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All subjects (including unvalidated):
subject book bibliographic info
central/panhellenic, identity, general, local vs. Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110
panhellenic Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 12, 112, 127, 198, 316
Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 75, 136, 138, 243, 275, 574
Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 2, 107, 108, 114, 117, 128, 370
Raaflaub Ober and Wallace (2007), Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece, 32, 33, 43, 49, 55
Versnel (2011), Coping with the Gods: Wayward Readings in Greek Theology, 71
Weissenrieder (2016), Borders: Terminologies, Ideologies, and Performances 205, 223
panhellenic, appeal, apollo pto, i, os, ptoieus Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 368
panhellenic, contests Naiden (2013), Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods, 327
panhellenic, corpus of myth Hawes (2014), Rationalizing Myth in Antiquity, 70, 71, 89, 90
panhellenic, cult panhellenism, community, forging of Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 182, 188, 189, 190, 191, 192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 200, 201, 219, 220, 221, 222, 223
panhellenic, deliverance, soteria, in greek antiquity Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 19, 30, 38, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 68
panhellenic, expedition Morrison (2020), Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography, 39, 50, 147, 188
panhellenic, fame in local contexts, poets, of Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 171, 322
panhellenic, festival Stavrianopoulou (2013), Shifting Social Imaginaries in the Hellenistic Period: Narrations, Practices and Images, 319, 329, 330, 331, 354, 356, 357
panhellenic, festivals Breytenbach and Tzavella (2022), Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas, 81, 91, 94, 114, 144
Lupu (2005), Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) 104
Williamson (2021), Urban Rituals in Sacred Landscapes in Hellenistic Asia Minor, 327
panhellenic, funerary, local myth in Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 191, 192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 200, 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221
panhellenic, games Cosgrove (2022), Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine, 118
Gygax and Zuiderhoek (2021), Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity, 76
Meister (2019), Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity, 83, 90, 124
panhellenic, games, new Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 55, 57, 64, 77, 187
panhellenic, helen, epichoric vs. Marincola et al. (2021), Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians, 67, 68, 69
panhellenic, identity Stavrianopoulou (2013), Shifting Social Imaginaries in the Hellenistic Period: Narrations, Practices and Images, 329
panhellenic, identity, theoria, and Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 200, 201
panhellenic, insular Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 191, 192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 200, 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 223, 355
panhellenic, panhellenic, sanctuaries, not quite Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 188, 189, 190, 191, 192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 200, 201, 336, 338
panhellenic, persona, gods, timai in Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 12, 13, 89
panhellenic, phenomenon, sundials anaximander Ker (2023), Quotidian Time and Forms of Life in Ancient Rome. 48
panhellenic, religion, greek, local vs. Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 3, 4, 5, 6, 23, 24
panhellenic, ritual setting, aeschylus, local, in Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 191, 192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 200, 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 223
panhellenic, ritual, featuring local myth Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 188, 190, 193, 194, 195, 196, 199, 200, 201, 202, 203, 207, 208, 209, 212, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 222
panhellenic, ritual, zeus hellanios, myth of blending into Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 201, 202, 203, 219, 220, 221, 222, 223
