thy issue of the herd must be.,Oh that a righteous death would end my grief!—,it is a dreadful thing to be a God!,Behold the lethal gate of death is shut,against me, and my growing grief must last,throughout eternity.”,came starry Argus there, and Io bore,from her lamenting father. Thence he led,his charge to other pastures; and removed,from her, upon a lofty mountain sat,,whence he could always watch her, undisturbed.,to witness Io's woes. He called his son,,whom Maia brightest of the Pleiades,brought forth, and bade him slay the star eyed guard,,argus. He seized his sleep compelling wand,and fastened waving wings on his swift feet,,and deftly fixed his brimmed hat on his head:—,lo, Mercury, the favoured son of Jove,,descending to the earth from heaven's plains,,put off his cap and wings,— though still retained,his wand with which he drove through pathless wilds,ome stray she goats, and as a shepherd fared,,piping on oaten reeds melodious tunes.,of this new art began; “Whoever thou art,,it with me on this stone beneath the trees,in cooling shade, whilst browse the tended flock,abundant herbs; for thou canst see the shade,is fit for shepherds.” Wherefore, Mercury,at down beside the keeper and conversed,of various things—passing the laggard hours.—,to lull those ever watchful eyes asleep;,but Argus strove his languor to subdue,,and though some drowsy eyes might slumber, still,were some that vigil kept. Again he spoke,,(for the pipes were yet a recent art),“I pray thee tell what chance discovered these.”,among the Hamadryads, on the cold,Arcadian summit Nonacris, whose name,was Syrinx. often she escaped the Gods,,that wandered in the groves of sylvan shades,,and often fled from Satyrs that pursued.,Vowing virginity, in all pursuits,he strove to emulate Diana 's ways:,and as that graceful goddess wears her robe,,o Syrinx girded hers that one might well,believe Diana there. Even though her bow,were made of horn, Diana 's wrought of gold,,vet might she well deceive.,“Now chanced it Pan.,Whose head was girt with prickly pines, espied,the Nymph returning from the Lycian Hill,,and these words uttered he: ”—But Mercury,refrained from further speech, and Pan's appeal,remains untold. If he had told it all,,the tale of Syrinx would have followed thus:—,through pathless wilds until she had arrived,the placid Ladon's sandy stream, whose waves,prevented her escape. There she implored,her sister Nymphs to change her form: and Pan,,believing he had caught her, held instead,ome marsh reeds for the body of the Nymph;,and while he sighed the moving winds began,to utter plaintive music in the reeds,,o sweet and voice like that poor Pan exclaimed;,“Forever this discovery shall remain,a sweet communion binding thee to me.”—,and this explains why reeds of different length,,when joined together by cementing wax,,derive the name of Syrinx from the maid.,but now perceiving Argus ' eyes were dimmed,in languorous doze, he hushed his voice and touched,the drooping eyelids with his magic wand,,compelling slumber. Then without delay,he struck the sleeper with his crescent sword,,where neck and head unite, and hurled his head,,blood dripping, down the rocks and rugged cliff.,his hundred eyes, his many orbed lights,extinguished in the universal gloom,that night surrounds; but Saturn 's daughter spread,their glister on the feathers of her bird,,emblazoning its tail with starry gems.,to vent her wrath on Io; and she raised,in thought and vision of the Grecian girl,a dreadful Fury. Stings invisible,,and pitiless, she planted in her breast,,and drove her wandering throughout the globe.,O Nile , thou didst remain. Which, having reached,,and placed her tired knees on that river's edge,,he laid her there, and as she raised her neck,looked upward to the stars, and groaned and wept,and mournfully bellowed: trying thus to plead,,by all the means she had, that Jupiter,might end her miseries. Repentant Jove,embraced his consort, and entreated her,to end the punishment: “Fear not,” he said,,“For she shall trouble thee no more.” He spoke,,and called on bitter Styx to hear his oath.,permitted Io to resume her form,—,at once the hair fell from her snowy sides;,the horns absorbed, her dilate orbs decreased;,the opening of her jaws contracted; hands,appeared and shoulders; and each transformed hoof,became five nails. And every mark or form,that gave the semblance of a heifer changed,,except her fair white skin; and the glad Nymph,was raised erect and stood upon her feet.,But long the very thought of speech, that she,might bellow as a heifer, filled her mind,with terror, till the words so long forgot,for some sufficient cause were tried once more.,and since that time, the linen wearing throng,of Egypt have adored her as a God;,for they believe the seed of Jove prevailed;,and when her time was due she bore to him,a son called Epaphus; who also dwells,in temples with his mother in that land.,was equal to his rival, Epaphus,,in mind and years; and he was glad to boast,of wonders, nor would yield to Epaphus,for pride of Phoebus, his reputed sire.,Unable to endure it, Io's son,thus mocked him; “Poor, demented fellow, what,will you not credit if your mother speaks,,you are so puffed up with the fond conceit,of your imagined sire, the Lord of Day.”,withholding rage, reported all the taunts,of Epaphus to Clymene his mother:,“'Twill grieve you, mother, I, the bold and free,,was silent; and it shames me to report,this dark reproach remains unchallenged. Oh,,if I am born of race divine, give proof,of that illustrious descent and claim,my right to Heaven.” Around his mother's neck,he drew his arms, and by the head of Merops,,and by his own, and by the nuptial torch,of his beloved sisters, he implored,for some true token of his origin.,or by the grievous charge, who might declare?,She raised her arms to Heaven, and gazing full,upon the broad sun said; “I swear to you,by yonder orb, so radiant and bright,,which both beholds and hears us while we speak,,that you are his begotten son.—You are,the child of that great light which sways the world:,and if I have not spoken what is true,,let not mine eyes behold his countece,,and let this fatal moment be the last,that I shall look upon the light of day!,Nor will it weary you, my son, to reach,your father's dwelling; for the very place,where he appears at dawn is near our land.,Go, if it please you, and the very truth,learn from your father.” Instantly sprang forth,exultant Phaethon. Overjoyed with words,o welcome, he imagined he could leap,and touch the skies. And so he passed his land,of Ethiopia , and the Indies, hot,beneath the tawny sun, and there he turned,his footsteps to his father's Land of Dawn." '1.94 and fixed their certain bounds, when all the stars, 1.95 which long were pressed and hidden in the mass, 1.96 began to gleam out from the plains of heaven, 1.97 and traversed, with the Gods, bright ether fields: 1.98 and lest some part might be bereft of life 1.99 the gleaming waves were filled with twinkling fish; 1.100 the earth was covered with wild animals; 1.101 the agitated air was filled with birds.' "1.103 a being capable of lofty thought, 1.104 intelligent to rule, was wanting still 1.105 man was created! Did the Unknown God 1.106 designing then a better world make man 1.107 of seed divine? or did Prometheu 1.108 take the new soil of earth (that still contained' "1.109 ome godly element of Heaven's Life)" '1.110 and use it to create the race of man; 1.111 first mingling it with water of new streams; 1.112 o that his new creation, upright man, 1.113 was made in image of commanding Gods? 1.114 On earth the brute creation bends its gaze, 1.115 but man was given a lofty countece 1.116 and was commanded to behold the skies; 1.117 and with an upright face may view the stars:— 1.118 and so it was that shapeless clay put on 1.119 the form of man till then unknown to earth. 1.120 First was the Golden Age. Then rectitude 1.121 pontaneous in the heart prevailed, and faith. 1.122 Avengers were not seen, for laws unframed 1.123 were all unknown and needless. Punishment 1.124 and fear of penalties existed not. 1.125 No harsh decrees were fixed on brazen plates. 1.126 No suppliant multitude the countece 1.127 of Justice feared, averting, for they dwelt 1.128 without a judge in peace. Descended not 1.129 the steeps, shorn from its height, the lofty pine, 1.130 cleaving the trackless waves of alien shores, 1.131 nor distant realms were known to wandering men. 1.132 The towns were not entrenched for time of war; 1.133 they had no brazen trumpets, straight, nor horn 1.134 of curving brass, nor helmets, shields nor swords. 1.135 There was no thought of martial pomp —secure 1.136 a happy multitude enjoyed repose.' "1.138 a store of every fruit. The harrow touched 1.139 her not, nor did the plowshare wound 1.140 her fields. And man content with given food, 1.141 and none compelling, gathered arbute fruit 1.142 and wild strawberries on the mountain sides, 1.143 and ripe blackberries clinging to the bush, 1.144 and corners and sweet acorns on the ground, 1.145 down fallen from the spreading tree of Jove. 1.146 Eternal Spring! Soft breathing zephyrs soothed 1.147 and warmly cherished buds and blooms, produced 1.148 without a seed. The valleys though unplowed 1.149 gave many fruits; the fields though not renewed 1.150 white glistened with the heavy bearded wheat:' "
6.721
All this Minerva heard; and she approved,their songs and their resentment; but her heart,was brooding thus, “It is an easy thing,to praise another, I should do as they:,no creature of the earth should ever slight,the majesty that dwells in me,—without,just retribution.”—So her thought was turned,upon the fortune of Arachne — proud,,who would not ever yield to her the praise,won by the art of deftly weaving wool,,a girl who had not fame for place of birth,,nor fame for birth, but only fame for skill!,in Colophon ; where, at his humble trade,,he dyed in Phocean purples, fleecy wool.,Her mother, also of the lower class,,had died. Arachne in a mountain town,by skill had grown so famous in the Land,of Lydia , that unnumbered curious nymphs,eager to witness her dexterity,,deserted the lush vineyards of Timolus;,or even left the cool and flowing streams,of bright Pactolus, to admire the cloth,,or to observe her deftly spinning wool.,was twisting the coarse wool in little balls,,or if she teased it with her finger-tips,,or if she softened the fine fleece, drawn forth,in misty films, or if she twirled the smooth,round spindle with her energetic thumb,,or if with needle she embroidered cloth;—,how much Minerva had instructed her:,but this she ever would deny, displeased,to share her fame; and said, “Let her contend,in art with me; and if her skill prevails,,I then will forfeit all!”,and came to her, disguised with long grey hair,,and with a staff to steady her weak limbs.,She seemed a feeble woman, very old,,and quavered as she said, “Old age is not,the cause of every ill; experience comes,with lengthened years; and, therefore, you should not,despise my words. It is no harm in you,to long for praise of mortals, when,your nimble hands are spinning the soft wool,—,but you should not deny Minerva's art—,and you should pray that she may pardon you,,for she will grant you pardon if you ask.”,Looked at the goddess, as she dropped her thread.,She hardly could restrain her threatening hand,,and, trembling in her anger, she replied,to you, disguised Minerva:,worn out and witless in your palsied age,,a great age is your great misfortune!— Let,your daughter and your son's wife—if the Gods,have blessed you—let them profit by your words;,within myself, my knowledge is contained,ufficient; you need not believe that your,advice does any good; for I am quite,unchanged in my opinion. Get you gone,—,advise your goddess to come here herself,,and not avoid the contest!”,the goddess said, “Minerva comes to you!”,And with those brief words, put aside the shape,of the old woman, and revealed herself,,Minerva, goddess.,and matrons of Mygdonia worshiped her;,but not Arachne, who defiant stood;—,although at first she flushed up—then went pale—,then blushed again, reluctant.—So, at first,,the sky suffuses, as Aurora moves,,and, quickly when the glorious sun comes up,,pales into white.,her own destruction, for she would not give,from her desire to gain the victory.,Nor did the daughter of almighty Jove,decline: disdaining to delay with words,,he hesitated not.,elected their positions, stretched their webs,with finest warp, and separated warp with sley.,The woof was next inserted in the web,by means of the sharp shuttles, which,their nimble fingers pushed along, so drawn,within the warp, and so the teeth notched in,the moving sley might strike them.—Both, in haste,,girded their garments to their breasts and moved,their skilful arms, beguiling their fatigue,in eager action.,besides the Tyrian purple—royal dye,,extracted in brass vessels.—As the bow,,that spans new glory in the curving sky,,its glittering rays reflected in the rain,,preads out a multitude of blended tints,,in scintillating beauty to the sight,of all who gaze upon it; — so the threads,,inwoven, mingled in a thousand tints,,harmonious and contrasting; shot with gold:,and there, depicted in those shining webs,,were shown the histories of ancient days:—,where ancient Cecrops built his citadel,,and showed the old contention for the name,it should be given.—Twelve celestial Gods,urrounded Jupiter , on lofty thrones;,and all their features were so nicely drawn,,that each could be distinguished.— Jupiter,appeared as monarch of those judging Gods.,contending with Minerva. As he struck,the Rock with his long trident, a wild horse,prang forth which he bequeathed to man. He claimed,his right to name the city for that gift.,bearing a shield, and in her hand a lance,,harp-pointed, and a helmet on her head—,her breast well-guarded by her Aegis: there,he struck her spear into the fertile earth,,from which a branch of olive seemed to sprout,,pale with new clustered fruits.—And those twelve Gods,,appeared to judge, that olive as a gift,urpassed the horse which Neptune gave to man.,might learn the folly of her mad attempt,,from the great deeds of ancient histories,,and what award presumption must expect,,Minerva wove four corners with life scenes,of contest, brightly colored, but of size,diminutive.,the snow-clad mountains, Rhodope,,and Haemus , which for punishment were changed,from human beings to those rigid forms,,when they aspired to rival the high Gods.,And in another corner she described,that Pygmy, whom the angry Juno changed,from queen-ship to a crane; because she thought,herself an equal of the living Gods,,he was commanded to wage cruel wars,upon her former subjects. In the third,,he wove the story of Antigone,,who dared compare herself to Juno, queen,of Jupiter , and showed her as she was,transformed into a silly chattering stork,,that praised her beauty, with her ugly beak.—,Despite the powers of Ilion and her sire,Laomedon, her shoulders fledged white wings.,And so, the third part finished, there was left,one corner, where Minerva deftly worked,the story of the father, Cinyras;—,as he was weeping on the temple steps,,which once had been his daughter's living limbs.,And she adorned the border with designs,of peaceful olive—her devoted tree—,which having shown, she made an end of work.,the story of Europa, as the bull,deceived her, and so perfect was her art,,it seemed a real bull in real waves.,Europa seemed to look back towards the land,which she had left; and call in her alarm,to her companions—and as if she feared,the touch of dashing waters, to draw up,her timid feet, while she was sitting on,the bull's back.,by the assaulting eagle; and beneath the swan's,white wings showed Leda lying by the stream:,he sought the beautiful Antiope,,to whom was given twins; and how he seemed,Amphitryon when he deceived Alcmena;,and how he courted lovely Danae,luring her as a gleaming shower of gold;,and poor Aegina , hidden in his flame,,jove as a shepherd with Mnemosyne;,and beautiful Proserpina, involved,by him, apparent as a spotted snake.,of Neptune:—who was shown first as a bull,,when he was deep in love with virgin Arne,then as Enipeus when the giant twins,,Aloidae, were begot; and as the ram,that gambolled with Bisaltis; as a horse,loved by the fruitful Ceres , golden haired,,all-bounteous mother of the yellow grain;,and as the bird that hovered round snake-haired,Medusa, mother of the winged horse;,and as the dolphin, sporting with the Nymph,,Melantho.—All of these were woven true,to life, in proper shades.,Apollo, when disguised in various forms:,as when he seemed a rustic; and as when,he wore hawk-wings, and then the tawny skin,of a great lion; and once more when he,deluded Isse, as a shepherd lad.,as a large cluster of fictitious grapes;,deluding by that wile the beautiful,Erigone;—and Saturn, as a steed,,begetter of the dual-natured Chiron.,wove all around the web a patterned edge,of interlacing flowers and ivy leaves.,even Envy can not censure perfect art—,enraged because Arachne had such skill,he ripped the web, and ruined all the scenes,that showed those wicked actions of the Gods;,and with her boxwood shuttle in her hand,,truck the unhappy mortal on her head,—,truck sharply thrice, and even once again.,uch insult, brooded on it, till she tied,a cord around her neck, and hung herself.,ustained and saved her from that bitter death;,but, angry still, pronounced another doom:,“Although I grant you life, most wicked one,,your fate shall be to dangle on a cord,,and your posterity forever shall,take your example, that your punishment,may last forever!” Even as she spoke,,before withdrawing from her victim's sight,,he sprinkled her with juice—extract of herbs,of Hecate.,her nose and ears remained not, and her head,hrunk rapidly in size, as well as all,her body, leaving her diminutive.—,Her slender fingers gathered to her sides,as long thin legs; and all her other parts,were fast absorbed in her abdomen—whence,he vented a fine thread;—and ever since,,Arachne, as a spider, weaves her web.,All Lydia was astonished at her fate,the Rumor spread to Phrygia , soon the world,was filled with fear and wonder. Niobe,had known her long before,—when in Maeonia,near to Mount Sipylus; but the sad fate,which overtook Arachne, lost on her,,he never ceased her boasting and refused,to honor the great Gods.,increased her pride: She loved to boast,her husband's skill, their noble family,,the rising grandeur of their kingdom. Such,felicities were great delights to her;,but nothing could exceed the haughty way,he boasted of her children: and, in truth,,Niobe might have been adjudged on earth,,the happiest mother of mankind, if pride,had not destroyed her wit.,that Manto, daughter of Tiresias,,who told the future; when she felt the fire,of prophecy descend upon her, rushed,upon the street and shouted in the midst:,to high Latona and her children, twain,,incense and prayer. Go, and with laurel wreathe,your hair in garlands, as your sacred prayers,arise to heaven. Give heed, for by my speech,Latona has ordained these holy rites.”,with laurel, and they cast in hallowed flame,the grateful incense, while they supplicate,all favors of the ever-living Gods.,urrounded with a troup that follow her,,and most conspicuous in her purple robe,,bright with inwoven threads of yellow gold.,Beautiful in her anger, she tosses back,her graceful head. The glory of her hair,hines on her shoulders. Standing forth,,he looks upon them with her haughty eyes,,and taunts them, “Madness has prevailed on you,to worship some imagined Gods of Heaven,,which you have only heard of; but the Gods,that truly are on earth, and can be seen,,are all neglected! Come, explain to me,,why is Latona worshiped and adored,,and frankincense not offered unto me?,For my divinity is known to you.,approached the tables of the Gods in heaven;,my mother, sister of the Pleiades,,was daughter of huge Atlas, who supports,the world upon his shoulders; I can boast,of Jupiter as father of my sire,,I count him also as my father-in-law.,The peoples of my Phrygia dread my power,,and I am mistress of the palace built,by Cadmus . By my husband, I am queen,of those great walls that reared themselves,to the sweet music of his sounding lyre.,We rule together all the people they,encompass and defend. And everywhere,my gaze is turned, an evidence of wealth,is witnessed.,the beauty of a goddess, but above,that majesty is all the glory due,to me, the mother of my seven sons,and daughters seven. And the time will come,when by their marriage they will magnify,the circle of my power invincible.,and must no longer worship, in despite,of my superior birth, this deity,,a daughter of ignoble Coeus, whom,one time the great Earth would not even grant,ufficient space for travail: whom the Heavens,,the Land, the Sea together once compelled,to wander, hopeless on all hostile shores!,Throughout the world she found herself rebuffed,,till Delos , sorry for the vagrant, said,,‘Homeless you roam the lands, and I the seas!’,And even her refuge always was adrift.,with mine, are but as one to seven. Who,denies my fortunate condition?