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10 results for "pompey"
1. Homer, Iliad, 21.273-21.283, 22.508-22.515 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •pompey, funeral rites of Found in books: Mcclellan (2019), Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola, 135, 136, 143
21.273. / in vexation of spirit, and the River was ever tiring his knees with its violent flow beneath, and was snatching away the ground from under his feet. 21.274. / in vexation of spirit, and the River was ever tiring his knees with its violent flow beneath, and was snatching away the ground from under his feet. Then the son of Peleus uttered a bitter cry, with a look at the broad heaven:Father Zeus, how is it that no one of the gods taketh it upon him in my pitiless plight to save me from out the River! thereafter let come upon me what may. 21.275. / None other of the heavenly gods do I blame so much, but only my dear mother, that beguiled me with false words, saying that beneath the wall of the mail-clad Trojans I should perish by the swift missiles of Apollo. Would that Hector had slain me, the best of the men bred here; 21.276. / None other of the heavenly gods do I blame so much, but only my dear mother, that beguiled me with false words, saying that beneath the wall of the mail-clad Trojans I should perish by the swift missiles of Apollo. Would that Hector had slain me, the best of the men bred here; 21.277. / None other of the heavenly gods do I blame so much, but only my dear mother, that beguiled me with false words, saying that beneath the wall of the mail-clad Trojans I should perish by the swift missiles of Apollo. Would that Hector had slain me, the best of the men bred here; 21.278. / None other of the heavenly gods do I blame so much, but only my dear mother, that beguiled me with false words, saying that beneath the wall of the mail-clad Trojans I should perish by the swift missiles of Apollo. Would that Hector had slain me, the best of the men bred here; 21.279. / None other of the heavenly gods do I blame so much, but only my dear mother, that beguiled me with false words, saying that beneath the wall of the mail-clad Trojans I should perish by the swift missiles of Apollo. Would that Hector had slain me, the best of the men bred here; 21.280. / then had a brave man been the slayer, and a brave man had he slain. But now by a miserable death was it appointed me to be cut off, pent in the great river, like a swine-herd boy whom a torrent sweepeth away as he maketh essay to cross it in winter. So spake he, and forthwith Poseidon and Pallas Athene 21.281. / then had a brave man been the slayer, and a brave man had he slain. But now by a miserable death was it appointed me to be cut off, pent in the great river, like a swine-herd boy whom a torrent sweepeth away as he maketh essay to cross it in winter. So spake he, and forthwith Poseidon and Pallas Athene 21.282. / then had a brave man been the slayer, and a brave man had he slain. But now by a miserable death was it appointed me to be cut off, pent in the great river, like a swine-herd boy whom a torrent sweepeth away as he maketh essay to cross it in winter. So spake he, and forthwith Poseidon and Pallas Athene 21.283. / then had a brave man been the slayer, and a brave man had he slain. But now by a miserable death was it appointed me to be cut off, pent in the great river, like a swine-herd boy whom a torrent sweepeth away as he maketh essay to cross it in winter. So spake he, and forthwith Poseidon and Pallas Athene 22.508. / But now, seeing he has lost his dear father, he will suffer ills full many—my Astyanax, whom the Troians call by this name for that thou alone didst save their gates and their high walls. But now by the beaked ships far from thy parents shall writhing worms devour thee, when the dogs have had their fill, as thou liest a naked corpse; 22.509. / But now, seeing he has lost his dear father, he will suffer ills full many—my Astyanax, whom the Troians call by this name for that thou alone didst save their gates and their high walls. But now by the beaked ships far from thy parents shall writhing worms devour thee, when the dogs have had their fill, as thou liest a naked corpse; 22.510. / yet in thy halls lieth raiment, finely-woven and fair, wrought by the hands of women. Howbeit all these things will I verily burn in blazing fire—in no wise a profit unto thee, seeing thou shalt not lie therein, but to be an honour unto thee from the men and women of Troy. 22.511. / yet in thy halls lieth raiment, finely-woven and fair, wrought by the hands of women. Howbeit all these things will I verily burn in blazing fire—in no wise a profit unto thee, seeing thou shalt not lie therein, but to be an honour unto thee from the men and women of Troy. 22.512. / yet in thy halls lieth raiment, finely-woven and fair, wrought by the hands of women. Howbeit all these things will I verily burn in blazing fire—in no wise a profit unto thee, seeing thou shalt not lie therein, but to be an honour unto thee from the men and women of Troy. 22.513. / yet in thy halls lieth raiment, finely-woven and fair, wrought by the hands of women. Howbeit all these things will I verily burn in blazing fire—in no wise a profit unto thee, seeing thou shalt not lie therein, but to be an honour unto thee from the men and women of Troy. 22.514. / yet in thy halls lieth raiment, finely-woven and fair, wrought by the hands of women. Howbeit all these things will I verily burn in blazing fire—in no wise a profit unto thee, seeing thou shalt not lie therein, but to be an honour unto thee from the men and women of Troy. 22.515. / So spake she weeping, and thereto the women added their laments.
