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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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10 results for "pseudo-phocylides"
1. Hebrew Bible, Proverbs, 21.6 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •pseudo-phocylides, and religious experience Found in books: Klawans (2019) 35
21.6. "פֹּעַל אוֹצָרוֹת בִּלְשׁוֹן שָׁקֶר הֶבֶל נִדָּף מְבַקְשֵׁי־מָוֶת׃", 21.6. "The getting of treasures by a lying tongue Is a vapour driven to and fro; they [that seek them] seek death.",
2. Anon., 1 Enoch, 98.15, 104.9-104.10 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •pseudo-phocylides, and religious experience Found in books: Klawans (2019) 35
104.9. day and night, see all your sins. Be not godless in your hearts, and lie not and alter not the words of uprightness, nor charge with lying the words of the Holy Great One, nor take account of your
3. Dead Sea Scrolls, Community Rule, 4.9-4.14, 6.15, 8.18 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •pseudo-phocylides, and religious experience Found in books: Klawans (2019) 35
4. Septuagint, 2 Maccabees, 6.21-6.28 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •pseudo-phocylides, and religious experience Found in books: Klawans (2019) 35
6.21. Those who were in charge of that unlawful sacrifice took the man aside, because of their long acquaintance with him, and privately urged him to bring meat of his own providing, proper for him to use, and pretend that he was eating the flesh of the sacrificial meal which had been commanded by the king,' 6.22. o that by doing this he might be saved from death, and be treated kindly on account of his old friendship with them.' 6.23. But making a high resolve, worthy of his years and the dignity of his old age and the gray hairs which he had reached with distinction and his excellent life even from childhood, and moreover according to the holy God-given law, he declared himself quickly, telling them to send him to Hades.' 6.24. Such pretense is not worthy of our time of life, he said, 'lest many of the young should suppose that Eleazar in his ninetieth year has gone over to an alien religion,' 6.25. and through my pretense, for the sake of living a brief moment longer, they should be led astray because of me, while I defile and disgrace my old age.' 6.26. For even if for the present I should avoid the punishment of men, yet whether I live or die I shall not escape the hands of the Almighty.' 6.27. Therefore, by manfully giving up my life now, I will show myself worthy of my old age' 6.28. and leave to the young a noble example of how to die a good death willingly and nobly for the revered and holy laws.'When he had said this, he went at once to the rack.'
5. Josephus Flavius, Jewish War, 1.526-1.529, 1.641-1.643 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •pseudo-phocylides, and religious experience Found in books: Klawans (2019) 35
1.526. 3. When Eurycles had made this portentous speech, he greatly commended Antipater, as the only child that had an affection for his father, and on that account was an impediment to the other’s plot against him. Hereupon the king, who had hardly repressed his anger upon the former accusations, was exasperated to an incurable degree. 1.527. At which time Antipater took another occasion to send in other persons to his father to accuse his brethren, and to tell him that they had privately discoursed with Jucundus and Tyrannus, who had once been masters of the horse to the king, but for some offenses had been put out of that honorable employment. Herod was in a very great rage at these informations, and presently ordered those men to be tortured; 1.528. yet did not they confess anything of what the king had been informed; but a certain letter was produced, as written by Alexander to the governor of a castle, to desire him to receive him and Aristobulus into the castle when he had killed his father, and to give them weapons, and what other assistance he could, upon that occasion. 1.529. Alexander said that this letter was a forgery of Diophantus. This Diophantus was the king’s secretary, a bold man, and cunning in counterfeiting anyone’s hand; and after he had counterfeited a great number, he was at last put to death for it. Herod did also order the governor of the castle to be tortured, but got nothing out of him of what the accusations suggested. 1.641. 6. Now after this it was discovered that Antipater had laid a plot against Salome also; for one of Antiphilus’s domestic servants came, and brought letters from Rome, from a maidservant of Julia [Caesar’s wife], whose name was Acme. By her a message was sent to the king, that she had found a letter written by Salome, among Julia’s papers, and had sent it to him privately, out of her goodwill to him. 1.642. This letter of Salome contained the most bitter reproaches of the king, and the highest accusations against him. Antipater had forged this letter, and had corrupted Acme, and persuaded her to send it to Herod. 1.643. This was proved by her letter to Antipater, for thus did this woman write to him:—“As thou desirest, I have written a letter to thy father, and have sent that letter, and am persuaded that the king will not spare his sister when he reads it. Thou wilt do well to remember what thou hast promised, when all is accomplished.”
6. New Testament, Colossians, 3.9 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •pseudo-phocylides, and religious experience Found in books: Klawans (2019) 35
3.9. μὴ ψεύδεσθε εἰς ἀλλήλους· ἀπεκδυσάμενοι τὸν παλαιὸν ἄνθρωπον σὺν ταῖς πράξεσιν αὐτοῦ, 3.9. Don't lie to one another, seeing that you have put off the old man with his doings,
7. New Testament, Ephesians, 4.25, 6.14 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •pseudo-phocylides, and religious experience Found in books: Klawans (2019) 35
4.25. Διὸ ἀποθέμενοι τὸ ψεῦδος λαλεῖτε ἀλήθειαν ἕκαστος μετὰ τοῦ πλησίον αὐτοῦ, ὅτι ἐσμὲν ἀλλήλων μέλη. 6.14. στῆτε οὖν περιζωσάμενοι τὴν ὀσφὺν ὑμῶν ἐν ἀληθεία, καὶ ἐνδυσάμενοι τὸν θώρακα τῆς δικαιοσύνης, 4.25. Therefore, putting away falsehood, speak truth each one with his neighbor. For we are members one of another. 6.14. Stand therefore, having the utility belt of truth buckled around your waist, and having put on the breastplate of righteousness,
8. Ammonius Hermiae, In Aristotelis Analyticorum Priorum Librum I Commentarium, 7.13, 20.24-20.26 (5th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •pseudo-phocylides, and religious experience Found in books: Klawans (2019) 35
9. Septuagint, 4 Maccabees, 6.12-6.23  Tagged with subjects: •pseudo-phocylides, and religious experience Found in books: Klawans (2019) 35
6.12. At that point, partly out of pity for his old age, 6.13. partly out of sympathy from their acquaintance with him, partly out of admiration for his endurance, some of the king's retinue came to him and said, 6.14. Eleazar, why are you so irrationally destroying yourself through these evil things? 6.15. We will set before you some cooked meat; save yourself by pretending to eat pork." 6.16. But Eleazar, as though more bitterly tormented by this counsel, cried out: 6.17. May we, the children of Abraham, never think so basely that out of cowardice we feign a role unbecoming to us! 6.18. For it would be irrational if we, who have lived in accordance with truth to old age and have maintained in accordance with law the reputation of such a life, should now change our course 6.19. become a pattern of impiety to the young, in becoming an example of the eating of defiling food. 6.20. It would be shameful if we should survive for a little while and during that time be a laughing stock to all for our cowardice, 6.21. and if we should be despised by the tyrant as unmanly, and not protect our divine law even to death. 6.22. Therefore, O children of Abraham, die nobly for your religion! 6.23. And you, guards of the tyrant, why do you delay?"
10. Pseudo-Phocylides, The Sentences of Pseudo-Phocylides, 12, 16-17, 48-50, 7  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Klawans (2019) 35