panhellenic, sanctuaries Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020), Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B, 23
panhellenic, sanctuaries and games Papadodima (2022), Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II, 61
panhellenic, sanctuaries, exclusive Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 9, 191, 192, 195, 200, 201
panhellenic, significance of zeus soter Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 57, 82
panhellenic, standing, akhaia, akhaians, epic, also atreids, importance for Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 174, 175, 176, 177, 185, 186, 209, 221, 319, 386, 387
panhellenic, tradition Stavrianopoulou (2006), Ritual and Communication in the Graeco-Roman World, 271
panhellenism Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 73, 74
Giusti (2018), Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries, 57
Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 3, 4, 5, 25, 27, 40, 48, 49, 50, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 59, 60, 61, 173, 174, 175, 176, 177, 178, 179, 180, 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 191, 192, 193, 220, 221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 227, 228, 229, 230, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 236
Konig (2022), The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture, 22, 331
Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 9, 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 191, 192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 200, 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 223, 356, 387
Pucci (2016), Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay, 115, 116, 131, 139
Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020), Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity, 36, 49, 51, 53, 141, 267
panhellenism, aiakos, devoted to Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 209, 210
panhellenism, aigina, aiginetans Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 201, 202, 203, 207, 208, 209, 210, 213, 214, 387
panhellenism, alexander iii, ‘the great’, and Chrysanthou (2018), Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement. 72, 73, 74
panhellenism, and thebes/koinon Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 355, 356, 357, 358, 388, 389
panhellenism, athens, and Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 207, 208, 209, 210, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221
panhellenism, competed over Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 207, 208, 209, 210, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219
panhellenism, contested visions of Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 187, 188, 196, 198, 202, 203, 207, 209, 210, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 223
panhellenism, defending greeks and democracies, and Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 214, 217
panhellenism, delphi and Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 191, 192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 200, 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 223
panhellenism, economic dimension of Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 187, 202, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219
panhellenism, economy, early fifth-century, and definitions of Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219
panhellenism, expressed in song Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 191, 192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 200, 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 223
panhellenism, festivals propagating Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 184, 185, 201, 202
panhellenism, grain-supply, and Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219
panhellenism, kimon vs. themistokles Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 214, 215, 216
panhellenism, local claims to Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 130, 162, 174, 176, 177, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219, 255, 387
panhellenism, local cults claiming Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 167, 181, 182, 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 219, 223
panhellenism, locality, and Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 191, 192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 200, 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 223