2. Homer, Odyssey, 5.299-5.312 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •pompey, funeral rites of Found in books: Mcclellan (2019), Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola, 143
3. Polybius, Histories, 6.53-6.54 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •pompey, funeral rites of Found in books: Mcclellan (2019), Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola, 128
6.53. 1.  Whenever any illustrious man dies, he is carried at his funeral into the forum to the so‑called rostra, sometimes conspicuous in an upright posture and more rarely reclined.,2.  Here with all the people standing round, a grown-up son, if he has left one who happens to be present, or if not some other relative mounts the rostra and discourses on the virtues and success­ful achievements of the dead.,3.  As a consequence the multitude and not only those who had a part in these achievements, but those also who had none, when the facts are recalled to their minds and brought before their eyes, are moved to such sympathy that the loss seems to be not confined to the mourners, but a public one affecting the whole people.,4.  Next after the interment and the performance of the usual ceremonies, they place the image of the departed in the most conspicuous position in the house, enclosed in a wooden shrine.,5.  This image is a mask reproducing with remarkable fidelity both the features and complexion of the deceased.,6.  On the occasion of public sacrifices they display these images, and decorate them with much care, and when any distinguished member of the family dies they take them to the funeral, putting them on men who seem to them to bear the closest resemblance to the original in stature and carriage.,7.  These representatives wear togas, with a purple border if the deceased was a consul or praetor, whole purple if he was a censor, and embroidered with gold if he had celebrated a triumph or achieved anything similar.,8.  They all ride in chariots preceded by the fasces, axes, and other insignia by which the different magistrates are wont to be accompanied according to the respective dignity of the offices of state held by each during his life;,9.  and when they arrive at the rostra they all seat themselves in a row on ivory chairs. There could not easily be a more ennobling spectacle for a young man who aspires to fame and virtue.,10.  For who would not be inspired by the sight of the images of men renowned for their excellence, all together and as if alive and breathing? What spectacle could be more glorious than this? 6.54. 1.  Besides, he who makes the oration over the man about to be buried, when he has finished speaking of him recounts the successes and exploits of the rest whose images are present, beginning with the most ancient.,2.  By this means, by this constant renewal of the good report of brave men, the celebrity of those who performed noble deeds is rendered immortal, while at the same time the fame of those who did good service to their country becomes known to the people and a heritage for future generations.,3.  But the most important result is that young men are thus inspired to endure every suffering for public welfare in the hope of winning the glory that attends on brave men.,4.  What I say is confirmed by the facts. For many Romans have voluntarily engaged in single combat in order to decide a battle, not a few have faced certain death, some in war to save the lives of the rest, and others in peace to save the republic.,5.  Some even when in office have put their own sons to death contrary to every law or custom, setting a higher value on the interest of their country than on the ties of nature that bound them to their nearest and dearest.,6.  Many such stories about many men are related in Roman history, but one told of a certain person will suffice for the present as an example and as a confirmation of what I say.