—Who,can doubt my future?—I am surely safe.,for Fortune to assail me. Let her rage,despoil me of large substance; yet so much,would still be mine, for I have risen above,the blight of apprehension. But, suppose,a few of my fair children should be taken!,Even so deprived, I could not be reduced,to only two, as this Latona , who,,might quite as well be childless.—Get you gone,from this insensate sacrifice. Make haste!,Cast off the wreathing laurels from your brows!”,the sacrifice, obedient to her will,,although in gentle murmurs they adored,the goddess Niobe had so defamed.,flew swiftly to the utmost peak of Cynthus,,and spoke to her two children in these words:,uch glorious children! I will yield,prestige before no goddess—save alone,immortal Juno ! I have been debased,,and driven for all ages from my own—,my altars, unto me devoted long,,and so must languish through eternity,,unless by you sustained. Nor is this all;.,That daughter of Tantalus, bold Niobe,,has added curses to her evil deeds,,and with a tongue as wicked as her sire's,,has raised her base-born children over mine.,Has even called me childless! A sad fate,more surely should be hers! Oh, I entreat”—,is necessary, for it only serves,to hinder the swift sequel of her doom.”,And with the same words Phoebe answered her.,And having spoken, they descended through,the shielding shadows of surrounding clouds,,and hovered on the citadel of Cadmus .,which swept around those walls; where trampling steeds,,with horny hoofs, and multitudinous wheels,,had beaten a wide track. And on the field,the older sons of Niobe on steeds,emblazoned with bright dyes and harness rich,with studded gold were circling.—One of these,,Ismenus, first-born of his mother, while,controlling his fleet courser's foaming mouth,,cried out, “Ah wretched me!” A shaft had pierced,the middle of his breast; and as the reins,dropped slowly on the rapid courser's neck,,his drooping form fell forward to the ground.,could hear the whistling of a fatal shaft,,and in his fright urged on the plunging steed:,as when the watchful pilot, sensible,of storms approaching, crowds on sail,,hoping to catch a momentary breeze,,o fled he, urging an impetuous flight;,but, while he fled the shaft, unerring, flew;,transfixed him with its quivering death; struck where,the neck supports the head and the sharp point,protruded from his throat. In his swift flight,,as he was leaning forward, he was struck;,and, rolling over the wild horse's neck,pitched to the ground, and stained it with his blood.,(So named from his maternal grandsire) now,had finished coursing on the track, and smooth.,Shining with oil, were wrestling in the field;,and while those brothers struggled—breast to breast—,another arrow, hurtling from the sky,,pierced them together, just as they were clinched.,The mingled sound that issued from two throats,was like a single groan. Convulsed with pain,,the wrestlers fell together on the ground,,where, stricken with a double agony,,rolling their eyeballs, they sobbed out their lives.,in agony—ran to lift in his arms,their lifeless bodies cold—while doing this,he fell upon them. Phoebus struck him so,,piercing his midriff in a vital part,,with fatal shot, which, when he pulled it forth,,dragged with its barb a torn clot of his lung—,his blood and life poured out upon the air.,not only once; an arrow pierced his leg,just where the sinews of the thigh begin,,and as he turned and stooped to pluck it out,,another keen shaft shot into his neck,,up to the fletching.—The blood drove it out,,and spouted after it in crimson jets.,lifted his unavailing arms in prayer,,and cried, “O Universal Deities,,gods of eternal heaven, spare my life!”—,Besought too late, Apollo of the Bow,,could not prevail against the deadly shaft,,already on its way: and yet his will,,compellant, acted to retard its flight,,o that it cut no deeper than his heart.,the wailings of sad Niobe's loved friends,—,the terror of her grieving relatives,—,all gave some knowledge of her sudden loss:,but so bewildered and enraged her mind,,that she could hardly realize the Gods,had privilege to dare against her might.,Nor would she, till her lord, Amphion , thrust,his sword deep in his breast, by which his life,and anguish both were ended in dark night.,Proud Niobe who but so lately drove,her people from Latona 's altars, while,,moving majestic through the midst, she hears,their plaudits, now so bitterly debased,,her meanest enemy may pity her!—,and in a frenzy of maternal grief,,kissed their unfeeling lips. Then unto Heaven,with arms accusing, railed upon her foe:,“Glut your revenge! Latona , glut your rage!,Yea, let my lamentations be your joy!,Go—satiate your flinty heart with death!,Are not my seven sons all dead? Am I,not waiting to be carried to my grave?—,exult and triumph, my victorious foe!,Victorious? Nay!—Much more remains to me,in all my utmost sorrow, than to you,,you gloater upon vengeance—Undismayed,,I stand victorious in my Field of Woe!”,twanged from the ever-ready bow; and all,who heard the fatal sound, again were filled,with fear,—save Niobe, in misery bold,—,defiant in misfortune.—Clothed in black,,the sisters of the stricken brothers stood,,with hair disheveled, by the funeral biers.,a shaft, swooned unto death, fell on her face—,on her dear brother's corpse. Another girl,,while she consoled her mother, suddenly,,was stricken with an unseen, deadly wound;,and doubled in convulsions, closed her lips,,tight held them, till both breath and life were lost.,Another, vainly rushed away from death—,he met it, and pitched head-first to the ground;,and still another died upon her corse,,another vainly sought a secret death,,and, then another slipped beyond's life's edge.,So, altogether, six of seven died—,each victim, strickened in a different way.,the mother, as she covered her with all,her garments and her body, wailed—“Oh, leave,me this one child! the youngest of them all!,My darling daughter—only leave me one!”,But even while she was entreating for its life—,the life was taken from her only child.,her lifeless daughters, and her husband's corpse.,The breeze not even moved her fallen hair,,a chill of marble spread upon her flesh,,beneath her pale, set brows, her eyes moved not,,her bitter tongue turned stiff in her hard jaws,,her lovely veins congealed, and her stiff neck,and rigid hands could neither bend nor move.—,her limbs and body, all were changed to stone.,were falling she was carried from the place,,enveloped in a storm and mighty wind,,far, to her native land, where fixed upon,a mountain summit she dissolves in tears,—,and to this day the marble drips with tears.,All men and women, after this event,,feared to incur Latona 's fateful wrath,,and worshiped with more zeal the Deity,,mother of twins.—And, as it is the way,of men to talk of many other things,after a strong occurrence, they recalled,what other deeds the goddess had performed;—,and one of them recited this event:,ome rustics, in the fertile fields of Lycia ,,heedless, insulted the goddess to their harm:—,perhaps you've never heard of this event,,because those country clowns were little known.,The event was wonderful, but I can vouch,the truth of it. I visited the place,and I have seen the pool of water, where,happened the miracle I now relate.,incapable of travel, ordered me,to fetch some cattle—thoroughbreds—from there,,and had secured a Lycian for my guide,,it chanced, I saw an ancient altar,—grimed,with sacrificial ashes—in the midst,of a large pool, with sedge and reeds around,,a-quiver in the breeze. And there my guide,tood on the marge, and with an awe-struck voice,began to whisper, “Be propitious, hear,my supplications, and forget not me!”,“Forget not me!” which, having done, I turned,to him and said, “Whose altar can this be?,Perhaps a sacred altar of the Fauns,,or of the Naiads, or a native God?”,may not be worshiped at this altar. She,whom once the royal Juno drove away,to wander a harsh world, alone permits,this altar to be used: that goddess whom,the wandering Isle of Delos , at the time,it drifted as the foam, almost refused,a refuge.,against a palm-tree—and against the tree,most sacred to Minerva , brought forth twins,,although their harsh step-mother, Juno , strove,to interfere.—And from the island forced,to fly by jealous Juno , on her breast,he bore her children, twin Divinities.,with thirst—long-wandering in those heated days,over the arid land of Lycia , where,was bred the dire Chimaera— at the time,her parching breasts were drained, she saw this pool,of crystal water, shimmering in the vale.,and useful osiers, and the bulrush, found,with sedge in fenny pools. To them approached,Latona , and she knelt upon the merge,to cool her thirst, with some refreshing water.,But those clowns forbade her and the goddess cried,,as they so wickedly opposed her need:,The use of water is the sacred right,of all mankind, for Nature has not made,the sun and air and water, for the sole,estate of any creature; and to Her,kind bounty I appeal, although of you,I humbly beg the use of it. Not here,do I intend to bathe my wearied limbs.,I only wish to quench an urgent thirst,,for, even as I speak, my cracking lips,and mouth so parched, almost deny me words.,A drink of water will be like a draught,of nectar, giving life; and I shall owe,to you the bounty and my life renewed.—,ah, let these tender infants, whose weak arms,implore you from my bosom, but incline,your hearts to pity!” And just as she spoke,,it chanced the children did stretch out their arms,and who would not be touched to hear such words,,as spoken by this goddess, and refuse?,against the goddess; for they hindered her,,and threatened with their foul, abusive tongues,to frighten her away—and, worse than all,,they even muddied with their hands and feet,the clear pool; forcing the vile, slimy dregs,up from the bottom, in a spiteful way,,by jumping up and down.—Enraged at this,,he felt no further thirst, nor would she deign,to supplicate again; but, feeling all,the outraged majesty of her high state,,he raised her hands to Heaven, and exclaimed,,“Forever may you live in that mud-pool!”,and every one of them began to swim,beneath the water, and to leap and plunge,deep in the pool.—Now, up they raise their heads,,now swim upon the surface, now they squat,themselves around the marshy margent, now,they plump again down to the chilly deeps.,And, ever and again, with croaking throats,,indulge offensive strife upon the banks,,or even under water, boom abuse.,to puff out; and their widened jaws are made,till wider in the venting of their spleen.,make them appear as if their shrunken necks,have been cut off. Their backbones are dark green;,white are their bellies, now their largest part.—,muddy their own pools, where they leap and dive.,So he related how the clowns were changed,to leaping frogs; and after he was through,,another told the tale of Marsyas, in these words:,in rivalry against Apollo's lyre,,lost that audacious contest and, alas!,His life was forfeit; for, they had agreed,the one who lost should be the victor's prey.,And, as Apollo punished him, he cried,,“Ah-h-h! why are you now tearing me apart?,A flute has not the value of my life!”,his living skin was ripped off from his limbs,,till his whole body was a flaming wound,,with nerves and veins and viscera exposed.,and all the Fauns and Sylvan Deities,,and all the Satyrs, and Olympus , his,loved pupil—even then renowned in song,,and all the Nymphs, lamented his sad fate;,and all the shepherds, roaming on the hills,,lamented as they tended fleecy flocks.,descended to her deepest veins, as drip,the moistening dews,—and, gathering as a fount,,turned upward from her secret-winding caves,,to issue, sparkling, in the sun-kissed air,,the clearest river in the land of Phrygia ,—,through which it swiftly flows between steep banks,down to the sea: and, therefore, from his name,,'Tis called “The Marsyas” to this very day.,and wept for Niobe's loved children dead,,and also, mourned Amphion, sorrow-slain.,The Theban people hated Niobe,,but Pelops, her own brother, mourned her death;,and as he rent his garment, and laid bare,his white left shoulder, you could see the part,composed of ivory.—At his birth 'twas all,of healthy flesh; but when his father cut,his limbs asunder, and the Gods restored,his life, all parts were rightly joined, except,part of one shoulder, which was wanting; so,to serve the purpose of the missing flesh,,a piece of ivory was inserted there,,making his body by such means complete.,The lords of many cities that were near,,now met together and implored their kings,to mourn with Pelops those unhappy deeds.—,and Calydon, before it had incurred,the hatred of Diana, goddess of the chase;,fertile Orchomenus and Corinth , great,in wealth of brass; Patrae and fierce Messena;,Cleone, small; and Pylus and Troezen ,,not ruled by Pittheus then,—and also, all,the other cities which are shut off by,the Isthmus there dividing by its two seas,,and all the cities which are seen from there.,Athens alone was wanting, for a war,had gathered from the distant seas, a host,of savage warriors had alarmed her walls,,and hindered her from mourning for the dead.,came to the aid of Athens as defense,from that fierce horde; and there by his great deeds,achieved a glorious fame. Since his descent,was boasted from the mighty Gradivus,,and he was gifted with enormous wealth,,Pandion, king of Athens , gave to him,in sacred wedlock his dear daughter, Procne.,attended not, nor Hymenaeus, nor,the Graces. But the Furies snatched up brands,from burning funeral pyres, and brandished them,as torches. They prepared the nuptial couch,—,a boding owl flew over the bride's room,,and then sat silently upon the roof.,ad Procne, and those omens cast a gloom,on all the household till the fateful birth,of their first born. All Thrace went wild with joy—,and even they, rejoicing, blessed the Gods,,when he, the little Itys, saw the light;,and they ordained each year their wedding day,,and every year the birthday of their child,,hould be observed with festival and song:,o the sad veil of fate conceals from us,our future woes.,the changing seasons through five autumns, when,,in gentle accents, Procne spoke these words:,“My dearest husband, if you love me, let,me visit my dear sister, or consent,that she may come to us and promise her,that she may soon return. If you will but,permit me to enjoy her company,my heart will bless you as I bless the Gods.”,to launch upon the sea; and driven by sail,,and hastened by the swiftly sweeping oars,,they entered the deep port of Athens , where,he made fair landing on the fortified,Piraeus . There, when time was opportune,to greet his father-in-law and shake his hand,,they both exchanged their wishes for good health,,and Tereus told the reason why he came.,Promising Philomela's safe return,from a brief visit, when Philomela appeared,rich in her costly raiment, yet more rich,in charm and beauty, just as if a fair,Dryad or Naiad should be so attired,,appearing radiant, from dark solitudes.,or the dry leaves, or hay piled in a stack;,o Tereus, when he saw the beautiful,and blushing virgin, was consumed with love.,of worthy love; but by his heritage,,derived from a debasing clime, his love,was base; and fires unholy burned within,from his own lawless nature, just as fierce,as are the habits of his evil race.,he thought he would corrupt her trusted maid,,her tried attendants, and corrupt even,her virtue with large presents: he would waste,his kingdom in the effort.—He prepared,to seize her at the risk of cruel war.,And he would do or dare all things to feed,his raging flame.—He could not brook delay.,pretending he gave voice to Procne's hopes.—,his own desire made him wax eloquent,,as often as his words exceeded bounds,,he pleaded he was uttering Procne's words.,as though they represented her desire—,and, O you Gods above, what devious ways,are harbored in the hearts of mortals! Through,his villainous desire he gathered praise,,and many lauded him for the great love,he bore his wife.,desires her own undoing; and with fond,embraces nestles to her father, while,he pleads for his consent, that she may go,to visit her dear sister.—Tereus viewed,her pretty pleading, and in his hot heart,,imagined he was then embracing her;,and as he saw her kiss her father's lips,,her arms around his neck, it seemed that each,caress was his; and so his fire increased.,He even wished he were her father; though,,if it were so, his passion would no less,be impious.—Overcome at last by these,entreaties, her kind father gave consent.,Greatly she joyed and thanked him for her own,misfortune. She imagined a success,,instead of all the sorrow that would come.,remained for Phoebus. Now his flaming steeds,were beating with their hoofs the downward slope,of high Olympus ; and the regal feast,was set before the guests, and flashing wine,was poured in golden vessels, and the feast,went merrily, until the satisfied,assembly sought in gentle sleep their rest.,who, sleepless, imaged in his doting mind,the form of Philomela, recalled the shape,of her fair hands, and in his memory,reviewed her movements. And his flaming heart,pictured her beauties yet unseen.—He fed,his frenzy on itself, and could not sleep.,Pandion, took his son-in-law's right hand,to bid farewell; and, as he wept,,commended his dear daughter, Philomela,,unto his guarding care. “And in your care,,my son-in-law, I trust my daughter's health.,Good reason, grounded on my love, compels,my sad approval. You have begged for her,,and both my daughters have persuaded me.,Wherefore, I do entreat you and implore,your honor, as I call upon the Gods,,that you will ever shield her with the love,of a kind father and return her safe,,as soon as may be—my last comfort given,to bless my doting age. And all delay,will agitate and vex my failing heart.,if you have any love for me, return,without too long delay and comfort me,,lest I may grieve; for it is quite enough,that I should suffer while your sister stays away.”,his daughter, while he wept. Then did he join,their hands in pledge of their fidelity,,and, as he gave his blessing, cautioned them,to kiss his absent daughter and her son,for his dear sake. Then as he spoke a last,farewell, his trembling voice was filled with sobs.,And he could hardly speak;—for a great fear,from some vague intuition of his mind,,urged over him, and he was left forlorn.,the painted ship and as the sailors urged,the swiftly gliding keel across the deep,and the dim land fast-faded from their view,,then Tereus, in exultant humor, thought,,“Now all is well, the object of my love,ails with me while the sailors ply the oars.”,,desire—with difficulty stayed his lust,,he followed all her actions with hot eyes. —,So, when the ravenous bird of Jupiter,has caught with crooked talons the poor hare,,and dropped it—ruthless,—in his lofty nest,,where there is no escape, his cruel eyes,gloat on the victim he anticipates.,they landed from the travel-wearied ship,,afe on the shores of his own kingdom. Then,he hastened with the frightened Philomela,into most wild and silent solitudes,of an old forest; where, concealed among,deep thickets a forbidding old house stood:,there he immured the pale and trembling maid,,who, vainly in her fright, began to call,upon her absent sister,—and her tears,implored his pity. His obdurate mind,could not be softened by such piteous cries;,but even while her agonizing screams,implored her sister's and her father's aid,,and while she vainly called upon the Gods,,he overmastered her with brutal force.