Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

   Search:  
validated results only / all results

and or

Filtering options: (leave empty for all results)
By author:     
By work:        
By subject:
By additional keyword:       



Results for
Please note: the results are produced through a computerized process which may frequently lead to errors, both in incorrect tagging and in other issues. Please use with caution.
Due to load times, full text fetching is currently attempted for validated results only.
Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

For a list of book indices included, see here.


graph

graph

All subjects (including unvalidated):
subject book bibliographic info
papia, et poppaea lex Huebner and Laes (2019), Aulus Gellius and Roman Reading Culture: Text, Presence and Imperial Knowledge in the 'Noctes Atticae', 97, 112, 172
papia, leges liciniae sextiae, lex, mariage law of Erker (2023), Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family, 242
papia, lex iulia et Gorain (2019), Language in the Confessions of Augustine, 147
Phang (2001), The Marriage of Roman Soldiers (13 B.C. - A.D. 235), 98, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 129, 130, 131, 198, 202, 204, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217
papia, lex, iulia et McGinn (2004), The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel. 206
papia, military will, and lex iulia et Phang (2001), The Marriage of Roman Soldiers (13 B.C. - A.D. 235), 214, 215, 216, 217
papia, poppaea lex, ad Hug (2023), Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome, 117
papia, poppaea, lex Hubbard (2014), A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities, 79
Perry (2014), Gender, Manumission, and the Roman Freedwoman, 29, 80, 85, 86, 91, 134, 149
Phang (2001), The Marriage of Roman Soldiers (13 B.C. - A.D. 235), 115
papia, poppaea, lex julia et Huebner and Laes (2019), Aulus Gellius and Roman Reading Culture: Text, Presence and Imperial Knowledge in the 'Noctes Atticae', 38, 107, 109
papias Avery-Peck, Chilton, and Scott Green (2014), A Legacy of Learning: Essays in Honor of Jacob Neusner , 242
Doble and Kloha (2014), Texts and Traditions: Essays in Honour of J. Keith Elliott, 358
Edelmann-Singer et al. (2020), Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions, 185, 216
Galinsky (2016), Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity, 352
Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 150, 190, 191, 193, 195, 196, 205, 206, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 227, 228, 229, 230, 231, 269, 270, 273, 391
Iricinschi et al. (2013), Beyond the Gnostic Gospels: Studies Building on the Work of Elaine Pagels, 140
James (2021), Learning the Language of Scripture: Origen, Wisdom, and the Logic of Interpretation, 259
Lieu (2015), Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century, 103, 309
McGowan (1999), Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals, 92
Neusner Green and Avery-Peck (2022), Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points, 98
Peppard (2011), The Son of God in the Roman World: Divine Sonship in its Social and Political Context, 89
Rasimus (2009), Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence, 272, 274
papias, klexos, laodicea Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 21, 160, 166
papias, lexicographer Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 269, 270
papias, of hierapolis Piovanelli, Burke, Pettipiece (2015), Rediscovering the Apocryphal Continent : New Perspectives on Early Christian and Late Antique Apocryphal Textsand Traditions. De Gruyter: 2015 220
Taylor (2012), The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea, 117, 118, 129
Vinzent (2013), Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament, 29, 84, 96, 97, 98, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 110, 130, 154, 183, 190
van 't Westeinde (2021), Roman Nobilitas in Jerome's Letters: Roman Values and Christian Asceticism for Socialites, 161
papias, of hierapolis, christian writer Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 531
papias, of hieropolis Stroumsa (1996), Hidden Widsom: Esoteric Traditions and the Roots of Christian Mysticism. 35, 85, 113, 154
papias, papas, or papias, see zeus soter, zeus papas, or soter, παρίστημι‎ Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 25
papias, soter, zeus papas, or Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 139
papias, vocabularium Bremmer (2008), Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East, 82

List of validated texts:
16 validated results for "papias"
1. New Testament, 1 Peter, 5.13 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Fragments of Papias, Derivation • Fragments of Papias, Witness to the New Testament • Fragments of Papias, and fertility tradition • Papias

 Found in books: Bird and Harrower (2021), The Cambridge Companion to the Apostolic Fathers, 335, 348; Peppard (2011), The Son of God in the Roman World: Divine Sonship in its Social and Political Context, 89

sup>
5.13 Ἀσπάζεται ὑμᾶς ἡ ἐν Βαβυλῶνι συνεκλεκτὴ καὶ Μάρκος ὁ υἱός μου.'' None
sup>
5.13 She who is in Babylon, elect together with you, greets you; and so does Mark, my son. '' None
2. New Testament, 1 Corinthians, 2.6 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Irenaeus of Lyons, Papias and • Papias of Hieropolis • Papias of Hieropolis, Expositions of the Dominical Oracles • Papias of Hieropolis, Irenaeus and • living voice versus writing,, Christians after Papias on • living voice versus writing,, Jews and Christians before Papias on

 Found in books: Ayres and Ward (2021), The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual, 35; Stroumsa (1996), Hidden Widsom: Esoteric Traditions and the Roots of Christian Mysticism. 113

sup>
2.6 Σοφίαν δὲ λαλοῦμεν ἐν τοῖς τελείοις, σοφίαν δὲ οὐ τοῦ αἰῶνος τούτου οὐδὲ τῶν ἀρχόντων τοῦ αἰῶνος τούτου τῶν καταργουμένων·'' None
sup>
2.6 We speak wisdom, however, among those who are fullgrown; yet a wisdom not of this world, nor of the rulers of this world,who are coming to nothing.'' None
3. New Testament, Acts, 1.18, 1.23, 12.12, 13.5, 15.36-15.41, 21.9 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Fragments of Papias, and Judas • Papias • Papias of Hierapolis • Papias,

