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27 results for "seneca"
1. Cicero, On His Consulship, 5.10 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •seneca, on environmental determinism, on jews Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 225
2. Horace, Letters, 2.1.156 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •seneca, on environmental determinism, on jews Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 225
3. Seneca The Younger, Quaestiones Naturales, 6.7 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •seneca, on environmental determinism, on germans (and scythians) Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 431
4. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 5.32 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •seneca, on environmental determinism, on germans and nomads Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 427
5.32. 1.  And now it will be useful to draw a distinction which is unknown to many: The peoples who dwell in the interior above Massalia, those on the slopes of the Alps, and those on this side the Pyrenees mountains are called Celts, whereas the peoples who are established above this land of Celtica in the parts which stretch to the north, both along the ocean and along the Hercynian Mountain, and all the peoples who come after these, as far as Scythia, are known as Gauls; the Romans, however, include all these nations together under a single name, calling them one and all Gauls.,2.  The women of the Gauls are not only like the men in their great stature but they are a match for them in courage as well. Their children are usually born with grayish hair, but as they grow older the colour of their hair changes to that of their parents.,3.  The most savage peoples among them are those who dwell beneath the Bears and on the borders of Scythia, and some of these, we are told, eat human beings, even as the Britons do who dwell on Iris, as it is called.,4.  And since the valour of these peoples and their savage ways have been famed abroad, some men say that it was they who in ancient times overran all Asia and were called Cimmerians, time having slightly corrupted the word into the name of Cimbrians, as they are now called. For it has been their ambition from old to plunder, invading for this purpose the lands of others, and to regard all men with contempt.,5.  For they are the people who captured Rome, who plundered the sanctuary at Delphi, who levied tribute upon a large part of Europe and no small part of Asia, and settled themselves upon the lands of the peoples they had subdued in war, being called in time Greco-Gauls, because they became mixed with the Greeks, and who, as their last accomplishment, have destroyed many large Roman armies.,6.  And in pursuance of their savage ways they manifest an outlandish impiety also with respect to their sacrifices; for their criminals they keep prisoner for five years and then impale in honour of the gods, dedicating them together with many other offerings of first-fruits and constructing pyres of great size. Captives also are used by them as victims for their sacrifices in honour of the gods. Certain of them likewise slay, together with the human beings, such animals as are taken in war, or burn them or do away with them in some other vengeful fashion.,7.  Although their wives are comely, they have very little to do with them, but rage with lust, in outlandish fashion, for the embraces of males. It is their practice to sleep upon the ground on the skins of wild beasts and to tumble with a catamite on each side. And the most astonishing thing of all is that they feel no concern for their proper dignity, but prostitute to others without a qualm the flower of their bodies; nor do they consider this a disgraceful thing to do, but rather when anyone of them is thus approached and refuses the favour offered him, this they consider an act of dishonour.
5. Seneca The Younger, De Constantia Sapientis, 13.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •seneca, on environmental determinism, on theparthians and peoples of asia minor Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 317
6. New Testament, Acts, 18.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •seneca, on environmental determinism, on jews Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 458
18.2. καὶ εὑρών τινα Ἰουδαῖον ὀνόματι Ἀκύλαν, Ποντικὸν τῷ γένει, προσφάτως ἐληλυθότα ἀπὸ τῆς Ἰταλίας καὶ Πρίσκιλλαν γυναῖκα αὐτοῦ διὰ τὸ διατεταχέναι Κλαύδιον χωρίζεσθαι πάντας τοὺς Ἰουδαίους ἀπὸ τῆς Ῥώμης, προσῆλθεν αὐτοῖς, 18.2. He found a certain Jew named Aquila, a man of Pontus by race, who had recently come from Italy, with his wife Priscilla, because Claudius had commanded all the Jews to depart from Rome. He came to them,
7. Lucan, Pharsalia, 7.442 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •seneca, on environmental determinism, on theparthians and peoples of asia minor Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 317
8. Juvenal, Satires, 3.60-3.74 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •seneca, on environmental determinism, on greek and roman eloquence Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 395
9. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 33.41, 38.38 (1st cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •seneca, on environmental determinism, on greek and roman eloquence Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 395
33.41.  well then, suppose that a man were to judge you too by the sound that came to him from a distance, what kind of men would he guess you were and what your occupation? For you haven't the capacity for tending either cattle or sheep! And would any one call you colonists from Argos, as you claim to be, or more likely colonists of those abominable Aradians? Would he call you Greeks, or the most licentious of Phoenicians? I believe it is more appropriate for a man of sense to plug his ears with wax in a city like yours than if he chanced to be sailing past the Sirens. For there one faced the risk of death, but here it is licentiousness, insolence, the most extreme corruption that threatens. 38.38.  In truth such marks of distinction, on which you plume yourselves, not only are objects of utter contempt in the eyes of all persons of discernment, but especially in Rome they excite laughter and, what is still more humiliating, are called "Greek failings!" And failings they are indeed, men of Nicomedia, though not Greek, unless some one will claim that in this special particular they are Greek, namely, that those Greeks of old, both Athenians and Spartans, once laid counterclaims to glory. However, I may have said already that their doings were not mere vain conceit but a struggle for real empire — though nowadays you may fancy somehow that they were making a valiant struggle for the right to lead the procession, like persons in some mystic celebration putting up a sham battle over something not really theirs.
10. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 2.80.189, 3.42, 4.4, 7.50, 7.52, 15.19.1, 24.5.5, 29.6.12-29.6.13 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •seneca, on environmental determinism •seneca, on environmental determinism, on greek and roman eloquence •seneca, on environmental determinism, on jews Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 80, 225, 226, 395
11. Tacitus, Histories, 5.5.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •seneca, on environmental determinism, on jews Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 459
12. Plutarch, Pompey, 70.3-70.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •seneca, on environmental determinism, on germans (and scythians) Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 431
70.3. πολὺ δὲ καί Σκυθία λειπόμενον ἔργον καί Ἰνδοί, καὶ πρόφασις οὐκ ἄδοξος ἐπὶ ταῦτα τῆς πλεονεξίας ἡμερῶσαι τὰ βαρβαρικά, τίς δʼ ἂν ἢ Σκυθῶν ἵππος ἢ τοξεύματα Πάρθων ἢ πλοῦτος Ἰνδῶν ἐπέσχε μυριάδας ἑπτὰ Ῥωμαίων ἐν ὅπλοις ἐπερχομένας Πομπηΐου καί Καίσαρος ἡγουμένων, ὧν ὄνομα πολὺ πρότερον ἤκουσαν ἢ τὸ Ῥωμαίων; οὕτως ἄμικτα καί ποικίλα καί θηριώδη φῦλα νικῶντες ἐπῆλθον. 70.4. τότε δὲ ἀλλήλοις μαχούμενοι συνῄεσαν, οὐδὲ τὴν δόξαν αὑτῶν, διʼ ἣν τῆς πατρίδος ἠφείδουν, οἰκτείραντες, ἄχρι τῆς ἡμέρας ἐκείνης ἀνικήτων προσαγορευομένων. ἡ μὲν γὰρ γενομένη συγγένεια καί τὰ Ἰουλίας φίλτρα καί γάμος ἐκεῖνος εὐθὺς ἦν ἀπατηλὰ καί ὕποπτα κοινωνίας ἐπὶ χρείᾳ συνισταμένης ὁμηρεύματα, φιλίας δʼ ἀληθινῆς οὐ μετέσχεν. 70.3. 70.4.
13. Tacitus, Annals, 11.15.1, 13.32.2, 14.44.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •seneca, on environmental determinism, on jews Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 458, 459
14. Tacitus, Agricola, 11.2, 31.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •seneca, on environmental determinism •seneca, on environmental determinism, on germans (and scythians) •seneca, on environmental determinism, on theparthians and peoples of asia minor Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 95, 317
15. Suetonius, Claudius, 25.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •seneca, on environmental determinism, on jews Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 458
16. Silius Italicus, Punica, 14.136-14.138 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •seneca, on environmental determinism, on greek and roman eloquence Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 395
17. Seneca The Younger, Natural Questions, 6.7 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •seneca, on environmental determinism, on germans (and scythians) Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 431
18. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 47.9, 108.22 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •seneca, on environmental determinism, on natural slavery •seneca, on environmental determinism, on the treatment of slaves •seneca, on environmental determinism, on jews Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 186, 458, 459
19. Seneca The Younger, De Providentia (Dialogorum Liber I), 4.14 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •seneca, on environmental determinism, on germans and nomads Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 427, 428
20. Seneca The Younger, On Anger, 2.15.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •seneca, on environmental determinism •seneca, on environmental determinism, on germans (and scythians) Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 80, 95, 205, 430, 431
21. Tacitus, Germania (De Origine Et Situ Germanorum), 33.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 137, 430
22. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 60.6.6 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •seneca, on environmental determinism, on jews Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 458
60.6.6.  As for the Jews, who had again increased so greatly that by reason of their multitude it would have been hard without raising a tumult to bar them from the city, he did not drive them out, but ordered them, while continuing their traditional mode of life, not to hold meetings. He also disbanded the clubs, which had been reintroduced by Gaius.