—,which, just delivered from the frothing jaws,of a gaunt wolf, dreads every moving twig.,She trembled as a timid injured dove,,(her feathers dripping with her own life-blood),that dreads the ravening talons of a hawk,from which some fortune has delivered her.,he tore her streaming hair and beat her arms,,and, stretching forth her hands in frenzied grief,,cried out, “Oh, barbarous and brutal wretch!,Unnatural monster of abhorrent deeds!,Could not my anxious father's parting words,,nor his foreboding tears restrain your lust?,Have you no slight regard for your chaste wife,,my dearest sister, and are you without,all honor, so to spoil virginity,now making me invade my sister's claim,,you have befouled the sacred fount of life,—,you are a lawless bond of double sin!,Come, finish with my murder your black deed,,o nothing wicked may remain undone.,But oh, if you had only slaughtered me,before your criminal embrace befouled,my purity, I should have had a shade,entirely pure, and free from any stain!,Oh, if there is a Majesty in Heaven,,and if my ruin has not wrecked the world,,then, you shall suffer for this grievous wrong,and time shall hasten to avenge my wreck.,and publish my own shame to punish you!,And if I'm prisoned in the solitudes,,my voice will wake the echoes in the wood,and move the conscious rocks. Hear me, O Heaven!,And let my imprecations rouse the Gods—,ah-h-h, if there can be a god in Heaven!”,and frightened him, lest ever his foul deed,might shock his kingdom: and, roused at once,by rage and guilty fear; he seized her hair,,forced her weak arms against her back, and bound,them fast with brazen chains, then drew his sword.,Flashing and sharp, she wished only for death,,and offered her bare throat: but while she screamed,,and, struggling, called upon her father's name,,he caught her tongue with pincers, pitiless,,till quivered, but the bleeding tongue itself,,fell murmuring on the blood-stained floor. As the tail,of a slain snake still writhes upon the ground,,o did the throbbing tongue; and, while it died,,moved up to her, as if to seek her feet.—,And, it is said that after this foul crime,,the monster violated her again.,returned to Procne, who, when she first met,her brutal husband, anxiously inquired,for tidings of her sister; but with sighs,and tears, he told a false tale of her death,,and with such woe that all believed it true.,her royal robe, bordered with purest gold,,and putting it away, assumed instead,garments of sable mourning; and she built,a noble sepulchre, and offered there,her pious gifts to an imagined shade;—,lamenting the sad death of her who lived.,the sun had coursed the Zodiac's twelve signs.,But what could Philomela hope or do?,For like a jail the strong walls of the house,were built of massive stone, and guards around,prevented flight; and mutilated, she,could not communicate with anyone,to tell her injuries and tragic woe.,there is an ingenuity which gives,inventive genius to protect from harm:,and now, the grief-distracted Philomela,wove in a warp with purple marks and white,,a story of the crime; and when 'twas done,he gave it to her one attendant there,and begged her by appropriate signs to take,it secretly to Procne. She took the web,,he carried it to Procne, with no thought,of words or messages by art conveyed.,the cloth, and after she unwrapped it saw,and understood the mournful record sent.,She pondered it in silence and her tongue,could find no words to utter her despair;—,her grief and frenzy were too great for tears.—,In a mad rage her rapid mind counfounded,the right and wrong—intent upon revenge.,when all the Thracian matrons celebrate,the rites of Bacchus—every third year thus—,night then was in their secret; and at night,the slopes of Rhodope resounded loud,with clashing of shrill cymbals. So, at night,the frantic queen of Tereus left her home,and, clothed according to the well known rites,of Bacchus, hurried to the wilderness.,and from her left side native deer skin hung;,and on her shoulder rested a light spear.—,o fashioned, the revengeful Procne rushed,through the dark woods, attended by a host,of screaming followers, and wild with rage,,pretended it was Bacchus urged her forth.,her sister, Philomela, was immured;,and as she howled and shouted “Ee-woh-ee-e!”,,She forced the massive doors; and having seized,her sister, instantly concealed her face,in ivy leaves, arrayed her in the trappings,of Bacchanalian rites. When this was done,,they rushed from there, demented, to the house,where as the Queen of Tereus, Procne dwelt.,at that accursed house, her countece,,though pale with grief, took on a ghastlier hue:,and, wretched in her misery and fright,,he shuddered in convulsions.—Procne took,the symbols, Bacchanalian, from her then,,and as she held her in a strict embrace,unveiled her downcast head. But she refused,to lift her eyes, and fixing her sad gaze,on vacant space, she raised her hand, instead;,as if in oath she called upon the Gods,to witness truly she had done no wrong,,but suffered a disgrace of violence.—,cut short her sister's terror in these words,,“This is no time for weeping! awful deeds,demand a great revenge—take up the sword,,and any weapon fiercer than its edge!,My breast is hardened to the worst of crime,make haste with me! together let us put,this palace to the torch!,the beastly Tereus with revenging iron,,cut out his tongue, and quench his cruel eyes,,and hurl and burn him writhing in the flames!,Or, shall we pierce him with a grisly blade,,and let his black soul issue from deep wounds,a thousand.—Slaughter him with every death,imagined in the misery of hate!”,Itys, her son, was hastening to his mother;,and when she saw him, her revengeful eyes,conceiving a dark punishment, she said,,“Aha! here comes the image of his father!”,She gave no other warning, but prepared,to execute a horrible revenge.,and called her “mother”, put his little arms,around her neck, and when he smiled and kissed,her often, gracious in his cunning ways,—,again the instinct of true motherhood,pulsed in her veins, and moved to pity, she,began to weep in spite of her resolve.,unnerving her, she turned her eyes from him,and looked upon her sister, and from her,glanced at her darling boy again. And so,,while she was looking at them both, by turns,,he said, “Why does the little one prevail,with pretty words, while Philomela stands,in silence always, with her tongue torn out?,She cannot call her sister, whom he calls,his mother! Oh, you daughter of Pandion,,consider what a wretch your husband is!,The wife of such a monster must be flint;,compassion in her heart is but a crime.”,as the fierce tigress of the Ganges leaps,,eizes the suckling offspring of the hind,,and drags it through the forest to its lair;,o, Procne seized and dragged the frightened boy,to a most lonely section of the house;,and there she put him to the cruel sword,,while he, aware of his sad fate, stretched forth,his little hands, and cried, “Ah, mother,—ah!—”,And clung to her—clung to her, while she struck—,her fixed eyes, maddened, glaring horribly—,truck wildly, lopping off his tender limbs.,But Philomela cut through his tender throat.,till quivering with the remt of his life,,and boiled a part of him in steaming pots,,that bubbled over with the dead child's blood,,and roasted other parts on hissing spits.,her husband, Tereus, to the loathsome feast,,and with a false pretense of sacred rites,,according to the custom of her land,,by which, but one man may partake of it,,he sent the servants from the banquet hall.—,Tereus, majestic on his ancient throne,high in imagined state, devoured his son,,and gorged himself with flesh of his own flesh—,and in his rage of gluttony called out,for Itys to attend and share the feast!,and eager to gloat over his distress,,Procne cried out,,the thing that you are asking for!” — Amazed,,he looked around and called his son again:—,disordered, and all stained with blood of murder,,unable then to speak, she hurled the head,of Itys in his father's fear-struck face,,and more than ever longed for fitting words.,and howling, called up from the Stygian pit,,the viperous sisters. Tearing at his breast,,in miserable efforts to disgorge,the half-digested gobbets of his son,,he called himself his own child's sepulchre,,and wept the hot tears of a frenzied man.,Then with his sword he rushed at the two sisters.,and it was true, for they had changed to birds.,Then Philomela, flitting to the woods,,found refuge in the leaves: but Procne flew,traight to the sheltering gables of a roof—,and always, if you look, you can observe,the brand of murder on the swallow's breast—,red feathers from that day. And Tereus, swift,in his great agitation, and his will,to wreak a fierce revenge, himself is turned,into a crested bird. His long, sharp beak,is given him instead of a long sword,,and so, because his beak is long and sharp,,he rightly bears the name of Hoopoe.,Before the number of his years was told,,Pandion with the shades of Tartarus,,because of this, has wandered in sad dooms.,Erectheus, next in line, with mighty sway,and justice, ruled all Athens on the throne,left vacant by the good Pandion's death.,Four daughters and four sons were granted him;,and of his daughters, two were beautiful,,and one of these was wed to Cephalus,,grandson of Aeolus. — But mighty Boreas,desired the hand of Orithyia, fair,and lovable.—King Tereus and the Thracians,were then such obstacles to Boreas,the god was long kept from his dear beloved.,Although the great king (who compels the cold,north-wind) had sought with prayers to win her hand,,and urged his love in gentleness, not force.,he roughly said, with customary rage,and violence: “Away with sentimental talk!,but I should blame nobody but myself;,then why should I, despising my great strength,,debase myself to weakness and soft prayers?—,might is my right, and violence my strength!—,by force I drive the force of gloomy clouds.,monarch of Violence, rolling on clouds,,I toss wide waters, and I fell huge trees—,knotted old oaks—and whirled upon ice-wings,,I scatter the light snow, and pelt the Earth,with sleet and hail! I rush through boundless voids.,My thunders rumble in the hollow clouds—,and crash upon my brothers—fire to fire!,heer to the utmost caverns of old Earth;,and straining, up from those unfathomed deeps,,catter the terror-stricken shades of hell;,and hurl death-dealing earthquakes through the world!,and never trust entreaties to prevail,,or win my bride—Force is the law of life!”,resounding words, unrolled his rustling wings—,that fan the earth and ruffle the wide sea—,and, swiftly wrapping untrod mountain peaks,in whirling mantles of far-woven dust,,thence downward hovered to the darkened world;,and, canopied in artificial night,of swarthy overshadowing wings, caught up,the trembling Orithyia to his breast:,nor did he hesitate in airy course,until his huge wings fanned the chilling winds,around Ciconian Walls.,the wife of that cold, northern king of storms;,and unto him she gave those hero twins,,endowed with wings of their immortal sire,,and graceful in their mother's form and face.,and those twin boys, Zetes and Calais ,,at first were void of feathers and soft down.,But when their golden hair and beards were grown,,wings like an eagle's came;—and feather-down,grew golden on their cheeks: and when from youth,they entered manhood, quick they were to join,the Argonauts, who for the Golden Fleece,,ought in that first ship, ventured on the sea."' None
17. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.360, 1.361, 1.362, 1.363, 1.364, 4.361-5.34, 7.341, 7.342, 7.343, 7.344, 7.345, 7.346, 7.347, 7.348, 7.349, 7.350, 7.351, 7.352, 7.353, 7.354, 7.355, 7.356, 7.357, 7.358, 7.359, 7.360, 7.361, 7.362, 7.363, 7.364, 7.365, 7.366, 7.367, 7.368, 7.369, 7.370, 7.371, 7.372, 7.373, 7.374, 7.375, 7.376, 7.377, 7.378, 7.379, 7.380, 7.381, 7.382, 7.383, 7.384, 7.385, 7.386, 7.387, 7.388, 7.389, 7.390, 7.391, 7.392, 7.393, 7.394, 7.395, 7.396, 7.397, 7.398, 7.399, 7.400, 7.401, 7.402, 7.403, 7.404, 7.405, 7.406, 7.407, 8.113, 8.319, 8.320, 8.321, 8.322, 8.323, 8.324, 8.325, 8.326, 8.327, 9.598, 9.599, 9.600, 9.601, 9.602, 9.603, 9.604, 9.605, 9.606, 9.607, 9.608, 9.609, 9.610, 9.611, 9.612, 9.613, 9.614, 9.615, 9.616, 9.617, 9.618, 9.619, 9.620 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Argo, as first ship

 Found in books: Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 117, 123, 128, 131, 134; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 117, 123, 128, 131, 134

sup>
1.360 His commota fugam Dido sociosque parabat:
1.361
conveniunt, quibus aut odium crudele tyranni
1.362
aut metus acer erat; navis, quae forte paratae,
1.363
corripiunt, onerantque auro: portantur avari
1.364
Pygmalionis opes pelago; dux femina facti.
7.341
Exin Gorgoneis Allecto infecta venenis
7.342
principio Latium et Laurentis tecta tyranni
7.343
celsa petit tacitumque obsedit limen Amatae,
7.344
quam super adventu Teucrum Turnique hymenaeis
7.345
femineae ardentem curaeque iraeque coquebant.
7.346
Huic dea caeruleis unum de crinibus anguem
7.347
conicit inque sinum praecordia ad intuma subdit,
7.348
quo furibunda domum monstro permisceat omnem.
7.349
Ille inter vestes et levia pectora lapsus
7.350
volvitur attactu nullo fallitque furentem,
7.351
vipeream inspirans animam: fit tortile collo
7.352
aurum ingens coluber, fit longae taenia vittae
7.353
innectitque comas, et membris lubricus errat.
7.354
Ac dum prima lues udo sublapsa veneno
7.355
pertemptat sensus atque ossibus implicat ignem
7.356
necdum animus toto percepit pectore flammam,
7.357
mollius et solito matrum de more locuta est,
7.358
multa super nata lacrimans Phrygiisque hymenaeis:
7.359
Exsulibusne datur ducenda Lavinia Teucris,
7.360
O genitor, nec te miseret gnataeque tuique ?
7.361
Nec matris miseret, quam primo aquilone relinquet
7.362
perfidus alta petens abducta virgine praedo?
7.363
An non sic Phrygius penetrat Lacedaemona pastor
7.364
Ledaeamque Helenam Troianas vexit ad urbes ?
7.365
Quid tua sancta fides, quid cura antiqua tuorum' 7.367 Si gener externa petitur de gente Latinis
7.368
idque sedet Faunique premunt te iussa parentis,
7.369
omnem equidem sceptris terram quae libera nostris
7.370
dissidet, externam reor et sic dicere divos.
7.371
Et Turno, si prima domus repetatur origo,
7.372
Inachus Acrisiusque patres mediaeque Mycenae.
7.373
His ubi nequiquam dictis experta Latinum
7.374
contra stare videt penitusque in viscera lapsum
7.375
serpentis furiale malum totamque pererrat,
7.376
tum vero infelix, ingentibus excita monstris,
7.377
immensam sine more furit lymphata per urbem.
7.378
Ceu quondam torto volitans sub verbere turbo,
7.379
quem pueri magno in gyro vacua atria circum
7.380
intenti ludo exercent; ille actus habena
7.381
curvatis fertur spatiis; stupet inscia supra
7.382
inpubesque manus, mirata volubile buxum;
7.383
dant animos plagae: non cursu segnior illo
7.384
per medias urbes agitur populosque feroces.
7.385
Quin etiam in silvas, simulato numine Bacchi,
7.386
maius adorta nefas maioremque orsa furorem
7.387
evolat et natam frondosis montibus abdit,
7.388
quo thalamum eripiat Teucris taedasque moretur,
7.389
Euhoe Bacche, fremens, solum te virgine dignum
7.390
vociferans, etenim mollis tibi sumere thyrsos,
7.391
te lustrare choro, sacrum tibi pascere crinem.
7.392
Fama volat, furiisque accensas pectore matres
7.393
idem omnis simul ardor agit nova quaerere tecta:
7.394
deseruere domos, ventis dant colla comasque,
7.395
ast aliae tremulis ululatibus aethera complent,
7.396
pampineasque gerunt incinctae pellibus hastas;
7.397
ipsa inter medias flagrantem fervida pinum
7.398
sustinet ac natae Turnique canit hymenaeos,
7.399
sanguineam torquens aciem, torvumque repente
7.400
clamat: Io matres, audite, ubi quaeque, Latinae:
7.404
Talem inter silvas, inter deserta ferarum,
7.405
reginam Allecto stimulis agit undique Bacchi.
7.406
Postquam visa satis primos acuisse furores
7.407
consiliumque omnemque domum vertisse Latini,
8.113
ignotas temptare vias, quo tenditis? inquit.
8.319
Primus ab aetherio venit Saturnus Olympo,
8.320
arma Iovis fugiens et regnis exsul ademptis.
8.321
Is genus indocile ac dispersum montibus altis
8.322
composuit legesque dedit Latiumque vocari
8.323
maluit, his quoniam latuisset tutis in oris.
8.324
Aurea quae perhibent illo sub rege fuere
8.325
saecula. Sic placida populos in pace regebat,
8.326
deterior donec paulatim ac decolor aetas
8.327
et belli rabies et amor successit habendi.
9.598
Non pudet obsidione iterum valloque teneri,
9.599
bis capti Phryges, et morti praetendere muros?
9.600
En qui nostra sibi bello conubia poscunt!
9.601
Quis deus Italiam, quae vos dementia adegit
9.602
Non hic Atridae nec fandi fictor Ulixes:
9.603
durum a stirpe genus natos ad flumina primum
9.604
deferimus saevoque gelu duramus et undis,
9.605
venatu invigilant pueri silvasque fatigant,
9.606
flectere ludus equos et spicula tendere cornu.
9.607
At patiens operum parvoque adsueta iuventus
9.608
aut rastris terram domat aut quatit oppida bello.
9.609
Omne aevum ferro teritur, versaque iuvencum
9.610
terga fatigamus hasta; nec tarda senectus
9.611
debilitat vires animi mutatque vigorem:
9.612
canitiem galea premimus, semperque recentis
9.613
comportare iuvat praedas et vivere rapto.
9.615
desidiae cordi, iuvat indulgere choreis,
9.616
et tunicae manicas et habent redimicula mitrae.
9.617
O vere Phrygiae, neque enim Phryges, ite per alta
9.618
Dindyma ubi adsuetis biforem dat tibia cantum!
9.619
Tympana vos buxusque vocat Berecyntia Matris
9.620
Idaeae sinite arma viris et cedite ferro.'' None
sup>
1.360 and, quell its nations wild; his city-wall
1.361
and sacred laws shall be a mighty bond
1.362
about his gathered people. Summers three
1.363
hall Latium call him king; and three times pass ' "
1.364
the winter o'er Rutulia's vanquished hills. " "
7.341
to clasp your monarch's hand. Bear back, I pray, " 7.342 this answer to your King: my dwelling holds
7.343
a daughter, whom with husband of her blood ' "
7.344
great signs in heaven and from my father's tomb " 7.345 forbid to wed. A son from alien shores ' "
7.346
they prophesy for Latium 's heir, whose seed " 7.347 hall lift our glory to the stars divine.
7.348
I am persuaded this is none but he,
7.349
that man of destiny; and if my heart
7.350
be no false prophet, I desire it so.”
7.351
Thus having said, the sire took chosen steeds
7.352
from his full herd, whereof, well-groomed and fair,
7.353
three hundred stood within his ample pale.
7.354
of these to every Teucrian guest he gave
7.355
a courser swift and strong, in purple clad
7.356
and broidered housings gay; on every breast
7.357
hung chains of gold; in golden robes arrayed,
7.358
they champed the red gold curb their teeth between.