 Found in books: Bird and Harrower (2021), The Cambridge Companion to the Apostolic Fathers, 341; Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 196, 206, 217, 219; Peppard (2011), The Son of God in the Roman World: Divine Sonship in its Social and Political Context, 89; Piovanelli, Burke, Pettipiece (2015), Rediscovering the Apocryphal Continent : New Perspectives on Early Christian and Late Antique Apocryphal Textsand Traditions. De Gruyter: 2015 220; Taylor (2012), The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea, 117, 118; Vinzent (2013), Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament, 97

sup>
1.18 — Οὗτος μὲν οὖν ἐκτήσατο χωρίον ἐκ μισθοῦ τῆς ἀδικίας, καὶ πρηνὴς γενόμενος ἐλάκησεν μέσος, καὶ ἐξεχύθη πάντα τὰ σπλάγχνα αὐτοῦ.
1.23
καὶ ἔστησαν δύο, Ἰωσὴφ τὸν καλούμενον Βαρσαββᾶν, ὃς ἐπεκλήθη Ἰοῦστος, καὶ Μαθθίαν.
12.12
συνιδών τε ἦλθεν ἐπὶ τὴν οἰκίαν τῆς Μαρίας τῆς μητρὸς Ἰωάνου τοῦ ἐπικαλουμένου Μάρκου, οὗ ἦσαν ἱκανοὶ συνηθροισμένοι καὶ προσευχόμενοι.
13.5
καὶ γενόμενοι ἐν Σαλαμῖνι κατήγγελλον τὸν λόγον τοῦ θεοῦ ἐν ταῖς συναγωγαῖς τῶν Ἰουδαίων· εἶχον δὲ καὶ Ἰωάννην ὑπηρέτην.
15.36
Μετὰ δέ τινας ἡμέρας εἶπεν πρὸς Βαρνάβαν Παῦλος Ἐπιστρέψαντες δὴ ἐπισκεψώμεθα τοὺς ἀδελφοὺς κατὰ πόλιν πᾶσαν ἐν αἷς κατηγγείλαμεν τὸν λόγον τοῦ κυρίου, πῶς ἔχουσιν. 15.37 Βαρνάβας δὲ ἐβούλετο συνπαραλαβεῖν καὶ τὸν Ἰωάνην τὸν καλούμενον Μάρκον· 15.38 Παῦλος δὲ ἠξίου, τὸν ἀποστάντα ἀπʼ αὐτῶν ἀπὸ Παμφυλίας καὶ μὴ συνελθόντα αὐτοῖς εἰς τὸ ἔργον, μὴ συνπαραλαμβάνειν τοῦτον. 15.39 ἐγένετο δὲ παροξυσμὸς ὥστε ἀποχωρισθῆναι αὐτοὺς ἀπʼ ἀλλήλων, τόν τε Βαρνάβαν παραλαβόντα τὸν Μάρκον ἐκπλεῦσαι εἰς Κύπρον. 15.40 Παῦλος δὲ ἐπιλεξάμενος Σίλαν ἐξῆλθεν παραδοθεὶς τῇ χάριτι τοῦ κυρίου ὑπὸ τῶν ἀδελφῶν, 15.41 διήρχετο δὲ τὴν Συρίαν καὶ τὴν Κιλικίαν ἐπιστηρίζων τὰς ἐκκλησίας.
21.9
τούτῳ δὲ ἦσαν θυγατέρες τέσσαρες παρθένοι προφητεύουσαι.' ' None
sup>
1.18 Now this man obtained a field with the reward for his wickedness, and falling headlong, his body burst open, and all his intestines gushed out.
1.23
They put forward two, Joseph called Barsabbas, who was surnamed Justus, and Matthias.
12.12
Thinking about that, he came to the house of Mary, the mother of John whose surname was Mark, where many were gathered together and were praying.
13.5
When they were at Salamis, they proclaimed the word of God in the synagogues of the Jews. They had also John as their attendant. 13 , Now in the assembly that was at Antioch there were some prophets and teachers: Barnabas, Simeon who was called Niger, Lucius of Cyrene, Manaen the foster-brother of Herod the tetrarch, and Saul. , As they served the Lord and fasted, the Holy Spirit said, "Separate Barnabas and Saul for me, for the work to which I have called them.", Then, when they had fasted and prayed and laid their hands on them, they sent them away. , So, being sent out by the Holy Spirit, they went down to Seleucia. From there they sailed to Cyprus. , When they were at Salamis, they proclaimed the word of God in the synagogues of the Jews. They had also John as their attendant. , When they had gone through the island to Paphos, they found a certain sorcerer, a false prophet, a Jew, whose name was Bar Jesus, , who was with the proconsul, Sergius Paulus, a man of understanding. The same summoned Barnabas and Saul, and sought to hear the word of God. , But Elymas the sorcerer (for so is his name by interpretation) withstood them, seeking to turn aside the proconsul from the faith. , But Saul, who is also called Paul, filled with the Holy Spirit, fastened his eyes on him, , and said, "Full of all deceit and all cunning, you son of the devil, you enemy of all righteousness, will you not cease to pervert the right ways of the Lord? , Now, behold, the hand of the Lord is on you, and you will be blind, not seeing the sun for a season!"Immediately there fell on him a mist and darkness. He went around seeking someone to lead him by the hand. , Then the proconsul, when he saw what was done, believed, being astonished at the teaching of the Lord. , Now Paul and his company set sail from Paphos, and came to Perga in Pamphylia. John departed from them and returned to Jerusalem. , But they, passing through from Perga, came to Antioch of Pisidia. They went into the synagogue on the Sabbath day, and sat down. , After the reading of the law and the prophets, the rulers of the synagogue sent to them, saying, "Brothers, if you have any word of exhortation for the people, speak.", Paul stood up, and beckoning with his hand said, "Men of Israel, and you who fear God, listen. , The God of this people Israel chose our fathers, and exalted the people when they stayed as aliens in the land of Egypt , and with an uplifted arm, he led them out of it. , For about the time of forty years he put up with them in the wilderness. , When he had destroyed seven nations in the land of Canaan, he gave them their land for an inheritance, for about four hundred fifty years. , After these things he gave them judges until Samuel the prophet. , Afterward they asked for a king, and God gave to them Saul the son of Kish, a man of the tribe of Benjamin, for forty years. , When he had removed him, he raised up David to be their king, to whom he also testified, \'I have found David the son of Jesse, a man after my heart, who will do all my will.