panhellenism, of xenophon Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 415, 416
panhellenism, persian wars, and Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 207, 208, 209, 210, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219
panhellenism, themistokles Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 208, 216, 217, 221
panhellenism, thespiai Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 356, 387, 388
panhellenism, tool in social contexts Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219, 387
panhellenism, zeus hellanios, and claims to Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 181, 182, 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219

List of validated texts:
15 validated results for "panhellenic"
1. Homer, Iliad, 2.6, 2.24, 2.37-2.38, 2.51-2.52, 2.110-2.154, 2.225-2.277, 4.70-4.72, 15.187-15.192 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Aeschylus, local, in panhellenic ritual setting • Helen, epichoric vs. panhellenic, • Panhellenic ritual, featuring local myth • Panhellenic sanctuaries, not quite panhellenic • Panhellenism • Panhellenism, Delphi and • Panhellenism, Panhellenic cult community, forging of • Panhellenism, and Thebes/koinon • Panhellenism, contested visions of • Panhellenism, expressed in song • funerary, local myth in Panhellenic • gods, timai in Panhellenic persona • insular, Panhellenic • locality, and Panhellenism • panhellenic • panhellenism

 Found in books: Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 12; Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 27, 49, 57, 189; Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 196, 355; Lipka (2021), Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus, 53; Marincola et al. (2021), Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians, 68; Raaflaub Ober and Wallace (2007), Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece, 32

sup>
2.6 πέμψαι ἐπʼ Ἀτρεΐδῃ Ἀγαμέμνονι οὖλον ὄνειρον·
2.24
οὐ χρὴ παννύχιον εὕδειν βουληφόρον ἄνδρα
2.37
φῆ γὰρ ὅ γʼ αἱρήσειν Πριάμου πόλιν ἤματι κείνῳ 2.38 νήπιος, οὐδὲ τὰ ᾔδη ἅ ῥα Ζεὺς μήδετο ἔργα·
2.51
κηρύσσειν ἀγορὴν δὲ κάρη κομόωντας Ἀχαιούς· 2.52 οἳ μὲν ἐκήρυσσον, τοὶ δʼ ἠγείροντο μάλʼ ὦκα·
2.110
ὦ φίλοι ἥρωες Δαναοὶ θεράποντες Ἄρηος 2.111 Ζεύς με μέγα Κρονίδης ἄτῃ ἐνέδησε βαρείῃ, 2.112 σχέτλιος, ὃς πρὶν μέν μοι ὑπέσχετο καὶ κατένευσεν 2.113 Ἴλιον ἐκπέρσαντʼ εὐτείχεον ἀπονέεσθαι, 2.114 νῦν δὲ κακὴν ἀπάτην βουλεύσατο, καί με κελεύει 2.115 δυσκλέα Ἄργος ἱκέσθαι, ἐπεὶ πολὺν ὤλεσα λαόν. 2.116 οὕτω που Διὶ μέλλει ὑπερμενέϊ φίλον εἶναι, 2.117 ὃς δὴ πολλάων πολίων κατέλυσε κάρηνα 2.118 ἠδʼ ἔτι καὶ λύσει· τοῦ γὰρ κράτος ἐστὶ μέγιστον. 2.119 αἰσχρὸν γὰρ τόδε γʼ ἐστὶ καὶ ἐσσομένοισι πυθέσθαι 2.120 μὰψ οὕτω τοιόνδε τοσόνδε τε λαὸν Ἀχαιῶν 2.121 ἄπρηκτον πόλεμον πολεμίζειν ἠδὲ μάχεσθαι 2.122 ἀνδράσι παυροτέροισι, τέλος δʼ οὔ πώ τι πέφανται· 2.123 εἴ περ γάρ κʼ ἐθέλοιμεν Ἀχαιοί τε Τρῶές τε 2.124 ὅρκια πιστὰ ταμόντες ἀριθμηθήμεναι ἄμφω, 2.125 Τρῶας μὲν λέξασθαι ἐφέστιοι ὅσσοι ἔασιν, 2.126 ἡμεῖς δʼ ἐς δεκάδας διακοσμηθεῖμεν Ἀχαιοί, 2.127 Τρώων δʼ ἄνδρα ἕκαστοι ἑλοίμεθα οἰνοχοεύειν, 2.128 πολλαί κεν δεκάδες δευοίατο οἰνοχόοιο. 2.129 τόσσον ἐγώ φημι πλέας ἔμμεναι υἷας Ἀχαιῶν 2.130 Τρώων, οἳ ναίουσι κατὰ πτόλιν· ἀλλʼ ἐπίκουροι 2.131 πολλέων ἐκ πολίων ἐγχέσπαλοι ἄνδρες ἔασιν, 2.132 οἵ με μέγα πλάζουσι καὶ οὐκ εἰῶσʼ ἐθέλοντα 2.133 Ἰλίου ἐκπέρσαι εὖ ναιόμενον πτολίεθρον. 2.134 ἐννέα δὴ βεβάασι Διὸς μεγάλου ἐνιαυτοί, 2.135 καὶ δὴ δοῦρα σέσηπε νεῶν καὶ σπάρτα λέλυνται· 2.136 αἳ δέ που ἡμέτεραί τʼ ἄλοχοι καὶ νήπια τέκνα 2.137 εἵατʼ ἐνὶ μεγάροις ποτιδέγμεναι· ἄμμι δὲ ἔργον 2.138 αὔτως ἀκράαντον οὗ εἵνεκα δεῦρʼ ἱκόμεσθα. 2.139 ἀλλʼ ἄγεθʼ ὡς ἂν ἐγὼ εἴπω πειθώμεθα πάντες· 2.140 φεύγωμεν σὺν νηυσὶ φίλην ἐς πατρίδα γαῖαν· 2.141 οὐ γὰρ ἔτι Τροίην αἱρήσομεν εὐρυάγυιαν. 2.142 ὣς φάτο, τοῖσι δὲ θυμὸν ἐνὶ στήθεσσιν ὄρινε 2.143 πᾶσι μετὰ πληθὺν ὅσοι οὐ βουλῆς ἐπάκουσαν· 2.144 κινήθη δʼ ἀγορὴ φὴ κύματα μακρὰ θαλάσσης 2.145 πόντου Ἰκαρίοιο, τὰ μέν τʼ Εὖρός τε Νότος τε 2.146 ὤρορʼ ἐπαΐξας πατρὸς Διὸς ἐκ νεφελάων. 2.147 ὡς δʼ ὅτε κινήσῃ Ζέφυρος βαθὺ λήϊον ἐλθὼν 2.148 λάβρος ἐπαιγίζων, ἐπί τʼ ἠμύει ἀσταχύεσσιν, 2.149 ὣς τῶν πᾶσʼ ἀγορὴ κινήθη· τοὶ δʼ ἀλαλητῷ 2.150 νῆας ἔπʼ ἐσσεύοντο, ποδῶν δʼ ὑπένερθε κονίη 2.151 ἵστατʼ ἀειρομένη· τοὶ δʼ ἀλλήλοισι κέλευον 2.152 ἅπτεσθαι νηῶν ἠδʼ ἑλκέμεν εἰς ἅλα δῖαν, 2.153 οὐρούς τʼ ἐξεκάθαιρον· ἀϋτὴ δʼ οὐρανὸν ἷκεν 2.154 οἴκαδε ἱεμένων· ὑπὸ δʼ ᾕρεον ἕρματα νηῶν.