7.359
For offering to Aeneas, he bade send
7.360
a chariot, with chargers twain of seed
7.361
ethereal, their nostrils breathing fire:
7.362
the famous kind which guileful Circe bred, ' "
7.363
cheating her sire, and mixed the sun-god's team " 7.364 with brood-mares earthly born. The sons of Troy,
7.365
uch gifts and greetings from Latinus bearing, ' "
7.366
One more immortal name thy death bequeathed, ,Nurse of Aeneas, to Italian shores, , Caieta ; there thy honor hath a home; ,Thy bones a name: and on Hesperia's breast ,Their proper glory. When Aeneas now ,The tribute of sepulchral vows had paid ,Beside the funeral mound, and o'er the seas ,Stillness had fallen, he flung forth his sails, ,And leaving port pursued his destined way. ,Freshly the night-winds breathe; the cloudless moon ,Outpours upon his path unstinted beam, ,And with far-trembling glory smites the sea. ,Close to the lands of Circe soon they fare, ,Where the Sun's golden daughter in far groves ,Sounds forth her ceaseless song; her lofty hall ,Is fragrant every night with flaring brands ,of cedar, giving light the while she weaves ,With shrill-voiced shuttle at her linens fine. ,From hence are heard the loud lament and wrath ,of lions, rebels to their linked chains ,And roaring all night long; great bristly boars ,And herded bears, in pinfold closely kept, ,Rage horribly, and monster-wolves make moan; ,Whom the dread goddess with foul juices strong ,From forms of men drove forth, and bade to wear ,the mouths and maws of beasts in Circe's thrall. ,But lest the sacred Trojans should endure ,such prodigy of doom, or anchor there ,on that destroying shore, kind Neptune filled ,their sails with winds of power, and sped them on ,Now morning flushed the wave, and saffron-garbed ,Aurora from her rose-red chariot beamed ,in highest heaven; the sea-winds ceased to stir; ,a sudden calm possessed the air, and tides ,of marble smoothness met the laboring oar. ,Then, gazing from the deep, Aeneas saw ,a stretch of groves, whence Tiber 's smiling stream, ,its tumbling current rich with yellow sands, ,burst seaward forth: around it and above ,shore-haunting birds of varied voice and plume ,flattered the sky with song, and, circling far ,o'er river-bed and grove, took joyful wing. ,Thither to landward now his ships he steered, ,Hail, Erato! while olden kings and thrones ,and all their sequent story I unfold! ,How Latium 's honor stood, when alien ships ,brought war to Italy, and from what cause ,the primal conflict sprang, O goddess, breathe ,upon thy bard in song. Dread wars I tell, ,array of battle, and high-hearted kings ,thrust forth to perish, when Etruria's host ,and all Hesperia gathered to the fray. ,Events of grander march impel my song, ,and loftier task I try. Latinus, then ,an aged king, held long-accepted sway ,o'er tranquil vales and towns. He was the son ,of Faunus, so the legend tells, who wed ,the nymph Marica of Laurentian stem. ,Picus was Faunus' father, whence the line ,to Saturn's Ioins ascends. O heavenly sire, ,from thee the stem began! But Fate had given ,to King Latinus' body no heirs male: ,for taken in the dawning of his day ,his only son had been; and now his home ,and spacious palace one sole daughter kept, ,who was grown ripe to wed and of full age ,to take a husband. Many suitors tried ,from all Ausonia and Latium 's bounds; ,but comeliest in all their princely throng ,came Turnus, of a line of mighty sires. ,Him the queen mother chiefly loved, and yearned ,to call him soon her son. But omens dire ,and menaces from Heaven withstood her will. ,A laurel-tree grew in the royal close, ,of sacred leaf and venerated age, ,which, when he builded there his wall and tower, ,Father Latinus found, and hallowed it ,to Phoebus' grace and power, wherefrom the name ,Laurentian, which his realm and people bear. ,Unto this tree-top, wonderful to tell, ,came hosts of bees, with audible acclaim ,voyaging the stream of air, and seized a place ,on the proud, pointing crest, where the swift swarm, ,with interlacement of close-clinging feet, ,swung from the leafy bough. “Behold, there comes,” ,the prophet cried, “a husband from afar! ,To the same region by the self-same path ,behold an arm'd host taking lordly sway ,upon our city's crown!” Soon after this, ,when, coming to the shrine with torches pure, ,Lavinia kindled at her father's side ,the sacrifice, swift seemed the flame to burn ,along her flowing hair—O sight of woe! ,Over her broidered snood it sparkling flew, ,lighting her queenly tresses and her crown ,of jewels rare: then, wrapt in flaming cloud, ,from hall to hall the fire-god's gift she flung. ,This omen dread and wonder terrible ,was rumored far: for prophet-voices told ,bright honors on the virgin's head to fall ,The King, sore troubled by these portents, sought ,oracular wisdom of his sacred sire, ,Faunus, the fate-revealer, where the groves ,stretch under high Albunea, and her stream ,roars from its haunted well, exhaling through ,vast, gloomful woods its pestilential air. ,Here all Oenotria's tribes ask oracles ,in dark and doubtful days: here, when the priest ,has brought his gifts, and in the night so still, ,couched on spread fleeces of the offered flock, ,awaiting slumber lies, then wondrously ,a host of flitting shapes he sees, and hears ,voices that come and go: with gods he holds ,high converse, or in deep Avernian gloom ,parleys with Acheron. Thither drew near ,Father Latinus, seeking truth divine. ,Obedient to the olden rite, he slew ,a hundred fleecy sheep, and pillowed lay ,upon their outstretched skins. Straightway a voice ,out of the lofty forest met his prayer. ,“Seek not in wedlock with a Latin lord ,to join thy daughter, O my son and seed! ,Beware this purposed marriage! There shall come ,sons from afar, whose blood shall bear our name ,starward; the children of their mighty loins, ,as far as eve and morn enfold the seas, ,shall see a subject world beneath their feet ,submissive lie.” This admonition given ,Latinus hid not. But on restless wing ,rumor had spread it, when the men of Troy ,along the river-bank of mounded green ,their fleet made fast. Aeneas and his chiefs, ,with fair Iulus, under spreading boughs ,of one great tree made resting-place, and set ,the banquet on. Thin loaves of altar-bread ,along the sward to bear their meats were laid ,(such was the will of Jove), and wilding fruits ,rose heaping high, with Ceres' gift below. ,Soon, all things else devoured, their hunger turned ,to taste the scanty bread, which they attacked ,with tooth and nail audacious, and consumed ,both round and square of that predestined leaven. ,“Look, how we eat our tables even!” cried ,Iulus, in a jest. Such was the word ,which bade their burdens fall. From his boy's lip ,the father caught this utterance of Fate, ,silent with wonder at the ways of Heaven; ,then swift he spoke: “Hail! O my destined shore, ,protecting deities of Ilium, hail! ,Here is our home, our country here! This day ,I publish the mysterious prophecy ,by Sire Anchises given: ‘My son,’ said he, ,‘When hunger in strange lands shall bid devour ,the tables of thy banquet gone, then hope ,for home, though weary, and take thought to build ,a dwelling and a battlement.’ Behold! ,This was our fated hunger! This last proof ,will end our evil days. Up, then! For now ,by morning's joyful beam we will explore ,what men, what cities, in this region be, ,and, leaving ship, our several errands ply. ,Your gift to Jove outpour! Make thankful prayer ,unto Anchises' shade! To this our feast ,bring back the flowing wine!” Thereat he bound ,his forehead with green garland, calling loud ,upon the Genius of that place, and Earth, ,eldest of names divine; the Nymphs he called, ,and river-gods unknown; his voice invoked ,the night, the omen-stars through night that roll. ,Jove, Ida's child, and Phrygia 's fertile Queen: ,he called his mother from Olympian skies, ,and sire from Erebus. Lo, o'er his head ,three times unclouded Jove omnipotent ,in thunder spoke, and, with effulgent ray ,from his ethereal tract outreaching far, ,shook visibly the golden-gleaming air. ,Swift, through the concourse of the Trojans, spread ,news of the day at hand when they should build ,their destined walls. So, with rejoicing heart ,at such vast omen, they set forth a feast ,with zealous emulation, ranging well ,Soon as the morrow with the lamp of dawn ,looked o'er the world, they took their separate ways, ,exploring shore and towns; here spread the pools ,and fountain of Numicius; here they see ,the river Tiber, where bold Latins dwell. ,Anchises' son chose out from his brave band ,a hundred envoys, bidding them depart ,to the King's sacred city, each enwreathed ,with Pallas' silver leaf; and gifts they bear ,to plead for peace and friendship at his throne. ,While on this errand their swift steps are sped, ,Aeneas, by a shallow moat and small, ,his future city shows, breaks ground, and girds ,with mound and breastwork like a camp of war ,the Trojans' first abode. Soon, making way ,to where the Latin citadel uprose, ,the envoys scanned the battlements, and paused ,beneath its wall. Outside the city gates ,fair youths and striplings in life's early bloom ,course with swift steeds, or steer through dusty cloud ,the whirling chariot, or stretch stout bows, ,or hurl the seasoned javelin, or strive ,in boxing-bout and foot-race: one of these ,made haste on horseback to the aged King, ,with tidings of a stranger company ,in foreign garb approaching. The good King ,bade call them to his house, and took his seat ,Large and majestical the castle rose: ,a hundred columns lifted it in air ,upon the city's crown—the royal keep ,of Picus of Laurentum; round it lay ,deep, gloomy woods by olden worship blest. ,Here kings took sceptre and the fasces proud ,with omens fair; the selfsame sacred place ,was senate-house and temple; here was found ,a hall for hallowed feasting, where a ram ,was offered up, and at long banquet-boards ,the nation's fathers sat in due array. ,Here ranged ancestral statues roughly hewn ,of ancient cedar-wood: King Italus; ,Father Sabinus, planter of the vine, ,a curving sickle in his sculptured hand; ,gray-bearded Saturn; and the double brow ,of Janus' head; and other sires and kings ,were wardens of the door, with many a chief ,wounded in battle for his native land. ,Trophies of arms in goodly order hung ,along the columns: chariots of war ,from foeman taken, axes of round blade, ,plumed helmets, bolts and barriers of steel ,from city-gates, shields, spears, and beaks of bronze ,from captured galleys by the conqueror torn. ,Here, wielding his Quirinal augur-staff, ,girt in scant shift, and bearing on his left ,the sacred oval shield, appeared enthroned ,Picus, breaker of horses, whom his bride, ,enamoured Circe, smote with golden wand, ,and, raining o'er him potent poison-dew, ,In such a temple of his gods did Sire ,Latinus, on hereditary throne, ,welcome the Trojans to his halls, and thus ,with brow serene gave greeting as they came: ,“O sons of Dardanus, think not unknown ,your lineage and city! Rumored far ,your venturous voyage has been. What seek ye here? ,What cause, what quest, has brought your barks and you ,o'er the blue waters to Ausonia's hills? ,What way uncharted, or wild stress of storm, ,or what that sailors suffer in mid-sea, ,unto this river bank and haven bore? ,Doubt not our welcome! We of Latin land ,are Saturn's sons, whose equitable minds, ,not chained by statute or compulsion, keep ,in freedom what the god's good custom gave. ,Now I bethink me our Ausonian seers ,have dark, dim lore that 't was this land gave birth ,to Dardanus, who after took his way ,through Phrygian Ida's towns and Samothrace . ,Once out of Tuscan Corythus he fared; ,but now in golden house among the stars ,he has a throne, and by his altars blest ,He spoke; Ilioneus this answer made: ,“O King, great heir of Faunus! No dark storm ,impelled us o'er the flood thy realm to find. ,Nor star deceived, nor strange, bewildering shore ,threw out of our true course; but we are come ,by our free choice and with deliberate aim ,to this thy town, though exiled forth of realms ,once mightiest of all the sun-god sees ,when moving from his utmost eastern bound. ,From Jove our line began; the sons of Troy ,boast Jove to be their sire, and our true King ,is of Olympian seed. To thine abode ,Trojan Aeneas sent us. How there burst ,o'er Ida's vales from dread Mycenae 's kings ,a tempest vast, and by what stroke of doom ,all Asia 's world with Europe clashed in war, ,that lone wight hears whom earth's remotest isle ,has banished to the Ocean's rim, or he ,whose dwelling is the ample zone that burns ,betwixt the changeful sun-god's milder realms, ,far severed from the world. We are the men ,from war's destroying deluge safely borne ,over the waters wide. We only ask ,some low-roofed dwelling for our fathers' gods, ,some friendly shore, and, what to all is free, ,water and air. We bring no evil name ,upon thy people; thy renown will be ,but wider spread; nor of a deed so fair ,can grateful memory die. Ye ne'er will rue ,that to Ausonia's breast ye gathered Troy . ,I swear thee by the favored destinies ,of great Aeneas, by his strength of arm ,in friendship or in war, that many a tribe ,(O, scorn us not, that, bearing olive green, ,with suppliant words we come), that many a throne ,has sued us to be friends. But Fate's decree ,to this thy realm did guide. Here Dardanus ,was born; and with reiterate command ,this way Apollo pointed to the stream ,of Tiber and Numicius' haunted spring. ,Lo, these poor tributes from his greatness gone ,Aeneas sends, these relics snatched away ,from Ilium burning: with this golden bowl ,Anchises poured libation when he prayed; ,and these were Priam's splendor, when he gave ,laws to his gathered states; this sceptre his, ,this diadem revered, and beauteous pall, ,handwork of Asia 's queens.” So ceased to speak ,Ilioneus. But King Latinus gazed ,uswering on the ground, all motionless ,save for his musing eyes. The broidered pall ,of purple, and the sceptre Priam bore, ,moved little on his kingly heart, which now ,pondered of giving to the bridal bed ,his daughter dear. He argues in his mind ,the oracle of Faunus:—might this be ,that destined bridegroom from an alien land, ,to share his throne, to get a progeny ,of glorious valor, which by mighty deeds ,should win the world for kingdom? So at last ,with joyful brow he spoke: “Now let the gods ,our purpose and their own fair promise bless! ,Thou hast, O Trojan, thy desire. Thy gifts ,I have not scorned; nor while Latinus reigns ,shall ye lack riches in my plenteous land, ,not less than Trojan store. But where is he, ,Aeneas' self? If he our royal love ,so much desire, and have such urgent mind ,to be our guest and friend, let him draw near, ,nor turn him from well-wishing looks away! ,My offering and pledge of peace shall be ,to clasp your monarch's hand. Bear back, I pray, ,this answer to your King: my dwelling holds ,a daughter, whom with husband of her blood ,great signs in heaven and from my father's tomb ,forbid to wed. A son from alien shores ,they prophesy for Latium 's heir, whose seed ,shall lift our glory to the stars divine. ,I am persuaded this is none but he, ,that man of destiny; and if my heart ,be no false prophet, I desire it so.” ,Thus having said, the sire took chosen steeds ,from his full herd, whereof, well-groomed and fair, ,three hundred stood within his ample pale. ,of these to every Teucrian guest he gave ,a courser swift and strong, in purple clad ,and broidered housings gay; on every breast ,hung chains of gold; in golden robes arrayed, ,they champed the red gold curb their teeth between. ,For offering to Aeneas, he bade send ,a chariot, with chargers twain of seed ,ethereal, their nostrils breathing fire: ,the famous kind which guileful Circe bred, ,cheating her sire, and mixed the sun-god's team ,with brood-mares earthly born. The sons of Troy, ,such gifts and greetings from Latinus bearing, ,But lo! from Argos on her voyage of air ,rides the dread spouse of Jove. She, sky-enthroned ,above the far Sicilian promontory, ,pachynus, sees Dardania's rescued fleet, ,and all Aeneas' joy. The prospect shows ,houses a-building, lands of safe abode, ,and the abandoned ships. With bitter grief ,she stands at gaze: then with storm-shaken brows, ,thus from her heart lets loose the wrathful word: ,“O hated race! O Phrygian destinies — ,to mine forevermore (unhappy me!) ,a scandal and offense! Did no one die ,on Troy 's embattled plain? Could captured slaves ,not be enslaved again? Was Ilium's flame ,no warrior's funeral pyre? Did they walk safe ,through serried swords and congregated fires? ,At last, methought, my godhead might repose, ,and my full-fed revenge in slumber lie. ,But nay! Though flung forth from their native land, ,I o'er the waves, with enmity unstayed, ,dared give them chase, and on that exiled few ,hurled the whole sea. I smote the sons of Troy ,with ocean's power and heaven's. But what availed ,Syrtes, or Scylla, or Charybdis' waves? ,The Trojans are in Tiber ; and abide ,within their prayed-for land delectable, ,safe from the seas and me! Mars once had power ,the monstrous Lapithae to slay; and Jove ,to Dian's honor and revenge gave o'er ,the land of Calydon. What crime so foul ,was wrought by Lapithae or Calydon? ,But I, Jove's wife and Queen, who in my woes ,have ventured each bold stroke my power could find, ,and every shift essayed,—behold me now ,outdone by this Aeneas! If so weak ,my own prerogative of godhead be, ,let me seek strength in war, come whence it will! ,If Heaven I may not move, on Hell I call. ,To bar him from his Latin throne exceeds ,my fated power. So be it! Fate has given ,Lavinia for his bride. But long delays ,I still can plot, and to the high event ,deferment and obstruction. I can smite ,the subjects of both kings. Let sire and son ,buy with their people's blood this marriage-bond! ,Let Teucrian and Rutulian slaughter be ,thy virgin dower, and Bellona's blaze ,light thee the bridal bed! Not only teemed ,the womb of Hecuba with burning brand, ,and brought forth nuptial fires; but Venus, too, ,such offspring bore, a second Paris, who ,So saying, with aspect terrible she sped ,earthward her way; and called from gloom of hell ,Alecto, woeful power, from cloudy throne ,among the Furies, where her heart is fed ,with horrid wars, wrath, vengeance, treason foul, ,and fatal feuds. Her father Pluto loathes ,the creature he engendered, and with hate ,her hell-born sister-fiends the monster view. ,A host of shapes she wears, and many a front ,of frowning black brows viper-garlanded. ,Juno to her this goading speech addressed: ,“O daughter of dark Night, arouse for me ,thy wonted powers and our task begin! ,Lest now my glory fail, my royal name ,be vanquished, while Aeneas and his crew ,cheat with a wedlock bond the Latin King ,and seize Italia 's fields. Thou canst thrust on ,two Ioving brothers to draw sword and slay, ,and ruin homes with hatred, calling in ,the scourge of Furies and avenging fires. ,A thousand names thou bearest, and thy ways ,of ruin multiply a thousand-fold. ,Arouse thy fertile breast! Go, rend in twain ,this plighted peace! Breed calumnies and sow ,causes of battle, till yon warrior hosts ,Straightway Alecto, through whose body flows ,the Gorgon poison, took her viewless way ,to Latium and the lofty walls and towers ,of the Laurentian King. Crouching she sate ,in silence on the threshold of the bower ,where Queen Amata in her fevered soul ,pondered, with all a woman's wrath and fear, ,upon the Trojans and the marriage-suit ,of Turnus. From her Stygian hair the fiend ,a single serpent flung, which stole its way ,to the Queen's very heart, that, frenzy-driven, ,she might on her whole house confusion pour. ,Betwixt her smooth breast and her robe it wound ,unfelt, unseen, and in her wrathful mind ,instilled its viper soul. Like golden chain ,around her neck it twined, or stretched along ,the fillets on her brow, or with her hair ,enwrithing coiled; then on from limb to limb ,slipped tortuous. Yet though the venom strong ,thrilled with its first infection every vein, ,and touched her bones with fire, she knew it not, ,nor yielded all her soul, but made her plea ,in gentle accents such as mothers use; ,and many a tear she shed, about her child, ,her darling, destined for a Phrygian's bride: ,“O father! can we give Lavinia's hand ,to Trojan fugitives? why wilt thou show ,no mercy on thy daughter, nor thyself; ,nor unto me, whom at the first fair wind ,that wretch will leave deserted, bearing far ,upon his pirate ship my stolen child? ,Was it not thus that Phrygian shepherd came ,to Lacedaemon, ravishing away ,Helen, the child of Leda, whom he bore ,to those false Trojan lands? Hast thou forgot ,thy plighted word? Where now thy boasted love ,of kith and kin, and many a troth-plight given ,unto our kinsman Turnus? If we need ,an alien son, and Father Faunus' words ,irrevocably o'er thy spirit brood, ,I tell thee every land not linked with ours ,under one sceptre, but distinct and free, ,is alien; and 't is thus the gods intend. ,Indeed, if Turnus' ancient race be told, ,it sprang of Inachus, Acrisius, ,and out of mid- Mycenae .” But she sees ,her lord Latinus resolute, her words ,an effort vain; and through her body spreads ,the Fury's deeply venomed viper-sting. ,Then, woe-begone, by dark dreams goaded on, ,she wanders aimless, fevered and unstrung ,along the public ways; as oft one sees ,beneath the twisted whips a leaping top ,sped in long spirals through a palace-close ,by lads at play: obedient to the thong, ,it weaves wide circles in the gaping view ,of its small masters, who admiring see ,the whirling boxwood made a living thing ,under their lash. So fast and far she roved ,from town to town among the clansmen wild. ,Then to the wood she ran, feigning to feel ,the madness Bacchus loves; for she essays ,a fiercer crime, by fiercer frenzy moved. ,Now in the leafy dark of mountain vales ,she hides her daughter, ravished thus away ,from Trojan bridegroom and the wedding-feast. ,“Hail, Bacchus! Thou alone,” she shrieked and raved, ,“art worthy such a maid. For thee she bears ,the thyrsus with soft ivy-clusters crowned, ,and trips ecstatic in thy beauteous choir. ,For thee alone my daughter shall unbind ,the glory of her virgin hair.” Swift runs ,the rumor of her deed; and, frenzy-driven, ,the wives of Latium to the forests fly, ,enkindled with one rage. They leave behind ,their desolated hearths, and let rude winds ,o'er neck and tresses blow; their voices fill ,the welkin with convulsive shriek and wail; ,and, with fresh fawn-skins on their bodies bound, ,they brandish vine-clad spears. The Queen herself ,lifts high a blazing pine tree, while she sings ,a wedding-song for Turnus and her child. ,With bloodshot glance and anger wild, she cries: ,“Ho! all ye Latin wives, if e'er ye knew ,kindness for poor Amata, if ye care ,for a wronged mother's woes, O, follow me! ,Cast off the matron fillet from your brows, ,and revel to our mad, voluptuous song.” ,Thus, through the woodland haunt of creatures wild, ,Alecto urges on the raging Queen ,with Bacchus' cruel goad. But when she deemed ,the edge of wrath well whetted, and the house ,of wise Latinus of all reason reft, ,then soared the black-winged goddess to the walls ,of the bold Rutule, to the city built ,(So runs the tale) by beauteous Danae ,and her Acrisian people, shipwrecked there ,by south wind strong. Its name was Ardea ,in language of our sires, and that proud name ,of Ardea still it wears, though proud no more. ,Here Turnus in the gloom of midnight lay ,half-sleeping in his regal hall. For him ,Alecto her grim fury-guise put by, ,and wore an old crone's face, her baleful brow ,delved deep with wrinkled age, her hoary hair ,in sacred fillet bound, and garlanded ,with leaf of olive: Calybe she seemed, ,an aged servitress ot Juno's shrine, ,and in this seeming thus the prince addressed:— ,“O Turnus, wilt thou tamely see thy toil ,lavished in vain? and thy true throne consigned ,to Trojan wanderers? The King repels ,thy noble wooing and thy war-won dower. ,He summons him a son of alien stem ,to take his kingdom. Rouse thee now, and front, ,scorned and without reward, these perilous days. ,Tread down that Tuscan host! Protect the peace ,of Latium from its foe! Such is the word ,which, while in night and slumber thou wert laid, , Saturnia 's godhead, visibly revealed, ,bade me declare. Up, therefore, and array ,thy warriors in arms! Swift sallying forth ,from thy strong city-gates, on to the fray ,exultant go! Assail the Phrygian chiefs ,who tent them by thy beauteous river's marge, ,and burn their painted galleys! 