\' , From this man\'s seed, God has brought salvation to Israel according to his promise, , before his coming, when John had first preached the baptism of repentance to all the people of Israel. , As John was fulfilling his course, he said, \'What do you suppose that I am? I am not he. But behold, one comes after me the sandals of whose feet I am not worthy to untie.\' , Brothers, children of the stock of Abraham, and those among you who fear God, the word of this salvation is sent out to you. , For those who dwell in Jerusalem, and their rulers, because they didn\'t know him, nor the voices of the prophets which are read every Sabbath, fulfilled them by condemning him. , Though they found no cause for death, they still asked Pilate to have him killed. , When they had fulfilled all things that were written about him, they took him down from the tree, and laid him in a tomb. , But God raised him from the dead, , and he was seen for many days by those who came up with him from Galilee to Jerusalem, who are his witnesses to the people. , We bring you good news of the promise made to the fathers, , that God has fulfilled the same to us, their children, in that he raised up Jesus. As it is also written in the second psalm, \'You are my Son. Today I have become your father.\' , "Concerning that he raised him up from the dead, now no more to return to corruption, he has spoken thus: \'I will give you the holy and sure blessings of David.\' , Therefore he says also in another psalm, \'You will not allow your Holy One to see decay.\' , For David, after he had in his own generation served the counsel of God, fell asleep, and was laid with his fathers, and saw decay. , But he whom God raised up saw no decay. , Be it known to you therefore, brothers, that through this man is proclaimed to you remission of sins, , and by him everyone who believes is justified from all things, from which you could not be justified by the law of Moses. , Beware therefore, lest that come on you which is spoken in the prophets: , \'Behold, you scoffers, and wonder, and perish; For I work a work in your days, A work which you will in no way believe, if one declares it to you.\'", So when the Jews went out of the synagogue, the Gentiles begged that these words might be preached to them the next Sabbath. , Now when the synagogue broke up, many of the Jews and of the devout proselytes followed Paul and Barnabas; who, speaking to them, urged them to continue in the grace of God. , The next Sabbath almost the whole city was gathered together to hear the word of God. , But when the Jews saw the multitudes, they were filled with jealousy, and contradicted the things which were spoken by Paul, and blasphemed. , Paul and Barnabas spoke out boldly, and said, "It was necessary that God\'s word should be spoken to you first. Since indeed you thrust it from you, and judge yourselves unworthy of eternal life, behold, we turn to the Gentiles. , For so has the Lord commanded us, saying, \'I have set you as a light of the Gentiles, That you should be for salvation to the uttermost parts of the earth.\'", As the Gentiles heard this, they were glad, and glorified the word of God. As many as were appointed to eternal life believed. , The Lord\'s word was spread abroad throughout all the region. , But the Jews urged on the devout women of honorable estate, and the chief men of the city, and stirred up a persecution against Paul and Barnabas, and threw them out of their borders. , But they shook off the dust of their feet against them, and came to Iconium. , The disciples were filled with joy with the Holy Spirit. 15.36 After some days Paul said to Barnabas, "Let\'s return now and visit our brothers in every city in which we proclaimed the word of the Lord, to see how they are doing." 15.37 Barnabas planned to take John with them also, who was called Mark. ' "15.38 But Paul didn't think that it was a good idea to take with them someone who withdrew from them from Pamphylia, and didn't go with them to do the work. " '15.39 Then there arose a sharp contention, so that they separated from each other. Barnabas took Mark with him, and sailed away to Cyprus, 15.40 but Paul chose Silas, and went out, being commended by the brothers to the grace of God. 15.41 He went through Syria and Cilicia, strengthening the assemblies.
21.9
Now this man had four virgin daughters who prophesied. ' None
4. New Testament, Apocalypse, 12.8-12.9 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Fragments of Papias, and Satan • Papias,

