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112 results for "platonic"
1. Hebrew Bible, Psalms, 12.8 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •forms, platonic Found in books: O'Daly (2020), Augustine's City of God: A Reader's Guide (2nd edn), 178
12.8. "אַתָּה־יְהוָה תִּשְׁמְרֵם תִּצְּרֶנּוּ מִן־הַדּוֹר זוּ לְעוֹלָם׃", 12.8. "Thou wilt keep them, O LORD; Thou wilt preserve us from this generation for ever.",
2. Hesiod, Fragments, None (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Castagnoli and Ceccarelli (2019), Greek Memories: Theories and Practices, 194
3. Hebrew Bible, Isaiah, 53.8 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •platonic forms Found in books: Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 42
53.8. "מֵעֹצֶר וּמִמִּשְׁפָּט לֻקָּח וְאֶת־דּוֹרוֹ מִי יְשׂוֹחֵחַ כִּי נִגְזַר מֵאֶרֶץ חַיִּים מִפֶּשַׁע עַמִּי נֶגַע לָמוֹ׃", 53.8. "By oppression and judgment he was taken away, And with his generation who did reason? For he was cut off out of the land of the living, For the transgression of my people to whom the stroke was due.",
4. Homer, Odyssey, 6.18, 8.457 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •platonic forms Found in books: Castagnoli and Ceccarelli (2019), Greek Memories: Theories and Practices, 194
5. Homeric Hymns, To Aphrodite, 77 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •platonic forms Found in books: Castagnoli and Ceccarelli (2019), Greek Memories: Theories and Practices, 194
77. With them to grassy pasturelands, yet he
6. Sappho, Fragments, 16 (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •platonic forms Found in books: Castagnoli and Ceccarelli (2019), Greek Memories: Theories and Practices, 189
7. Parmenides, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 113
8. Plato, Sophist, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •forms, platonic, inferior Found in books: Marmodoro and Prince (2015), Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity, 64
254b. καρτερεῖν πρὸς τὸ θεῖον ἀφορῶντα ἀδύνατα. ΘΕΑΙ. καὶ ταῦτα εἰκὸς οὐχ ἧττον ἐκείνων οὕτως ἔχειν. ΞΕ. οὐκοῦν περὶ μὲν τούτου καὶ τάχα ἐπισκεψόμεθα σαφέστερον, ἂν ἔτι βουλομένοις ἡμῖν ᾖ· περὶ δὲ τοῦ σοφιστοῦ που δῆλον ὡς οὐκ ἀνετέον πρὶν ἂν ἱκανῶς αὐτὸν θεασώμεθα. ΘΕΑΙ. καλῶς εἶπες. ΞΕ. ὅτʼ οὖν δὴ τὰ μὲν ἡμῖν τῶν γενῶν ὡμολόγηται κοινωνεῖν ἐθέλειν ἀλλήλοις, τὰ δὲ μή, καὶ τὰ μὲν ἐπʼ ὀλίγον, τὰ δʼ ἐπὶ πολλά, τὰ δὲ καὶ διὰ πάντων οὐδὲν κωλύειν τοῖς 254b. of the soul of the multitude are not strong enough to endure the sight of the divine. Theaet. This also seems no less true than what you said about the sophist. Str. Now we will make more accurate investigations about the philosopher hereafter, if we still care to do so; but as to the sophist, it is clear that we must not relax our efforts until we have a satisfactory view of him. Theaet. You are right. Str. Since, therefore, we are agreed that some of the classes will mingle with one another, and others will not, and some will mingle with few and others with many, and that
9. Plato, Timaeus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 167
10. Hippias of Elis, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Castagnoli and Ceccarelli (2019), Greek Memories: Theories and Practices, 346
11. Plato, Theaetetus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Struck (2016), Divination and Human Nature: A Cognitive History of Intuition in Classical Antiquity, 65
150d. μὲν οὐ πάνυ τι σοφός, οὐδέ τί μοι ἔστιν εὕρημα τοιοῦτον γεγονὸς τῆς ἐμῆς ψυχῆς ἔκγονον· οἱ δʼ ἐμοὶ συγγιγνόμενοι τὸ μὲν πρῶτον φαίνονται ἔνιοι μὲν καὶ πάνυ ἀμαθεῖς, πάντες δὲ προϊούσης τῆς συνουσίας, οἷσπερ ἂν ὁ θεὸς παρείκῃ, θαυμαστὸν ὅσον ἐπιδιδόντες, ὡς αὑτοῖς τε καὶ τοῖς ἄλλοις δοκοῦσι· καὶ τοῦτο ἐναργὲς ὅτι παρʼ ἐμοῦ οὐδὲν πώποτε μαθόντες, ἀλλʼ αὐτοὶ παρʼ αὑτῶν πολλὰ καὶ καλὰ εὑρόντες τε καὶ τεκόντες. τῆς μέντοι μαιείας ὁ θεός τε καὶ ἐγὼ
12. Plato, Symposium, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Castagnoli and Ceccarelli (2019), Greek Memories: Theories and Practices, 193
212c. οὖν τὸν λόγον, ὦ Φαῖδρε, εἰ μὲν βούλει, ὡς ἐγκώμιον εἰς ἔρωτα νόμισον εἰρῆσθαι, εἰ δέ, ὅτι καὶ ὅπῃ χαίρεις ὀνομάζων, τοῦτο ὀνόμαζε. 212c. as far as I am able. So I ask you, Phaedrus, to be so good as to consider this account as a eulogy bestowed on Love, or else to call it by any name that pleases your fancy.