't is the will ,of gods above that speaks. Yea, even the King ,Latinus, if he will not heed thy plea, ,or hear thy wooing, shall be taught too late ,In mocking answer to the prophetess ,the warrior thus replied: “That stranger fleet ,in Tiber moored, not, as thy folly prates, ,of me unnoted lies. Vex me no more ,with thy fantastic terror. Juno's power ,is watchful of my cause. 'T is mere old age, ,gone to decay and dotage, fills thy breast ,with vain foreboding, and, while kings contend, ,scares and deceives thy visionary eye. ,Guard thou in yonder temple's holy shade ,the images divine! of peace and war ,So kindled he Alecto's wrath to flame; ,and even as he spoke a shudder thrilled ,the warrior's body, and his eyeballs stood ,stonily staring at the hydra hair ,which hissed and writhed above the grisly head ,of the large-looming fiend. With eyes of fire ,horribly rolling, she repelled him far, ,while he but faltered speechless. She upraised ,two coiling snakes out of her tresses, cracked ,the lashes of her scourge, and wrathfully, ,with raving lips replied: “Look well on me, ,gone to decay and dotage of old age! ,And mocked with foolish fear while kings contend! ,Wilt hearken now! Behold me, hither flown ,from where my sister-furies dwell! My hands ,bring bloody death and war.” She spoke, and hurled ,her firebrand at the hero, thrusting deep ,beneath his heart her darkly smouldering flame. ,Then horror broke his sleep, and fearful sweat ,dripped from his every limb. He shrieked aloud ,for arms; and seized the ready arms that lay ,around his couch and hall. Then o'er his soul ,the lust of battle and wild curse of war ,broke forth in angry power, as when the flames ,of faggots round the bubbling cauldron sing, ,and up the waters leap; the close-kept flood ,brims over, streaming, foaming, breaking bound, ,and flings thick clouds in air. He, summoning ,his chieftains, bade them on Latinus move, ,break peace, take arms, and, over Italy ,their shields extending, to thrust forth her foe: ,himself for Teucrian with Latin joined ,was more than match. He called upon the gods ,in witness of his vows: while, nothing loth, ,Rutulia's warriors rushed into array; ,some by his youth and noble beauty moved, ,While Turnus stirred Rutulia's valiant souls, ,Alecto on her Stygian pinions sped ,to where the Teucrians lay. She scanned the ground ,with eager guile, where by the river's marge ,fair-browed Iulus with his nets and snares ,rode fiercely to the chase. Then o'er his hounds ,that hell-born virgin breathed a sudden rage, ,and filled each cunning nostril with the scent ,of stags, till forth in wild pursuit they flew. ,Here all the woe began, and here awoke ,in rustic souls the swift-enkindling war. ,For a fair stag, tall-antlered, stolen away ,even from its mother's milk, had long been kept ,by Tyrrhus and his sons—the shepherd he ,of all the royal flocks, and forester ,of a wide region round. With fondest care ,their sister Silvia entwined its horns ,with soft, fresh garlands, tamed it to run close, ,and combed the creature, or would bring to bathe ,at a clear, crystal spring. It knew the hands ,of all its gentle masters, and would feed ,from their own dish; or wandering through the wood, ,come back unguided to their friendly door, ,though deep the evening shade. Iulus' dogs ,now roused this wanderer in their ravening chase, ,as, drifted down-stream far from home it lay, ,on a green bank a-cooling. From bent bow ,Ascanius, eager for a hunter's praise, ,let go his shaft; nor did Alecto fail ,his aim to guide: but, whistling through the air, ,the light-winged reed pierced deep in flank and side. ,Swift to its cover fled the wounded thing, ,and crept loud-moaning to its wonted stall, ,where, like a blood-stained suppliant, it seemed ,to fill that shepherd's house with plaintive prayer. ,Then Silvia the sister, smiting oft ,on breast and arm, made cry for help, and called ,the sturdy rustics forth in gathering throng. ,These now (for in the silent forest couched ,the cruel Fury) swift to battle flew. ,One brandished a charred stake, another swung ,a knotted cudgel, as rude anger shapes ,its weapon of whate'er the searching eye ,first haps to fall on. Tyrrhus roused his clans, ,just when by chance he split with blows of wedge ,an oak in four; and, panting giant breath, ,shouldered his woodman's axe. Alecto then, ,prompt to the stroke of mischief, soared aloft ,from where she spying sate, to the steep roof ,of a tall byre, and from its peak of straw ,blew a wild signal on a shepherd's horn, ,outflinging her infernal note so far ,that all the forest shuddered, and the grove ,throbbed to its deepest glen. Cold Trivia's lake ,from end to end gave ear, and every wave ,of the white stream of Nar, the lonely pools ,of still Velinus heard: while at the sound ,pale mothers to their breasts their children drew. ,Swift to the signal of the dreadful horn, ,snatching their weapons rude, the freeborn swains ,assembled for the fray; the Trojan bands ,poured from their bivouac with instant aid ,for young Ascanius. In array of war ,both stand confronting. Not mere rustic brawl ,with charred oak-staff and cudgel is the fight, ,but with the two-edged steel; the naked swords ,wave like dark-bladed harvest-field, while far ,the brazen arms flash in the smiting sun, ,and skyward fling their beam: so some wide sea, ,at first but whitened in the rising wind, ,swells its slow-rolling mass and ever higher ,its billows rears, until the utmost deep ,lifts in one surge to heaven. The first to fall ,was Almo, eldest-born of Tyrrhus' sons, ,whom, striding in the van, a loud-winged shaft ,laid low in death; deep in his throat it clung, ,and silenced with his blood the dying cry ,of his frail life. Around him fell the forms ,of many a brave and strong; among them died ,gray-haired Galaesus pleading for a truce: ,righteous he was, and of Ausonian fields ,a prosperous master; five full flocks had he ,of bleating sheep, and from his pastures came ,five herds of cattle home; his busy churls ,While o'er the battle-field thus doubtful swung ,the scales of war, the Fury (to her task ,now equal proven) having dyed the day ,a deep-ensanguined hue, and opened fight ,with death and slaughter, made no tarrying ,within Hesperia, but skyward soared, ,and, Ioud in triumph, insolently thus ,to Juno called: “See, at thy will, their strife ,full-blown to war and woe! Could even thyself ,command them now to truce and amity? ,But I, that with Ausonia's blood befoul ,their Trojan hands, yet more can do, if thou ,shift not thy purpose. For with dire alarms ,I will awake the bordering states to war ,enkindling in their souls the frenzied lust ,the war-god breathes; till from th' horizon round ,the reinforcement pours—I scattering seeds ,of carnage through the land.” In answer spoke ,juno: “Enough of artifice and fear! ,Thy provocation works. Now have they joined ,in close and deadly combat, and warm blood ,those sudden-leaping swords incarnadines, ,which chance put in their hands. Such nuptial joys, ,such feast of wedlock, let the famous son ,of Venus with the King Latinus share! ,But yon Olympian Sire and King no more ,permits thee freely in our skies to roam. ,Go, quit the field! Myself will take control ,of hazards and of labors yet to be.” ,Thus Saturn's daughter spoke. Alecto then, ,unfolding far her hissing, viperous wings, ,turned toward her Stygian home, and took farewell ,of upper air. Deep in Italia lies ,a region mountain-girded, widely famed, ,and known in olden songs from land to land: ,the valley of Amsanctus; deep, dark shades ,enclose it between forest-walls, whereby ,through thunderous stony channel serpentines ,a roaring fall. Here in a monstrous cave ,are breathing-holes of hell, a vast abyss ,where Acheron opes wide its noisome jaws: ,in this Alecto plunged, concealing so ,her execrable godhead, while the air ,Forthwith the sovereign hands of Juno haste ,to consummate the war. The shepherds bear ,back from the field of battle to the town ,the bodies of the slain: young Almo's corse ,and gray Galaesus' bleeding head. They call ,just gods in heaven to Iook upon their wrong, ,and bid Latinus see it. Turnus comes, ,and, while the angry mob surveys the slain, ,adds fury to the hour. “Shall the land ,have Trojan lords? Shall Phrygian marriages ,debase our ancient, royal blood—and I ,be spurned upon the threshold?” Then drew near ,the men whose frenzied women-folk had held ,bacchantic orgies in the pathless grove, ,awed by Amata's name: these, gathering, ,sued loud for war. Yea, all defied the signs ,and venerable omens; all withstood ,divine decrees, and clamored for revenge, ,prompted by evil powers. They besieged ,the house of King Latinus, shouting-loud ,with emulous rage. But like a sea-girt rock ,unmoved he stood; like sea-girt rock when surge ,of waters o'er it sweeps, or howling waves ,surround; it keeps a ponderous front of power, ,though foaming cliffs around it vainly roar; ,from its firm base the broken sea-weeds fall. ,But when authority no whit could change ,their counsels blind, and each event fulfilled ,dread Juno's will, then with complaining prayer ,the aged sire cried loud upon his gods ,and on th' unheeding air: “Alas,” said he, ,“My doom is shipwreck, and the tempest bears ,my bark away! O wretches, your own blood ,shall pay the forfeit for your impious crime. ,O Turnus! O abominable deed! ,Avenging woes pursue thee; to deaf gods ,thy late and unavailing prayer shall rise. ,Now was my time to rest. But as I come ,close to my journey's end, thou spoilest me ,of comfort in my death.” With this the King ,A sacred custom the Hesperian land ,of Latium knew, by all the Alban hills ,honored unbroken, which wide-ruling Rome ,keeps to this day, when to new stroke she stirs ,the might of Mars; if on the Danube 's wave ,resolved to fling the mournful doom of war, ,or on the Caspian folk or Arabs wild; ,or chase the morning far as India 's verge, ,ind from the Parthian despot wrest away ,our banners Iost. Twin Gates of War there be, ,of fearful name, to Mars' fierce godhead vowed: ,a hundred brass bars shut them, and the strength ,of uncorrupting steel; in sleepless watch ,Janus the threshold keeps. 'T is here, what time ,the senate's voice is war, the consul grave ,in Gabine cincture and Quirinal shift ,himself the griding hinges backward moves, ,and bids the Romans arm; obedient then ,the legionary host makes Ioud acclaim, ,and hoarse consent the brazen trumpets blow. ,Thus King Latinus on the sons of Troy ,was urged to open war, and backward roll ,those gates of sorrow: but the aged king ,recoiled, refused the loathsome task, and fled ,to solitary shades. Then from the skies ,the Queen of gods stooped down, and her sole hand ,the lingering portal moved; Saturnia ,swung on their hinges the barred gates of war. ,ausonia from its old tranquillity ,bursts forth in flame. Foot-soldiers through the field ,run to and fro; and mounted on tall steeds ,the cavaliers in clouds of dust whirl by. ,All arm in haste. Some oil the glittering shield ,or javelin bright, or on the whetstone wear ,good axes to an edge, while joyful bands ,uplift the standards or the trumpets blow. ,Five mighty cities to their anvils bring ,new-tempered arms: Atina—martial name — ,proud Tibur, Ardea, Crustumium, ,and river-walled Antemnae, crowned with towers ,strong hollow helmets on their brows they draw ,and weave them willow-shields; or melt and mould ,corselets of brass or shining silver greaves; ,none now for pruning-hook or sacred plough ,have love or care: but old, ancestral swords ,for hardier tempering to the smith they bring. ,Now peals the clarion; through the legions pass ,the watchwords: the impatient yeoman takes ,his helmet from the idle roof-tree hung; ,while to his chariot the master yokes ,the mettled war-horse, dons a shining shield ,Virgins of Helicon, renew my song! ,Instruct me what proud kings to battle flown ,with following legions throng the serried plain. ,Tell me what heroes and illustrious arms , Italia 's bosom in her dawning day ,benigt bore: for your celestial minds, ,have memory of the past, but faint and low ,Foremost in fight, from shores Etrurian came ,Mezentius, scornful rebel against Heaven, ,his people all in arms; and at his side ,Lausus his heir (no fairer youth than he, ,save Turnus of Laurentum), Lausus, skilled ,o break proud horses and wild beasts to quell; ,who from Agylla's citadel in vain ,led forth his thousand warriors: worthy he ,to serve a nobler sire, and happier far ,Next after these, conspicuous o'er the plain, ,with palm-crowned chariot and victorious steeds, ,rode forth well-moulded Aventinus, sprung ,from shapely Hercules; upon the shield ,his blazon was a hundred snakes, and showed ,his father's hydra-cincture serpentine; ,him deep in Aventine 's most secret grove ,the priestess Rhea bore—a mortal maid ,clasped in a god's embrace the wondrous day ,when, flushed with conquest of huge Geryon, ,the lord of Tiryns to Laurentum drove, ,and washed in Tiber 's wave th' Iberian kine. ,His followers brandished pointed pikes and staves, ,or smooth Sabellian bodkin tipped with steel; ,but he, afoot, swung round him as he strode ,a monstrous lion-skin, its bristling mane ,and white teeth crowning his ferocious brow: ,Then came twin brethren, leaving Tibur 's keep ,(named from Tiburtus, brother of them twain) ,Catillus and impetuous Coras, youth ,of Argive seed, who foremost in the van ,pressed ever where the foemen densest throng: ,as when two centaurs, children of the cloud, ,from mountain-tops descend in swift career, ,the snows of Homole and Othrys leaving, ,Nor was Praeneste 's founder absent there, ,by Vulcan sired, among the herds and hinds, ,and on a hearth-stone found (so runs the tale ,each pious age repeats) King Caeculus ,with rustic legions gathered from afar: ,from steep Praeneste and the Gabian vale ,to Juno dear, from Anio's cold stream, ,from upland Hernic rocks and foaming rills, ,from rich Anagnia 's pastures, and the plain ,whence Amasenus pours his worshipped wave. ,Not all of armor boast, and seldom sound ,the chariot and shield; but out of slings ,they hurl blue balls of lead, or in one hand ,a brace of javelins bear; pulled o'er their brows ,are hoods of tawny wolf-skin; as they march ,the left foot leaves a barefoot track behind, ,Messapus came, steed-tamer, Neptune's son, ,by sword and fire invincible: this day, ,though mild his people and unschooled in war, ,he calls them to embattled lines, and draws ,no lingering sword. Fescennia musters there, ,Aequi Falisci, and what clans possess ,Soracte's heights, Flavinia's fruitful farms, ,Ciminian lake and mountain, and the groves ,about Capena . Rank on rank they move, ,loud singing of their chieftain's praise: as when ,a flock of snowy swans through clouded air ,return from feeding, and make tuneful cry ,from their long throats, while Asia 's rivers hear, ,and lone Cayster's startled moorland rings: ,for hardly could the listening ear discern ,the war-cry of a mail-clad host; the sound ,was like shrill-calling birds, when home from sea ,Then, one of far-descended Sabine name, ,Clausus advanced, the captain of a host, ,and in himself an equal host he seemed; ,from his proud loins the high-born Claudian stem ,through Latium multiplies, since Roman power ,with Sabine first was wed. A cohort came ,from Amiternum and the olden wall ,of Cures, called Quirites even then; ,Eretum answered and Mutusca's hill ,with olives clad, Velinus' flowery field, ,nomentum's fortress, the grim precipice ,of Tetrica, Severus' upland fair, ,Casperia, Foruli, Himella's waves, , Tiber and Fabaris, and wintry streams ,of Nursia ; to the same proud muster sped ,Tuscan with Latin tribes, and loyal towns ,beside whose walls ill-omened Allia flows. ,As numerous they moved as rolling waves ,that stir smooth Libyan seas, when in cold floods ,sinks grim Orion's star; or like the throng ,of clustering wheat-tops in the summer sun, ,near Hermus or on Lycia 's yellowing plain: ,Now Agamemnon's kinsman, cruel foe ,to the mere name of Troy, Halaesus, yokes ,the horses of his car and summons forth ,a thousand savage clans at Turnus' call : ,rude men whose mattocks to the Massic hills ,bring Bacchus' bounty, or by graybeard sires ,sent from Auruncan upland and the mead ,of Sidicinum; out of Cales came ,its simple folk; and dwellers by the stream ,of many-shoaled Volturnus, close-allied ,with bold Saticulan or Oscan swains. ,Their arms are tapered javelins, which they wear ,bound by a coiling thong; a shield conceals ,Nor shalt thou, Oebalus, depart unsung, ,whom minstrels say the nymph Sebethis bore ,to Telon, who in Capri was a king ,when old and gray; but that disdaining son ,quitted so small a seat, and conquering sway ,among Sarrastian folk and those wide plains ,watered by Sarnus' wave, became a king ,over Celenna, Rufrae, Batulum, ,and where among her apple-orchards rise ,Abella's walls. All these, as Teutons use, ,hurl a light javelin; for helm they wear ,stripped cork-tree bark; the crescent of their shields ,Next Ufens, mountain-bred, from Nersae came ,to join the war; of goodly fame was he ,for prosperous arms: his Aequian people show ,no gentle mien, but scour the woods for prey, ,or, ever-armed, across the stubborn glebe ,compel the plough; though their chief pride and joy ,Next after these, his brows and helmet bound ,with noble olive, from Marruvium came ,a priest, brave Umbro, ordered to the field ,by King Archippus: o'er the viper's brood, ,and venomed river-serpents he had power ,to scatter slumber with wide-waving hands ,and wizard-songs. His potent arts could soothe ,their coiling rage and heal the mortal sting: ,but 'gainst a Trojan sword no drug had he, ,nor could his drowsy spells his flesh repair, ,nor gathered simples from the Marsic hills. ,Thee soon in wailing woods Anguitia mourned, ,thee, Fucinus, the lake of crystal wave, ,Next, Virbius in martial beauty rode, ,son of Hippolytus, whose mother, proud , Aricia, sent him in his flower of fame ,out of Egeria's hills and cloudy groves ,where lies Diana's gracious, gifted fane. ,For legend whispers that Hippolytus, ,by step-dame's plot undone, his life-blood gave ,to sate his vengeful father, and was rent ,in sunder by wild horses; but the grave ,to air of heaven and prospect of the stars ,restored him;—for Diana's love and care ,poured out upon him Paeon's healing balm. ,But Jove, almighty Sire, brooked not to see ,a mortal out of death and dark reclimb ,to light of life, and with a thunderbolt ,hurled to the Stygian river Phoebus' son, ,who dared such good elixir to compound. ,But pitying Trivia hid Hippolytus ,in her most secret cave, and gave in ward ,to the wise nymph Egeria in her grove; ,where he lived on inglorious and alone, ,ranging the woods of Italy, and bore ,the name of Virbius. 'T is for this cause ,the hallowed woods to Trivia's temple vowed ,forbid loud-footed horses, such as spilled ,stripling and chariot on the fatal shore, ,scared by the monsters peering from the sea. ,Yet did the son o'er that tumultuous plain ,Lo, Turnus strides conspicuous in the van, ,full armed, of mighty frame, his lordly head ,high o'er his peers emerging! His tall helm ,with flowing triple crest for ensign bears ,Chimaera, whose terrific lips outpour ,volcanic fires; where'er the menace moves ,of her infernal flames and wrathful frown, ,there wildest flows the purple flood of war. ,On his smooth shield deep graven in the gold ,is horned Io—wondrous the device!— ,a shaggy heifer-shape the maiden shows; ,Argus is watching her, while Inachus ,pours forth his river from the pictured urn. ,A storm of tramping troops, to Turnus sworn, ,throngs all the widespread plain with serried shields: ,warriors of Argos, and Auruncan bands, ,Sicani, Rutuli, Sacranian hosts, ,Labicum's painted shields; all who till ,thy woodland vales, O Tiber ! or the shore ,Numicius hallows; all whose ploughs upturn ,Rutulia's hills, or that Circaean range ,where Jove of Anxur guards, and forests green ,make fair Feronia glad; where lie the fens ,of Satura, and Ufens' icy wave ,Last came Camilla, of the Volscians bred, ,leading her mail-clad, radiant chivalry; ,a warrior-virgin, of Minerva's craft ,of web and distaff, fit for woman's toil, ,no follower she; but bared her virgin breast ,to meet the brunt of battle, and her speed ,left even the winds behind; for she would skim ,an untouched harvest ere the sickle fell, ,nor graze the quivering wheat-tops as she ran; ,or o'er the mid-sea billows' swollen surge ,so swiftly race, she wet not in the wave ,her flying feet. For sight of her the youth ,from field and fortress sped, and matrons grave ,stood wondering as she passed, well-pleased to see ,her royal scarf in many a purple fold ,float off her shining shoulder, her dark hair ,in golden clasp caught fast, and how she bore ,for arms a quiver of the Lycian mode, ,and shepherd's shaft of myrtle tipped with steel. " 7.367 But lo! from Argos on her voyage of air
7.368
rides the dread spouse of Jove. She, sky-enthroned
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above the far Sicilian promontory, ' "
7.370
pachynus, sees Dardania's rescued fleet, " "
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and all Aeneas' joy. The prospect shows " 7.372 houses a-building, lands of safe abode,
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and the abandoned ships. With bitter grief
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he stands at gaze: then with storm-shaken brows,
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thus from her heart lets loose the wrathful word:
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“O hated race! O Phrygian destinies —
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to mine forevermore (unhappy me!)