 Found in books: Bird and Harrower (2021), The Cambridge Companion to the Apostolic Fathers, 343; Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 215

sup>
12.8 καὶ οὐκ ἴσχυσεν, οὐδὲ τόπος εὑρέθη αὐτῶν ἔτι ἐν τῷ οὐρανῷ. 12.9 καὶ ἐβλήθη ὁ δράκων ὁ μέγας,ὁ ὄφιςὁ ἀρχαῖος, ὁ καλούμενοςΔιάβολοςκαὶ ὉΣατανᾶς,ὁ πλανῶν τὴν οἰκουμένην ὅλην, — ἐβλήθη εἰς τὴν γῆν, καὶ οἱ ἄγγελοι αὐτοῦ μετʼ αὐτοῦ ἐβλήθησαν.'' None
sup>
12.8 They didn't prevail, neither was a place found for him any more in heaven." '12.9 The great dragon was thrown down, the old serpent, he who is called the devil and Satan, the deceiver of the whole world. He was thrown down to the earth, and his angels were thrown down with him.'" None
5. New Testament, Colossians, 4.10 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Papias of Hierapolis

 Found in books: Piovanelli, Burke, Pettipiece (2015), Rediscovering the Apocryphal Continent : New Perspectives on Early Christian and Late Antique Apocryphal Textsand Traditions. De Gruyter: 2015 220; Taylor (2012), The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea, 118

sup>
4.10 Ἀσπάζεται ὑμᾶς Ἀρίσταρχος ὁ συναιχμάλωτός μου, καὶ Μάρκος ὁ ἀνεψιὸς Βαρνάβα,?̔περὶ οὗ ἐλάβετε ἐντολάς, ἐὰν ἔλθῃ πρὸς ὑμᾶς δέξασθε αὐτόν?̓'' None
sup>
4.10 Aristarchus, my fellow prisoner greets you, and Mark, the cousin of Barnabas (concerning whom you received commandments, "if he comes to you, receive him"), '' None
6. New Testament, John, 13.23, 21.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Papias • Papias of Hierapolis, Christian writer

 Found in books: Edelmann-Singer et al. (2020), Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions, 216; Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 531; Rasimus (2009), Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence, 274

sup>
13.23 ἦν ἀνακείμενος εἷς ἐκ τῶν μαθητῶν αὐτοῦ ἐν τῷ κόλπῳ τοῦ Ἰησοῦ, ὃν ἠγάπα ὁ Ἰησοῦς·
21.2
Ἦσαν ὁμοῦ Σίμων Πέτρος καὶ Θωμᾶς ὁ λεγόμενος Δίδυμος καὶ Ναθαναὴλ ὁ ἀπὸ Κανὰ τῆς Γαλιλαίας καὶ οἱ τοῦ Ζεβεδαίου καὶ ἄλλοι ἐκ τῶν μαθητῶν αὐτοῦ δύο.'' None
sup>
13.23 One of his disciples, whom Jesus loved, was at the table, leaning against Jesus' breast. " 21.2 Simon Peter, Thomas called Didymus, Nathanael of Cana in Galilee, and the sons of Zebedee, and two others of his disciples were together. '" None
7. New Testament, Luke, 1.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Papias • living voice versus writing,, Jews and Christians before Papias on

 Found in books: Avery-Peck, Chilton, and Scott Green (2014), A Legacy of Learning: Essays in Honor of Jacob Neusner , 242; Ayres and Ward (2021), The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual, 33

sup>
1.2 καθὼς παρέδοσαν ἡμῖν οἱ ἀπʼ ἀρχῆς αὐτόπται καὶ ὑπηρέται γενόμενοι τοῦ λόγου,'' None
sup>
1.2 even as those who from the beginning were eyewitnesses and ministers of the word delivered them to us, '' None
8. New Testament, Mark, 13.14 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Papias of Hierapolis • living voice versus writing,, Jews and Christians before Papias on

 Found in books: Ayres and Ward (2021), The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual, 33; Taylor (2012), The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea, 118

sup>
13.14 Ὅταν δὲ ἴδητε τὸ βδέλυγμα τῆς ἐρημώσεως ἑστηκότα ὅπου οὐ δεῖ, ὁ ἀναγινώσκων νοείτω, τότε οἱ ἐν τῇ Ἰουδαίᾳ φευγέτωσαν εἰς τὰ ὄρη,'' None
sup>
13.14 But when you see the abomination of desolation, spoken of by Daniel the prophet, standing where it ought not (let the reader understand), then let those who are in Judea flee to the mountains, '' None
9. New Testament, Matthew, 27.5 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Fragments of Papias, and Judas • Papias,

 Found in books: Bird and Harrower (2021), The Cambridge Companion to the Apostolic Fathers, 341; Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 217

sup>
27.5 καὶ ῥίψας τὰ ἀργύρια εἰς τὸν ναὸν ἀνεχώρησεν, καὶ ἀπελθὼν ἀπήγξατο.'' None
sup>
27.5 He threw down the pieces of silver in the sanctuary, and departed. He went away and hanged himself. '' None
10. None, None, nan (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Fragments of Papias, Authorship • Fragments of Papias, and fertility tradition • Papias • Papias,

 Found in books: Bird and Harrower (2021), The Cambridge Companion to the Apostolic Fathers, 340; Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 228; Neusner Green and Avery-Peck (2022), Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points, 98

11. Irenaeus, Refutation of All Heresies, 3.1.1, 3.3.4, 5.33.3-5.33.4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Aristion and the elder John, Papias as direct witness to • Mark, Papias on etiology of gospel of • Papias • Papias of Hierapolis • Papias of Hierapolis, Christian writer • Papias of Hieropolis, Aristion and the elder John, as direct witness to • Papias of Hieropolis, Expositions of the Dominical Oracles • Papias of Hieropolis, Mark, on etiology of gospel of • Papias of Hieropolis, Tannaim and rabbinic parallels • Papias of Hieropolis, preference for living and lasting voice over books • Papias, • Tannaim, Papias, parallels to

