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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

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All subjects (including unvalidated):
subject book bibliographic info
dionysus/satyrs/thiasos, priapus, and Arampapaslis, Augoustakis, Froedge, Schroer (2023), Dynamics Of Marginality: Liminal Characters and Marginal Groups in Neronian and Flavian Literature. 106, 110, 111
satyr Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 45, 456, 531, 541, 542
Demoen and Praet (2009), Theios Sophistes: Essays on Flavius Philostratus' Vita Apollonii, 108, 118, 119, 220
Faraone (1999), Ancient Greek Love Magic, 21
Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 572
Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 70, 71, 195
Riess (2012), Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens, 239, 252, 293, 300
Schaaf (2019), Animal Kingdom of Heaven: Anthropozoological Aspects in the Late Antique World. 62, 73, 81
Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 290, 292
satyr, berlin painter, amphora with hermes and Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro, (2021), The Gods of the Greeks, 333, 334, 397
satyr, drama Liapis and Petrides (2019), Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca, 35, 37, 50, 51, 53, 75, 80, 92, 97, 101, 120, 121, 122, 123, 153, 156, 168, 206, 211, 215, 219, 274, 339
satyr, marsyas Steiner (2001), Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought, 200, 201
satyr, mask Miller and Clay (2019), Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury, 277
satyr, of praxiteles, statuary, pouring Steiner (2001), Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought, 60
satyr, on sophocles’ tomb Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 100, 101
satyr, play Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 78, 665
Serafim and Papioannou (2023), Nonverbal Behaviour in Ancient Literature: Athenian Dialogues III 18
satyr, play, satyr Riess (2012), Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens, 283, 300
satyr, plays Steiner (2001), Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought, 46, 47, 49, 50
satyr, satyr-play, drama Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 41, 42, 150, 274, 293, 369, 374, 381
satyr, skirtos Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 79
satyres, silenus Belayche and Massa (2021), Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity, 63, 67, 82, 185
satyric, drama, dionysos, in Seaford (2018), Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays, 181
satyric, drama, inventions in Seaford (2018), Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays, 47
satyric, drama, money, in Seaford (2018), Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49
satyric, drama, thiasos in Seaford (2018), Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays, 49
satyrplay/satyr, drama Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 3, 4, 22, 122, 216
satyrplay/satyr, drama, and autocrats Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 3, 71, 75, 76
satyrplay/satyr, drama, and egyptian artists, technitai Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 78
satyrplay/satyr, drama, and the attalids Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 79, 80
satyrplay/satyr, drama, at cyzicus Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 80
satyrplay/satyr, drama, at magnesia Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 80
satyrplay/satyr, drama, at pergamum Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 80, 83
satyrplay/satyr, drama, at teos Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 79, 80
satyrplay/satyr, drama, at thespiae Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 122
satyrplay/satyr, drama, choruses of Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 11, 81, 82
satyrplay/satyr, drama, costume Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 77
satyrplay/satyr, drama, festivals performed at Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 72, 73
satyrplay/satyr, drama, independence from tragedy Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 72, 73, 74, 77, 78, 81
satyrplay/satyr, drama, professionalisation, absence of Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 81, 82
satyrplay/satyr, drama, roman Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 83, 84
satyrplay/satyr, drama, supposed decline of Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 71, 72
satyrs Bednarek (2021), The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond, 30, 31, 102, 103, 110, 171, 177
Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 104, 106, 107, 111, 120, 160, 189, 274, 284, 289, 293, 374, 379, 492, 544, 550
Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 29, 61, 65, 74, 77, 88
Hubbard (2014), A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities, 144, 216
de Jáuregui (2010), Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity, 263, 265
satyrs, alexander iii, ‘the great’, of macedon, and Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 76
satyrs, and alexander Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 71, 76
satyrs, and cithara, vase paintings Cosgrove (2022), Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine, 90
satyrs, and dionysius i Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 29, 74, 75
satyrs, and the argeads Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 76
satyrs, and the attalids Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 71, 79
satyrs, and the ptolemies Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 71, 75
satyrs, at taenarum, the, sophocles Jouanna (2018), Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context, 563
satyrs, callias, playwright Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 45
satyrs, captivity of satyric, drama Seaford (2018), Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays, 47
satyrs, cratinus Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 45
satyrs, ecphantides Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 45
satyrs, hermes, as father of the silenes or Miller and Clay (2019), Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury, 135
satyrs, on ship from, clazomenae, vase fragment with Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro, (2021), The Gods of the Greeks, 308
satyrs, wonder-culture Mheallaigh (2014), Reading Fiction with Lucian: Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality, 262, 263, 264
satyrs/, dionysus, nymphs and silens, associated with Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro, (2021), The Gods of the Greeks, 241, 250, 297, 321
‘satyric, comedies’, sulla, general, writer of Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 84

