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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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Please note: the results are produced through a computerized process which may frequently lead to errors, both in incorrect tagging and in other issues. Please use with caution.
Due to load times, full text fetching is currently attempted for validated results only.
Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

For a list of book indices included, see here.


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All subjects (including unvalidated):
subject book bibliographic info
phallus Belayche and Massa (2021), Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity, 6, 79, 171, 213
Benefiel and Keegan (2016), Inscriptions in the Private Sphere in the Greco-Roman World, 43
Bremmer (2008), Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East, 92
Erker (2023), Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family, 165, 166, 208, 215, 240
Graf and Johnston (2007), Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets, 143, 148
Hubbard (2014), A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities, 216, 217, 524, 525
Laes Goodey and Rose (2013), Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies, 291
Riess (2012), Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens, 149, 239, 271, 280, 281, 299, 371
Versnel (2011), Coping with the Gods: Wayward Readings in Greek Theology, 119, 120, 121, 126, 127, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135, 136
de Jáuregui (2010), Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity, 99, 223
phallus, / more colorful synonyms, penis / Gazzarri and Weiner (2023), Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome. 9, 43, 49, 56, 61, 63, 78, 109, 130, 163, 167, 169, 171, 173, 182, 207, 208, 213, 219, 222, 223, 254
phallus, and cista Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 224, 227, 293
phallus, and cista, phallic rite Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 331
phallus, comedians Richlin (2018), Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy, 104, 241, 269, 298, 299, 345
phallus, dedication, object Bodel and Kajava (2009), Dediche sacre nel mondo greco-romano : diffusione, funzioni, tipologie = Religious dedications in the Greco-Roman world : distribution, typology, use : Institutum Romanum Finlandiae, American Academy in Rome, 19-20 aprile, 2006 356
phallus, dionysus, and Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 225
phallus, phallic Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 34, 76, 101, 253, 369, 375, 382, 420, 421, 423, 424, 425, 429, 430

List of validated texts:
8 validated results for "phallus"
1. Hebrew Bible, Deuteronomy, 22.5 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Phallus, as a weapon • Phallus, as sword • Phallus, exposing phallus as an aggressive act • phallic imagery

 Found in books: Kosman (2012), Gender and Dialogue in the Rabbinic Prism, 202, 203; Neis (2012), When a Human Gives Birth to a Raven: Rabbis and the Reproduction of Species. 248

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22.5 לֹא־יִהְיֶה כְלִי־גֶבֶר עַל־אִשָּׁה וְלֹא־יִלְבַּשׁ גֶּבֶר שִׂמְלַת אִשָּׁה כִּי תוֹעֲבַת יְהוָה אֱלֹהֶיךָ כָּל־עֹשֵׂה אֵלֶּה׃'' None
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22.5 A woman shall not wear that which pertaineth unto a man, neither shall a man put on a woman’s garment; for whosoever doeth these things is an abomination unto the LORD thy God.'' None
2. Herodotus, Histories, 2.51 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Mysteries, phallic rites in • ithyphallic, see also phallic • phallic rites • phallic, see also ithyphallic

 Found in books: Miller and Clay (2019), Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury, 283; Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro, (2021), The Gods of the Greeks, 333