 Found in books: Ayres and Ward (2021), The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual, 40, 41; Edelmann-Singer et al. (2020), Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions, 185; Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 213, 227, 228; Lieu (2015), Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century, 103; Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 531; McGowan (1999), Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals, 92; Rasimus (2009), Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence, 272; Vinzent (2013), Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament, 110

sup>
3.1.1 WE have learned from none others the plan of our salvation, than from those through whom the Gospel has come down to us, which they did at one time proclaim in public, and, at a later period, by the will of God, handed down to us in the Scriptures, to be the ground and pillar of our faith. For it is unlawful to assert that they preached before they possessed "perfect knowledge," as some do even venture to say, boasting themselves as improvers of the apostles. For, after our Lord rose from the dead, the apostles were invested with power from on high when the Holy Spirit came down upon them, were filled from all His gifts, and had perfect knowledge: they departed to the ends of the earth, preaching the glad tidings of the good things sent from God to us, and proclaiming the peace of heaven to men, who indeed do all equally and individually possess the Gospel of God. Matthew also issued a written Gospel among the Hebrews in their own dialect, while Peter and Paul were preaching at Rome, and laying the foundations of the Church. After their departure, Mark, the disciple and interpreter of Peter, did also hand down to us in writing what had been preached by Peter. Luke also, the companion of Paul, recorded in a book the Gospel preached by him. Afterwards, John, the disciple of the Lord, who also had leaned upon His breast, did himself publish a Gospel during his residence at Ephesus in Asia.
3.3.4
But Polycarp also was not only instructed by apostles, and conversed with many who had seen Christ, but was also, by apostles in Asia, appointed bishop of the Church in Smyrna, whom I also saw in my early youth, for he tarried on earth a very long time, and, when a very old man, gloriously and most nobly suffering martyrdom, departed this life, having always taught the things which he had learned from the apostles, and which the Church has handed down, and which alone are true. To these things all the Asiatic Churches testify, as do also those men who have succeeded Polycarp down to the present time,--a man who was of much greater weight, and a more stedfast witness of truth, than Valentinus, and Marcion, and the rest of the heretics. He it was who, coming to Rome in the time of Anicetus caused many to turn away from the aforesaid heretics to the Church of God, proclaiming that he had received this one and sole truth from the apostles,--that, namely, which is handed down by the Church. There are also those who heard from him that John, the disciple of the Lord, going to bathe at Ephesus, and perceiving Cerinthus within, rushed out of the bath-house without bathing, exclaiming, "Let us fly, lest even the bath-house fall down, because Cerinthus, the enemy of the truth, is within." And Polycarp himself replied to Marcion, who met him on one occasion, and said, "Dost thou know me?" "I do know thee, the first-born of Satan." Such was the horror which the apostles and their disciples had against holding even verbal communication with any corrupters of the truth; as Paul also says, "A man that is an heretic, after the first and second admonition, reject; knowing that he that is such is subverted, and sinneth, being condemned of himself." There is also a very powerful Epistle of Polycarp written to the Philippians, from which those who choose to do so, and are anxious about their salvation, can learn the character of his faith, and the preaching of the truth. Then, again, the Church in Ephesus, founded by Paul, and having John remaining among them permanently until the times of Trajan, is a true witness of the tradition of the apostles.
5.33.3
The blessing of Isaac with which he blessed his younger son Jacob has the same meaning, when he says, "Behold, the smell of my son is as the smell of a full field which the Lord has blessed." But "the field is the world." And therefore he added, "God give to thee of the dew of heaven, and of the fatness of the earth, plenty of corn and wine. And let the nations serve thee, and kings bow down to thee; and be thou lord over thy brother, and thy father\'s sons shall bow down to thee: cursed shall be he who shall curse thee, and blessed shall be he who shall bless thee." If any one, then, does not accept these things as referring to the appointed kingdom, he must fall into much contradiction and contrariety, as is the case with the Jews, who are involved in absolute perplexity. For not only did not the nations in this life serve this Jacob; but even after he had received the blessing, he himself going forth from his home, served his uncle Laban the Syrian for twenty years; and not only was he not made lord of his brother, but he did himself bow down before his brother Esau, upon his return from Mesopotamia to his father, and offered many gifts to him. Moreover, in what way did he inherit much corn and wine here, he who emigrated to Egypt because of the famine which possessed the land in which he was dwelling, and became Subject to Pharaoh, who was then ruling over Egypt? The predicted blessing, therefore, belongs unquestionably to the times of the kingdom, when the righteous shall bear rule upon their rising from the dead; when also the creation, having been renovated and set free, shall fructify with an abundance of all kinds of food, from the dew of heaven, and from the fertility of the earth: as the elders who saw John, the disciple of the Lord, related that they had heard from him how the Lord used to teach in regard to these times, and say: The days will come, in which vines shall grow, each having ten thousand branches, and in each branch ten thousand twigs, and in each true twig ten thousand shoots, and in each one of the shoots ten thousand dusters, and on every one of the clusters ten thousand grapes, and every grape when pressed will give five and twenty metretes of wine. And when any one of the saints shall lay hold of a cluster, another shall cry out, "I am a better cluster, take me; bless the Lord through me." In like manner the Lord declared that a grain of wheat would produce ten thousand ears, and that every ear should have ten thousand grains, and every grain would yield ten pounds (quinque bilibres) of clear, pure, fine flour; and that all other fruit-bearing trees, and seeds and grass, would produce in similar proportions (secundum congruentiam iis consequentem); and that all animals feeding only on the productions of the earth, should in those days become peaceful and harmonious among each other, and be in perfect subjection to man. 5.33.4 And these things are bone witness to in writing by Papias, the hearer of John, and a companion of Polycarp, in his fourth book; for there were five books compiled (suntetagmena) by him. And he says in addition, "Now these things are credible to believers." And he says that, "when the traitor Judas did not give credit to them, and put the question, \'How then can things about to bring forth so abundantly be wrought by the Lord?\' the Lord declared, \'They who shall come to these times shall see.\'" When prophesying of these times, therefore, Esaias says: "The wolf also shall feed with the lamb, and the leopard shall take his rest with the kid; the calf also, and the bull, and the lion shall eat together; and a little boy shall lead them. The ox and the bear shall feed together, and their young ones shall agree together; and the lion shall eat straw as well as the ox. And the infant boy shall thrust his hand into the asp\'s den, into the nest also of the adder\'s brood; and they shall do no harm, nor have power to hurt anything in my holy mountain." And again he says, in recapitulation, "Wolves and lambs shall then browse together, and the lion shall eat straw like the ox, and the serpent earth as if it were bread; and they shall neither hurt nor annoy anything in my holy mountain, saith the Lord." I am quite aware that some persons endeavour to refer these words to the case of savage men, both of different nations and various habits, who come to believe, and when they have believed, act in harmony with the righteous. But although this is true now with regard to some men coming from various nations to the harmony of the faith, nevertheless in the resurrection of the just the words shall also apply to those animals mentioned. For God is non in all things. And it is right that when the creation is restored, all the animals should obey and be in subjection to man, and revert to the food originally given by God (for they had been originally subjected in obedience to Adam), that is, the productions of the earth. But some other occasion, and not the present, is to be sought for showing that the lion shall then feed on straw. And this indicates the large size and rich quality of the fruits. For if that animal, the lion, feeds upon straw at that period, of what a quality must the wheat itself be whose straw shall serve as suitable food for lions?'' None
12. None, None, nan (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • lex Papia Poppaea • lex Papia et Poppaea (