List of validated texts:
19 validated results for "satyr"
1. Hebrew Bible, Isaiah, 34.11 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Satyr • satyr

 Found in books: Schaaf (2019), Animal Kingdom of Heaven: Anthropozoological Aspects in the Late Antique World. 81; Stuckenbruck (2007), 1 Enoch 91-108, 290

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34.11 וִירֵשׁוּהָ קָאַת וְקִפּוֹד וְיַנְשׁוֹף וְעֹרֵב יִשְׁכְּנוּ־בָהּ וְנָטָה עָלֶיהָ קַו־תֹהוּ וְאַבְנֵי־בֹהוּ׃'' None
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34.11 But the pelican and the bittern shall possess it, And the owl and the raven shall dwell therein; And He shall stretch over it The line of confusion, and the plummet of emptiness.'' None
2. Homer, Iliad, 6.130-6.133 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Dionysus, nymphs and satyrs/ silens, associated with • satyr drama, satyr-play

 Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 150; Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro, (2021), The Gods of the Greeks, 297, 321

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6.130 οὐδὲ γὰρ οὐδὲ Δρύαντος υἱὸς κρατερὸς Λυκόοργος 6.131 δὴν ἦν, ὅς ῥα θεοῖσιν ἐπουρανίοισιν ἔριζεν· 6.132 ὅς ποτε μαινομένοιο Διωνύσοιο τιθήνας 6.133 σεῦε κατʼ ἠγάθεον Νυσήϊον· αἳ δʼ ἅμα πᾶσαι'' None
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6.130 Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.133 Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. '' None
3. Homeric Hymns, To Aphrodite, 262 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Berlin Painter, amphora with Hermes and satyr • satyr drama • satyrs

 Found in books: Farrell (2021), Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity, 171; Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro, (2021), The Gods of the Greeks, 334

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262 Called the gods’ sancta, high up in the air.'' None
4. Euripides, Rhesus, 816, 972 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • satyr drama • satyr drama, satyr-play • satyr-dramas

 Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 41; Liapis and Petrides (2019), Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca, 75; Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 20

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816 εὖ νυν τόδ' ἴστε — Ζεὺς ὀμώμοται πατήρ —"
972
Βάκχου προφήτης ὥστε Παγγαίου πέτραν' "' None
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816 For this deed—I have sworn by Zeus our Lord !—972 As under far Pangaion Orpheus lies, ' None
5. Xenophon, The Persian Expedition, 1.2.13 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Satyrs • satyr

 Found in books: Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 71, 195; de Jáuregui (2010), Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity, 265

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1.2.13 These honorary grants Caesar sent orders to have engraved in the Capitol, that they might stand there as indications of his own justice, and of the virtue of Antipater.1.2.13 and while those that were there present have given false accounts of things, and this either out of a humor of flattery to the Romans, or of hatred towards the Jews; and while their writings contain sometimes accusations, and sometimes encomiums, but nowhere the accurate truth of the facts,
1.2.13
as also how our people made a sedition upon Herod’s death, while Augustus was the Roman emperor, and Quintilius Varus was in that country; and how the war broke out in the twelfth year of Nero, with what happened to Cestius; and what places the Jews assaulted in a hostile manner in the first sallies of the war. ' None
6. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • satyr drama • satyr-dramas

 Found in books: Liapis and Petrides (2019), Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca, 75; Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 20

7. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Callias, playwright, Satyrs • Cratinus, Satyrs • Ecphantides, Satyrs • satyr • satyr, satyr play • satyr-dramas

 Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 45; Riess (2012), Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens, 283; Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 20, 81

8. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • satyr play • satyr, satyr play

 Found in books: Kanellakis (2020), Aristophanes and the Poetics of Surprise, 42; Riess (2012), Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens, 283

9. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • money, in satyric drama • satyr drama, satyr-play • satyr-dramas • satyric drama, inventions in • satyric drama, satyrs, captivity of • satyric drama, thiasos in

 Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 41; Seaford (2018), Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays, 47, 48, 49; Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 118, 242

10. None, None, nan (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • comedy, comic, relation to satyr drama • satyr drama