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2.51 ταῦτα μέν νυν καὶ ἄλλα πρὸς τούτοισι, τὰ ἐγὼ φράσω, Ἕλληνες ἀπʼ Αἰγυπτίων νενομίκασι· τοῦ δὲ Ἑρμέω τὰ ἀγάλματα ὀρθὰ ἔχειν τὰ αἰδοῖα ποιεῦντες οὐκ ἀπʼ Αἰγυπτίων μεμαθήκασι, ἀλλʼ ἀπὸ Πελασγῶν πρῶτοι μὲν Ἑλλήνων ἁπάντων Ἀθηναῖοι παραλαβόντες, παρὰ δὲ τούτων ὧλλοι. Ἀθηναίοισι γὰρ ἤδη τηνικαῦτα ἐς Ἕλληνας τελέουσι Πελασγοὶ σύνοικοι ἐγένοντο ἐν τῇ χώρῃ, ὅθεν περ καὶ Ἕλληνες ἤρξαντο νομισθῆναι. ὅστις δὲ τὰ Καβείρων ὄργια μεμύηται, τὰ Σαμοθρήικες ἐπιτελέουσι παραλαβόντες παρὰ Πελασγῶν, οὗτος ὡνὴρ οἶδε τὸ λέγω· τὴν γὰρ Σαμοθρηίκην οἴκεον πρότερον Πελασγοὶ οὗτοι οἵ περ Ἀθηναίοισι σύνοικοι ἐγένοντο, καὶ παρὰ τούτων Σαμοθρήικες τὰ ὄργια παραλαμβάνουσι. ὀρθὰ ὦν ἔχειν τὰ αἰδοῖα τἀγάλματα τοῦ Ἑρμέω Ἀθηναῖοι πρῶτοι Ἑλλήνων μαθόντες παρὰ Πελασγῶν ἐποιήσαντο· οἱ δὲ Πελασγοὶ ἱρόν τινα λόγον περὶ αὐτοῦ ἔλεξαν, τὰ ἐν τοῖσι ἐν Σαμοθρηίκῃ μυστηρίοισι δεδήλωται.'' None
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2.51 These customs, then, and others besides, which I shall indicate, were taken by the Greeks from the Egyptians. It was not so with the ithyphallic images of Hermes; the production of these came from the Pelasgians, from whom the Athenians were the first Greeks to take it, and then handed it on to others. ,For the Athenians were then already counted as Greeks when the Pelasgians came to live in the land with them and thereby began to be considered as Greeks. Whoever has been initiated into the rites of the Cabeiri, which the Samothracians learned from the Pelasgians and now practice, understands what my meaning is. ,Samothrace was formerly inhabited by those Pelasgians who came to live among the Athenians, and it is from them that the Samothracians take their rites. ,The Athenians, then, were the first Greeks to make ithyphallic images of Hermes, and they did this because the Pelasgians taught them. The Pelasgians told a certain sacred tale about this, which is set forth in the Samothracian mysteries.
2.51
These customs, then, and others besides, which I shall indicate, were taken by the Greeks from the Egyptians. It was not so with the ithyphallic images of Hermes; the production of these came from the Pelasgians, from whom the Athenians were the first Greeks to take it, and then handed it on to others. ,For the Athenians were then already counted as Greeks when the Pelasgians came to live in the land with them and thereby began to be considered as Greeks. Whoever has been initiated into the rites of the Cabeiri, which the Samothracians learned from the Pelasgians and now practice, understands what my meaning is. ,Samothrace was formerly inhabited by those Pelasgians who came to live among the Athenians, and it is from them that the Samothracians take their rites. ,The Athenians, then, were the first Greeks to make ithyphallic images of Hermes, and they did this because the Pelasgians taught them. The Pelasgians told a certain sacred tale about this, which is set forth in the Samothracian mysteries. '' None
3. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • phallus • phallus, phallic • phallus/penis

 Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 375; Kanellakis (2020), Aristophanes and the Poetics of Surprise, 81; Riess (2012), Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens, 280

4. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • phallus • phallus/penis

 Found in books: Kanellakis (2020), Aristophanes and the Poetics of Surprise, 138, 140; Riess (2012), Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens, 280, 299

5. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • phallus • phallus/penis

 Found in books: Kanellakis (2020), Aristophanes and the Poetics of Surprise, 189; Riess (2012), Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens, 271

6. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 1.22.6-1.22.7, 5.62 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Dedicatory objects, phallic figurines • Dionysus, and phallus • Pamylia, phallic rites • penis / phallus / more colorful synonyms • phallus • phallus, phallic

 Found in books: Belayche and Massa (2021), Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity, 6; Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 76, 424; Gazzarri and Weiner (2023), Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome. 213; Graf and Johnston (2007), Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets, 148; Griffiths (1975), The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI), 225; Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 606