 Found in books: Huebner and Laes (2019), Aulus Gellius and Roman Reading Culture: Text, Presence and Imperial Knowledge in the 'Noctes Atticae', 97; Perry (2014), Gender, Manumission, and the Roman Freedwoman, 86

13. Eusebius of Caesarea, Ecclesiastical History, 2.15.1-2.15.2, 3.24.5-3.24.16, 3.39, 3.39.1-3.39.5, 3.39.7, 3.39.9, 3.39.15-3.39.17, 5.24.3 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Aristion and the elder John, Papias as direct witness to • Mark, Papias on etiology of gospel of • Papias • Papias of Hierapolis • Papias of Hierapolis, Christian writer • Papias of Hieropolis • Papias of Hieropolis, Aristion and the elder John, as direct witness to • Papias of Hieropolis, Expositions of the Dominical Oracles • Papias of Hieropolis, Mark, on etiology of gospel of • Papias of Hieropolis, Tannaim and rabbinic parallels • Papias of Hieropolis, access to gospels • Papias of Hieropolis, preference for living and lasting voice over books • Papias, • Tannaim, Papias, parallels to

 Found in books: Ayres and Ward (2021), The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual, 39, 40, 41, 42, 44; Dijkstra (2020), The Early Reception and Appropriation of the Apostle Peter (60-800 CE): The Anchors of the Fisherman, 45; Doble and Kloha (2014), Texts and Traditions: Essays in Honour of J. Keith Elliott, 358; Edelmann-Singer et al. (2020), Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions, 185, 216; Fowler (2014), Plato in the Third Sophistic, 229; Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 150, 190, 191, 195, 205, 213, 219, 220, 221, 224, 225, 229; James (2021), Learning the Language of Scripture: Origen, Wisdom, and the Logic of Interpretation, 259; Lieu (2015), Marcion and the Making of a Heretic: God and Scripture in the Second Century, 309; Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 531; Neusner Green and Avery-Peck (2022), Judaism from Moses to Muhammad: An Interpretation: Turning Points and Focal Points, 98; Piovanelli, Burke, Pettipiece (2015), Rediscovering the Apocryphal Continent : New Perspectives on Early Christian and Late Antique Apocryphal Textsand Traditions. De Gruyter: 2015 220; Rasimus (2009), Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence, 272; Stroumsa (1996), Hidden Widsom: Esoteric Traditions and the Roots of Christian Mysticism. 85; Taylor (2012), The Essenes, the Scrolls, and the Dead Sea, 117, 129; Vinzent (2013), Christ's Resurrection in Early Christianity and the Making of the New Testament, 97

