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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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10 results for "religion"
1. Homer, Iliad, 1.423-1.425, 23.205-23.207 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •religion, ethiopian Found in books: Gruen (2011), Rethinking the Other in Antiquity, 198
1.423. / But remain by your swift, sea-faring ships, and continue your wrath against the Achaeans, and refrain utterly from battle; for Zeus went yesterday to Oceanus, to the blameless Ethiopians for a feast, and all the gods followed with him; but on the twelfth day he will come back again to Olympus, 1.424. / But remain by your swift, sea-faring ships, and continue your wrath against the Achaeans, and refrain utterly from battle; for Zeus went yesterday to Oceanus, to the blameless Ethiopians for a feast, and all the gods followed with him; but on the twelfth day he will come back again to Olympus, 1.425. / and then will I go to the house of Zeus with threshold of bronze, and will clasp his knees in prayer, and I think I shall win him. 23.205. / I may not sit, for I must go back unto the streams of Oceanus, unto the land of the Ethiopians, where they are sacrificing hecatombs to the immortals, that I too may share in the sacred feast. But Achilles prayeth the North Wind and the noisy West Wind to come, and promiseth them fair offerings, that so ye may rouse the pyre to burn whereon lieth 23.206. / I may not sit, for I must go back unto the streams of Oceanus, unto the land of the Ethiopians, where they are sacrificing hecatombs to the immortals, that I too may share in the sacred feast. But Achilles prayeth the North Wind and the noisy West Wind to come, and promiseth them fair offerings, that so ye may rouse the pyre to burn whereon lieth 23.207. / I may not sit, for I must go back unto the streams of Oceanus, unto the land of the Ethiopians, where they are sacrificing hecatombs to the immortals, that I too may share in the sacred feast. But Achilles prayeth the North Wind and the noisy West Wind to come, and promiseth them fair offerings, that so ye may rouse the pyre to burn whereon lieth
2. Homer, Odyssey, 1.22-1.25, 5.282-5.287 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •religion, ethiopian Found in books: Gruen (2011), Rethinking the Other in Antiquity, 198
3. Strabo, Geography, 17.2.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •religion, ethiopian Found in books: Gruen (2011), Rethinking the Other in Antiquity, 199
17.2.3. Above Meroe is Psebo, a large lake, containing a well-inhabited island. As the Libyans occupy the western bank of the Nile, and the Ethiopians the country on the other side of the river, they thus dispute by turns the possession of the islands and the banks of the river, one party repulsing the other, or yielding to the superiority of its opponent.The Ethiopians use bows of wood four cubits long, and hardened in the fire. The women also are armed, most of whom wear in the upper lip a copper ring. They wear sheepskins, without wool; for the sheep have hair like goats. Some go naked, or wear small skins or girdles of well-woven hair round the loins.They regard as God one being who is immortal, the cause of all things; another who is mortal, a being without a name, whose nature is not clearly understood.In general they consider as gods benefactors and royal persons, some of whom are their kings, the common saviours and guardians of all; others are private persons, esteemed as gods by those who have individually received benefits from them.of those who inhabit the torrid region, some are even supposed not to acknowledge any god, and are said to abhor even the sun, and to apply opprobrious names to him, when they behold him rising, because he scorches and tortures them with his heat; these people take refuge in the marshes.The inhabitants of Meroe worship Hercules, Pan, and Isis, besides some other barbaric deity.Some tribes throw the dead into the river; others keep them in the house, enclosed in hyalus (oriental alabaster ?). Some bury them around the temples in coffins of baked clay. They swear an oath by them, which is reverenced as more sacred than all others.Kings are appointed from among persons distinguished for their personal beauty, or by their breeding of cattle, or for their courage, or their riches.In Meroe the priests anciently held the highest rank, and sometimes sent orders even to the king, by a messenger, to put an end to himself, when they appointed another king in his place. At last one of their kings abolished this custom, by going with an armed body to the temple where the golden shrine is, and slaughtering all the priests.The following custom exists among the Ethiopians. If a king is mutilated in any part of the body, those who are most attached to his person, as attendants, mutilate themselves in the same manner, and even die with him. Hence the king is guarded with the utmost care. This will suffice on the subject of Ethiopia.
4. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 3.2.2-3.2.4, 3.3.1, 3.9.1-3.9.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •religion, ethiopian Found in books: Gruen (2011), Rethinking the Other in Antiquity, 198, 199
3.2.2.  And they say that they were the first to be taught to honour the gods and to hold sacrifices and processions and festivals and the other rites by which men honour the deity; and that in consequence their piety has been published abroad among all men, and it is generally held that the sacrifices practised among the Ethiopians are those which are the most pleasing to heaven. 3.2.3.  As witness to this they call upon the poet who is perhaps the oldest and certainly the most venerated among the Greeks; for in the Iliad he represents both Zeus and the rest of the gods with him as absent on a visit to Ethiopia to share in the sacrifices and the banquet which were given annually by the Ethiopians for all the gods together: For Zeus had yesterday to Ocean's bounds Set forth to feast with Ethiop's faultless men, And he was followed there by all the gods. 3.2.4.  And they state that, by reason of their piety towards the deity, they manifestly enjoy the favour of the gods, inasmuch as they have never experienced the rule of an invader from abroad; for from all time they have enjoyed a state of freedom and of peace one with another, and although many and powerful rulers have made war upon them, not one of these has succeeded in his undertaking. 3.3.1.  Cambyses, for instance, they say, who made war upon them with a great force, both lost all his army and was himself exposed to the greatest peril; Semiramis also, who through the magnitude of her undertakings and achievements has become renowned, after advancing a short distance into Ethiopia gave up her campaign against the whole nation; and Heracles and Dionysus, although they visited all the inhabited earth, failed to subdue the Ethiopians alone who dwell above Egypt, both because of the piety of these men and because of the insurmountable difficulties involved in the attempt. They say also that the Egyptians are colonists sent out by the Ethiopians, Osiris having been the leader of the colony. 3.9.1.  With regard to the gods, the Ethiopians who dwell above Meroë entertain two opinions: they believe that some of them, such as the sun and the moon and the universe as a whole, have a nature which is eternal and imperishable, but others of them, they think, share a mortal nature and have come to receive immortal honours because of their virtue and the benefactions which they have bestowed upon all mankind; 3.9.2.  for instance, they revere Isis and Pan, and also Heracles and Zeus, considering that these deities in particular have been benefactors of the race of men. But a few of the Ethiopians do not believe in the existence of any gods at all; consequently at the rising of the sun they utter imprecations against it as being most hostile to them, and flee to the marshes of those parts.
5. Statius, Thebais, 5.426-5.428 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •religion, ethiopian Found in books: Gruen (2011), Rethinking the Other in Antiquity, 198
6. Plutarch, Precepts of Statecraft, 3.21-3.23 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •religion, ethiopian Found in books: Gruen (2011), Rethinking the Other in Antiquity, 199
7. Heliodorus, Ethiopian Story, 4.8, 4.12, 8.1, 8.16-8.17, 9.1, 9.5-9.6, 9.13, 9.20-9.26, 10.4, 10.6, 10.9, 10.16-10.17 (2nd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •religion, ethiopian Found in books: Gruen (2011), Rethinking the Other in Antiquity, 199
8. Lucian, Astrology, 3, 5, 4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Gruen (2011), Rethinking the Other in Antiquity, 199
9. Lucian, Sacrifices, 2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •religion, ethiopian Found in books: Gruen (2011), Rethinking the Other in Antiquity, 198
10. Julian (Emperor), Ad Heraclium Cynicum, 37 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •religion, ethiopian Found in books: Gruen (2011), Rethinking the Other in Antiquity, 198