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17 results for "prosenes"
1. Martial, Epigrams, 2.32 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •prosenes, marcus aurelius Found in books: Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 334
2. Martial, Epigrams, 2.32 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •prosenes, marcus aurelius Found in books: Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 334
3. Tertullian, To Scapula, 4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •prosenes, marcus aurelius Found in books: Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 333, 337
4. We who are without fear ourselves are not seeking to frighten you, but we would save all men if possible by warning them not to fight with God. You may perform the duties of your charge, and yet remember the claims of humanity; if on no other ground than that you are liable to punishment yourself, (you ought to do so). For is not your commission simply to condemn those who confess their guilt, and to give over to the torture those who deny? You see, then, how you trespass yourselves against your instructions to wring from the confessing a denial. It is, in fact, an acknowledgment of our innocence that you refuse to condemn us at once when we confess. In doing your utmost to extirpate us, if that is your object, it is innocence you assail. But how many rulers, men more resolute and more cruel than you are, have contrived to get quit of such causes altogether - as Cincius Severus, who himself suggested the remedy at Thysdris, pointing out how the Christians should answer that they might secure an acquittal; as Vespronius Candidus, who dismissed from his bar a Christian, on the ground that to satisfy his fellow citizens would break the peace of the community; as Asper, who, in the case of a man who gave up his faith under slight infliction of the torture, did not compel the offering of sacrifice, having owned before, among the advocates and assessors of court, that he was annoyed at having had to meddle with such a case. Pudens, too, at once dismissed a Christian who was brought before him, perceiving from the indictment that it was a case of vexatious accusation; tearing the document in pieces, he refused so much as to hear him without the presence of his accuser, as not being consistent with the imperial commands. All this might be officially brought under your notice, and by the very advocates, who are themselves also under obligations to us, although in court they give their voice as it suits them. The clerk of one of them who was liable to be thrown upon the ground by an evil spirit, was set free from his affliction; as was also the relative of another, and the little boy of a third. How many men of rank (to say nothing of common people) have been delivered from devils, and healed of diseases! Even Severus himself, the father of Antonine, was graciously mindful of the Christians; for he sought out the Christian Proculus, surnamed Torpacion, the steward of Euhodias, and in gratitude for his having once cured him by anointing, he kept him in his palace till the day of his death. Antonine, too, brought up as he was on Christian milk, was intimately acquainted with this man. Both women and men of highest rank, whom Severus knew well to be Christians, were not merely permitted by him to remain uninjured; but he even bore distinguished testimony in their favour, and gave them publicly back to us from the hands of a raging populace. Marcus Aurelius also, in his expedition to Germany, by the prayers his Christian soldiers offered to God, got rain in that well-known thirst. When, indeed, have not droughts been put away by our kneelings and our fastings? At times like these, moreover, the people crying to the God of gods, the alone Omnipotent, under the name of Jupiter, have borne witness to our God. Then we never deny the deposit placed in our hands; we never pollute the marriage bed; we deal faithfully with our wards; we give aid to the needy; we render to none evil for evil. As for those who falsely pretend to belong to us, and whom we, too, repudiate, let them answer for themselves. In a word, who has complaint to make against us on other grounds? To what else does the Christian devote himself, save the affairs of his own community, which during all the long period of its existence no one has ever proved guilty of the incest or the cruelty charged against it? It is for freedom from crime so singular, for a probity so great, for righteousness, for purity, for faithfulness, for truth, for the living God, that we are consigned to the flames; for this is a punishment you are not wont to inflict either on the sacrilegious, or on undoubted public enemies, or on the treason-tainted, of whom you have so many. Nay, even now our people are enduring persecution from the governors of Legio and Mauritania; but it is only with the sword, as from the first it was ordained that we should suffer. But the greater our conflicts, the greater our rewards.