sup>
2.15.1 And thus when the divine word had made its home among them, the power of Simon was quenched and immediately destroyed, together with the man himself. And so greatly did the splendor of piety illumine the minds of Peter's hearers that they were not satisfied with hearing once only, and were not content with the unwritten teaching of the divine Gospel, but with all sorts of entreaties they besought Mark, a follower of Peter, and the one whose Gospel is extant, that he would leave them a written monument of the doctrine which had been orally communicated to them. Nor did they cease until they had prevailed with the man, and had thus become the occasion of the written Gospel which bears the name of Mark." '2.15.2 And they say that Peter — when he had learned, through a revelation of the Spirit, of that which had been done — was pleased with the zeal of the men, and that the work obtained the sanction of his authority for the purpose of being used in the churches. Clement in the eighth book of his Hypotyposes gives this account, and with him agrees the bishop of Hierapolis named Papias. And Peter makes mention of Mark in his first epistle which they say that he wrote in Rome itself, as is indicated by him, when he calls the city, by a figure, Babylon, as he does in the following words: The church that is at Babylon, elected together with you, salutes you; and so does Marcus my son.
3.24.5
And the rest of the followers of our Saviour, the twelve apostles, the seventy disciples, and countless others besides, were not ignorant of these things. Nevertheless, of all the disciples of the Lord, only Matthew and John have left us written memorials, and they, tradition says, were led to write only under the pressure of necessity. 3.24.6 For Matthew, who had at first preached to the Hebrews, when he was about to go to other peoples, committed his Gospel to writing in his native tongue, and thus compensated those whom he was obliged to leave for the loss of his presence. 3.24.7 And when Mark and Luke had already published their Gospels, they say that John, who had employed all his time in proclaiming the Gospel orally, finally proceeded to write for the following reason. The three Gospels already mentioned having come into the hands of all and into his own too, they say that he accepted them and bore witness to their truthfulness; but that there was lacking in them an account of the deeds done by Christ at the beginning of his ministry. 3.24.8 And this indeed is true. For it is evident that the three evangelists recorded only the deeds done by the Saviour for one year after the imprisonment of John the Baptist, and indicated this in the beginning of their account.' "3.24.9 For Matthew, after the forty days' fast and the temptation which followed it, indicates the chronology of his work when he says: Now when he heard that John was delivered up he withdrew from Judea into Galilee." '3.24.10 Mark likewise says: Now after that John was delivered up Jesus came into Galilee. And Luke, before commencing his account of the deeds of Jesus, similarly marks the time, when he says that Herod, adding to all the evil deeds which he had done, shut up John in prison. 3.24.11 They say, therefore, that the apostle John, being asked to do it for this reason, gave in his Gospel an account of the period which had been omitted by the earlier evangelists, and of the deeds done by the Saviour during that period; that is, of those which were done before the imprisonment of the Baptist. And this is indicated by him, they say, in the following words: This beginning of miracles did Jesus; and again when he refers to the Baptist, in the midst of the deeds of Jesus, as still baptizing in Aenon near Salim; where he states the matter clearly in the words: For John was not yet cast into prison. 3.24.12 John accordingly, in his Gospel, records the deeds of Christ which were performed before the Baptist was cast into prison, but the other three evangelists mention the events which happened after that time. 3.24.13 One who understands this can no longer think that the Gospels are at variance with one another, inasmuch as the Gospel according to John contains the first acts of Christ, while the others give an account of the latter part of his life. And the genealogy of our Saviour according to the flesh John quite naturally omitted, because it had been already given by Matthew and Luke, and began with the doctrine of his divinity, which had, as it were, been reserved for him, as their superior, by the divine Spirit. 3.24.14 These things may suffice, which we have said concerning the Gospel of John. The cause which led to the composition of the Gospel of Mark has been already stated by us. 3.24.15 But as for Luke, in the beginning of his Gospel, he states himself the reasons which led him to write it. He states that since many others had more rashly undertaken to compose a narrative of the events of which he had acquired perfect knowledge, he himself, feeling the necessity of freeing us from their uncertain opinions, delivered in his own Gospel an accurate account of those events in regard to which he had learned the full truth, being aided by his intimacy and his stay with Paul and by his acquaintance with the rest of the apostles. 3.24.16 So much for our own account of these things. But in a more fitting place we shall attempt to show by quotations from the ancients, what others have said concerning them.' "

3.39.1
There are extant five books of Papias, which bear the title Expositions of Oracles of the Lord. Irenaeus makes mention of these as the only works written by him, in the following words: These things are attested by Papias, an ancient man who was a hearer of John and a companion of Polycarp, in his fourth book. For five books have been written by him. These are the words of Irenaeus.
3.39.2
But Papias himself in the preface to his discourses by no means declares that he was himself a hearer and eye-witness of the holy apostles, but he shows by the words which he uses that he received the doctrines of the faith from those who were their friends.
3.39.3
He says: But I shall not hesitate also to put down for you along with my interpretations whatsoever things I have at any time learned carefully from the elders and carefully remembered, guaranteeing their truth. For I did not, like the multitude, take pleasure in those that speak much, but in those that teach the truth; not in those that relate strange commandments, but in those that deliver the commandments given by the Lord to faith, and springing from the truth itself.
3.39.4
If, then, any one came, who had been a follower of the elders, I questioned him in regard to the words of the elders — what Andrew or what Peter said, or what was said by Philip, or by Thomas, or by James, or by John, or by Matthew, or by any other of the disciples of the Lord, and what things Aristion and the presbyter John, the disciples of the Lord, say. For I did not think that what was to be gotten from the books would profit me as much as what came from the living and abiding voice.
3.39.5
It is worth while observing here that the name John is twice enumerated by him. The first one he mentions in connection with Peter and James and Matthew and the rest of the apostles, clearly meaning the evangelist; but the other John he mentions after an interval, and places him among others outside of the number of the apostles, putting Aristion before him, and he distinctly calls him a presbyter.

3.39.7
And Papias, of whom we are now speaking, confesses that he received the words of the apostles from those that followed them, but says that he was himself a hearer of Aristion and the presbyter John. At least he mentions them frequently by name, and gives their traditions in his writings. These things, we hope, have not been uselessly adduced by us.

3.39.9
That Philip the apostle dwelt at Hierapolis with his daughters has been already stated. But it must be noted here that Papias, their contemporary, says that he heard a wonderful tale from the daughters of Philip. For he relates that in his time one rose from the dead. And he tells another wonderful story of Justus, surnamed Barsabbas: that he drank a deadly poison, and yet, by the grace of the Lord, suffered no harm.' "