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1.22.6 \xa0It is for this reason that travellers are not allowed to set foot on this island. And all the inhabitants of the Thebaid, which is the oldest portion of Egypt, hold it to be the strongest oath when a man swears "by Osiris who lieth in Philae." Now the parts of the body of Osiris which were found were honoured with burial, they say, in the manner described above, but the privates, according to them, were thrown by Typhon into the Nile because no one of his accomplices was willing to take them. Yet Isis thought them as worthy of divine honours as the other parts, for, fashioning a likeness of them, she set it up in the temples, commanded that it be honoured, and made it the object of the highest regard and reverence in the rites and sacrifices accorded to the god. 1.22.7 \xa0Consequently the Greeks too, inasmuch as they received from Egypt the celebrations of the orgies and the festivals connected with Dionysus, honour this member in both the mysteries and the initiatory rites and sacrifices of this god, giving it the name "phallus."' "
5.62
1. \xa0In Castabus, on the Cherronesus, there is a temple which is sacred to Hemithea, and there is no reason why we should omit to mention the strange occurrence which befell this goddess. Now many and various accounts have been handed down regarding her, but we shall recount that which has prevailed and is in accord with what the natives relate. To Staphylus and Chrysothemis were born three daughters, Molpadia, Rhoeo, and Parthenos by name. Apollo lay with Rhoeo and brought her with child; and her father, believing that her seduction was due to a man, was angered, and in his anger he shut up his daughter in a chest and cast her into the sea.,2. \xa0But the chest was washed up upon Delos, where she gave birth to a male child and called the babe Anius. And Rhoeo, who had been saved from death in this unexpected manner, laid the babe upon the altar of Apollo and prayed to the god to save its life if it was his child. Thereupon Apollo, the myth relates, concealed the child for the time, but afterwards he gave thought to its rearing, instructed it in divination, and conferred upon it certain great honours.,3. \xa0And the other sisters of the maiden who had been seduced, namely, Molpadia and Parthenos, while watching their father's wine, a drink which had only recently been discovered among men, fell asleep; and while they were asleep some swine which they were keeping entered in and broke the jar which contained the wine and so destroyed the wine. And the maidens, when they learned what had happened, in fear of their father's severity fled to the edge of the sea and hurled themselves down from some lofty rocks.,4. \xa0But Apollo, because of his affection for their sister, rescued the maidens and established them in the cities of the Cherronesus. The one named Parthenos, as the god brought it to pass, enjoyed honours and a sacred precinct in Bubastus of the Cherronesus, while Molpadia, who came to Castabus, was given the name Hemithea, because the god had appeared to men, and she was honoured by all who dwelt in the Cherronesus.,5. \xa0And in sacrifices which are held in her honour a mixture of honey and milk is used in the libations, because of the experience which she had had in connection with the wine, while anyone who has touched a hog or eaten of its flesh is not permitted to draw near to the sacred precinct."
5.62
\xa0In Castabus, on the Cherronesus, there is a temple which is sacred to Hemithea, and there is no reason why we should omit to mention the strange occurrence which befell this goddess. Now many and various accounts have been handed down regarding her, but we shall recount that which has prevailed and is in accord with what the natives relate. To Staphylus and Chrysothemis were born three daughters, Molpadia, Rhoeo, and Parthenos by name. Apollo lay with Rhoeo and brought her with child; and her father, believing that her seduction was due to a man, was angered, and in his anger he shut up his daughter in a chest and cast her into the sea.,\xa0But the chest was washed up upon Delos, where she gave birth to a male child and called the babe Anius. And Rhoeo, who had been saved from death in this unexpected manner, laid the babe upon the altar of Apollo and prayed to the god to save its life if it was his child. Thereupon Apollo, the myth relates, concealed the child for the time, but afterwards he gave thought to its rearing, instructed it in divination, and conferred upon it certain great honours.,\xa0And the other sisters of the maiden who had been seduced, namely, Molpadia and Parthenos, while watching their father's wine, a drink which had only recently been discovered among men, fell asleep; and while they were asleep some swine which they were keeping entered in and broke the jar which contained the wine and so destroyed the wine. And the maidens, when they learned what had happened, in fear of their father's severity fled to the edge of the sea and hurled themselves down from some lofty rocks.,\xa0But Apollo, because of his affection for their sister, rescued the maidens and established them in the cities of the Cherronesus. The one named Parthenos, as the god brought it to pass, enjoyed honours and a sacred precinct in Bubastus of the Cherronesus, while Molpadia, who came to Castabus, was given the name Hemithea, because the god had appeared to men, and she was honoured by all who dwelt in the Cherronesus.,\xa0And in sacrifices which are held in her honour a mixture of honey and milk is used in the libations, because of the experience which she had had in connection with the wine, while anyone who has touched a hog or eaten of its flesh is not permitted to draw near to the sacred precinct." "' None
7. Ovid, Fasti, 6.627-6.636 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • phallus

 Found in books: Erker (2023), Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family, 165; Hubbard (2014), A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities, 217

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6.627 namque pater Tulli Volcanus, Ocresia mater 6.628 praesignis facie Corniculana fuit. 6.629 hanc secum Tanaquil sacris de more peractis 6.630 iussit in ornatum fundere vina focum: 6.631 hic inter cineres obsceni forma virilis 6.632 aut fuit aut visa est, sed fuit illa magis, 6.633 iussa foco captiva sedet: conceptus ab illa 6.634 Servius a caelo semina gentis habet. 6.635 signa dedit genitor tunc cum caput igne corusco 6.636 contigit, inque comis flammeus arsit apex.'' None
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6.627 The temple once burned: but the fire spared 6.628 The statue: Mulciber himself preserved his son. 6.629 For Servius’ father was Vulcan, and the lovely 6.630 Ocresia of Corniculum his mother. 6.631 Once, performing sacred rites with her in the due manner, 6.632 Tanaquil ordered her to pour wine on the garlanded hearth: 6.633 There was, or seemed to be, the form of a male organ 6.634 In the ashes: the shape was really there in fact. 6.635 The captive girl sat on the hearth, as commanded: 6.636 She conceived Servius, born of divine seed.'' None
8. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Uranus phallus, in ritual • phallus, phallic

 Found in books: Alvarez (2018), The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries, 34; Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 34




Please note: the results are produced through a computerized process which may frequently lead to errors, both in incorrect tagging and in other issues. Please use with caution.
Due to load times, full text fetching is currently attempted for validated results only.
Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

For a list of book indices included, see here.