13. Anaxagoras, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •forms in middle platonism Found in books: d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 101
14. Plato, Apology of Socrates, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Struck (2016), Divination and Human Nature: A Cognitive History of Intuition in Classical Antiquity, 40
15. Plato, Cratylus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •platonism, theory of forms Found in books: James (2021), Learning the Language of Scripture: Origen, Wisdom, and the Logic of Interpretation, 52
439d. ΚΡ. ἔμοιγε δοκεῖ, ὦ Σώκρατες, εἶναι . ΣΩ. αὐτὸ τοίνυν ἐκεῖνο σκεψώμεθα, μὴ εἰ πρόσωπόν τί ἐστιν καλὸν ἤ τι τῶν τοιούτων, καὶ δοκεῖ ταῦτα πάντα ῥεῖν· ἀλλʼ αὐτό, φῶμεν, τὸ καλὸν οὐ τοιοῦτον ἀεί ἐστιν οἷόν ἐστιν; ΚΡ. ἀνάγκη. ΣΩ. ἆρʼ οὖν οἷόν τε προσειπεῖν αὐτὸ ὀρθῶς, εἰ ἀεὶ ὑπεξέρχεται, πρῶτον μὲν ὅτι ἐκεῖνό ἐστιν, ἔπειτα ὅτι τοιοῦτον, ἢ ἀνάγκη ἅμα ἡμῶν λεγόντων ἄλλο αὐτὸ εὐθὺς γίγνεσθαι καὶ ὑπεξιέναι καὶ μηκέτι οὕτως ἔχειν; ΚΡ. ἀνάγκη. 439d. Cratylus. I think there is, Socrates. Socrates. Then let us consider the absolute, not whether a particular face, or something of that sort, is beautiful, or whether all these things are in flux. Is not, in our opinion, absolute beauty always such as it is? Cratylus. That is inevitable. Socrates. Can we, then, if it is always passing away, correctly say that it is this, then that it is that, or must it inevitably, in the very instant while we are speaking, become something else and pass away and no longer be what it is? Cratylus. That is inevitable.
16. Alcidamas, On The Sophists, 28, 27 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Castagnoli and Ceccarelli (2019), Greek Memories: Theories and Practices, 346
17. Plato, Critias, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •platonic forms Found in books: Castagnoli and Ceccarelli (2019), Greek Memories: Theories and Practices, 194
117b. ὕδασι, δεξαμενάς τε αὖ τὰς μὲν ὑπαιθρίους, τὰς δὲ χειμερινὰς τοῖς θερμοῖς λουτροῖς ὑποστέγους περιτιθέντες, χωρὶς μὲν βασιλικάς, χωρὶς δὲ ἰδιωτικάς, ἔτι δὲ γυναιξὶν ἄλλας καὶ ἑτέρας ἵπποις καὶ τοῖς ἄλλοις ὑποζυγίοις, τὸ πρόσφορον τῆς κοσμήσεως ἑκάστοις ἀπονέμοντες. τὸ δὲ ἀπορρέον ἦγον ἐπὶ τὸ τοῦ Ποσειδῶνος ἄλσος, δένδρα παντοδαπὰ κάλλος ὕψος τε δαιμόνιον ὑπʼ ἀρετῆς τῆς γῆς ἔχοντα, καὶ ἐπὶ τοὺς ἔξω κύκλους διʼ ὀχετῶν κατὰ τὰς γεφύρας 117b. and, moreover, they set reservoirs round about, some under the open sky, and others under cover to supply hot baths in the winter; they put separate baths for the kings and for the private citizens, besides others for women, and others again for horses and all other beasts of burden, fitting out each in an appropriate manner. And the outflowing water they conducted to the sacred grove of Poseidon, which contained trees of all kinds that were of marvellous beauty and height because of the richness of the soil; and by means of channels they led the water to the outer circles over against the bridges.
18. Plato, Greater Hippias, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Castagnoli and Ceccarelli (2019), Greek Memories: Theories and Practices, 346
285d. ἀνθρώπων διαιρεῖν, περί τε γραμμάτων δυνάμεως καὶ συλλαβῶν καὶ ῥυθμῶν καὶ ἁρμονιῶν; ΙΠ. ποίων, ὠγαθέ, ἁρμονιῶν καὶ γραμμάτων; ΣΩ. ἀλλὰ τί μήν ἐστιν ἃ ἡδέως σου ἀκροῶνται καὶ ἐπαινοῦσιν; αὐτός μοι εἰπέ, ἐπειδὴ ἐγὼ οὐχ εὑρίσκω. ΙΠ. περὶ τῶν γενῶν, ὦ Σώκρατες, τῶν τε ἡρώων καὶ τῶν ἀνθρώπων, καὶ τῶν κατοικίσεων, ὡς τὸ ἀρχαῖον ἐκτίσθησαν αἱ πόλεις, καὶ συλλήβδην πάσης τῆς ἀρχαιολογίας ἥδιστα 285d. concerning the value of letters and syllables and rhythms and harmonies? Hipp. Harmonies indeed, my good fellow, and letters! Soc. But then what are the things about which they like to listen to you and which they applaud? Tell me yourself, for I cannot discover them. Hipp. They are very fond of hearing about the genealogies of heroes and men, Socrates, and the foundations of cities in ancient times and, in short, about antiquity in general, so that for their sake I have been obliged to learn all that sort of thing by heart
19. Plato, Lesser Hippias, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •platonic forms Found in books: Castagnoli and Ceccarelli (2019), Greek Memories: Theories and Practices, 346
368d. καὶ διθυράμβους, καὶ καταλογάδην πολλοὺς λόγους καὶ παντοδαποὺς συγκειμένους· καὶ περὶ τῶν τεχνῶν δὴ ὧν ἄρτι ἐγὼ ἔλεγον ἐπιστήμων ἀφικέσθαι διαφερόντως τῶν ἄλλων, καὶ περὶ ῥυθμῶν καὶ ἁρμονιῶν καὶ γραμμάτων ὀρθότητος, καὶ ἄλλα ἔτι πρὸς τούτοις πάνυ πολλά, ὡς ἐγὼ δοκῶ μνημονεύειν· καίτοι τό γε μνημονικὸν ἐπελαθόμην σου, ὡς ἔοικε, τέχνημα, ἐν ᾧ σὺ οἴει λαμπρότατος εἶναι· οἶμαι δὲ καὶ 368d. and that you were there excelling all others in knowledge of the arts of which I was speaking just now, and of the correctness of rhythms and harmonies and letters, and many other things besides, as I seem to remember; and yet I forgot your art of memory, as it seems, in which you think you are most brilliant;
20. Hippias of Elis, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Castagnoli and Ceccarelli (2019), Greek Memories: Theories and Practices, 346
21. Plato, Meno, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •platonic forms Found in books: Castagnoli and Ceccarelli (2019), Greek Memories: Theories and Practices, 27
