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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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Please note: the results are produced through a computerized process which may frequently lead to errors, both in incorrect tagging and in other issues. Please use with caution.
Due to load times, full text fetching is currently attempted for validated results only.
Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

For a list of book indices included, see here.


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All subjects (including unvalidated):
subject book bibliographic info
sabazius Bickerman and Tropper (2007), Studies in Jewish and Christian History, 603, 604, 605, 606
Graf and Johnston (2007), Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets, 149, 151
Martin (2009), Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes, 106, 107, 108, 109
Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 325, 373
Riess (2012), Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens, 233
sabazius, gods Thonemann (2020), An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams, 5
sabazius, jupiter Goodman (2006), Judaism in the Roman World: Collected Essays, 108

List of validated texts:
6 validated results for "sabazius"
1. Euripides, Bacchae, 102, 125-129, 697-698, 768 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Sabazios • Sabazius

 Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 335; Martin (2009), Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes, 107, 108, 109; Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 61

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102 στεφάνοις, ἔνθεν ἄγραν θηροτρόφον 125 μοι Κορύβαντες ηὗρον· 126 βακχείᾳ δʼ ἀνὰ συντόνῳ 127 κέρασαν ἁδυβόᾳ Φρυγίων 128 αὐλῶν πνεύματι ματρός τε Ῥέας ἐς 129 χέρα θῆκαν, κτύπον εὐάσμασι Βακχᾶν·
697
σύνδεσμʼ ἐλέλυτο, καὶ καταστίκτους δορὰς 698 ὄφεσι κατεζώσαντο λιχμῶσιν γένυν.
768
γλώσσῃ δράκοντες ἐξεφαίδρυνον χροός. ' None
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102 had perfected him, the bull-horned god, and he crowned him with crowns of snakes, for which reason Maenads cloak their wild prey over their locks. Choru125 covered with stretched hide; and in their excited revelry they mingled it with the sweet-voiced breath of Phrygian pipes and handed it over to mother Rhea, resounding with the sweet songs of the Bacchae;
697
First they let their hair loose over their shoulders, and secured their fawn-skins, as many of them as had released the fastenings of their knots, girding the dappled hides with serpents licking their jaws. And some, holding in their arms a gazelle or wild
768
And they returned where they had come from, to the very fountains which the god had sent forth for them, and washed off the blood, and snakes cleaned the drops from the women’s cheeks with their tongues.Receive this god then, whoever he is, ' None
2. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Sabazios • Sabazius

 Found in books: Martin (2009), Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes, 107; Munn (2006), The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion. 61

3. None, None, nan (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Sabazios • Sabazius

 Found in books: Bortolani et al. (2019), William Furley, Svenja Nagel, and Joachim Friedrich Quack, Cultural Plurality in Ancient Magical Texts and Practices: Graeco-Egyptian Handbooks and Related Traditions, 49; Parker (2005), Polytheism and Society at Athens, 325

4. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 3.23.58 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Sabazios • Sabazius

 Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 555; Bickerman and Tropper (2007), Studies in Jewish and Christian History, 603

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3.23.58 If you accept this conclusion, you will go on to prove that the world is perfectly able to read a book; for following in Zeno\'s footsteps you will be able to construct a syllogism as follows: \'That which is literate is superior to that which is illiterate; but nothing is superior to the world; therefore the world is literate.\' By this mode of reasoning the world will also be an orator, and even a mathematician, a musician, and in fact an expert in every branch of learning, in fine a philosopher. You kept repeating that the world is the sole source of all created things, and that nature\'s capacity does not include the power to create things unlike herself: am I to admit that the world is not only a living being, and wise, but also a harper and a flute-player, because it gives birth also to men skilled in these arts? Well then, your father of the Stoic school really adduces no reason why we should think that the world is rational, or even alive. Therefore the world is not god; and nevertheless there is nothing superior to the world, for there is nothing more beautiful than it, nothing more conducive to our health, nothing more ornate to the view, or more regular in motion. "And if the world as a whole isn\'t god, neither are the stars, which in all are countless numbers you wanted to reckon as gods, enlarging with delight upon their uniform and everlasting movements, and I protest with good reason, for they display a marvellous and extraordinary regularity. '' None
5. None, None, nan (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Sabazios • Sabazius

 Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 335; Martin (2009), Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes, 108; Rasimus (2009), Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence, 216

6. Demosthenes, Orations, 18.260, 19.281
 Tagged with subjects: • Sabazios • Sabazius

 Found in books: Horster and Klöckner (2014), Cult Personnel in Asia Minor and the Aegean Islands from the Hellenistic to the Imperial Period, 15; Martin (2009), Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes, 106, 107; Riess (2012), Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens, 233

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18.260 In day-time you marshalled your gallant throng of bacchanals through the public streets, their heads garlanded with fennel and white poplar; and, as you went, you squeezed the fat-cheeked snakes, or brandished them above your head, now shouting your Euoi Saboi! now footing it to the measure of Hyes Attes! Attes Hyes!—saluted by all the old women with such proud titles as Master of the Ceremonies, Fugleman, Ivy-bearer, Fan-carrier; and at last receiving your recompense of tipsy-cakes, and cracknels, and currant-buns. With such rewards who would not rejoice greatly, and account himself the favorite of fortune?
19.281
will you be content that all these men should have been subjected to the inexorable penalty of law; that they should find no succor in mercy or compassion, in weeping children bearing honored names, or in any other plea? And then, when you have in your power a son of Atrometus the dominie, and of Glaucothea, the fuglewoman of those bacchanalian routs for which another priestess According to Ulpian her name was Nino and her crime was mixing a love-potion. suffered death, will you release the son of such parents, a man who has never been of the slightest use to the commonwealth, neither he, nor his father, nor any member of his precious family?'' None



Please note: the results are produced through a computerized process which may frequently lead to errors, both in incorrect tagging and in other issues. Please use with caution.
Due to load times, full text fetching is currently attempted for validated results only.
Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

For a list of book indices included, see here.