 Found in books: Farrell (2021), Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity, 170; Liapis and Petrides (2019), Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca, 121

11. None, None, nan (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Satyrs • satyrs

 Found in books: Bednarek (2021), The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond, 171; Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 284

12. Plutarch, Sulla, 27.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Satyr • satyrplay/satyr drama, Roman • satyrplay/satyr drama, at Pergamum

 Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 83; Lipka (2021), Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus, 158

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27.2 ἐνταῦθά φασι κοιμώμενον ἁλῶναι σάτυρον, οἷον οἱ πλάσται καὶ γραφεῖς εἰκάζουσιν, ἀχθέντα δὲ ὡς Σύλλαν ἐρωτᾶσθαι διʼ ἑρμηνέων πολλῶν ὅστις εἴη· φθεγξαμένου δὲ μόλις οὐδὲν συνετῶς, ἀλλὰ τραχεῖάν τινα καὶ μάλιστα μεμιγμένην ἵππου τε χρεμετισμῷ καὶ τράγου μηκασμῷ φωνὴν ἀφέντος, ἐκπλαγέντα τὸν Σύλλαν ἀποδιοπομπήσασθαι.'' None
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27.2 '' None
13. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.4.5 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Satyrs • satyr

 Found in books: Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 71; de Jáuregui (2010), Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity, 265

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1.4.5 Γαλατῶν δὲ οἱ πολλοὶ ναυσὶν ἐς τὴν Ἀσίαν διαβάντες τὰ παραθαλάσσια αὐτῆς ἐλεηλάτουν· χρόνῳ δὲ ὕστερον οἱ Πέργαμον ἔχοντες, πάλαι δὲ Τευθρανίαν καλουμένην, ἐς ταύτην Γαλάτας ἐλαύνουσιν ἀπὸ θαλάσσης. οὗτοι μὲν δὴ τὴν ἐκτὸς Σαγγαρίου χώραν ἔσχον Ἄγκυραν πόλιν ἑλόντες Φρυγῶν, ἣν Μίδας ὁ Γορδίου πρότερον ᾤκισεν—ἄγκυρα δέ, ἣν ὁ Μίδας ἀνεῦρεν, ἦν ἔτι καὶ ἐς ἐμὲ ἐν ἱερῷ Διὸς καὶ κρήνη Μίδου καλουμένη· ταύτην οἴνῳ κεράσαι Μίδαν φασὶν ἐπὶ τὴν θήραν τοῦ Σιληνοῦ—, ταύτην τε δὴ τὴν Ἄγκυραν εἷλον καὶ Πεσσινοῦντα τὴν ὑπὸ τὸ ὄρος τὴν Ἄγδιστιν, ἔνθα καὶ τὸν Ἄττην τεθάφθαι λέγουσι.'' None
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1.4.5 The greater number of the Gauls crossed over to Asia by ship and plundered its coasts. Some time after, the inhabitants of Pergamus, that was called of old Teuthrania, drove the Gauls into it from the sea. Now this people occupied the country on the farther side of the river Sangarius capturing Ancyra, a city of the Phrygians, which Midas son of Gordius had founded in former time. And the anchor, which Midas found, A legend invented to explain the name “ Ancyra,” which means anchor. was even as late as my time in the sanctuary of Zeus, as well as a spring called the Spring of Midas, water from which they say Midas mixed with wine to capture Silenus. Well then, the Pergameni took Ancyra and Pessinus which lies under Mount Agdistis, where they say that Attis lies buried.'' None
14. Philostratus The Athenian, Life of Apollonius, 6.27 (2nd cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Satyrs • satyr

 Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 456; de Jáuregui (2010), Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity, 265