81a. ΜΕΝ. οὐκοῦν καλῶς σοι δοκεῖ λέγεσθαι ὁ λόγος οὗτος, ὦ Σώκρατες; ΣΩ. οὐκ ἔμοιγε. ΜΕΝ. ἔχεις λέγειν ὅπῃ; ΣΩ. ἔγωγε· ἀκήκοα γὰρ ἀνδρῶν τε καὶ γυναικῶν σοφῶν περὶ τὰ θεῖα πράγματα— ΜΕΝ. τίνα λόγον λεγόντων; ΣΩ. ἀληθῆ, ἔμοιγε δοκεῖν, καὶ καλόν. ΜΕΝ. τίνα τοῦτον, καὶ τίνες οἱ λέγοντες; ΣΩ. οἱ μὲν λέγοντές εἰσι τῶν ἱερέων τε καὶ τῶν ἱερειῶν ὅσοις μεμέληκε περὶ ὧν μεταχειρίζονται λόγον οἵοις τʼ εἶναι 81a. Men. Now does it seem to you to be a good argument, Socrates? Soc. It does not. Men. Can you explain how not? Soc. I can; for I have heard from wise men and women who told of things divine that— Men. What was it they said ? Soc. Something true, as I thought, and admirable. Men. What was it? And who were the speakers? Soc. They were certain priests and priestesses who have studied so as to be able to give a reasoned account of their ministry; and Pindar also
22. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Castagnoli and Ceccarelli (2019), Greek Memories: Theories and Practices, 346
23. Xenophon, Apology, 14 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •forms, platonic Found in books: Struck (2016), Divination and Human Nature: A Cognitive History of Intuition in Classical Antiquity, 40
24. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Castagnoli and Ceccarelli (2019), Greek Memories: Theories and Practices, 183
25. Plato, Protagoras, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •platonic forms Found in books: Castagnoli and Ceccarelli (2019), Greek Memories: Theories and Practices, 346
325e. and harp-playing. Soc. The masters take pains accordingly, and the children, when they have learnt their letters and are getting to understand the written word as before they did only the spoken, are furnished with works of good poets to read as they sit in class, and are made to learn them off by heart:
26. Plato, Philebus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Struck (2016), Divination and Human Nature: A Cognitive History of Intuition in Classical Antiquity, 58
64a. καὶ κρᾶσιν, ἐν ταύτῃ μαθεῖν πειρᾶσθαι τί ποτε ἔν τʼ ἀνθρώπῳ καὶ τῷ παντὶ πέφυκεν ἀγαθὸν καὶ τίνα ἰδέαν αὐτὴν εἶναί ποτε μαντευτέον. ἆρʼ οὐκ ἐμφρόνως ταῦτα καὶ ἐχόντως ἑαυτὸν τὸν νοῦν φήσομεν ὑπέρ τε αὑτοῦ καὶ μνήμης καὶ δόξης ὀρθῆς ἀποκρίνασθαι τὰ νῦν ῥηθέντα; ΠΡΩ. παντάπασι μὲν οὖν. ΣΩ. ἀλλὰ μὴν καὶ τόδε γε ἀναγκαῖον, καὶ οὐκ ἄλλως ἄν ποτε γένοιτο οὐδʼ ἂν ἕν. 64a. and to try to learn which of its elements is good in man and the universe, and what we should divine its nature to be, to mix these with mind. Shall we not say that this reply which mind has now made for itself and memory and right opinion is wise and reasonable? Pro. Certainly. Soc. But another addition is surely necessary, without which nothing whatsoever can ever come into being.
27. Plato, Phaedo, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Castagnoli and Ceccarelli (2019), Greek Memories: Theories and Practices, 27
72e. εἶναι καὶ ταῖς μέν γε ἀγαθαῖς ἄμεινον εἶναι, ταῖς δὲ κακαῖς κάκιον . καὶ μήν, ἔφη ὁ Κέβης ὑπολαβών, καὶ κατ’ ἐκεῖνόν γε τὸν λόγον, ὦ Σώκρατες , εἰ ἀληθής ἐστιν, ὃν σὺ εἴωθας θαμὰ λέγειν, ὅτι ἡμῖν ἡ μάθησις οὐκ ἄλλο τι ἢ ἀνάμνησις τυγχάνει οὖσα, καὶ κατὰ τοῦτον ἀνάγκη που ἡμᾶς ἐν προτέρῳ τινὶ χρόνῳ μεμαθηκέναι ἃ νῦν ἀναμιμνῃσκόμεθα. ΦΑΙΔ. τοῦτο δὲ n="73"/ 72e. exist. And besides, Cebes rejoined, if it is true, Socrates, as you are fond of saying, that our learning is nothing else than recollection, then this would be an additional argument that we must necessarily have learned in some previous time what we now remember. Phaedo. But this is impossible if
28. Plato, Phaedrus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Castagnoli and Ceccarelli (2019), Greek Memories: Theories and Practices, 183
254a. κέντρων ὑποπλησθῇ, ὁ μὲν εὐπειθὴς τῷ ἡνιόχῳ τῶν ἵππων, ἀεί τε καὶ τότε αἰδοῖ βιαζόμενος, ἑαυτὸν κατέχει μὴ ἐπιπηδᾶν τῷ ἐρωμένῳ· ὁ δὲ οὔτε κέντρων ἡνιοχικῶν οὔτε μάστιγος ἔτι ἐντρέπεται, σκιρτῶν δὲ βίᾳ φέρεται, καὶ πάντα πράγματα παρέχων τῷ σύζυγί τε καὶ ἡνιόχῳ ἀναγκάζει ἰέναι τε πρὸς τὰ παιδικὰ καὶ μνείαν ποιεῖσθαι τῆς τῶν ἀφροδισίων χάριτος. τὼ δὲ κατʼ ἀρχὰς μὲν ἀντιτείνετον 254a. prickings of yearning, the horse that is obedient to the charioteer, constrained then as always by modesty, controls himself and does not leap upon the beloved; but the other no longer heeds the pricks or the whip of the charioteer, but springs wildly forward, causing all possible trouble to his mate and to the charioteer, and forcing them to approach the beloved and propose the joys of love. And they at first pull back indigtly and
29. Antiphon, Orations, 1.6 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •platonic forms Found in books: Castagnoli and Ceccarelli (2019), Greek Memories: Theories and Practices, 183
30. Isocrates, Orations, 58 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •platonic forms Found in books: Castagnoli and Ceccarelli (2019), Greek Memories: Theories and Practices, 193
31. Aristophanes, Frogs, 186 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •platonic forms Found in books: Castagnoli and Ceccarelli (2019), Greek Memories: Theories and Practices, 183
186. τίς ἐς τὸ Λήθης πεδίον, ἢ ς' ̓́Ονου πόκας,