3.39.15
This also the presbyter said: Mark, having become the interpreter of Peter, wrote down accurately, though not in order, whatsoever he remembered of the things said or done by Christ. For he neither heard the Lord nor followed him, but afterward, as I said, he followed Peter, who adapted his teaching to the needs of his hearers, but with no intention of giving a connected account of the Lord's discourses, so that Mark committed no error while he thus wrote some things as he remembered them. For he was careful of one thing, not to omit any of the things which he had heard, and not to state any of them falsely. These things are related by Papias concerning Mark."
3.39.16
But concerning Matthew he writes as follows: So then Matthew wrote the oracles in the Hebrew language, and every one interpreted them as he was able. And the same writer uses testimonies from the first Epistle of John and from that of Peter likewise. And he relates another story of a woman, who was accused of many sins before the Lord, which is contained in the Gospel according to the Hebrews. These things we have thought it necessary to observe in addition to what has been already stated.' "
3.39
There are extant five books of Papias, which bear the title Expositions of Oracles of the Lord. Irenaeus makes mention of these as the only works written by him, in the following words: These things are attested by Papias, an ancient man who was a hearer of John and a companion of Polycarp, in his fourth book. For five books have been written by him. These are the words of Irenaeus.,But Papias himself in the preface to his discourses by no means declares that he was himself a hearer and eye-witness of the holy apostles, but he shows by the words which he uses that he received the doctrines of the faith from those who were their friends.,He says: But I shall not hesitate also to put down for you along with my interpretations whatsoever things I have at any time learned carefully from the elders and carefully remembered, guaranteeing their truth. For I did not, like the multitude, take pleasure in those that speak much, but in those that teach the truth; not in those that relate strange commandments, but in those that deliver the commandments given by the Lord to faith, and springing from the truth itself.,If, then, any one came, who had been a follower of the elders, I questioned him in regard to the words of the elders — what Andrew or what Peter said, or what was said by Philip, or by Thomas, or by James, or by John, or by Matthew, or by any other of the disciples of the Lord, and what things Aristion and the presbyter John, the disciples of the Lord, say. For I did not think that what was to be gotten from the books would profit me as much as what came from the living and abiding voice.,It is worth while observing here that the name John is twice enumerated by him. The first one he mentions in connection with Peter and James and Matthew and the rest of the apostles, clearly meaning the evangelist; but the other John he mentions after an interval, and places him among others outside of the number of the apostles, putting Aristion before him, and he distinctly calls him a presbyter.,This shows that the statement of those is true, who say that there were two persons in Asia that bore the same name, and that there were two tombs in Ephesus, each of which, even to the present day, is called John's. It is important to notice this. For it is probable that it was the second, if one is not willing to admit that it was the first that saw the Revelation, which is ascribed by name to John.,And Papias, of whom we are now speaking, confesses that he received the words of the apostles from those that followed them, but says that he was himself a hearer of Aristion and the presbyter John. At least he mentions them frequently by name, and gives their traditions in his writings. These things, we hope, have not been uselessly adduced by us.,But it is fitting to subjoin to the words of Papias which have been quoted, other passages from his works in which he relates some other wonderful events which he claims to have received from tradition.,That Philip the apostle dwelt at Hierapolis with his daughters has been already stated. But it must be noted here that Papias, their contemporary, says that he heard a wonderful tale from the daughters of Philip. For he relates that in his time one rose from the dead. And he tells another wonderful story of Justus, surnamed Barsabbas: that he drank a deadly poison, and yet, by the grace of the Lord, suffered no harm.,The Book of Acts records that the holy apostles after the ascension of the Saviour, put forward this Justus, together with Matthias, and prayed that one might be chosen in place of the traitor Judas, to fill up their number. The account is as follows: And they put forward two, Joseph, called Barsabbas, who was surnamed Justus, and Matthias; and they prayed and said.,The same writer gives also other accounts which he says came to him through unwritten tradition, certain strange parables and teachings of the Saviour, and some other more mythical things.,To these belong his statement that there will be a period of some thousand years after the resurrection of the dead, and that the kingdom of Christ will be set up in material form on this very earth. I suppose he got these ideas through a misunderstanding of the apostolic accounts, not perceiving that the things said by them were spoken mystically in figures.,For he appears to have been of very limited understanding, as one can see from his discourses. But it was due to him that so many of the Church Fathers after him adopted a like opinion, urging in their own support the antiquity of the man; as for instance Irenaeus and any one else that may have proclaimed similar views.,Papias gives also in his own work other accounts of the words of the Lord on the authority of Aristion who was mentioned above, and traditions as handed down by the presbyter John; to which we refer those who are fond of learning. But now we must add to the words of his which we have already quoted the tradition which he gives in regard to Mark, the author of the Gospel.,This also the presbyter said: Mark, having become the interpreter of Peter, wrote down accurately, though not in order, whatsoever he remembered of the things said or done by Christ. For he neither heard the Lord nor followed him, but afterward, as I said, he followed Peter, who adapted his teaching to the needs of his hearers, but with no intention of giving a connected account of the Lord's discourses, so that Mark committed no error while he thus wrote some things as he remembered them. For he was careful of one thing, not to omit any of the things which he had heard, and not to state any of them falsely. These things are related by Papias concerning Mark.,But concerning Matthew he writes as follows: So then Matthew wrote the oracles in the Hebrew language, and every one interpreted them as he was able. And the same writer uses testimonies from the first Epistle of John and from that of Peter likewise. And he relates another story of a woman, who was accused of many sins before the Lord, which is contained in the Gospel according to the Hebrews. These things we have thought it necessary to observe in addition to what has been already stated." 5.24.3 He fell asleep at Ephesus.'" None
14. None, None, nan (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Papias of Hieropolis • Papias of Hieropolis, oral-traditional authority in work of

 Found in books: Ayres and Ward (2021), The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual, 176; Stroumsa (1996), Hidden Widsom: Esoteric Traditions and the Roots of Christian Mysticism. 35, 154

15. None, None, nan (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Papias, • living voice versus writing,, Christians after Papias on

 Found in books: Ayres and Ward (2021), The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual, 37; Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 227

16. None, None, nan (5th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Papia Poppaea, lex • lex Iulia et Papia

 Found in books: Phang (2001), The Marriage of Roman Soldiers (13 B.C. - A.D. 235), 204; Talbert (1984), The Senate of Imperial Rome, 44




Please note: the results are produced through a computerized process which may frequently lead to errors, both in incorrect tagging and in other issues. Please use with caution.
Due to load times, full text fetching is currently attempted for validated results only.
Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

For a list of book indices included, see here.