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6.27 καταλύσαντες δὲ μετὰ τοὺς καταρράκτας ἐν κώμῃ τῆς Αἰθιοπίας οὐ μεγάλῃ ἐδείπνουν μὲν περὶ ἑσπέραν ἐγκαταμιγνύντες σπουδὴν παιδιᾷ, βοῆς δὲ ἀθρόας τῶν ἐν τῇ κώμῃ γυναικῶν ἤκουσαν ἐπικελευομένων ἀλλήλαις ἑλεῖν καὶ διῶξαι, παρεκάλουν δὲ καὶ τοὺς αὑτῶν ἄνδρας ἐς κοινωνίαν τοῦ ἔργου, οἱ δ' ἁρπασάμενοι ξύλα καὶ λίθους καὶ ὅ τι ἐς χεῖρας ἑκάστῳ ἔλθοι, ξυνεκάλουν ὥσπερ ἀδικούμενοι τοὺς γάμους. ἐπεφοίτα δὲ ἄρα τῇ κώμῃ δέκατον ἤδη μῆνα σατύρου φάσμα λυττῶν ἐπὶ τὰ γύναια, καὶ δύο ἀπεκτονέναι σφῶν ἐλέγετο, ὧν μάλιστα ἐδόκει ἐρᾶν. ἐκπλαγέντων οὖν τῶν ἑταίρων “μὴ δέδιτε,” εἶπεν ὁ ̓Απολλώνιος “ὑβρίζει γάρ τις ἐνταῦθα σάτυρος.” “νὴ Δί',” ἔφη ὁ Νεῖλος “ὅν γε ἡμεῖς οἱ Γυμνοὶ χρόνῳ ἤδη ὑβρίζοντα μήπω μετεστήσαμεν τοῦ σκιρτᾶν.” “ἀλλ' ἔστιν” εἶπεν “ἐπὶ τοὺς ὑβριστὰς τούτους φάρμακον, ᾧ λέγεται Μίδας ποτὲ χρήσασθαι: μετεῖχε μὲν γὰρ τοῦ τῶν σατύρων γένους ὁ Μίδας οὗτος, ὡς ἐδήλου τὰ ὦτα, σάτυρος δὲ ἐπ' αὐτὸν εἷς κατὰ τὸ ξυγγενὲς ἐκώμαζε τὰ τοῦ Μίδου διαβάλλων ὦτα, καὶ οὐ μόνον ᾅδων, ἀλλὰ καὶ αὐλῶν τούτω, ὁ δ', οἶμαι, τῆς μητρὸς ἀκηκοώς, ὅτι σάτυρος οἴνῳ θηρευθείς, ἐπειδὰν ἐς ὕπνον καταπέσῃ, σωφρονεῖ καὶ διαλλάττεται, κρήνην τὴν οὖσαν αὐτῷ περὶ τὰ βασίλεια κεράσας οἴνῳ ἐπαφῆκεν αὐτῇ τὸν σάτυρον, ὁ δὲ ἔπιέ τε καὶ ἥλω. καὶ ὅτι μὴ ψεύδεται ὁ λόγος, ἴωμεν παρὰ τὸν κωμάρχην, καὶ ἢν ἔχωσιν οἱ κωμῆται οἶνον, κεράσωμεν αὐτὸν τῷ σατύρῳ, καὶ ταὐτὰ τῷ Μίδου πείσεται.” ἔδοξε ταῦτα καὶ ἀμφορέας Αἰγυπτίους τέτταρας οἰνοχοήσας ἐς ληνόν, ἀφ' ἧς ἔπινε τὰ ἐν τῇ κώμῃ πρόβατα, ἐκάλει τὸν σάτυρον ἀφανῶς τι ἐπιπλήττων, ὁ δὲ οὔπω μὲν ἑωρᾶτο, ὑπεδίδου δὲ ὁ οἶνος, ὥσπερ πινόμενος: ἐπεὶ δὲ ἐξεπόθη “σπεισώμεθα” ἔφη “τῷ σατύρῳ, καθεύδει γάρ.” καὶ εἰπὼν ταῦτα ἡγεῖτο τοῖς κωμήταις ἐς Νυμφῶν ἄντρον, πλέθρον οὔπω ἀπέχον τῆς κώμης, ἐν ᾧ καθεύδοντα δείξας αὐτὸν ἀπέχεσθαι εἶπε τοῦ παίειν ἢ λοιδορεῖσθαί οἱ, “πέπαυται γὰρ τῶν ἀνοήτων.” τοῦτο μὲν δὴ τοιοῦτον ̓Απολλωνίου, μὰ Δί', οὐχὶ ὁδοῦ πάρεργον, ἀλλὰ παρόδου ἔργον, κἂν ἐντύχῃ τις ἐπιστολῇ τοῦ ἀνδρός, ἣν πρὸς μειράκιον ὑβρίζον γράφων καὶ σάτυρον δαίμονα σωφρονίσαι φησὶν ἐν Αἰθιοπίᾳ, μεμνῆσθαι χρὴ τοῦ λόγου τούτου. σατύρους δὲ εἶναί τε καὶ ἐρωτικῶν ἅπτεσθαι μὴ ἀπιστῶμεν: οἶδα γὰρ κατὰ τὴν Λῆμνον τῶν ἐμαυτοῦ τινα ἰσηλίκων, οὗ τῇ μητρὶ ἐλέγετο τις ἐπιφοιτᾶν σάτυρος, ὡς εἰκὸς ἦν τῇ ἱστορίᾳ ταύτῃ, νεβρίδα γὰρ ξυμφυᾶ ἐῴκει ἐνημμένῳ κατὰ τὸν νῶτον, ἧς οἱ ποδεῶνες οἱ πρῶτοι ξυνειληφότες τὴν δέρην περὶ τὸ στέρνον αὐτῷ ἀφήπτοντο. ἀλλὰ μὴ πλείω ὑπὲρ τούτων, οὔτε γὰρ ἡ πεῖρα ἀπιστητέα οὔτε ἐγώ."" None
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6.27 After passing the cataracts they halted in a village of the Ethiopians of no great size, and they were dining, towards the evening, mingling in their conversation the grave with the gay, when all on a sudden they heard the women of the village screaming and calling to one another to join in the pursuit and catch the thing; and they also summoned their husbands to help them in the matter. And the latter caught up sticks and stones and anything which came handy, and called upon one another to avenge the insult to their wives. And it appears that for ten months the ghost of a satyr had been haunting the village, who was mad after the women and was said to have killed two of them to whom he was supposed to be specially attached. The companions, then, of Apollonius were frightened out of their wits till Apollonius said: You need not be afraid, for it's only a satyr that is running amuck here. Yes, by Zeus, said Nilus, it's the one that we naked sages have found insulting us for a long time past and we could never stop his jumps and leaps. But, said Apollonius, I have a remedy against these hell-hounds, which Midas is said once to have employed; for Midas himself had some of the blood of