32. Aristotle, On The Universe, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Seaford, Wilkins, Wright (2017), Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill. 129
33. Aristotle, Metaphysics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Fuhrer and Soldo (2024), Fallibility and Fallibilism in Ancient Philosophy and Literature 240
34. Aristotle, Heavens, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •forms, platonic Found in books: Joosse (2021), Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher, 83
35. Aristotle, Generation And Corruption, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Marmodoro and Prince (2015), Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity, 116
36. Aristotle, Politics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •platonic forms Found in books: Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 74
37. Aristotle, Posterior Analytics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Joosse (2021), Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher, 89
38. Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Joosse (2021), Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher, 65
39. Aristotle, Memory And Reminiscence, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •platonic forms Found in books: Castagnoli and Ceccarelli (2019), Greek Memories: Theories and Practices, 27
40. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 1.24.57 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •forms, platonic Found in books: Joosse (2021), Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher, 177
41. Septuagint, Ecclesiasticus (Siracides), 290 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •forms, platonic, as thoughts Found in books: Marmodoro and Prince (2015), Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity, 105
42. Strabo, Geography, 2.76.11-2.76.12 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •platonism, theory of forms Found in books: James (2021), Learning the Language of Scripture: Origen, Wisdom, and the Logic of Interpretation, 31
43. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, 1.2.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •platonic forms Found in books: Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 74
44. Cicero, Academica Posteriora, 1.2.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •forms, platonic Found in books: O'Daly (2020), Augustine's City of God: A Reader's Guide (2nd edn), 127
45. Plutarch, On Common Conceptions Against The Stoics, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •platonism, theory of forms Found in books: James (2021), Learning the Language of Scripture: Origen, Wisdom, and the Logic of Interpretation, 31
46. New Testament, Acts, 19.11-19.16 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •plato, platonic forms Found in books: Janowitz (2002), Magic in the Roman World: Pagans, Jews and Christians, 38
19.11. Δυνάμεις τε οὐ τὰς τυχούσας ὁ θεὸς ἐποίει διὰ τῶν χειρῶν Παύλου, 19.12. ὥστε καὶ ἐπὶ τοὺς ἀσθενοῦντας ἀποφέρεσθαι ἀπὸ τοῦ χρωτὸς αὐτοῦ σουδάρια ἢ σιμικίνθια καὶ ἀπαλλάσσεσθαι ἀπʼ αὐτῶν τὰς νόσους, τά τε πνεύματα τὰ πονηρὰ ἐκπορεύεσθαι. 19.13. Ἐπεχείρησαν δέ τινες καὶ τῶν περιερχομένων Ἰουδαίων ἐξορκισ̀τῶν ὀνομάζειν ἐπὶ τοὺς ἔχοντας τὰ πνεύματα τὰ πονηρὰ τὸ ὄνομα τοῦ κυρίου Ἰησοῦ λέγοντες Ὁρκίζω ὑμᾶς τὸν Ἰησοῦν ὃν Παῦλος κηρύσσει. 19.14. ἦσαν δέ τινος Σκευᾶ Ἰουδαίου ἀρχιερέως ἑπτὰ υἱοὶ τοῦτο ποιοῦντες. 19.15. ἀποκριθὲν δὲ τὸ πνεῦμα τὸ πονηρὸν εἶπεν αὐτοῖς Τὸν [μὲν] Ἰησοῦν γινώσκω καὶ τὸν Παῦλον ἐπίσταμαι, ὑμεῖς δὲ τίνες ἐστέ; 19.16. καὶ ἐφαλόμενος ὁ ἄνθρωπος ἐπʼ αὐτοὺς ἐν ᾧ ἦν τὸ πνεῦμα τὸ πονηρὸν κατακυριεύσας ἀμφοτέρων ἴσχυσεν κατʼ αὐτῶν, ὥστε γυμνοὺς καὶ τετραυματισμένους ἐκφυγεῖν ἐκ τοῦ οἴκου ἐκείνου. 19.11. God worked special miracles by the hands of Paul, 19.12. so that even handkerchiefs or aprons were carried away from his body to the sick, and the evil spirits went out. 19.13. But some of the itinerant Jews, exorcists, took on themselves to name over those who had the evil spirits the name of the Lord Jesus, saying, "We adjure you by Jesus whom Paul preaches." 19.14. There were seven sons of one Sceva, a Jewish chief priest, who did this. 19.15. The evil spirit answered, "Jesus I know, and Paul I know, but who are you?" 19.16. The man in whom the evil spirit was leaped on them, and overpowered them, and prevailed against them, so that they fled out of that house naked and wounded.
47. New Testament, Ephesians, 1.9-1.12, 2.4, 3.2-3.11 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •platonic forms Found in books: Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 29, 74
