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35 results for "ritual"
1. Homer, Iliad, 12.233-12.243 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ritual, false Found in books: Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 117
12.233. / Then with an angry glance from beneath his brows spake to him Hector of the flashing helm:Polydamas, this that thou sayest is no longer to my pleasure; yea, thou knowest how to devise better words than these. But if thou verily speakest thus in earnest, then of a surety have the gods themselves destroyed thy wits, 12.234. / Then with an angry glance from beneath his brows spake to him Hector of the flashing helm:Polydamas, this that thou sayest is no longer to my pleasure; yea, thou knowest how to devise better words than these. But if thou verily speakest thus in earnest, then of a surety have the gods themselves destroyed thy wits, 12.235. / seeing thou biddest me forget the counsels of loud-thundering Zeus, that himself promised me and bowed his head thereto. But thou biddest us be obedient to birds long of wing, that I regard not, nor take thought thereof, whether they fare to the right, toward the Dawn and the sun, 12.236. / seeing thou biddest me forget the counsels of loud-thundering Zeus, that himself promised me and bowed his head thereto. But thou biddest us be obedient to birds long of wing, that I regard not, nor take thought thereof, whether they fare to the right, toward the Dawn and the sun, 12.237. / seeing thou biddest me forget the counsels of loud-thundering Zeus, that himself promised me and bowed his head thereto. But thou biddest us be obedient to birds long of wing, that I regard not, nor take thought thereof, whether they fare to the right, toward the Dawn and the sun, 12.238. / seeing thou biddest me forget the counsels of loud-thundering Zeus, that himself promised me and bowed his head thereto. But thou biddest us be obedient to birds long of wing, that I regard not, nor take thought thereof, whether they fare to the right, toward the Dawn and the sun, 12.239. / seeing thou biddest me forget the counsels of loud-thundering Zeus, that himself promised me and bowed his head thereto. But thou biddest us be obedient to birds long of wing, that I regard not, nor take thought thereof, whether they fare to the right, toward the Dawn and the sun, 12.240. / or to the left toward the murky darkness. nay, for us, let us be obedient to the counsel of great Zeus, that is king over all mortals and immortals. One omen is best, to fight for one's country. Wherefore dost thou fear war and battle? 12.241. / or to the left toward the murky darkness. nay, for us, let us be obedient to the counsel of great Zeus, that is king over all mortals and immortals. One omen is best, to fight for one's country. Wherefore dost thou fear war and battle? 12.242. / or to the left toward the murky darkness. nay, for us, let us be obedient to the counsel of great Zeus, that is king over all mortals and immortals. One omen is best, to fight for one's country. Wherefore dost thou fear war and battle? 12.243. / or to the left toward the murky darkness. nay, for us, let us be obedient to the counsel of great Zeus, that is king over all mortals and immortals. One omen is best, to fight for one's country. Wherefore dost thou fear war and battle?
2. Hesiod, Works And Days, 109-147, 149-201, 148 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 113
148. Zeus fashioned out of bronze, quite different than
3. Polybius, Histories, 11.33.7 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 126
11.33.7. συντέλειαν ἐπιτεθεικὼς τοῖς κατὰ τὴν Ἰβηρίαν ἔργοις, παρῆν εἰς τὸν Ταρράκωνα μετὰ μεγίστης χαρᾶς, κάλλιστον θρίαμβον καὶ καλλίστην νίκην τῇ πατρίδι κατάγων. 11.33.7.  Having thus completely executed his task in Spain Scipio reached Tarraco full of joy, taking home as a gift to his country a splendid triumph and a glorious victory.