satyrs in his veins, as was clear from the shape of his ears; and a satyr once, trespassing on his kinship with Midas, made merry at the expense of his ears, not only singing about them, but piping about them. Well, Midas, I understand, had heard from his mother that when a satyr is overcome by wine he falls asleep, and at such times comes to his senses and will make friends with you; so he mixed wine which he had in his palace in a fountain and let the satyr get at it, and the latter drank it up and was overcome. And to show that the story is true, let us go to the head man of the village, and if the villagers have any wine, we will mix it with water for the satyr and he will share the fate of Midas' satyr. They thought it a good plan, so he poured four Egyptian jars of wine into the trough out of which the village cattle drank, and then called the satyr by means of some secret rebuke or threat; and though as yet the latter was not visible, the wine sensibly diminished as if it was being drunk up. And when it was quite finished, Apollonius said: Let us make peace with the satyr, for he is fast asleep. And with these words he led the villagers to the cave of the nymphs, which was not quite a furlong away from the village; and he showed them a satyr lying fast asleep in it, but he told them not to hit him or abuse him, For, he said, his nonsense is stopped for ever. Such was this exploit of Apollonius, and, by heavens, we may call it not an incidental work in passing, but a masterwork of his passing by 1; and if you read the sage's epistle, in which he wrote to an insolent young man that he had sobered even a satyr demon in Ethiopia, you will perforce call to mind the above story. But we must not disbelieve that satyrs both exist and are susceptible to the passion of love; for I knew a youth of my own age in Lemnos whose mother was said to be visited by a satyr, as he well might to judge by this story; for he was represented as wearing in his back a fawn-skin that exactly fitted him, the front paws of which were drawn around his neck and fastened over his chest. But I must not go further into this subject; but, anyhow, credit is due as much to experience of facts as it is to myself."" None
15. None, None, nan (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • satyr • satyrs

 Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 107; Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 70

16. None, None, nan (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Satyrs • satyrs

 Found in books: Bednarek (2021), The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond, 177; Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 284

17. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • satyr drama • satyrplay/satyr drama, festivals performed at • satyrplay/satyr drama, independence from tragedy • satyrs • satyrs, and Dionysius I

 Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 73, 74; Liapis and Petrides (2019), Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca, 121

18. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • satyr drama • satyrplay/satyr drama, festivals performed at • satyrplay/satyr drama, independence from tragedy

 Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 73; Liapis and Petrides (2019), Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca, 168

19. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • satyr drama • scholars/scholarship, ancient and Byzantine (on tragedy), Satyrus

 Found in books: Hesk (2000), Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens, 181; Liapis and Petrides (2019), Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca, 247




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