1.9. ἧς ἐπερίσσευσεν εἰς ἡμᾶς ἐν πάσῃ σοφίᾳ καὶ φρονήσει γνωρίσας ἡμῖν τὸ μυστήριον τοῦ θελήματος αὐτοῦ, κατὰ τὴν εὐδοκίαν αὐτοῦ ἣν προέθετο ἐν αὐτῷ 1.10. εἰς οἰκονομίαν τοῦ πληρώματος τῶν καιρῶν, ἀνακεφαλαιώσασθαι τὰ πάντα ἐν τῷ χριστῷ, τὰ ἐπὶ τοῖς οὐρανοῖς καὶ τὰ ἐπὶ τῆς γῆς· ἐν αὐτῷ, 1.11. ἐν ᾧ καὶ ἐκληρώθημεν προορισθέντες κατὰ πρόθεσιν τοῦ τὰ πάντα ἐνεργοῦντος κατὰ τὴν βουλὴν τοῦ θελήματος αὐτοῦ, 1.12. εἰς τὸ εἶναι ἡμᾶς εἰς ἔπαινον δόξης αὐτοῦ τοὺς προηλπικότας ἐν τῷ χριστῷ· 2.4. ὁ δὲ θεὸς πλούσιος ὢν ἐν ἐλέει, διὰ τὴν πολλὴν ἀγάπην αὐτοῦ ἣν ἠγάπησεν ἡμᾶς, 3.2. εἴ γε ἠκούσατε τὴν οἰκονομίαν τῆς χάριτος τοῦ θεοῦ τῆς δοθείσης μοι εἰς ὑμᾶς, 3.3. [ὅτι] κατὰ ἀποκάλυψιν ἐγνωρίσθη μοι τὸ μυστήριον, καθὼς προέγραψα ἐν ὀλίγῳ, 3.4. πρὸς ὃ δύνασθε ἀναγινώσκοντες νοῆσαι τὴν σύνεσίν μου ἐν τῷ μυστηρίῳ τοῦ χριστοῦ, 3.5. ὃ ἑτέραις γενεαῖς οὐκ ἐγνωρίσθη τοῖς υἱοῖς τῶν ἀνθρώπων ὡς νῦν ἀπεκαλύφθη τοῖς ἁγίοις ἀποστόλοις αὐτοῦ καὶ προφήταις ἐν πνεύματι, 3.6. εἶναι τὰ ἔθνη συνκληρονόμα καὶ σύνσωμα καὶ συνμέτοχα τῆς ἐπαγγελίας ἐν Χριστῷ Ἰησοῦ διὰ τοῦ εὐαγγελίου, 3.7. οὗ ἐγενήθην διάκονος κατὰ τὴν δωρεὰν τῆς χάριτος τοῦ θεοῦ τῆς δοθείσης μοι κατὰ τὴν ἐνέργειαν τῆς δυνάμεως αὐτοῦ — 3.8. ἐμοὶ τῷ ἐλαχιστοτέρῳ πάντων ἁγίων ἐδόθη ἡ χάρις αὕτη — τοῖς ἔθνεσιν εὐαγγελίσασθαι τὸ ἀνεξιχνίαστον πλοῦτος τοῦ χριστοῦ, 3.9. καὶ φωτίσαι τίς ἡ οἰκονομία τοῦ μυστηρίου τοῦ ἀποκεκρυμμένου ἀπὸ τῶν αἰώνων ἐν τῷ θεῷ τῷ τὰ πάντα κτίσαντι, 3.10. ἵνα γνωρισθῇ νῦν ταῖς ἀρχαῖς καὶ ταῖς ἐξουσίαις ἐν τοῖς ἐπουρανίοις διὰ τῆς ἐκκλησίας ἡ πολυποίκιλος σοφία τοῦ θεοῦ, 3.11. κατὰ πρόθεσιν τῶν αἰώνων ἣν ἐποίησεν ἐν τῷ χριστῷ Ἰησοῦ τῷ κυρίῳ ἡμῶν, 1.9. making known to us the mystery of his will, according to his good pleasure which he purposed in him 1.10. to an administration of the fullness of the times, to sum up all things in Christ, the things in the heavens, and the things on the earth, in him; 1.11. in whom also we were assigned an inheritance, having been foreordained according to the purpose of him who works all things after the counsel of his will; 1.12. to the end that we should be to the praise of his glory, we who had before hoped in Christ: 2.4. But God, being rich in mercy, for his great love with which he loved us, 3.2. if it is so that you have heard of the administration of that grace of God which was given me toward you; 3.3. how that by revelation the mystery was made known to me, as I wrote before in few words, 3.4. by which, when you read, you can perceive my understanding in the mystery of Christ; 3.5. which in other generations was not made known to the sons of men, as it has now been revealed to his holy apostles and prophets in the Spirit; 3.6. that the Gentiles are fellow heirs, and fellow members of the body, and fellow partakers of his promise in Christ Jesus through the gospel, 3.7. whereof I was made a servant, according to the gift of that grace of God which was given me according to the working of his power. 3.8. To me, the very least of all saints, was this grace given, to preach to the Gentiles the unsearchable riches of Christ, 3.9. and to make all men see what is the administration of the mystery which for ages has been hidden in God, who created all things through Jesus Christ; 3.10. to the intent that now through the assembly the manifold wisdom of God might be made known to the principalities and the powers in the heavenly places, 3.11. according to the eternal purpose which he purposed in Christ Jesus our Lord;
48. New Testament, Romans, None (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 29
49. New Testament, John, 1.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •platonic forms Found in books: Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 254
1.4. ὃ γέγονεν ἐν αὐτῷ ζωὴ ἦν, καὶ ἡ ζωὴ ἦν τὸ φῶς τῶν ἀνθρώπων· 1.4. In him was life, and the life was the light of men.
50. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 8.46-8.49 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •plato, platonic forms Found in books: Janowitz (2002), Magic in the Roman World: Pagans, Jews and Christians, 38
8.46. and this method of cure is of great force unto this day; for I have seen a certain man of my own country, whose name was Eleazar, releasing people that were demoniacal in the presence of Vespasian, and his sons, and his captains, and the whole multitude of his soldiers. The manner of the cure was this: 8.47. He put a ring that had a root of one of those sorts mentioned by Solomon to the nostrils of the demoniac, after which he drew out the demon through his nostrils; and when the man fell down immediately, he abjured him to return into him no more, making still mention of Solomon, and reciting the incantations which he composed. 8.48. And when Eleazar would persuade and demonstrate to the spectators that he had such a power, he set a little way off a cup or basin full of water, and commanded the demon, as he went out of the man, to overturn it, and thereby to let the spectators know that he had left the man; 8.49. and when this was done, the skill and wisdom of Solomon was shown very manifestly: for which reason it is, that all men may know the vastness of Solomon’s abilities, and how he was beloved of God, and that the extraordinary virtues of every kind with which this king was endowed may not be unknown to any people under the sun for this reason, I say, it is that we have proceeded to speak so largely of these matters.
51. New Testament, Matthew, 13.17 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •platonic forms Found in books: Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 42
13.17. ἀμὴν γὰρ λέγω ὑμῖν ὅτι πολλοὶ προφῆται καὶ δίκαιοι ἐπεθύμησαν ἰδεῖν ἃ βλέπετε καὶ οὐκ εἶδαν, καὶ ἀκοῦσαι ἃ ἀκούετε καὶ οὐκ ἤκουσαν. 13.17. For most assuredly I tell you that many prophets and righteous men desired to see the things which you see, and didn't see them; and to hear the things which you hear, and didn't hear them.