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a scandal and offense! Did no one die ' "
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on Troy 's embattled plain? Could captured slaves " "
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not be enslaved again? Was Ilium's flame " "
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no warrior's funeral pyre? Did they walk safe " 7.382 through serried swords and congregated fires?
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At last, methought, my godhead might repose,
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and my full-fed revenge in slumber lie.
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But nay! Though flung forth from their native land, ' "
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I o'er the waves, with enmity unstayed, " 7.387 dared give them chase, and on that exiled few
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hurled the whole sea. I smote the sons of Troy ' "
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with ocean's power and heaven's. But what availed " "
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Syrtes, or Scylla, or Charybdis' waves? " 7.391 The Trojans are in Tiber ; and abide
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within their prayed-for land delectable,
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afe from the seas and me! Mars once had power
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the monstrous Lapithae to slay; and Jove ' "
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to Dian's honor and revenge gave o'er " 7.396 the land of Calydon. What crime so foul
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was wrought by Lapithae or Calydon? ' "
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But I, Jove's wife and Queen, who in my woes " 7.399 have ventured each bold stroke my power could find,
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and every shift essayed,—behold me now
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outdone by this Aeneas! If so weak
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my own prerogative of godhead be,
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let me seek strength in war, come whence it will!
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If Heaven I may not move, on Hell I call.
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To bar him from his Latin throne exceeds
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my fated power. So be it! Fate has given
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Lavinia for his bride. But long delays
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white gleaming through the grove, with all her brood ' "
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filled all the arching sky, the river's banks " 8.320 asunder leaped, and Tiber in alarm ' "
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reversed his flowing wave. So Cacus' lair " 8.322 lay shelterless, and naked to the day
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the gloomy caverns of his vast abode
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tood open, deeply yawning, just as if
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the riven earth should crack, and open wide ' "
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th' infernal world and fearful kingdoms pale, " 8.327 which gods abhor; and to the realms on high
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the bosom white as snow. Euryalus
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ank prone in death; upon his goodly limbs
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the life-blood ran unstopped, and low inclined
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the drooping head; as when some purpled flower,
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cut by the ploughshare, dies, or poppies proud
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with stem forlorn their ruined beauty bow
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before the pelting storm. Then Nisus flew
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traight at his foes; but in their throng would find
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Volscens alone, for none but Volscens stayed:
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they gathered thickly round and grappled him
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in shock of steel with steel. But on he plunged,
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winging in ceaseless circles round his head
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his lightning-sword, and thrust it through the face
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of shrieking Volscens, with his own last breath
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triking his foeman down; then cast himself ' "
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upon his fallen comrade's breast; and there, " "
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While thus in distant region moves the war, ,down to bold Turnus Saturn's daughter sends ,celestial Iris. In a sacred vale, ,the seat of worship at his grandsire's tomb, ,Pilumnus, Faunus' son, the hero mused. ,And thus the wonder-child of Thaumas called ,with lips of rose: “O Turnus, what no god ,dared give for reward of thy fondest vow, ,has come unbidden on its destined day. ,Behold, Aeneas, who has left behind ,the city with his fleet and followers, ,is gone to kingly Palatine, the home ,of good Evander. Yea, his march invades ,the far Etrurian towns, where now he arms ,the Lydian rustics. Wilt thou longer muse? ,Call for thy chariot and steeds! Away! ,Take yonder tents by terror and surprise!” ,She spoke; and heavenward on poising wings ,soared, cleaving as she fled from cloud to cloud ,a vast, resplendent bow. The warrior saw, ,and, lifting both his hands, pursued with prayer ,the fading glory: “Beauteous Iris, hail! ,Proud ornament of heaven! who sent thee here ,across yon cloud to earth, and unto me? ,Whence may this sudden brightness fall? I see ,the middle welkin lift, and many a star, ,far-wandering in the sky. Such solemn sign ,I shall obey, and thee, O god unknown!” ,So saying, he turned him to a sacred stream, ,took water from its brim, and offered Heaven ,Soon o'er the spreading fields in proud array ,the gathered legions poured; no lack was there ,of steeds all fire, and broidered pomp and gold. ,Messapus led the van; in rearguard rode ,the sons of Tyrrheus; kingly Turnus towered ,from the mid-column eminent: the host ,moved as great Ganges lifting silently ,his seven peaceful streams, or when the flood ,of fructifying Nile from many a field ,back to his channel flows. A swift-blown cloud ,of black, uprolling dust the Teucrians see ,o'ershadowing the plain; Calcus calls ,from lofty outpost: “O my countrymen, ,I see a huge, black ball of rolling smoke. ,Your swords and lances! Man the walls! To arms! ,The foe is here! What ho!” With clamors loud ,the Teucrians through the city-gates retire, ,and muster on the walls. For, wise in war, ,Aeneas, ere he went, had left command ,they should not range in battle-line, nor dare, ,whate'er might hap, to risk in open plain ,the bold sortie, but keep them safe entrenched ,in mounded walls. So now, though rage and shame ,prick to a close fight, they defensive bar ,each portal strong, and, patient of control, ,Turnus, at full speed, had outridden far ,his laggard host, and, leading in his train ,a score of chosen knights, dashed into view ,hard by the walls. A barb of Thracian breed ,dappled with white he rode; a crimson plume ,flamed over his golden helmet. “Who,” he cries, ,“Is foremost at the foe? Who follows me? ,Behold!” And, with the word, he hurled in air ,a javelin, provoking instant war: ,and, towering from his horse, charged o'er the field. ,With answering shout his men-at-arms pursue, ,and war-cries terrible. They laugh to scorn ,“the craven hearts of Troy, that cannot give ,fair, equal vantage, matching man to man, ,but cuddle into camp.” This way and that ,Turnus careers, and stormily surveys ,the frowning rampart, and where way is none ,some entering breach would find: so prowls a wolf ,nigh the full sheepfold, and through wind and rain ,stands howling at the postern all night long; ,beneath the ewes their bleating lambs lie safe; ,but he, with undesisting fury, more ,rages from far, made frantic for his prey ,by hunger of long hours, his foaming jaws ,athirst for blood: not less the envy burned ,of the Rutulian, as he scanned in vain ,the stronghold of his foe. Indigt scorn ,thrilled all his iron frame. But how contrive ,to storm the fortress or by force expel ,the Trojans from the rampart, and disperse ,along the plain? Straightway he spied the ships, ,in hiding near the camp, defended well ,by mounded river-bank and fleeting wave. ,On these he fell; while his exultant crew ,brought firebrands, and he with heart aflame ,grasped with a vengeful hand the blazing pine. ,To the wild work his followers sped; for who ,could prove him craven under Turnus' eye? ,The whole troop for the weapon of their rage ,seized smoking coals, of many a hearth the spoil; ,red glare of fuming torches burned abroad, ,What god, O Muses, saved the Trojans then ,from wrathful flame? Who shielded then the fleet, ,I pray you tell, from bursting storm of fire? ,From hoary eld the tale, but its renown ,sings on forever. When Aeneas first ,on Phrygian Ida hewed the sacred wood ,for rib and spar, and soon would put to sea, ,that mighty mother of the gods, they say, ,the Berecynthian goddess, thus to Jove ,addressed her plea: “Grant, O my son, a boon, ,which thy dear mother asks, who aided thee ,to quell Olympian war. A grove I have ,of sacred pine, long-loved from year to year. ,On lofty hill it grew, and thither came ,my worshippers with gifts, in secret gloom ,of pine-trees dark and shadowing maple-boughs.; ,these on the Dardan warrior at his need ,I, not unwilling, for his fleet bestowed. ,But I have fears. O, Iet a parent's prayer ,in this prevail, and bid my care begone! ,Let not rude voyages nor the shock of storm ,my ships subdue, but let their sacred birth ,on my charmed hills their strength and safety be!” ,Then spake her son, who guides the wheeling spheres: ,“Wouldst thou, my mother, strive to oversway ,the course of Fate? What means this prayer of thine? ,Can it be granted ships of mortal mould ,to wear immortal being? Wouldst thou see ,Aeneas pass undoubting and secure ,through doubtful strait and peril? On what god ,was e'er such power bestowed? Yet will I grant ,a different boon. Whatever ships shall find ,a safe Ausonian haven, and convey ,safe through the seas to yon Laurentian plain ,the Dardan King, from such I will remove ,their perishable shapes, and bid them be ,sea-nymphs divine, like Nereus' daughters fair, ,Doto and Galatea, whose white breasts ,divide the foaming wave.” He said, and swore ,by his Tartarean brother's mournful stream, ,the pitch-black floods and dark engulfing shore ,of Styx; then great Jove bowed his head, and all ,Now was the promised day at hand (for Fate ,had woven the web so far) when Turnus' rage ,stirred the divine progenitress to save ,her sacred ships from fire. Then sudden shone ,a strange effulgence in the eastern air; ,and in a storm-cloud wafted o'er the sky ,were Corybantic choirs, whose dreadful song ,smote both on Teucrian and Rutulian ear: ,“O Teucrians, fear not for the sure defence ,of all the ships, nor arm your mortal hands. ,Yon impious Turnus shall burn up the seas ,before my pine-trees blest. Arise! Be free, ,ye goddesses of ocean, and obey ,your mother's mighty word.” Then instant broke ,the hawsers of the sterns; the beaked prows ,went plunging like great dolphins from the shore ,down to the deeps, and, wonderful to tell, ,the forms of virgin goddesses uprose, ,The hearts of the Rutulian host stood still ,in panic, and Messapus terrified ,his trembling horses reined; the sacred stream ,of Father Tiber, harshly murmuring, ,held back his flood and checked his seaward way. ,But Turnus' courage failed not; he alone ,his followers roused, and with reproachful words ,alone spoke forth: “These signs and prodigies ,threaten the Trojan only. Jove himself ,has stripped them of their wonted strength: no more ,can they abide our deadly sword and fire. ,The Trojan path to sea is shut. What hope ,of flight is left them now? The half their cause ,is fallen. The possession of this land ,is ours already; thousands of sharp swords , Italia 's nations bring. Small fear have I ,of Phrygia 's boasted omens. What to me ,their oracles from heaven? The will of Fate ,and Venus have achieved their uttermost ,in casting on Ausonia's fruitful shore ,yon sons of Troy . I too have destinies: ,and mine, good match for theirs, with this true blade ,will spill the blood of all the baneful brood, ,in vengeance for my stolen wife. Such wrongs ,move not on Atreus' sons alone, nor rouse ,only Mycenae to a righteous war. ,Say you, ‘ Troy falls but once?’ One crime, say I, ,should have contented them; and now their souls ,should little less than loathe all womankind. ,These are the sort of soldiers that be brave ,behind entrenchment, where the moated walls ,may stem the foe and make a little room ,betwixt themselves and death. Did they not see ,how Troy 's vast bulwark built by Neptune's hand ,crumbled in flame? Forward, my chosen brave! ,Who follows me to cleave his deadly way ,through yonder battlement, and leap like storm ,upon its craven guard? I have no need ,of arms from Vulcan's smithy; nor of ships ,a thousand strong against our Teucrian foes, ,though all Etruria's league enlarge their power. ,Let them not fear dark nights, nor coward theft ,of Pallas' shrine, nor murdered sentinels ,on their acropolis. We shall not hide ,in blinding belly of a horse. But I ,in public eye and open day intend ,to compass their weak wall with siege and fire. ,I'll prove them we be no Pelasgic band, ,no Danaan warriors, such as Hector's arm ,ten years withstood. But look! this day hath spent ,its better part. In what remains, rejoice ,in noble deeds well done; let weary flesh ,have rest and food. My warriors, husband well ,your strength against to-morrow's hopeful war.” ,Meanwhile to block their gates with wakeful guard ,is made Messapus' work, and to gird round ,their camp with watchfires. Then a chosen band, ,twice seven Rutulian chieftains, man the walls ,with soldiery; each leads a hundred men ,crested with crimson, armed with glittering gold. ,Some post to separate sentries, and prepare ,alternate vigil; others, couched on grass, ,laugh round the wine and lift the brazen bowls. ,The camp-fires cheerly burn; the jovial guard ,The Trojans peering from the lofty walls ,survey the foe, and arm for sure defence ,of every point exposed. They prove the gates ,with fearful care, bind bridge with tower, and bring ,good store of javelins. Serestus bold ,and Mnestheus to their labors promptly fly, ,whom Sire Aeneas bade in time of stress ,to have authority and free command ,over his warriars. Along the walls ,the legions, by the cast of lots, divide ,the pain and peril, giving each his due ,Nisus kept sentry at the gate: a youth ,of eager heart for noble deeds, the son ,of Hyrtacus, whom in Aeneas' train ,Ida the huntress sent; swift could he speed ,the spear or light-winged arrow to its aim. ,Beside him was Euryalus, his friend: ,of all th' Aeneadae no youth more fair ,wore Trojan arms; upon his cheek unshorn ,the tender bloom of boyhood lingered still. ,Their loving hearts were one, and oft in war ,they battled side by side, as in that hour ,a common sentry at the gate they shared. ,Said Nisus: “Is it gods above that breathe ,this fever in my soul, Euryalus? ,or is the tyrant passion of each breast ,the god it serves? Me now my urgent mind ,to battles or some mighty deed impels, ,and will not give me rest. Look yonder, where ,the Rutuli in dull security ,the siege maintain. Yet are their lights but few. ,They are asleep or drunk, and in their line ,is many a silent space. O, hear my thought, ,and what my heart is pondering. To recall ,Aeneas is the dearest wish to-night ,of all, both high and low. They need true men ,to find him and bring tidings. If our chiefs ,but grant me leave to do the thing I ask ,(Claiming no reward save what honor gives), ,methinks I could search out by yonder hill ,a path to Pallanteum.” The amazed ,Euryalus, flushed warm with eager love ,for deeds of glory, instantly replied ,to his high-hearted friend: “Dost thou refuse, ,my Nisus, to go with me hand in hand ,when mighty deeds are done? Could I behold ,thee venturing alone on danger? Nay! ,Not thus my sire Opheltes, schooled in war, ,taught me his true child, 'mid the woes of Troy ,and Argive terrors reared; not thus with thee ,have I proved craven, since we twain were leal ,to great Aeneas, sharing all his doom. ,In this breast also is a heart which knows ,contempt of life, and deems such deeds, such praise, ,well worth a glorious death.” Nisus to him: ,“I have not doubted thee, nor e'er could have ,one thought disloyal. May almighty Jove, ,or whatsoe'er good power my purpose sees, ,bring me triumphant to thy arms once more! ,But if, as oft in doubtful deeds befalls, ,some stroke of chance, or will divine, should turn ,to adverse, 't is my fondest prayer that thou ,shouldst live the longer of us twain. Thy years ,suit better with more life. Oh! let there be ,one mourner true to carry to its grave ,my corpse, recaptured in the desperate fray, ,or ransomed for a price. Or if this boon ,should be—'t is Fortune's common way—refused, ,then pay the debt of grief and loyal woe ,unto my far-off dust, and garlands leave ,upon an empty tomb. No grief I give ,to any sorrowing mother; one alone, ,of many Trojan mothers, had the heart ,to follow thee, her child, and would not stay ,in great Acestes' land.” His friend replied: ,“Thou weavest but a web of empty words ,and reasons vain, nor dost thou shake at all ,my heart's resolve. Come, let us haste away!” ,He answered so, and summoned to the gate ,a neighboring watch, who, bringing prompt relief, ,the sentry-station took; then quitted he ,his post assigned; at Nisus' side he strode, ,Now in all lands all creatures that have breath ,lulled care in slumber, and each heart forgot ,its load of toil and pain. But they who led ,the Teucrian cause, with all their chosen brave, ,took counsel in the kingdom's hour of need ,what action to command or whom dispatch ,with tidings to Aeneas. In mid-camp ,on long spears leaning and with ready shield ,to leftward slung, th' assembled warriors stood. ,Thither in haste arrived the noble pair, ,brave Nisus with Euryalus his friend, ,and craved a hearing, for their suit, they said, ,was urgent and well-worth a patient ear. ,Iulus to the anxious striplings gave ,a friendly welcome, bidding Nisus speak. ,The son of Hyrtacus obeyed: “O, hear, ,Princes of Teucria, with impartial mind, ,nor judge by our unseasoned youth the worth ,of what we bring. Yon Rutule watch is now ,in drunken