23. Eusebius of Caesarea, Life of Constantine, 4.5 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •seneca, on environmental determinism, on germans (and scythians) Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 205
4.5. And why should I relate even briefly and incidentally, how he subjected barbarous nations to the Roman power; how he was the first who subjugated the Scythian and Sarmatian tribes, which had never learned submission, and compelled them, how unwilling soever, to own the sovereignty of Rome? For the emperors who preceded him had actually rendered tribute to the Scythians: and Romans, by an annual payment, had confessed themselves servants to barbarians; an indignity which our emperor could no longer bear, nor think it consistent with his victorious career to continue the payment his predecessors had made. Accordingly, with full confidence in his Saviour's aid, he raised his conquering standard against these enemies also, and soon reduced them all to obedience; coercing by military force those who fiercely resisted his authority, while, on the other hand, he conciliated the rest by wisely conducted embassies, and reclaimed them to a state of order and civilization from their lawless and savage life. Thus the Scythians at length learned to acknowledge subjection to the power of Rome.
24. Augustine, The City of God, 6.11 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •seneca, on environmental determinism, on jews Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 459
6.11. Seneca, among the other superstitions of civil theology, also found fault with the sacred things of the Jews, and especially the sabbaths, affirming that they act uselessly in keeping those seventh days, whereby they lose through idleness about the seventh part of their life, and also many things which demand immediate attention are damaged. The Christians, however, who were already most hostile to the Jews, he did not dare to mention, either for praise or blame, lest, if he praised them, he should do so against the ancient custom of his country, or, perhaps, if he should blame them, he should do so against his own will. When he was speaking concerning those Jews, he said, When, meanwhile, the customs of that most accursed nation have gained such strength that they have been now received in all lands, the conquered have given laws to the conquerors. By these words he expresses his astonishment; and, not knowing what the providence of God was leading him to say, subjoins in plain words an opinion by which he showed what he thought about the meaning of those sacred institutions: For, he says, those, however, know the cause of their rites, while the greater part of the people know not why they perform theirs. But concerning the solemnities of the Jews, either why or how far they were instituted by divine authority, and afterwards, in due time, by the same authority taken away from the people of God, to whom the mystery of eternal life was revealed, we have both spoken elsewhere, especially when we were treating against the Manich ans, and also intend to speak in this work in a more suitable place.
25. Strabo, Geography, 7.1.3, 7.2.4, 15.1.24  Tagged with subjects: •seneca, on environmental determinism, on germans and nomads •seneca, on environmental determinism, on germans (and scythians) •seneca, on environmental determinism Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 80, 428, 430
7.1.3. The first parts of this country are those that are next to the Rhenus, beginning at its source and extending a far as its outlet; and this stretch of river-land taken as a whole is approximately the breadth of the country on its western side. Some of the tribes of this river-land were transferred by the Romans to Celtica, whereas the others anticipated the Romans by migrating deep into the country, for instance, the Marsi; and only a few people, including a part of the Sugambri, are left. After the people who live along the river come the other tribes that live between the Rhenus and the River Albis, and traverses no less territory than the former. Between the two are other navigable rivers also (among them the Amasias, on which Drusus won a naval victory over the Bructeri), which likewise flow from the south towards the north and the ocean; for the country is elevated towards the south and forms a mountain chain that connects with the Alps and extends towards the east as though it were a part of the Alps; and in truth some declare that they actually are a part of the Alps, both because of their aforesaid position and of the fact that they produce the same timber; however, the country in this region does not rise to a sufficient height for that. Here, too, is the Hercynian Forest, and also the tribes of the Suevi, some of which dwell inside the forest, as, for instance, the tribes of the Coldui, in whose territory is Boihaemum, the domain of Marabodus, the place whither he caused to migrate, not only several other peoples, but in particular the Marcomanni, his fellow-tribesmen; for after his return from Rome this man, who before had been only a private citizen, was placed in charge of the affairs of state, for, as a youth he had been at Rome and had enjoyed the favor of Augustus, and on his return he took the rulership and acquired, in addition to the peoples aforementioned, the Lugii (a large tribe), the Zumi, the Butones, the Mugilones, the Sibini, and also the Semnones, a large tribe of the Suevi themselves. However, while some of the tribes of the Suevi dwell inside the forest, as I was saying, others dwell outside of it, and have a common boundary with the Getae. Now as for the tribe of the Suevi, it is the largest, for it extends from the Rhenus to the Albis; and a part of them even dwell on the far side of the Albis, as, for instance, the Hermondori and the