52. Ptolemy, Astrological Influences, 14.4 (1st cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •plato, platonic forms Found in books: Janowitz (2002), Magic in the Roman World: Pagans, Jews and Christians, 38
53. Epictetus, Discourses, 1.6.15, 3.1.25, 3.13.2-3.13.7, 3.16.15 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •platonism, theory of forms •forms, platonic Found in books: James (2021), Learning the Language of Scripture: Origen, Wisdom, and the Logic of Interpretation, 31; Seaford, Wilkins, Wright (2017), Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill. 131
54. Seneca The Younger, Letters, a b c d\n0 9.17 9.17 9 17 \n1 9.16 9.16 9 16 \n2 14.1 14.1 14 1 \n3 14.2 14.2 14 2 \n4 "15" "15" "15" None\n5 "58" "58" "58" None\n6 "92" "92" "92" None\n7 "121" "121" "121" None\n8 "8.5" "8.5" "8 5" (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Seaford, Wilkins, Wright (2017), Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill. 131
55. Seneca The Younger, De Vita Beata (Dialogorum Liber Vii), 8.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •forms, platonic Found in books: Seaford, Wilkins, Wright (2017), Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill. 131
56. Justin, Dialogue With Trypho, 85.5 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •platonic forms Found in books: Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 254
57. Justin, First Apology, 59, 44 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 163
44. And the holy Spirit of prophecy taught us this, telling us by Moses that God spoke thus to the man first created: Behold, before your face are good and evil: choose the good. And again, by the other prophet Isaiah, that the following utterance was made as if from God the Father and Lord of all: Wash you, make you clean; put away evils from your souls; learn to do well; judge the orphan, and plead for the widow: and come and let us reason together, says the Lord: And if your sins be as scarlet, I will make them white as wool; and if they be red like as crimson, I will make them white as snow. And if you be willing and obey Me, you shall eat the good of the land; but if you do not obey Me, the sword shall devour you: for the mouth of the Lord has spoken it. Isaiah 1:16, etc. And that expression, The sword shall devour you, does not mean that the disobedient shall be slain by the sword, but the sword of God is fire, of which they who choose to do wickedly become the fuel. Wherefore He says, The sword shall devour you: for the mouth of the Lord has spoken it. And if He had spoken concerning a sword that cuts and at once dispatches, He would not have said, shall devour. And so, too, Plato, when he says, The blame is his who chooses, and God is blameless, took this from the prophet Moses and uttered it. For Moses is more ancient than all the Greek writers. And whatever both philosophers and poets have said concerning the immortality of the soul, or punishments after death, or contemplation of things heavenly, or doctrines of the like kind, they have received such suggestions from the prophets as have enabled them to understand and interpret these things. And hence there seem to be seeds of truth among all men; but they are charged with not accurately understanding [the truth] when they assert contradictories. So that what we say about future events being foretold, we do not say it as if they came about by a fatal necessity; but God foreknowing all that shall be done by all men, and it being His decree that the future actions of men shall all be recompensed according to their several value, He foretells by the Spirit of prophecy that He will bestow meet rewards according to the merit of the actions done, always urging the human race to effort and recollection, showing that He cares and provides for men. But by the agency of the devils death has been decreed against those who read the books of Hystaspes, or of the Sibyl, or of the prophets, that through fear they may prevent men who read them from receiving the knowledge of the good, and may retain them in slavery to themselves; which, however, they could not always effect. For not only do we fearlessly read them, but, as you see, bring them for your inspection, knowing that their contents will be pleasing to all. And if we persuade even a few, our gain will be very great; for, as good husbandmen, we shall receive the reward from the Master.
58. Alexander of Aphrodisias, Problems And Solutions, 1.25, 2.19 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •forms, platonic, as generating world Found in books: Marmodoro and Prince (2015), Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity, 62
59. Alexander of Aphrodisias, On Fate, 33.141 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •forms, platonic, as generating world Found in books: Marmodoro and Prince (2015), Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity, 62
60. Aelius Aristides, Sacred Tales, 2.300.4-2.300.7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •platonic forms Found in books: Castagnoli and Ceccarelli (2019), Greek Memories: Theories and Practices, 194
61. Irenaeus, Demonstration of The Apostolic Teaching, 3, 47, 98, 42 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 167
62. Irenaeus, Refutation of All Heresies, 1.10.1, 2.1.1, 2.5.4, 2.16.3, 2.25.4, 2.28.1, 2.28.5-2.28.7, 2.34.4, 3.2.8, 3.6, 3.10.6, 3.11.9, 3.12.11, 3.16.7, 4.5.3, 4.9.3, 4.11, 4.14.3, 4.19.1, 4.21.3, 4.33.1, 4.34.1, 4.37.4, 4.38.3, 5.20.1 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •platonic forms Found in books: Osborne (2001), Irenaeus of Lyons, 29, 42, 89, 163, 167
4.11. These (numerical) relations, therefore, the greater than ninefold, and less than half, and greater than double, and less than two-fifths, and greater than half, and less than double, are beyond all symphonies, from which not any proportionate or harmonic system could be produced. But the whole world, and the parts of it, are in all respects similarly framed in conformity with proportion and harmony. The proportionate and harmonic relations, however, are preserved - as we have previously stated - by double and triple intervals. If, therefore, we consider Archimedes reliable in the case of only the first distance, that from the Moon to the Earth, it is easy also to find the rest (of the intervals), by multiplying (them) by double and treble. Let then the distance, according to Archimedes, from Earth to Moon be 5, 544, 130 stadii; there will therefore be the double number of this of stadiiwhich the Sun is distant from the Moon, viz. 11, 088, 260. But the Sun is distant from the Earth 16, 632, 390 stadii; and Venus is likewise distant from the Sun 16, 632, 390 stadii, but from the Earth 33, 264, 780 stadii; and Mercury is distant from Venus 22, 176, 520 stadii, but from Earth 55, 441, 300 stadii; and Mars is distant from Mercury 49, 897, 170 stadii, and from Earth 105, 338, 470 stadii; and Jupiter is distant from Mars 44, 353, 040 stadii, but from Earth 149, 691, 510 stadii; Saturn is distant from Jupiter 149, 691, 510 stadii, but from Earth 299, 383, 020 stadii.