sleep, and all is silent there. ,With our own eyes we picked out a good place ,to steal a march, that cross-road by the gate ,close-fronting on the bridge. Their lines of fire ,are broken, and a murky, rolling smoke ,fills all the region. If ye grant us leave ,by this good luck to profit, we will find ,Aeneas and the walls of Palatine, ,and after mighty slaughter and huge spoil ,ye soon shall see us back. Nor need ye fear ,we wander from the way. oft have we seen ,that city's crest loom o'er the shadowy vales, ,where we have hunted all day long and know ,each winding of yon river.” Then uprose ,aged Aletes, crowned with wisdom's years: ,“Gods of our fathers, who forevermore ,watch over Troy, ye surely had no mind ,to blot out Teucria's name, when ye bestowed ,such courage on young hearts, and bade them be ,so steadfast and so leal.” Joyful he clasped ,their hands in his, and on their shoulders leaned, ,his aged cheek and visage wet with tears. ,“What reward worthy of such actions fair, ,dear heroes, could be given? Your brightest prize ,will come from Heaven and your own hearts. The rest ,Aeneas will right soon bestow; nor will ,Ascanius, now in youth's unblemished prime, ,ever forget your praise.” Forthwith replied ,Aeneas' son, “By all our household gods, ,by great Assaracus, and every shrine ,of venerable Vesta, I confide ,my hopes, my fortunes, and all future weal ,to your heroic hearts. O, bring me back ,my father! Set him in these eyes once more! ,That day will tears be dry; and I will give ,two silver wine-cups graven and o'erlaid ,with clear-cut figures, which my father chose ,out of despoiled Arisbe; also two ,full talents of pure gold, and tripods twain, ,and ancient wine-bowl, Tyrian Dido's token. ,But if indeed our destiny shall be ,to vanquish Italy in prosperous war, ,to seize the sceptre and divide the spoil, — ,saw you that steed of Turnus and the arms ,in which he rode, all golden? That same steed, ,that glittering shield and haughty crimson crest ,I will reserve thee, e'er the lots are cast, ,and, Nisus, they are thine. Hereto my sire ,will add twelve captive maids of beauty rare, ,and slaves in armor; last, thou hast the fields ,which now Latinus holds. But as for thee, ,to whom my youth but binds me closer still, ,thee, kingly boy, my whole heart makes my own, ,and through all changeful fortune we shall be ,inseparable peers: nor will I seek ,renown and glory, or in peace or war, ,forgetting thee: but trust thee from this day ,in deed and word.” To him in answer spoke ,euryalus, “O, may no future show ,this heart unworthy thy heroic call! ,And may our fortune ever prosperous prove, ,not adverse. But I now implore of thee ,a single boon worth all beside. I have ,a mother, from the venerated line ,of Priam sprung, whom not the Trojan shore ,nor King Acestes' city could detain, ,alas! from following me. I leave her now ,without farewell; nor is her love aware ,of my supposed peril. For I swear ,by darkness of this night and thy right hand, ,that all my courage fails me if I see ,a mother's tears. O, therefore, I implore, ,be thou her sorrow's comfort and sustain ,her solitary day. Such grace from thee ,equip me for my war, and I shall face ,with braver heart whatever fortune brings.” ,With sudden sorrow thrilled, the veteran lords ,of Teucria showed their tears. But most of all ,such likeness of his own heart's filial love ,on fair Iulus moved, and thus he spoke: ,“Promise thyself what fits thy generous deeds. ,Thy mother shall be mine, Creusa's name ,alone not hers; nor is the womb unblest ,that bore a child like thee. Whate'er success ,may follow, I make oath immutable ,by my own head, on which my father swore, ,that all I promise thee of gift or praise ,if home thou comest triumphing, shall be ,the glory of thy mother and thy kin.” ,Weeping he spoke, and from his shoulder drew ,the golden sword, well-wrought and wonderful, ,which once in Crete Lycaon's cunning made ,and sheathed in ivory. On Nisus then ,Mnestheus bestowed a shaggy mantle torn ,from a slain lion; good Aletes gave ,exchange of crested helms. In such array ,they hastened forth; and all the princely throng, ,young men and old, ran with them to the gates, ,praying all gods to bless. Iulus then, ,a fair youth, but of grave, heroic soul ,beyond his years, gave them in solemn charge ,full many a message for his sire, but these ,the hazard of wild winds soon scattered far, ,Forth through the moat they climb, and steal away ,through midnight shades, to where their foemen lie ,encamped in arms; of whom, before these fall, ,a host shall die. Along the turf were seen, ,laid low in heavy slumber and much wine, ,a prostrate troop; the horseless chariots ,stood tilted on the shore, 'twixt rein and wheel ,the drivers dozed, wine-cups and idle swords ,strewn round them without heed. The first to speak ,was Nisus. “Look, Euryalus,” he cried, ,“Now boldly strike. The hour to do the deed ,is here, the path this way. Keep wide-eyed watch ,that no man smite behind us. I myself ,will mow the mighty fieid, and lead thee on ,in a wide swath of slaughter.” With this word ,he shut his lips; and hurled him with his sword ,on haughty Rhamnes, who lay propped at ease ,on pillows huge, and from his heaving breast ,poured slumber loud: of royal stem was he ,and honored of King Turnus for his skill ,in augury; yet could no augur's charm ,that bloody stroke forefend. And Nisus slew ,three slaves near by, that lay in reckless sleep ,upon their spears; then him that bore the shield ,of Remus, then the driver of his car ,close to the horses caught; his sword cut through ,their prostrate necks; then their great master's head ,he lifted high, and left decapitate ,the huge corpse spilling forth its crimson gore ,o'er couch and ground. Like stroke on Lamus fell ,and Lamyrus, with young Serranus, who ,had gamed the midnight through and sleeping lay, ,his fair young body to the wine-god given; ,but happier now had that long-revelling night ,been merry till the dawn! Thus round full folds ,of sheep a famished lion fiercely prowls; ,mad hunger moves him; he devours and rends ,with bloody, roaring mouth, the feeble flock ,that trembles and is dumb. Nor was the sword ,of fair Euryalus less fatal found; ,but fiercely raging on his path of death, ,he pressed on through a base and nameless throng, ,Rhoetus, Herbesus, Fadus, Abaris; ,surprising all save Rhoetus, who awake ,saw every stroke, and crouched in craven fear ,behind a mighty wine-bowl; but not less ,clean through his bare breast as he started forth ,the youth thrust home his sword, then drew it back ,death-dripping, while the bursting purple stream ,of life outflowed, with mingling blood and wine. ,Then, flushed with stealthy slaughter, he crept near ,the followers of Messapus, where he saw ,their camp-fire dying down, and tethered steeds ,upon the meadow feeding. Nisus then ,knew the hot lust of slaughter had swept on ,too far, and cried, “Hold off! For, lo, ,the monitory dawn is nigh. Revenge ,has fed us to the full. We have achieved ,clean passage through the foe.” Full many a prize ,was left untaken: princely suits of mail ,enwrought with silver pure, huge drinking-bowls, ,and broideries fair. Yet grasped Euryalus ,the blazonry at Rhamnes' corselet hung, ,and belt adorned with gold: which were a gift ,to Remulus of Tibur from the store ,of opulent Caedicus, who sued from far ,to be a friend; and these in death he gave ,to his son's son, who slain in battle fell, ,and proud Rutulians seized them with the spoil. ,Euryalus about his shoulder strong ,this booty slung—unprofitable gain! — ,and fitted on a gorgeous, crested helm ,which once Messapus wore. So from the camp, ,But horsemen from the Latin city sent ,to join the serried legions of the plain ,had come at Turnus' call, three hundred strong ,all bearing shields, and under the command ,of Volscens. Nigh the camp and walls they drew; ,and soon they spied upon the leftward path ,th' heroic pair, where in dim shades of night ,the helmet of Euryalus betrayed ,the heedless boy, and with a glancing beam ,flashed on the foe. Nor was it seen in vain. ,Loud from the line the voice of Volscens called: ,“Stand, gentlemen! What business brings you here? ,Whose your allegiance? Whither speed so fast?” ,No answer gave they save to fly in haste ,to cover of the forest and deep gloom ,of the defensive night. The horsemen then ,blocked every crossway known, and, scattering wide, ,kept sentry at the entrance. The great wood ,was all of tangled brush and blinding shade ,of flex-boughs. Impenetrable thorns ,had thickly overgrown, and seldom showed ,a pathway through the maze. Euryalus, ,by the black branches and his ponderous spoil ,impeded, groped along in fearful doubt, ,deceived and quite astray. Nisus his friend ,had quit him, and incautiously had forced ,a sally through the close-encircling foe, ,into that region which should after bear ,the name of Alba—a rude shelter then ,for King Latinus' herds. He stayed him there ,and looked, but vainly, for the comrade gone. ,“Euryalus, ill-fated boy!” he cried, ,“Where have I lost thee in the pathless wild? ,How find thee? How retrace the blinding maze ,of yonder treacherous wood?” Yet ere he said, ,on his own path he turns him back, and scans ,his own light footprints through the tangled thorn, ,so dark and still. But suddenly he hears ,the tread of horses, with confusing din ,and tumult of pursuit. Nor was it long ,he tarried ere upon his anguished ear ,smote a great cry: and, lo! Euryalus, ,trapped by the dark night, the deceptive ground, ,faced the whole onset, and fell back o'erwhelmed ,by a loud mob of foes, while his sole sword ,tried many a thrust in vain. O, what defence ,may Nisus bring? With what audacious arms ,his chosen comrade save? Shall he make bare ,his dying breast to all their swords, and run ,to honorable death that bloody way? ,he swung his spear with lifted arm, then looked ,to the still moon, in heaven, and thus implored: ,“O goddess, aid me in my evil case. ,O glory of the stars, Latona's child! ,O guardian of groves, if in my name ,my father Hyrtacus made offerings ,on burning altars, if my own right hand, ,successful in the chase, ere hung its gift ,beneath thy dome or on thy sacred wall, ,grant me yon troop to scatter. Guide my spear ,along its path in air.” He spoke, and hurled ,with all his gathered strength the shaft of steel. ,the swift spear clove the shades of night, and struck ,full in the back of Sulmo, where it split, ,but tore through to his very heart. The breast ,poured forth life's glowing stream, and he, o'erthrown ,lay cold in death, while his huge, heaving sides ,gave lingering throes. The men about him stared ,this way and that. But Nisus, fiercer still, ,poised level with his ear a second shaft, ,and, while the foeman paused, the whizzing spear ,straight through the brows of Tagus drove, and clung ,deep in the cloven brain. In frenzy rose ,Volscens, but nowhere could espy what hand ,the shaft had hurled, nor whither his wild rage ,could make reply. “But thou,” he cried, “shalt feed ,with thy hot blood my honor and revenge ,for both the slain.” Then with a sword unsheathed ,upon Euryalus he fell. Loud shrieked ,Nisus, of reason reft, who could not bear ,such horror, nor in sheltering gloom of night ,longer abide: “'T is I, 't is I!” he said. ,look on the man who slew them! Draw on me ,your swords, Rutulians! The whole stratagem ,was mine, mine only, and the lad ye slay ,dared not, and could not. O, by Heaven above ,and by the all-beholding stars I swear, ,he did but love his hapless friend too well.” ,But while he spoke, the furious-thrusting sword ,had pierced the tender body, and run through ,the bosom white as snow. Euryalus ,sank prone in death; upon his goodly limbs ,the life-blood ran unstopped, and low inclined ,the drooping head; as when some purpled flower, ,cut by the ploughshare, dies, or poppies proud ,with stem forlorn their ruined beauty bow ,before the pelting storm. Then Nisus flew ,straight at his foes; but in their throng would find ,Volscens alone, for none but Volscens stayed: ,they gathered thickly round and grappled him ,in shock of steel with steel. But on he plunged, ,swinging in ceaseless circles round his head ,his lightning-sword, and thrust it through the face ,of shrieking Volscens, with his own last breath ,striking his foeman down; then cast himself ,upon his fallen comrade's breast; and there, ,Heroic pair and blest! If aught I sing ,have lasting music, no remotest age ,shall blot your names from honor's storied scroll: ,not while the altars of Aeneas' line ,shall crown the Capitol's unshaken hill, ,nor while the Roman Father's hand sustains ,The Rutules seized the spoils of victory, ,and slowly to their camp, with wail and cry, ,bore Volscens' corse; and in the eamp they made ,like wailing over Rhamnes lifeless found, ,o'er Numa and Serranus, and a throng ,of princes dead. The gazing people pressed ,around the slain, the dying, where the earth ,ran red with slaughter and full many a stream ,of trickling gore; nor did they fail to know ,Messapus' glittering helm, his baldric fair, ,Now, from Tithonus' saffron couch set free, ,Aurora over many a land outpoured ,the rising morn; the sun's advancing beam ,unveiled the world; and Turnus to his host ,gave signal to stand forth, while he arrayed ,himself in glorious arms. Then every chief ,awoke his mail-clad company, and stirred ,their slumbering wrath with tidings from the foe. ,Tumultuously shouting, they impaled ,on lifted spears—O pitiable sight! — ,the heads of Nisus and Euryalus. ,Th' undaunted Trojans stood in battle-line ,along the wall to leftward (for the right ,the river-front defended) keeping guard ,on the broad moat; upon the ramparts high ,sad-eyed they stood, and shuddered as they saw ,the hero-faces thrust aloft; too well ,On restless pinions to the trembling town ,had voiceful Rumor hied, and to the ears ,of that lone mother of Euryalus ,relentless flown. Through all her feeble frame ,the chilling sorrow sped. From both her hands ,dropped web and shuttle; she flew shrieking forth, ,ill-fated mother! and with tresses torn, ,to the wide ramparts and the battle-line ,ran frantic, heeding naught of men-at-arms, ,nor peril nor the rain of falling spears; ,and thus with loud and lamentable cry ,filled all the air: “Is it in yonder guise, ,Euryalus, thou comest? Art thou he, ,last comfort of my life? O cruel one! ,Couldst thou desert me? When they thrust thee forth ,to death and danger, did they dare refuse ,a wretched mother's last embrace? But now — ,O woe is me!—upon this alien shore ,thou liest for a feast to Latin dogs ,and carrion birds. Nor did thy mother lead ,the mourners to thy grave, nor shut those eyes, ,nor wash the dreadful wounds, nor cover thee ,with the fair shroud, which many a night and day ,I swiftly wove, and at my web and loom ,forgot my years and sorrows. Whither now ,to seek and follow thee? What spot of earth ,holds the torn body and the mangled limbs? ,Is all the gift thou bringest home, dear child, ,this? O, was this the prize for which I came ,o'er land and sea? O, stab me very deep, ,if ye have any pity; hurl on me ,your every spear, Rutulians; make of me ,your swords' first work. Or, Father of the gods! ,Show mercy, thou! and with thy lightning touch ,this head accurst, and let it fall by thee ,down to the dark. For else what power is mine ,my tortured life to end?” Her agony ,smote on their listening souls; a wail of woe ,along the concourse ran. Stern men-at-arms ,felt valor for a moment sleep, and all ,their rage of battle fail. But while she stirred ,the passion of her grief, Ilioneus ,and young Iulus, weeping filial tears, ,bade Actor and Idaeus, lifting her ,But now the brazen trumpet's fearsome song ,blares loud, and startled shouts of soldiery ,spread through the roaring sky. The Volscian band ,press to the siege, and, locking shield with shield, ,fill the great trenches, tear the palisades, ,or seek approach by ladders up the walls, ,where'er the line of the defenders thins, and light ,through their black circle shines. The Trojans pour ,promiscuous missiles down, and push out hard ,with heavy poles—so well have they been schooled ,to fight against long sieges. They fling down ,a crushing weight of rocks, in hope to break ,th' assailing line, where roofed in serried shields ,the foe each charge repels. But not for long ,the siegers stand; along their dense array ,the crafty Teucrians down the rampart roll ,a boulder like a hill-top, laying low ,the Rutule troop and crashing through their shields. ,Nor may the bold Rutulian longer hope ,to keep in cover, but essays to storm ,only with far-flung shafts the bastion strong. ,Here grim Mezentius, terrible to see, ,waved an Etrurian pine, and made his war ,with smoking firebrands; there, in equal rage, ,Messapus, the steed-tamer, Neptune's son, ,ripped down the palisade, and at the breach ,Aid, O Calliope, the martial song! ,Tell me what carnage and how many deaths ,the sword of Turnus wrought: what peer in arms ,each hero to the world of ghosts sent down. ,A tower was there, well-placed and looming large, ,with many a lofty bridge, which desperately ,th' Italians strove to storm, and strangely plied ,besieging enginery to cast it down: ,the Trojans hurled back stones, or, standing close, ,flung through the loopholes a swift shower of spears. ,But Turnus launched a firebrand, and pierced ,the wooden wall with flame, which in the wind ,leaped larger, and devoured from floor to floor, ,burning each beam away. The trembling guards ,sought flight in vain; and while they crowded close ,into the side unkindled yet, the tower ,bowed its whole weight and fell, with sudden crash ,that thundered through the sky. Along the ground ,half dead the warriors fell (the crushing mass ,piled over them) by their own pointed spears ,pierced to the heart, or wounded mortally ,by cruel splinters of the wreck. Two men, ,Helenor one, and Lyeus at his side, ,alone get free. Helenor of the twain ,was a mere youth; the slave Lycymnia ,bore him in secret to the Lydian King, ,and, arming him by stealth, had sent away ,to serve the Trojan cause. One naked sword ,for arms had he, and on his virgin shield ,no blazon of renown; but when he saw ,the hosts of Turnus front him, and the lines ,this way and that of Latins closing round, — ,as a fierce, forest-creature, brought to bay ,in circling pack of huntsmen, shows its teeth ,against the naked spears, and scorning death ,leaps upward on the javelins,—even so, ,not loth to die, the youthful soldier flew ,straight at the centre of his foes, and where ,the shining swords looked thickest, there he sprung. ,But Lyeus, swifter-footed, forced his way ,past the opposing spears and made escape ,far as the ciity-wall, where he would fain ,clutch at the coping and climb up to clasp ,some friend above: but Turnus, spear in hand, ,had hotly followed, and exulting loud ,thus taunted him, “Hadst thou the hope, rash fool, ,beyond this grasp to fly?” So, as he clung, ,he tore him down; and with him broke and fell ,a huge piece of the wall: not otherwise ,a frail hare, or a swan of snow-white wing, ,is clutched in