Langobardi; and at the present time these latter, at least, have, to the last man, been driven in flight out of their country into the land on the far side of the river. It is a common characteristic of all the peoples in this part of the world that they migrate with ease, because of the meagerness of their livelihood and because they do not till the soil or even store up food, but live in small huts that are merely temporary structures; and they live for the most part off their flocks, as the Nomads do, so that, in imitation of the Nomads, they load their household belongings on their wagons and with their beasts turn whithersoever they think best. But other German tribes are still more indigent. I mean the Cherusci, the Chatti, the Gamabrivii and the Chattuarii, and also, near the ocean, the Sugambri, the Chaubi, the Bructeri, and the Cimbri, and also the Cauci, the Caulci, the Campsiani, and several others. Both the Visurgis and the Lupias Rivers run in the same direction as the Amasias, the Lupias being about six hundred stadia distant from the Rhenus and flowing through the country of the Lesser Bructeri. Germany has also the Salas River; and it was between the Salas and the Rhenus that Drusus Germanicus, while he was successfully carrying on the war, came to his end. He had subjugated, not only most of the tribes, but also the islands along the coast, among which is Burchanis, which he took by siege. 7.2.4. of the Germans, as I have said, those towards the north extend along the ocean; and beginning at the outlets of the Rhenus, they are known as far as the Albis; and of these the best known are the Sugambri and the Cimbri; but those parts of the country beyond the Albis that are near the ocean are wholly unknown to us. For of the men of earlier times I know of no one who has made this voyage along the coast to the eastern parts that extend as far as the mouth of the Caspian Sea; and the Romans have not yet advanced into the parts that are beyond the Albis; and likewise no one has made the journey by land either. However, it is clear from the climata and the parallel distances that if one travels longitudinally towards the east, one encounters the regions that are about the Borysthenes and that are to the north of the Pontus; but what is beyond Germany and what beyond the countries which are next after Germany — whether one should say the Bastarnae, as most writers suspect, or say that others lie in between, either the Iazyges, or the Roxolani, or certain other of the wagon-dwellers — it is not easy to say; nor yet whether they extend as far as the ocean along its entire length, or whether any part is uninhabitable by reason of the cold or other cause, or whether even a different race of people, succeeding the Germans, is situated between the sea and the eastern Germans. And this same ignorance prevails also in regard to the rest of the peoples that come next in order on the north; for I know neither the Bastarnae, nor the Sauromatae, nor, in a word, any of the peoples who dwell above the Pontus, nor how far distant they are from the Atlantic Sea, nor whether their countries border upon it. 15.1.24. This would not be admitted by the followers of Aristobulus, who say that the plains are not watered by rain. Onesicritus, however, thinks that rain-water is the cause of the peculiar properties of animals, and alleges in proof, that the colour of foreign herds which drink of it is changed to that of the native animals.This is a just remark; but it is not proper to attribute to the power of the water merely the cause of the black complexion and the woolly hair of the Ethiopians, and yet he censures Theodectes, who refers these peculiarities to the effects of the sun, in these words, Near these approaching with his radiant car,The sun their skins with dusky tint doth dye,And sooty hue; and with unvarying formsof fire, crisps their tufted hair.There may be reason in this, for he says that the sun does not approach nearer to the Ethiopians than to other nations, but shines more perpendicularly, and that on this account the heat is greater; indeed, it cannot be correctly said that the sun approaches near to the Ethiopians, for he is at an equal distance from all nations. Nor is the heat the cause of the black complexion, particularly of children in the womb, who are out of the reach of the sun. Their opinion is to be preferred, who attribute these effects to the sun and to intense solar heat, causing a great deficiency of moisture on the surface of the skin. Hence we say it is that the Indians have not woolly hair, nor is their colour so intensely dark, because they live in a humid atmosphere.With respect to children in the womb, they resemble their parents (in colour) according to a seminal disposition and constitution, on the same principle that hereditary diseases, and other likenesses, are explained.The equal distance of the sun from all nations (according to Onesicritus) is an argument addressed to the senses, and not to reason. But it is not an argument addressed to the senses generally, but in the meaning that the earth bears the proportion of a point to the sun, for we may understand such a meaning of an argument addressed to the senses, by which we estimate heat to be more or less, as it is near or at a distance, in which cases it is not the same; and in this meaning, not in that of Onesicritus, the sun is said to be near the Ethiopians.
26. Manilius, Astronomica, 4.794  Tagged with subjects: •seneca, on environmental determinism, on germans (and scythians) Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 205, 430
27. Velleius Paterculus, Roman History, 2.106, 2.109, 2.117.3, 2.118, 2.120  Tagged with subjects: •seneca, on environmental determinism, on germans (and scythians) Found in books: Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 430, 431