4. Cicero, On Old Age, 75 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ritual, false Found in books: Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 119
5. Cicero, On Divination, 1.77-1.78 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ritual, false Found in books: Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 117
1.77. Quid? bello Punico secundo nonne C. Flaminius consul iterum neglexit signa rerum futurarum magna cum clade rei publicae? Qui exercitu lustrato cum Arretium versus castra movisset et contra Hannibalem legiones duceret, et ipse et equus eius ante signum Iovis Statoris sine causa repente concidit nec eam rem habuit religioni obiecto signo, ut peritis videbatur, ne committeret proelium. Idem cum tripudio auspicaretur, pullarius diem proelii committendi differebat. Tum Flaminius ex eo quaesivit, si ne postea quidem pulli pascerentur, quid faciendum censeret. Cum ille quiescendum respondisset, Flaminius: Praeclara vero auspicia, si esurientibus pullis res geri poterit, saturis nihil geretur! itaque signa convelli et se sequi iussit. Quo tempore cum signifer primi hastati signum non posset movere loco nec quicquam proficeretur, plures cum accederent, Flaminius re nuntiata suo more neglexit. Itaque tribus iis horis concisus exercitus atque ipse interfectus est. 1.78. Magnum illud etiam, quod addidit Coelius, eo tempore ipso, cum hoc calamitosum proelium fieret, tantos terrae motus in Liguribus, Gallia compluribusque insulis totaque in Italia factos esse, ut multa oppida conruerint, multis locis labes factae sint terraeque desederint fluminaque in contrarias partes fluxerint atque in amnes mare influxerit. Fiunt certae divinationum coniecturae a peritis. Midae illi Phrygi, cum puer esset, dormienti formicae in os tritici grana congesserunt. Divitissumum fore praedictum est; quod evenit. At Platoni cum in cunis parvulo dormienti apes in labellis consedissent, responsum est singulari illum suavitate orationis fore. Ita futura eloquentia provisa in infante est. 1.77. Again, did not Gaius Flaminius by his neglect of premonitory signs in his second consulship in the Second Punic War cause great disaster to the State? For, after a review of the army, he had moved his camp and was marching towards Arretium to meet Hannibal, when his horse, for no apparent reason, suddenly fell with him just in front of the statue of Jupiter Stator. Although the soothsayers considered this a divine warning not to join battle, he did not so regard it. Again, after the auspices by means of the tripudium had been taken, the keeper of the sacred chickens advised the postponement of battle. Flaminius then asked, Suppose the chickens should never eat, what would you advise in that case? You should remain in camp, was the reply. Fine auspices indeed! said Flaminius, for they counsel action when chickens crops are empty and inaction when chickens crops are filled. So he ordered the standards to be plucked up and the army to follow him. Then, when the standard-bearer of the first company could not loosen his standard, several soldiers came to his assistance, but to no purpose. This fact was reported to Flaminius, and he, with his accustomed obstinacy, ignored it. The consequence was that within three hours his army was cut to pieces and he himself was slain. 1.78. Coelius has added the further notable fact that, at the very time this disastrous battle was going on, earthquakes of such violence occurred in Liguria, in Gaul, on several islands, and in every part of Italy, that a large number of towns were destroyed, landslips took place in many regions, the earth sank, rivers flowed upstream, and the sea invaded their channels.[36] Trustworthy conjectures in divining are made by experts. For instance, when Midas, the famous king of Phrygia, was a child, ants filled his mouth with grains of wheat as he slept. It was predicted that he would be a very wealthy man; and so it turned out. Again, while Plato was an infant, asleep in his cradle, bees settled on his lips and this was interpreted to mean that he would have a rare sweetness of speech. Hence in his infancy his future eloquence was foreseen.
6. Cicero, Brutus, 62 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ritual, false Found in books: Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 129
62. et hercules eae quidem eae quidem F2 : hae quidem M : equidem codd. exstant: ipsae enim familiae sua quasi ornamenta ac monumenta servabant et ad usum, si quis eiusdem generis occidisset, et ad memoriam laudum domesticarum et ad inlustrandam nobilitatem suam. Quam- 20 quam his laudationibus historia rerum nostrarum est facta mendosior. Multa enim scripta sunt in eis eis vulg. : his L quae facta non sunt: falsi triumphi, plures consulatus, genera etiam falsa et ad plebem a plebe maluit Lambinus transitiones, cum homines humiliores in alienum eiusdem nominis infunderentur genus; ut si ego me a M'. Tullio esse dicerem, qui patricius cum Servio Sulpicio consul anno x post exactos reges fuit.
7. Cicero, Brutus, 62 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ritual, false Found in books: Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 129
62. et hercules eae quidem eae quidem F2 : hae quidem M : equidem codd. exstant: ipsae enim familiae sua quasi ornamenta ac monumenta servabant et ad usum, si quis eiusdem generis occidisset, et ad memoriam laudum domesticarum et ad inlustrandam nobilitatem suam. Quam- 20 quam his laudationibus historia rerum nostrarum est facta mendosior. Multa enim scripta sunt in eis eis vulg. : his L quae facta non sunt: falsi triumphi, plures consulatus, genera etiam falsa et ad plebem a plebe maluit Lambinus transitiones, cum homines humiliores in alienum eiusdem nominis infunderentur genus; ut si ego me a M'. Tullio esse dicerem, qui patricius cum Servio Sulpicio consul anno x post exactos reges fuit.
8. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 13.448 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ritual, false Found in books: Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 117
13.448. placet Achilleos mactata Polyxena manes!”
9. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 3.52-3.54 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ritual, false Found in books: Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 117
3.52. et nigras mactant pecudes et manibus divis 3.53. inferias mittunt multoque in rebus acerbis 3.54. acrius advertunt animos ad religionem.
10. Livy, History, 22.2.11-22.2.13, 22.3.4-22.3.14, 22.52.6, 25.17.4-25.17.7, 27.28.1-27.28.2, 28.38.4-28.38.5 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ritual, false Found in books: Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 116, 117, 119, 126
11. Sallust, Catiline, 61 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •ritual, false Found in books: Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 119
12. Tacitus, Agricola, 39 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ritual, false Found in books: Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 131
13. Seneca The Younger, De Beneficiis, 5.17.3 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ritual, false Found in books: Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 113
14. Martial, Epigrams, 2.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ritual, false Found in books: Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 131
15. Martial, Epigrams, 2.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ritual, false Found in books: Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 131
16. Seneca The Younger, De Consolatione Ad Marciam, 3.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ritual, false Found in books: Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 111, 128
17. Lucan, Pharsalia, 4.503-4.504, 8.72-8.742, 9.175-9.179 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ritual, false Found in books: Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 123, 124, 129
18. Seneca The Younger, On Anger, 3.26.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ritual, false Found in books: Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 113
19. Josephus Flavius, Jewish War, 7.121-7.157 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ritual, false Found in books: Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 131
7.121. nor were many days overpast when they determined to have but one triumph, that should be common to both of them, on account of the glorious exploits they had performed, although the senate had decreed each of them a separate triumph by himself. 7.122. So when notice had been given beforehand of the day appointed for this pompous solemnity to be made, on account of their victories, not one of the immense multitude was left in the city, but everybody went out so far as to gain only a station where they might stand, and left only such a passage as was necessary for those that were to be seen to go along it. 7.123. 4. Now all the soldiery marched out beforehand by companies, and in their several ranks, under their several commanders, in the nighttime, and were about the gates, not of the upper palaces, but those near the temple of Isis; for there it was that the emperors had rested the foregoing night. 7.124. And as soon as ever it was day, Vespasian and Titus came out crowned with laurel, and clothed in those ancient purple habits which were proper to their family, and then went as far as Octavian’s Walks; 7.125. for there it was that the senate, and the principal rulers, and those that had been recorded as of the equestrian order, waited for them. 7.126. Now a tribunal had been erected before the cloisters, and ivory chairs had been set upon it, when they came and sat down upon them. Whereupon the soldiery made an acclamation of joy to them immediately, and all gave them attestations of their valor; while they were themselves without their arms, and only in their silken garments, and crowned with laurel: 7.127. then Vespasian accepted of these shouts of theirs; but while they were still disposed to go on in such acclamations, he gave them a signal of silence. 7.128. And when everybody entirely held their peace, he stood up, and covering the greatest part of his head with his cloak, he put up the accustomed solemn prayers; the like prayers did Titus put up also; 7.129. after which prayers Vespasian made a short speech to all the people, and then sent away the soldiers to a dinner prepared for them by the emperors. 7.130. Then did he retire to that gate which was called the Gate of the Pomp, because pompous shows do always go through that gate; 7.131. there it was that they tasted some food, and when they had put on their triumphal garments, and had offered sacrifices to the gods that were placed at the gate, they sent the triumph forward, and marched through the theatres, that they might be the more easily seen by the multitudes. 7.132. 5. Now it is impossible to describe the multitude of the shows as they deserve, and the magnificence of them all; such indeed as a man could not easily think of as performed, either by the labor of workmen, or the variety of riches, or the rarities of nature; 7.133. for almost all such curiosities as the most happy men ever get by piecemeal were here one heaped on another, and those both admirable and costly in their nature; and all brought together on that day demonstrated the vastness of the dominions of the Romans; 7.134. for there was here to be seen a mighty quantity of silver, and gold, and ivory, contrived into all sorts of things, and did not appear as carried along in pompous show only, but, as a man may say, running along like a river. Some parts were composed of the rarest purple hangings, and so carried along; and others accurately represented to the life what was embroidered by the arts of the Babylonians. 