eagle-talons, when the bird ,of Jove soars skyward with his prey; or tender lamb ,from bleating mother and the broken fold ,is stolen by the wolf of Mars. Wild shouts ,on every side resound. In closer siege ,the foe press on, and heap the trenches full, ,or hurl hot-flaming torches at the towers. ,Ilioneus with mountain-mass of stone ,struck down Lucetius, as he crept with fire ,too near the city-gate. Emathion fell ,by Liger's hand, and Corynteus' death ,Asilas dealt: one threw the javelin well; ,th' insidious arrow was Asilas' skill. ,Ortygius was slain by Caeneus, then ,victorious Geneus fell by Turnus' ire. ,Then smote he Dioxippus, and laid low ,Itys and Promolus and Sagaris ,and Clonius, and from the lofty tower ,shot Idas down. The shaft of Capys pierced ,Privernus, whom Themilla's javelin ,but now had lightly grazed, and he, too bold, ,casting his shield far from him, had outspread ,his left hand on the wound: then sudden flew ,the feathered arrow, and the hand lay pinned ,against his left side, while the fatal barb ,was buried in his breathing life. The son ,of Arcens now stood forth in glittering arms. ,His broidered cloak was red Iberian stain, ,and beautiful was he. Arcens his sire ,had sent him to the war; but he was bred ,in a Sicilian forest by a stream ,to his nymph-mother dear, where rose the shrine ,of merciful Palicus, blest and fair. ,But, lo! Mezentius his spear laid by, ,and whirled three times about his head the thong ,of his loud sling: the leaden bullet clove ,the youth's mid-forehead, and his towering form ,'T was then Ascanius first shot forth in war ,the arrow swift from which all creatures wild ,were wont to fly in fear: and he struck down ,with artful aim Numanus, sturdy foe, ,called Remulus, who lately was espoused ,to Turnus' younger sister. He had stalked ,before the van, and made vociferous noise ,of truths and falsehoods foul and base, his heart ,puffed up with new-found greatness. Up and down ,he strode, and swelled his folly with loud words: ,“No shame have ye this second time to stay ,cooped close within a rampart's craven siege, ,O Phrygians twice-vanquished? Is a wall ,your sole defence from death? Are such the men ,who ask our maids in marriage? Say what god, ,what doting madness, rather, drove ye here ,to Italy ? This way ye will not find ,the sons of Atreus nor the trickster tongue ,of voluble Ulysses. Sturdy stock ,are we; our softest new-born babes we dip ,in chilling rivers, till they bear right well ,the current's bitter cold. Our slender lads ,hunt night and day and rove the woods at large, ,or for their merriment break stubborn steeds, ,or bend the horn-tipped bow. Our manly prime ,in willing labor lives, and is inured ,to poverty and scantness; we subdue ,our lands with rake and mattock, or in war ,bid strong-walled cities tremble. Our whole life ,is spent in use of iron; and we goad ,the flanks of bullocks with a javelin's end. ,Nor doth old age, arriving late, impair ,our brawny vigor, nor corrupt the soul ,to frail decay. But over silvered brows ,we bind the helmet. Our unfailing joy ,is rapine, and to pile the plunder high. ,But ye! your gowns-are saffron needlework ,or Tyrian purple; ye love shameful ease, ,or dancing revelry. Your tunics fiow ,long-sleeved, and ye have soft caps ribbon-bound. ,Aye, Phrygian girls are ye, not Phrygian men! ,Hence to your hill of Dindymus! Go hear ,the twy-mouthed piping ye have loved so long. ,The timbrel, hark! the Berecynthian flute ,calls you away, and Ida's goddess calls. ,of such loud insolence and words of shame ,Ascanius brooked no more, but laid a shaft ,athwart his bowstring, and with arms stretched wide ,took aim, first offering suppliant vow to Jove: ,“Almighty Jupiter, thy favor show ,to my bold deed! So to thy shrine I bear ,gifts year by year, and to thine altars lead ,a bull with gilded brows, snow-white, and tall ,as his own dam, what time his youth begins ,to lower his horns and fling the sand in air.” ,The Father heard, and from a cloudless sky ,thundered to leftward, while the deadly bow ,resounded and the arrow's fearful song ,hissed from the string; it struck unswervingly ,the head of Remulus and clove its way ,deep in the hollows of his brow. “Begone! ,Proud mocker at the brave! Lo, this reply ,twice-vanquished Phrygians to Rutulia send.” ,Ascanius said no more. The Teucrians ,with deep-voiced shout of joy applaud, and lift ,their exultation starward. Then from heaven ,the flowing-haired Apollo bent his gaze ,upon Ausonia's host, and cloud-enthroned ,looked downward o'er the city, speaking thus ,to fair Iulus in his victory: ,“Hail to thy maiden prowess, boy! This way ,the starward path to dwelling-place divine. ,O sired of gods and sire of gods to come, ,all future storms of war by Fate ordained ,shall into peace and lawful calm subside ,beneath the offspring of Assaracus. ,No Trojan destinies thy glory bound.” ,So saying, from his far, ethereal seat ,he hied him down, and, cleaving the quick winds ,drew near Ascanius. He wore the guise ,of aged Butes, who erewhile had borne ,Anchises, armor and kept trusty guard ,before his threshold, but attended now ,Ascanius, by commandment of his sire. ,Clad in this graybeard's every aspect, moved ,apollo forth,—his very voice and hue, ,his hoary locks and grimly sounding shield, — ,and to the flushed Iulus spoke this word: ,“Child of Aeneas, be content that now ,Numanus unavenged thine arrows feels. ,Such dawn of glory great Apollo's will ,concedes, nor envies thee the fatal shaft ,so like his own. But, tender youth, refrain ,hereafter from this war!” So said divine ,Apollo, who, while yet he spoke, put by ,his mortal aspect, and before their eyes ,melted to viewless air. The Teucrians knew ,the vocal god with armament divine ,of arrows; for his rattling quiver smote ,their senses as he fled. Obedient ,to Phoebus' voice they held back from the fray ,Iulus' fury, and their eager souls ,faced the fresh fight and danger's darkest frown. ,From tower to tower along the bastioned wall ,their war-cry flew: they bend with busy hand ,the cruel bow, or swing the whirling thong ,of javelins. The earth on every side ,is strewn with spent shafts, the reverberant shield ,and hollow helmet ring with blows; the fight ,more fiercely swells; not less the bursting storm ,from watery Kid-stars in the western sky ,lashes the plain, or multitudinous hail ,beats upon shallow seas, when angry Jove ,flings forth tempestuous and-boundless rain, ,The brothers Pandarus and Bitias, ,of whom Alcanor was the famous sire, ,on Ida born, and whom Iaera bred ,in sacred wood of Jove, an oread she, ,twin warriors, like their native hills and trees ,of stature proud, now burst those portals wide ,to them in ward consigned, and sword in hand ,challenge the foe to enter. Side by side, ,steel-clad, their tall heads in bright crested helms, ,to left and right, like towers, the champions stand ,as when to skyward, by the gliding waves ,of gentle Athesis or Padus wide, ,a pair of oaks uprise, and lift in air ,their shaggy brows and nodding crests sublime. ,In burst the Rutules where the onward way ,seemed open wide; Quercens no tarrying knows, ,nor proud Aquiculus in well-wrought arms; ,Tmarus sweeps on impetuous, and the host ,of Haemon, child of Mars. Some routed fly; ,some lay their lives-down at the gate. Wild rage ,o'erflows each martial breast, and gathered fast ,the Trojans rally to one point, and dare ,To Turnus, who upon a distant field ,was storming with huge havoc, came the news ,that now his foe, before a gate thrown wide, ,was red with slaughter. His own fight he stays, ,and speeds him, by enormous rage thrust on, ,to those proud brethren at the Dardan wall. ,There first Antiphates, who made his war ,far in the van (a Theban captive's child ,to great Sarpedon out of wedlock born), ,he felled to earth with whirling javelin: ,th' Italic shaft of cornel lightly flew ,along the yielding air, and through his throat ,pierced deep into the breast; a gaping wound ,gushed blood; the hot shaft to his bosom clung. ,Then Erymas and Merops his strong hand ,laid low: Aphidnus next, then came the turn ,of Bitias, fiery-hearted, furious-eyed: ,but not by javelin,—such cannot fall ,by flying javelin,—the ponderous beam ,of a phalaric spear, with mighty roar, ,like thunderbolt upon him fell; such shock ,neither the bull's-hides of his double shield ,nor twofold corselet's golden scales could stay ,but all his towering frame in ruin fell. ,Earth groaned, and o'er him rang his ample shield. ,so crashes down from Baiae 's storied shore ,a rock-built mole, whose mighty masonry, ,piled up with care, men cast into the sea; ,it trails its wreckage far, and fathoms down ,lies broken in the shallows, while the waves ,whirl every way, and showers of black sand ,are scattered on the air: with thunder-sound ,steep Prochyta is shaken, and that bed ,of cruel stone, Inarime, which lies ,Now to the Latins Mars, the lord of war, ,gave might and valor, and to their wild hearts ,his spur applied, but on the Teucrians breathed ,dark fear and flight. From every quarter came ,auxiliar hosts, where'er the conflict called, ,and in each bosom pulsed the god of war. ,When Pandarus now saw his brother's corse ,low Iying, and which way the chance and tide ,of battle ran, he violently moved ,the swinging hinges of the gate, and strained ,with both his shoulders broad. He shut outside ,not few of his own people, left exposed ,in fiercest fight but others with himself ,he barred inside and saved them as they fled; ,nor noted, madman, how the Rutule King ,had burst in midmost of the line, and now ,stood prisoned in their wall, as if he were ,some monstrous tiger among helpless kine. ,His eyeballs strangely glared; his armor rang ,terrific, his tall crest shook o'er his brows ,blood-red, and lightnings glittered from his shield ,familiar loomed that countece abhorred ,and frame gigantic on the shrinking eyes ,of the Aeneadae. Then Pandarus ,sprang towering forth, all fever to revenge ,his brother's slaughter. “Not this way,” he cried ,“Amata's marriage-gift! No Ardea here ,mews Turnus in his fathers' halls. Behold ,thy foeman's castle! Thou art not allowed ,to take thy leave.” But Turnus looked his way, ,and smiled with heart unmoved. “Begin! if thou ,hast manhood in thee, and meet steel with steel! ,Go tell dead Priam thou discoverest here ,Achilles!” For reply, the champion tall ,hurled with his might and main along the air ,his spear of knotted wood and bark untrimmed. ,But all it wounded was the passing wind, ,for Saturn's daughter turned its course awry, ,and deep in the great gate the spear-point drove. ,“Now from the stroke this right arm means for thee ,thou shalt not fly. Not such the sender of ,this weapon and this wound.” He said, and towered ,aloft to his full height; the lifted sword ,clove temples, brows, and beardless cheeks clean through ,with loudly ringing blow; the ground beneath ,shook with the giant's ponderous fall, and, lo, ,with nerveless limbs, and brains spilt o'er his shield, ,dead on the earth he lay! in equal halves ,In horror and amaze the Trojans all ,dispersed and fled; had but the conqueror thought ,to break the barriers of the gates and call ,his followers through, that fatal day had seen ,an ending of the Teucrians and their war. ,But frenzied joy of slaughter urged him on, ,infuriate, to smite the scattering foe. ,First Phaleris he caught; then cut the knees ,of Gyges; both their spears he snatched away ,and hurled them at the rout; 't was Juno roused ,his utmost might of rage. Now Halys fell, ,and Phegeus, whom he pierced right through the shield: ,next, at the walls and urging reckless war, ,Alcander, Halius, and Noemon gave ,their lives, and Prytanis went down. In vain ,Lynceus made stand and called his comrades brave: ,for Turnus from the right with waving sword ,caught at him and lopped off with one swift blow ,the head, which with its helmet rolled away. ,Next Amycus, destroyer of wild beasts, ,who knew full well to smear a crafty barb ,with venomed oil; young Clytius he slew, ,son of the wind-god; then on Cretheus fell, ,a follower of the muses and their friend: ,Cretheus, whose every joy it was to sing, ,and fit his numbers to the chorded Iyre; ,At last the Teucrian chiefs had heard the tale ,of so much slaughter; and in council met ,are Mnestheus and Serestus bold, who see ,their comrades routed and the conquering foe ,within the gates. Cries Mnestheus, “Whither fly? ,What open way is yonder or what wall? ,Beyond these ramparts lost what stronger lie? ,Shall one lone man here in your walls confined, ,make havoc unavenged and feed the grave ,with your best warriors? 0 cowards vile! ,For your sad country and her ancient gods ,and for renowned Aeneas, can ye feel ,no pity and no shame?” Enflamed to fight ,by words like these, they close the line, and stand ,in strong array. So Turnus for a space ,out of the battle step by step withdrew ,to make the river-bank his rearguard strong; ,whereat the Teucrians, shouting loud, swept on ,the fiercer, and in solid mass pressed round. ,as when a troop of hunters with keen spears ,encircle a wild lion, who in fear, ,but glaring grim and furious, backward falls, ,valor and rage constrain him ne'er to cease ,fronting the foe; yet not for all his ire ,can he against such serried steel make way: ,so Turnus backward with a lingering step ,unwilling drew, and wrath his heart oterflowed. ,for twice already had he cloven a path ,into the foe's mid-press, and twice had driven ,their flying lines in panic through the town. ,But now the whole throng from the camp he sees ,massed to the onset. Nor will Juno now ,dare give him vigor to withstand, for Jove ,had sent aerial Iris out of heaven ,with stern commandment to his sister-queen ,that Turnus from the Teucrian walls retire. ,Therefore the warrior's shield avails no more, ,nor his strong arm; but he is overthrown ,by general assault. Around his brows ,his smitten helmet rings; the ponderous mail ,cracks under falling stones; the haughty plumes ,are scattered from his head, nor can the boss ,of his stout shield endure; the Trojans hurl ,redoubled rain of spears; and with them speeds ,Mnestheus like thunderbolt. The hero's flesh ,dissolves in sweat; no room to breathe has he; ,his limbs are spent and weary; his whole frame ,shakes with his gasping breath: then bounding fort ,with all his harness on, headlong he plunged ,into the flowing stream; its yellow tide ,embraced him as he fell, and gentle waves ,restored him smiling to his friends in arms, ,with all the gore and carnage washed away. " 9.615 Heroic pair and blest! If aught I sing
9.616
have lasting music, no remotest age ' "
9.617
hall blot your names from honor's storied scroll: " "
9.618
not while the altars of Aeneas' line " "
9.619
hall crown the Capitol's unshaken hill, " "
9.620
nor while the Roman Father's hand sustains " ' None
18. Vergil, Eclogues, 4.6, 4.18-4.20, 4.31-4.35 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Argo, as first ship

 Found in books: Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 122, 123, 134; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 122, 123, 134

sup>
4.6 has come and gone, and the majestic roll
4.18
hall free the earth from never-ceasing fear. 4.19 He shall receive the life of gods, and see 4.20 heroes with gods commingling, and himself
4.31
caressing flowers. The serpent too shall die, 4.32 die shall the treacherous poison-plant, and far 4.33 and wide Assyrian spices spring. But soon' "4.34 as thou hast skill to read of heroes' fame," "4.35 and of thy father's deeds, and inly learn"' None
19. Vergil, Georgics, 1.121-1.146 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Argo, as first ship

 Found in books: Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 121, 123; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 121, 123

sup>
1.121 officiunt aut umbra nocet. Pater ipse colendi 1.122 haud facilem esse viam voluit, primusque per artem 1.123 movit agros curis acuens mortalia corda 1.124 nec torpere gravi passus sua regna veterno. 1.125 Ante Iovem nulli subigebant arva coloni; 1.126 ne signare quidem aut partiri limite campum 1.127 fas erat: in medium quaerebant ipsaque tellus 1.128 omnia liberius nullo poscente ferebat. 1.129 Ille malum virus serpentibus addidit atris 1.130 praedarique lupos iussit pontumque moveri, 1.131 mellaque decussit foliis ignemque removit 1.132 et passim rivis currentia vina repressit, 1.133 ut varias usus meditando extunderet artis 1.134 paulatim et sulcis frumenti quaereret herbam. 1.135 Ut silicis venis abstrusum excuderet ignem. 1.136 Tunc alnos primum fluvii sensere cavatas; 1.137 navita tum stellis numeros et nomina fecit, 1.138 Pleiadas, Hyadas, claramque Lycaonis Arcton; 1.139 tum laqueis captare feras et fallere visco 1.140 inventum et magnos canibus circumdare saltus; 1.141 atque alius latum funda iam verberat amnem 1.142 alta petens, pelagoque alius trahit humida lina; 1.143 tum ferri rigor atque argutae lamina serrae,— 1.144 nam primi cuneis scindebant fissile lignum 1.145 tum variae venere artes. Labor omnia vicit 1.146 inprobus et duris urgens in rebus egestas.'' None
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1.121 And heaved its furrowy ridges, turns once more 1.122 Cross-wise his shattering share, with stroke on stroke 1.123 The earth assails, and makes the field his thrall. 1.124 Pray for wet summers and for winters fine,' "1.125 Ye husbandmen; in winter's dust the crop" '1.126 Exceedingly rejoice, the field hath joy; 1.127 No tilth makes 1.128 Nor Gargarus his own harvests so admire. 1.129 Why tell of him, who, having launched his seed, 1.130 Sets on for close encounter, and rakes smooth 1.131 The dry dust hillocks, then on the tender corn 1.132 Lets in the flood, whose waters follow fain; 1.133 And when the parched field quivers, and all the blade 1.134 Are dying, from the brow of its hill-bed, 1.135 See! see! he lures the runnel; down it falls,' "1.136 Waking hoarse murmurs o'er the polished stones," '1.137 And with its bubblings slakes the thirsty fields? 1.138 Or why of him, who lest the heavy ear' "1.139 O'erweigh the stalk, while yet in tender blade" "1.140 Feeds down the crop's luxuriance, when its growth" '1.141 First tops the furrows? Why of him who drain' "1.142 The marsh-land's gathered ooze through soaking sand," '1.143 Chiefly what time in treacherous moons a stream 1.144 Goes out in spate, and with its coat of slime 1.145 Holds all the country, whence the hollow dyke 1.146 Sweat steaming vapour?'' None
20. None, None, nan (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Argo, as first ship

 Found in books: Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 123; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 123

21. None, None, nan (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Argo, as first ship • ship, • ships, displayed as spoils

 Found in books: Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 120, 128; Bowie (2021), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, 755, 756; Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 131; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 120, 128