63. Sextus, Against The Mathematicians, 8.184-8.185 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •platonism, theory of forms Found in books: James (2021), Learning the Language of Scripture: Origen, Wisdom, and the Logic of Interpretation, 124
64. Alcinous, Handbook of Platonism, 4.155.27-4.155.34, 4.156.19-4.156.23, 5.158.4, 10.164.27-10.164.31 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •platonic forms •forms in middle platonism Found in books: Castagnoli and Ceccarelli (2019), Greek Memories: Theories and Practices, 310; d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 105
65. Numenius of Apamea, Fragments, 41 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •forms in middle platonism Found in books: d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 101
66. Numenius of Apamea, Fragments, 41 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •forms in middle platonism Found in books: d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 101
67. Atticus, Fragments, 4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •forms in middle platonism Found in books: d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 105
68. Apuleius, On Plato, 1.10 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •forms, platonic, of the good Found in books: Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 13
69. Maximus of Tyre, Dialexeis, 4.9, 8.8, 11.8, 11.10, 13.4, 15.6, 15.9, 31.4, 33.7, 41.4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Seaford, Wilkins, Wright (2017), Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill. 131, 132, 133
70. Philostratus The Athenian, Lives of The Sophists, 1.11.1 (2nd cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •platonic forms Found in books: Castagnoli and Ceccarelli (2019), Greek Memories: Theories and Practices, 346
71. Origen, Commentary On John, 20.3.16, 20.29.267 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •platonism, theory of forms Found in books: James (2021), Learning the Language of Scripture: Origen, Wisdom, and the Logic of Interpretation, 52
72. Plotinus, Enneads, a b c d\n0 4.3.25.6 4.3.25.6 4 3\n1 4.3.25.14 4.3.25.14 4 3\n2 1.4.10.22 1.4.10.22 1 4\n3 4.3.25.25 4.3.25.25 4 3\n4 4.3.25.26 4.3.25.26 4 3\n.. ... ... .. ..\n312 15.6.1.5 15.6.1.5 15 6\n313 15.6.1.6 15.6.1.6 15 6\n314 15.3.13.20 15.3.13.20 15 3\n315 15.3.13.13 15.3.13.13 15 3\n316 15.3.13.22 15.3.13.22 15 3\n\n[317 rows x 4 columns] (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Castagnoli and Ceccarelli (2019), Greek Memories: Theories and Practices, 310
73. Porphyry, Life of Plotinus, 23.15-23.18 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •forms, platonic Found in books: Struck (2016), Divination and Human Nature: A Cognitive History of Intuition in Classical Antiquity, 232
74. Iamblichus, Concerning The Mysteries, 3.2, 3.2.9-3.2.11, 3.3.25, 3.3.43-3.3.55, 3.4.2, 3.4.7-3.4.9, 3.4.21-3.4.36, 3.6.10-3.6.16, 3.8-3.10, 3.8.3, 3.10.2, 3.12.3-3.12.14, 3.17.51, 3.25, 3.26.23, 3.27.2, 3.27.6, 3.27.9, 3.27.12, 3.27.37, 3.27.45, 3.27.56, 3.31.41, 3.31.58, 9.3.33, 9.5.19, 10.4.1, 10.5.2, 10.8.2 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •forms, platonic Found in books: Struck (2016), Divination and Human Nature: A Cognitive History of Intuition in Classical Antiquity, 230, 237, 238, 239
75. Calcidius (Chalcidius), Platonis Timaeus Commentaria, 272, 304 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 209
76. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 7.58, 7.88-7.89, 7.130 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •platonism, theory of forms •forms, platonic, in intellect •forms, platonic Found in books: James (2021), Learning the Language of Scripture: Origen, Wisdom, and the Logic of Interpretation, 31, 52; Marmodoro and Prince (2015), Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity, 167; Seaford, Wilkins, Wright (2017), Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill. 132
7.58. There are, as stated by Diogenes in his treatise on Language and by Chrysippus, five parts of speech: proper name, common noun, verb, conjunction, article. To these Antipater in his work On Words and their Meaning adds another part, the mean.A common noun or appellative is defined by Diogenes as part of a sentence signifying a common quality, e.g. man, horse; whereas a name is a part of speech expressing a quality peculiar to an individual, e.g. Diogenes, Socrates. A verb is, according to Diogenes, a part of speech signifying an isolated predicate, or, as others define it, an un-declined part of a sentence, signifying something that can be attached to one or more subjects, e.g. I write, I speak. A conjunction is an indeclinable part of speech, binding the various parts of a statement together; and an article is a declinable part of speech, distinguishing the genders and numbers of nouns, e.g. ὁ, ἡ, τό, οἱ, αἱ, τά. 7.88. And this is why the end may be defined as life in accordance with nature, or, in other words, in accordance with our own human nature as well as that of the universe, a life in which we refrain from every action forbidden by the law common to all things, that is to say, the right reason which pervades all things, and is identical with this Zeus, lord and ruler of all that is. And this very thing constitutes the virtue of the happy man and the smooth current of life, when all actions promote the harmony of the spirit dwelling in the individual man with the will of him who orders the universe. Diogenes then expressly declares the end to be to act with good reason in the selection of what is natural. Archedemus says the end is to live in the performance of all befitting actions. 7.89. By the nature with which our life ought to be in accord, Chrysippus understands both universal nature and more particularly the nature of man, whereas Cleanthes takes the nature of the universe alone as that which should be followed, without adding the nature of the individual.And virtue, he holds, is a harmonious disposition, choice-worthy for its own sake and not from hope or fear or any external motive. Moreover, it is in virtue that happiness consists; for virtue is the state of mind which tends to make the whole of life harmonious. When a rational being is perverted, this is due to the deceptiveness of external pursuits or sometimes to the influence of associates. For the starting-points of nature are never perverse. 7.130. Their definition of love is an effort toward friendliness due to visible beauty appearing, its sole end being friendship, not bodily enjoyment. At all events, they allege that Thrasonides, although he had his mistress in his power, abstained from her because she hated him. By which it is shown, they think, that love depends upon regard, as Chrysippus says in his treatise of Love, and is not sent by the gods. And beauty they describe as the bloom or flower of virtue.of the three kinds of life, the contemplative, the practical, and the rational, they declare that we ought to choose the last, for that a rational being is expressly produced by nature for contemplation and for action. They tell us that the wise man will for reasonable cause make his own exit from life, on his country's behalf or for the sake of his friends, or if he suffer intolerable pain, mutilation, or incurable disease.