4. Justin, Second Apology, 2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •prosenes, marcus aurelius Found in books: Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 351
2. A certain woman lived with an intemperate husband; she herself, too, having formerly been intemperate. But when she came to the knowledge of the teachings of Christ she became sober-minded, and endeavoured to persuade her husband likewise to be temperate, citing the teaching of Christ, and assuring him that there shall be punishment in eternal fire inflicted upon those who do not live temperately and conformably to right reason. But he, continuing in the same excesses, alienated his wife from him by his actions. For she, considering it wicked to live any longer as a wife with a husband who sought in every way means of indulging in pleasure contrary to the law of nature, and in violation of what is right, wished to be divorced from him. And when she was overpersuaded by her friends, who advised her still to continue with him, in the idea that some time or other her husband might give hope of amendment, she did violence to her own feeling and remained with him. But when her husband had gone into Alexandria, and was reported to be conducting himself worse than ever, she - that she might not, by continuing in matrimonial connection with him, and by sharing his table and his bed, become a partaker also in his wickednesses and impieties - gave him what you call a bill of divorce, and was separated from him. But this noble husband of hers - while he ought to have been rejoicing that those actions which formerly she unhesitatingly committed with the servants and hirelings, when she delighted in drunkenness and every vice, she had now given up, and desired that he too should give up the same - when she had gone from him without his desire, brought an accusation against her, affirming that she was a Christian. And she presented a paper to you, the Emperor, a very bold apostrophe, like that of Huss to the Emperor Sigismund, which crimsoned his forehead with a blush of shame.]}-- requesting that first she be permitted to arrange her affairs, and afterwards to make her defense against the accusation, when her affairs were set in order. And this you granted. And her quondam husband, since he was now no longer able to prosecute her, directed his assaults against a man, Ptolem us, whom Urbicus punished, and who had been her teacher in the Christian doctrines. And this he did in the following way. He persuaded a centurion - who had cast Ptolem us into prison, and who was friendly to himself - to take Ptolem us and interrogate him on this sole point: whether he were a Christian? And Ptolem us, being a lover of truth, and not of a deceitful or false disposition, when he confessed himself to be a Christian, was bound by the centurion, and for a long time punished in the prison And, at last, when the man came to Urbicus, he was asked this one question only: whether he was a Christian? And again, being conscious of his duty, and the nobility of it through the teaching of Christ, he confessed his discipleship in the divine virtue. For he who denies anything either denies it because he condemns the thing itself, or he shrinks from confession because he is conscious of his own unworthiness or alienation from it, neither of which cases is that of the true Christian. And when Urbicus ordered him to be led away to punishment, one Lucius, who was also himself a Christian, seeing the unreasonable judgment that had thus been given, said to Urbicus: What is the ground of this judgment? Why have you punished this man, not as an adulterer, nor fornicator, nor murderer, nor thief, nor robber, nor convicted of any crime at all, but who has only confessed that he is called by the name of Christian? This judgment of yours, O Urbicus, does not become the Emperor Pius, nor the philosopher, the son of C sar, nor the sacred senate. And he said nothing else in answer to Lucius than this: You also seem to me to be such an one. And when Lucius answered, Most certainly I am, he again ordered him also to be led away. And he professed his thanks, knowing that he was delivered from such wicked rulers, and was going to the Father and King of the heavens. And still a third having come forward, was condemned to be punished.
5. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 77.11.2-77.11.4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •prosenes, marcus aurelius Found in books: Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 337
77.11.2.  for a thunderbolt had struck a statue of his which stood near the gates through which he was intending to march out and looked toward the road leading to his destination, and it had erased three letters from his name. For this reason, as the seers made clear, he did not return, but died in the third year. He took along with him an immense amount of money.
6. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 1.19.2, 4.23 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •prosenes, marcus aurelius Found in books: Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 315
4.23. To Pomponius Bassus. I have been delighted to hear from our mutual friends that you map out and bear your retirement in a way that is worthy of your ripe wisdom, that you live in a charming spot, that you take exercise on both sea and land, that you have plenty of good conversation, that you read a great deal and listen to others reading, and that, though your stock of knowledge is vast, you yet add thereto every day. That is just the way a man should spend his later years after filling the highest magistracies, after commanding armies, and devoting himself wholly to the service of the State for as long as it became him to do so. For we owe our early and middle manhood to our country, our last years are due to ourselves - as indeed the laws direct which enforce retirement when we reach a certain age. When will that appointed time come to me? When shall I attain the age at which I may honourably retire and imitate the example of beautiful and perfect peace that you set me? When shall I be able to enjoy calm retreat without people calling it not peaceful tranquillity but laziness and sloth? Farewell.
7. Hermas, Visions, 1.1.7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •prosenes, marcus aurelius Found in books: Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 333
8. Apuleius, The Golden Ass, 10.18.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •prosenes, marcus aurelius Found in books: Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 332
9. Scriptores Historiae Augustae, Septimus Severus, 4.2 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •prosenes, marcus aurelius Found in books: Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 337
10. Scriptores Historiae Augustae, Carus, 1 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •prosenes, marcus aurelius Found in books: Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 337
11. Justinian, Digest, 50.4 (5th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •prosenes, marcus aurelius Found in books: Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 315
12. Papyri, Inscriptiones Christianae Urbis Romae, 17246, 8  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 37
13. Minucius Felix, Epigrams, 34.10  Tagged with subjects: •prosenes, marcus aurelius Found in books: Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 331
14. Historia Augusta, Geta, 3.1  Tagged with subjects: •prosenes, marcus aurelius Found in books: Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 337
16. Epigraphy, Inscriptiones Latinae Christianae Veteres, 2922, 3332, 3789, 90, 3337  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 331
17. Epigraphy, Cil, 2.2255, 6.983, 6.8498, 6.9835, 6.37764, 11.3612  Tagged with subjects: •prosenes, marcus aurelius Found in books: Lampe (2003), Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus, 331, 332, 334, 337