7.135. There were also precious stones that were transparent, some set in crowns of gold, and some in other ouches, as the workmen pleased; and of these such a vast number were brought, that we could not but thence learn how vainly we imagined any of them to be rarities. 7.136. The images of the gods were also carried, being as well wonderful for their largeness, as made very artificially, and with great skill of the workmen; nor were any of these images of any other than very costly materials; and many species of animals were brought, every one in their own natural ornaments. 7.137. The men also who brought every one of these shows were great multitudes, and adorned with purple garments, all over interwoven with gold; those that were chosen for carrying these pompous shows having also about them such magnificent ornaments as were both extraordinary and surprising. 7.138. Besides these, one might see that even the great number of the captives was not unadorned, while the variety that was in their garments, and their fine texture, concealed from the sight the deformity of their bodies. 7.139. But what afforded the greatest surprise of all was the structure of the pageants that were borne along; for indeed he that met them could not but be afraid that the bearers would not be able firmly enough to support them, such was their magnitude; 7.140. for many of them were so made, that they were on three or even four stories, one above another. The magnificence also of their structure afforded one both pleasure and surprise; 7.141. for upon many of them were laid carpets of gold. There was also wrought gold and ivory fastened about them all; 7.142. and many resemblances of the war, and those in several ways, and variety of contrivances, affording a most lively portraiture of itself. 7.143. For there was to be seen a happy country laid waste, and entire squadrons of enemies slain; while some of them ran away, and some were carried into captivity; with walls of great altitude and magnitude overthrown and ruined by machines; with the strongest fortifications taken, and the walls of most populous cities upon the tops of hills seized on, 7.144. and an army pouring itself within the walls; as also every place full of slaughter, and supplications of the enemies, when they were no longer able to lift up their hands in way of opposition. Fire also sent upon temples was here represented, and houses overthrown, and falling upon their owners: 7.145. rivers also, after they came out of a large and melancholy desert, ran down, not into a land cultivated, nor as drink for men, or for cattle, but through a land still on fire upon every side; for the Jews related that such a thing they had undergone during this war. 7.146. Now the workmanship of these representations was so magnificent and lively in the construction of the things, that it exhibited what had been done to such as did not see it, as if they had been there really present. 7.147. On the top of every one of these pageants was placed the commander of the city that was taken, and the manner wherein he was taken. Moreover, there followed those pageants a great number of ships; 7.148. and for the other spoils, they were carried in great plenty. But for those that were taken in the temple of Jerusalem, they made the greatest figure of them all; that is, the golden table, of the weight of many talents; the candlestick also, that was made of gold, though its construction were now changed from that which we made use of; 7.149. for its middle shaft was fixed upon a basis, and the small branches were produced out of it to a great length, having the likeness of a trident in their position, and had every one a socket made of brass for a lamp at the tops of them. These lamps were in number seven, and represented the dignity of the number seven among the Jews; 7.150. and the last of all the spoils, was carried the Law of the Jews. 7.151. After these spoils passed by a great many men, carrying the images of Victory, whose structure was entirely either of ivory or of gold. 7.152. After which Vespasian marched in the first place, and Titus followed him; Domitian also rode along with them, and made a glorious appearance, and rode on a horse that was worthy of admiration. 7.153. 6. Now the last part of this pompous show was at the temple of Jupiter Capitolinus, whither when they were come, they stood still; for it was the Romans’ ancient custom to stay till somebody brought the news that the general of the enemy was slain. 7.154. This general was Simon, the son of Gioras, who had then been led in this triumph among the captives; a rope had also been put upon his head, and he had been drawn into a proper place in the forum, and had withal been tormented by those that drew him along; and the law of the Romans required that malefactors condemned to die should be slain there. 7.155. Accordingly, when it was related that there was an end of him, and all the people had sent up a shout for joy, they then began to offer those sacrifices which they had consecrated, in the prayers used in such solemnities; which when they had finished, they went away to the palace. 7.156. And as for some of the spectators, the emperors entertained them at their own feast; and for all the rest there were noble preparations made for their feasting at home; 7.157. for this was a festival day to the city of Rome, as celebrated for the victory obtained by their army over their enemies, for the end that was now put to their civil miseries, and for the commencement of their hopes of future prosperity and happiness.
20. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 87.23-87.24 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ritual, false Found in books: Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 128
21. Silius Italicus, Punica, 1.8-1.11, 1.268, 1.296-1.302, 2.264-2.269, 2.460, 2.496, 2.681-2.682, 2.693-2.707, 3.572-3.573, 3.607, 4.709-4.710, 5.24-5.129, 5.652-5.655, 5.658-5.666, 7.6-7.8, 7.746-7.750, 10.504-10.506, 10.518-10.520, 10.565-10.567, 12.473-12.478, 13.466-13.487, 13.714-13.716, 15.381-15.396, 17.625, 17.627-17.628, 17.643-17.644, 17.647-17.650 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ritual, false Found in books: Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 111, 113, 115, 116, 117, 119, 123, 124, 126, 127, 131
22. Suetonius, Vespasianus, 12 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ritual, false Found in books: Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 131
23. Statius, Siluae, 4.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ritual, false Found in books: Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 131
24. Suetonius, Domitianus, 6.1, 13.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ritual, false Found in books: Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 131
25. Suetonius, Nero, 57 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ritual, false Found in books: Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 131
26. Plutarch, Marcellus, 30.1-30.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ritual, false Found in books: Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 119
30.1. Ἀννίβᾳ δὲ τῶν μὲν ἄλλων ἐλάχιστος ἦν λόγος, Μάρκελλον δὲ πεπτωκέναι πυθόμενος αὐτὸς ἐξέδραμεν ἐπὶ τὸν τόπον, καὶ τῷ νεκρῷ παραστάς καὶ πολὺν χρόνον τήν τε ῥώμην τοῦ σώματος καταμαθὼν καὶ τὸ εἶδος, οὔτε φωνὴν ἀφῆκεν ὑπερήφανον, οὔτε ἀπʼ ὄψεως τὸ χαῖρον, ὡς ἄν τις ἐργώδη πολέμιον καὶ βαρὺν ἀπεκτονώς, ἐξέφηνεν, 30.2. ἀλλʼ ἐπιθαυμάσας τὸ παράλογον τῆς τελευτῆς τὸν μὲν δακτύλιον ἀφείλετο, τὸ δὲ σῶμα κοσμήσας πρέποντι κόσμῳ καὶ περιστείλας ἐντίμως ἔκαυσε καὶ τὰ λείψανα συνθεὶς εἰς κάλπιν ἀργυρᾶν, καὶ χρυσοῦν ἐμβαλὼν στέφανον, ἀπέστειλε πρὸς τὸν υἱόν. τῶν δὲ Νομάδων τινὲς περιτυχόντες τοῖς κομίζουσιν ὥρμησαν ἀφαιρεῖσθαι τὸ τεῦχος, ἀντιλαμβανομένων δʼ ἐκείνων ἐκβιαζόμενοι καὶ μαχόμενοι διέρριψαν τὰ ὀστᾶ. 30.1. Hannibal made very little account of the rest, but when he learned that Marcellus had fallen, he ran out to the place himself, and after standing by the dead body and surveying for a long time its strength and mien, he uttered no boastful speech, nor did he manifest his joy at the sight, as one might have done who had slain a bitter and troublesome foe; 30.2. but after wondering at the unexpectedness of his end, he took off his signet-ring, indeed, of which he afterwards made fraudulent use ( Livy, xxvii. 28 ). but ordered the body to be honourably robed, suitably adorned, and burned. Then he collected the remains in a silver urn, placed a golden wreath upon it, and sent it back to his son. But some of the Numidians fell in with those who were carrying the urn and attempted to take it away from them, and when they resisted, fought with them, and in the fierce struggle scattered the bones far and wide.
27. Tacitus, Histories, 1.2, 2.8 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ritual, false Found in books: Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 113, 131
2.8.  About this time Achaia and Asia were terrified by a false rumour of Nero's arrival. The reports with regard to his death had been varied, and therefore many people imagined and believed that he was alive. The forces and attempts of other pretenders we shall tell as we proceed; but at this time, a slave from Pontus or, as others have reported, a freedman from Italy, who was skilled in playing on the cithara and in singing, gained the readier belief in his deceit through these accomplishments and his resemblance to Nero. He recruited some deserters, poor tramps whom he had bribed by great promises, and put to sea. A violent storm drove him to the island of Cythnus, where he called to his standard some soldiers who were returning from the East on leave, or ordered them to be killed if they refused. Then he robbed the merchants, and armed all the ablest-bodied of their slaves. A centurion, Sisenna, who was carrying clasped right hands, the symbol of friendship, to the praetorians in the name of the army in Syria, the pretender approached with various artifices, until Sisenna in alarm and fearing violence secretly left the island and made his escape. Then the alarm spread far and wide. Many came eagerly forward at the famous name, prompted by their desire for a change and their hatred of the present situation. The fame of the pretender was increasing from day to day when a chance shattered it.