4. Horace, Odes, 3.30.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •pompey, funeral rites of Found in books: Mcclellan (2019), Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola, 133
5. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 6.566-6.570, 11.428-11.429, 11.539-11.565, 11.723-11.730, 12.2-12.4, 12.612-12.618, 15.840 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •pompey, funeral rites of Found in books: Mcclellan (2019), Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola, 121, 122, 123, 124, 127, 135, 143
6.566. et lacrimae fecere fidem. Velamima Procne 6.567. deripit ex umeris auro fulgentia lato 6.568. induiturque atras vestes et ie sepulcrum 6.569. constituit falsisque piacula manibus infert 6.570. et luget non sic lugendae fata sororis. 11.428. et laceras nuper tabulas in litore vidi, 11.429. et saepe in tumulis sine corpore nomina legi. 11.539. Non tenet hic lacrimas, stupet hic, vocat ille beatos, 11.540. funera quos maneant: hic votis numen adorat 11.541. bracchiaque ad caelum, quod non videt, inrita tollens 11.542. poscit opem, subeunt illi fraterque parensque, 11.543. huic cum pignoribus domus et quodcumque relictum est. 11.544. Alcyone Ceyca movet, Ceycis in ore 11.545. nulla nisi Alcyone est; et cum desideret unam, 11.546. gaudet abesse tamen. Patriae quoque vellet ad oras 11.547. respicere inque domum supremos vertere vultus, 11.548. verum ubi sit, nescit; tanta vertigine pontus 11.549. fervet, et inducta piceis e nubibus umbra 11.550. omne latet caelum, duplicataque noctis imago est. 11.551. Frangitur incursu nimbosi turbinis arbor, 11.552. frangitur et regimen, spoliisque animosa superstes 11.553. unda, velut victrix, sinuataque despicit undas, 11.554. nec levius, quam siquis Athon Pindumve revulsos 11.555. sede sua totos in apertum everterit aequor, 11.556. praecipitata cadit pariterque et pondere et ictu 11.557. mergit in ima ratem; cum qua pars magna virorum, 11.558. gurgite pressa gravi neque in aera reddita, fato 11.559. functa suo est: alii partes et membra carinae 11.560. trunca tenent: tenet ipse manu, qua sceptra solebat, 11.561. fragmina navigii Ceyx socerumque patremque 11.562. invocat heu! frustra. Sed plurima tis in ore 11.563. Alcyone coniunx: illam meminitque refertque, 11.564. illius ante oculos ut agant sua corpora fluctus, 11.565. optat et exanimis manibus tumuletur amicis. 11.723. hoc minus et minus est mentis sua, iamque propinquae 11.724. admotum terrae, iam quod cognoscere posset, 11.725. cernit: erat coniunx. “Ille est!” exclamat et una 11.726. ora, comas, vestem lacerat tendensque trementes 11.727. ad Ceyca manus “sic, o carissime coniunx, 11.728. sic ad me, miserande, redis?” ait. Adiacet undis 11.729. facta manu moles, quae primas aequoris undas 11.730. frangit et incursus quae praedelassat aquarum. 12.2. vivere lugebat, tumulo quoque nomen habenti 12.3. inferias dederat cum fratribus Hector ii. 12.4. Defuit officio Paridis praesentia tristi, 12.612. Iam timor ille Phrygum, decus et tutela Pelasgi 12.613. nominis, Aeacides, caput insuperabile bello, 12.614. arserat: armarat deus idem idemque cremabat; 12.615. iam cinis est, et de tam magno restat Achille 12.616. nescio quid parvam, quod non bene conpleat urnam: 12.617. at vivit totum quae gloria conpleat orbem! 12.618. Haec illi mensura viro respondet, et hac est 15.840. Hanc animam interea caeso de corpore raptam
6. Silius Italicus, Punica, 5.658-5.666, 10.504-10.506, 10.565-10.567, 13.714-13.716 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •pompey, funeral of Found in books: Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 123
7. Appian, Civil Wars, 2.86 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •pompey, funeral rites of Found in books: Mcclellan (2019), Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola, 133
8. Lucan, Pharsalia, 1.549-1.552, 2.27, 2.306-2.307, 3.290-3.292, 5.281-5.282, 5.668-5.671, 6.533-6.537, 6.584-6.588, 6.787, 7.37-7.44, 7.792-7.794, 7.802, 8.72-8.742, 8.746-8.747, 8.752-8.753, 8.755-8.775, 8.777-8.778, 8.793, 8.798-8.799, 8.806-8.816, 8.843-8.850, 8.858-8.859, 9.1-9.18, 9.55-9.62, 9.70-9.72, 9.174-9.179, 9.212-9.214, 9.950, 9.1089-9.1104, 10.74, 10.378-10.381, 10.543-10.546 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •pompey, funeral rites of •pompey, death and funeral of •pompey, funeral of Found in books: Fertik (2019), The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome, 35; Mcclellan (2019), Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 142, 143; Roumpou (2023), Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature. 123
9. Vergil, Aeneis, 2.558  Tagged with subjects: •pompey, funeral rites of Found in books: Mcclellan (2019), Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola, 122
2.558. west wind and South, and jocund wind of morn
10. Manilius, Astronomica, 4.54-4.55  Tagged with subjects: •pompey, funeral rites of Found in books: Mcclellan (2019), Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola, 121