77. Hermeias of Alexandria, In Platonis Phaedrum Scholia,, 178.30-179.7, 179.1, 179.8, 224.1, 224.2, 224.3 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Castagnoli and Ceccarelli (2019), Greek Memories: Theories and Practices, 183
78. Basil of Caesarea, Homiliae In Hexaemeron, 2.2.10 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •forms, platonic, and was or will be Found in books: Marmodoro and Prince (2015), Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity, 81
79. Gregory of Nyssa, De Vita Mosis, None (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •forms, platonic Found in books: Fuhrer and Soldo (2024), Fallibility and Fallibilism in Ancient Philosophy and Literature 278
80. Proclus, In Platonis Timaeum Commentarii, 1.295.19-1.295.22, 1.322.18-1.322.26, 2.302, 3.100.1-3.100.8 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Hoenig (2018), Plato's Timaeus and the Latin Tradition, 166, 167, 178, 209
81. Damaskios, In Phaedonem (Versio 1), 1.143-1.144, 4.2.1-4.2.7, 4.6.7-4.6.13, 4.7.5-4.7.16, 4.8.8-4.8.9, 5.1.2-5.1.4, 5.1.10-5.1.19, 8.2, 8.4.4, 9.7.1-9.7.2, 11.7.2-11.7.5, 12.1.14, 12.1.24-12.1.25, 13.19.6 (5th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •forms, platonic Found in books: Joosse (2021), Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher, 65, 83, 86, 88, 89, 92
82. Damaskios, De Principiis, 2.117-2.118 (5th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •forms, platonic, and was or will be •forms, platonic, as first cosmos •forms, platonic, as generating world •forms, platonic, as model •forms, platonic, as objects of nous •forms, platonic, as thoughts •forms, platonic, in timaeus •forms, platonic, inferior •forms, platonic, rejected by alexander Found in books: Marmodoro and Prince (2015), Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity, 43, 52, 57, 62, 64, 65, 68, 81, 105, 116
83. Ammonius Hermiae, In Aristotelis De Interpretatione Commentarius, 186.9 (5th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •platonic forms Found in books: Castagnoli and Ceccarelli (2019), Greek Memories: Theories and Practices, 183
84. Ammonius Hermiae, In Porphyrii Isagogen Sive V Voces, 291 (5th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •forms, platonic, as thoughts Found in books: Marmodoro and Prince (2015), Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity, 105
85. John Philoponus, In Aristotelis De Anima Libros Commentaria, 1.14-2.1, 4.7, 51.16 (5th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Joosse (2021), Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher, 83
86. Proclus, In Platonis Cratylum Commentaria, 16.23-16.27 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •platonism, theory of forms Found in books: James (2021), Learning the Language of Scripture: Origen, Wisdom, and the Logic of Interpretation, 52
87. Proclus, In Platonis Parmenidem Commentarii, 3.784.18-3.784.20, 3.798.8-3.798.11, 3.799.9-3.799.16, 4.964.16-4.964.25, 7.512.23-7.512.33, 707.8-707.18 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 216
88. Proclus, Commentary On Plato'S Republic, 205.22 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •platonic forms Found in books: Castagnoli and Ceccarelli (2019), Greek Memories: Theories and Practices, 183
89. Proclus, Theologia Platonica ( ), 3.9, 3.17, 5.14, 5.27, 6.12, 35.19-24, 46.18-47.13, 65.20-67.19, 99.19-23, 105.23-106.8 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: nan nan nan nan nan nan nan nan nan nan
90. Proclus, In Platonis Timaeum Commentarii, 57.30-58.3 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •forms, platonic Found in books: Struck (2016), Divination and Human Nature: A Cognitive History of Intuition in Classical Antiquity, 226
91. Proclus, Institutio Theologica, 92.13-16, 103 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: nan nan
92. Zacharias, Ammonius Sive De Mundi Opificio Disputatio, 516-517, 833-835, 856 (5th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Marmodoro and Prince (2015), Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity, 81
93. Olympiodorus The Younger of Alexandria, In Platonis Alcibiadem Commentarii, 8.6, 8.7, 8.8, 8.9, 8.10, 8.11, 8.12, 8.13, 8.14, 34.20, 34.21, 34.22, 34.23, 34.24, 34.25, 42.10, 42.11, 42.12, 42.13, 42.14, 42.15, 42.16, 42.17, 42.18, 42.19, 42.20, 151.16-152.20, 153.8, 157.15, 172.5, 172.6, 172.7, 172.8, 172.9, 172.10, 172.11, 172.12, 175.20, 175.21, 180.10 (6th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Joosse (2021), Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher, 107
94. Olympiodorus The Younger of Alexandria, In Categorias Commentarium, 77.12 (6th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •forms, platonic Found in books: Joosse (2021), Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher, 92
95. Olympiodorus The Younger of Alexandria, In Platonis Gorgiam Commentaria, None (6th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Joosse (2021), Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher, 177
96. Simplicius of Cilicia, In Aristotelis Physicorum Libros Commentaria, 9.90.21, 256.14-256.15 (missingth cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •platonic forms •forms, platonic, and was or will be Found in books: Castagnoli and Ceccarelli (2019), Greek Memories: Theories and Practices, 183; Marmodoro and Prince (2015), Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity, 81
97. Alcinous, The Suppliants, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Seaford, Wilkins, Wright (2017), Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill. 131
98. Anon., Chaldean Oracles, 102-103, 109-110, 115, 134, 137-138, 142-143, 163, 171, 177, 20, 207, 3, 32-33, 35, 44, 54, 7, 70, 77, 8, 80, 82, 86, 9, 99, 5  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Struck (2016), Divination and Human Nature: A Cognitive History of Intuition in Classical Antiquity, 226; d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 217
99. Anon., Dissoi Logoi, 9  Tagged with subjects: •platonic forms Found in books: Castagnoli and Ceccarelli (2019), Greek Memories: Theories and Practices, 346
100. Dionysius The Areopagite, Divine Names, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Osborne (1996), Eros Unveiled: Plato and the God of Love. 209
101. Aristoteles, Protrepticus, a b c d\n0 "37.13‒22" "37.13‒22" "37 13‒22"  Tagged with subjects: •forms, platonic Found in books: Fuhrer and Soldo (2024), Fallibility and Fallibilism in Ancient Philosophy and Literature 240
102. Plato, Politeia, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Fuhrer and Soldo (2024), Fallibility and Fallibilism in Ancient Philosophy and Literature 278
103. Callimachus, Ep., 46, 28  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 200
104. Anselm, Proslogion, 18, 14  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Struck (2016), Divination and Human Nature: A Cognitive History of Intuition in Classical Antiquity, 26
107. Posidonius, On The Cosmos, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Marmodoro and Prince (2015), Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity, 167
111. Various, Anthologia Palatina, 11.427  Tagged with subjects: •plato, platonic forms Found in books: Janowitz (2002), Magic in the Roman World: Pagans, Jews and Christians, 38
112. Various, Anthologia Palatina Appendix Epigrammatum, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Castagnoli and Ceccarelli (2019), Greek Memories: Theories and Practices, 194