28. Tacitus, Germania (De Origine Et Situ Germanorum), 37 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ritual, false Found in books: Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 131
29. Tacitus, Annals, 14.13, 16.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ritual, false Found in books: Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 116, 129
14.13. Tamen cunctari in oppidis Campaniae, quonam modo urbem ingrederetur, an obsequium senatus, an studia plebis reperiret anxius: contra deterrimus quisque, quorum non alia regia fecundior extitit, invisum Agrippinae nomen et morte eius accensum populi favorem disserunt: iret intrepidus et venerationem sui coram experiretur; simul praegredi exposcunt. et promptiora quam promiserant inveniunt, obvias tribus, festo cultu senatum, coniugum ac liberorum agmina per sexum et aetatem disposita, extructos, qua incederet, spectaculorum gradus, quo modo triumphi visuntur. hinc superbus ac publici servitii victor Capitolium adiit, grates exolvit seque in omnis libidines effudit quas male coercitas qualiscumque matris reverentia tardaverat. 16.6. Post finem ludicri Poppaea mortem obiit, fortuita mariti iracundia, a quo gravida ictu calcis adflicta est. neque enim venenum crediderim, quamvis quidam scriptores tradant, odio magis quam ex fide: quippe liberorum cupiens et amori uxoris obnoxius erat. corpus non igni abolitum, ut Romanus mos, sed regum externorum consuetudine differtum odoribus conditur tumuloque Iuliorum infertur. ductae tamen publicae exequiae laudavitque ipse apud rostra formam eius et quod divinae infantis parens fuisset aliaque fortunae munera pro virtutibus. 14.13.  And yet he dallied in the towns of Campania, anxious and doubtful how to make his entry into Rome. Would he find obedience in the senate? enthusiasm in the crowd? Against his timidity it was urged by every reprobate — and a court more prolific of reprobates the world has not seen — that the name of Agrippina was abhorred and that her death had won him the applause of the nation. Let him go without a qualm and experience on the spot the veneration felt for his position! At the same time, they demanded leave to precede him. They found, indeed, an alacrity which surpassed their promises: the tribes on the way to meet him; the senate in festal dress; troops of wives and of children disposed according to their sex and years, while along his route rose tiers of seats of the type used for viewing a triumph. Then, flushed with pride, victor over the national servility, he made his way to the Capitol, paid his grateful vows, and abandoned himself to all the vices, till now retarded, though scarcely repressed, by some sort of deference to his mother. 16.6.  After the close of the festival, Poppaea met her end through a chance outburst of anger on the part of her husband, who felled her with a kick during pregcy. That poison played its part I am unable to believe, though the assertion is made by some writers less from conviction than from hatred; for Nero was desirous of children, and love for his wife was a ruling passion. The body was not cremated in the Roman style, but, in conformity with the practice of foreign courts, was embalmed by stuffing with spices, then laid to rest in the mausoleum of the Julian race. Still, a public funeral was held; and the emperor at the Rostra eulogized her beauty, the fact that she had been the mother of an infant daughter now divine, and other favours of fortune which did duty for virtues.
30. Statius, Thebais, 3.653-3.655, 12.787-12.788 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •ritual, false Found in books: Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 117, 127
31. Cassius Dio, Roman History, None (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 129
32. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, 1.6.6, 2.8.5  Tagged with subjects: •ritual, false Found in books: Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 126, 133
33. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 1.818-1.847  Tagged with subjects: •ritual, false Found in books: Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 115
35. Vergil, Aeneis, 6.801-6.805, 8.714-8.728  Tagged with subjects: •ritual, false Found in books: Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 127
6.801. In laws, for bribes enacted or made void; 6.802. Another did incestuously take 6.803. His daughter for a wife in lawless bonds. 6.804. All ventured some unclean, prodigious crime; 6.805. And what they dared, achieved. I could not tell, 8.714. Olympus calls. My goddess-mother gave 8.715. long since her promise of a heavenly sign 8.716. if war should burst; and that her power would bring 8.717. a panoply from Vulcan through the air, 8.718. to help us at our need. Alas, what deaths 8.719. over Laurentum's ill-starred host impend! 8.720. O Turnus, what a reckoning thou shalt pay 8.721. to me in arms! O Tiber , in thy wave 8.722. what helms and shields and mighty soldiers slain 8.723. hall in confusion roll! Yea, let them lead 8.725. He said: and from the lofty throne uprose. 8.726. Straightway he roused anew the slumbering fire 8.727. acred to Hercules, and glad at heart 8.728. adored, as yesterday, the household gods