2.225
Ἀτρεΐδη τέο δʼ αὖτʼ ἐπιμέμφεαι ἠδὲ χατίζεις; 2.226 πλεῖαί τοι χαλκοῦ κλισίαι, πολλαὶ δὲ γυναῖκες 2.227 εἰσὶν ἐνὶ κλισίῃς ἐξαίρετοι, ἅς τοι Ἀχαιοὶ 2.228 πρωτίστῳ δίδομεν εὖτʼ ἂν πτολίεθρον ἕλωμεν. 2.229 ἦ ἔτι καὶ χρυσοῦ ἐπιδεύεαι, ὅν κέ τις οἴσει 2.230 Τρώων ἱπποδάμων ἐξ Ἰλίου υἷος ἄποινα, 2.231 ὅν κεν ἐγὼ δήσας ἀγάγω ἢ ἄλλος Ἀχαιῶν, 2.232 ἠὲ γυναῖκα νέην, ἵνα μίσγεαι ἐν φιλότητι, 2.233 ἥν τʼ αὐτὸς ἀπονόσφι κατίσχεαι; οὐ μὲν ἔοικεν 2.234 ἀρχὸν ἐόντα κακῶν ἐπιβασκέμεν υἷας Ἀχαιῶν. 2.235 ὦ πέπονες κάκʼ ἐλέγχεʼ Ἀχαιΐδες οὐκέτʼ Ἀχαιοὶ 2.236 οἴκαδέ περ σὺν νηυσὶ νεώμεθα, τόνδε δʼ ἐῶμεν 2.237 αὐτοῦ ἐνὶ Τροίῃ γέρα πεσσέμεν, ὄφρα ἴδηται 2.238 ἤ ῥά τί οἱ χἠμεῖς προσαμύνομεν ἦε καὶ οὐκί· 2.239 ὃς καὶ νῦν Ἀχιλῆα ἕο μέγʼ ἀμείνονα φῶτα
2.240
ἠτίμησεν· ἑλὼν γὰρ ἔχει γέρας αὐτὸς ἀπούρας.
2.241
ἀλλὰ μάλʼ οὐκ Ἀχιλῆϊ χόλος φρεσίν, ἀλλὰ μεθήμων·
2.242
ἦ γὰρ ἂν Ἀτρεΐδη νῦν ὕστατα λωβήσαιο·
2.243
ὣς φάτο νεικείων Ἀγαμέμνονα ποιμένα λαῶν,
2.244
Θερσίτης· τῷ δʼ ὦκα παρίστατο δῖος Ὀδυσσεύς,
2.245
καί μιν ὑπόδρα ἰδὼν χαλεπῷ ἠνίπαπε μύθῳ·
2.246
Θερσῖτʼ ἀκριτόμυθε, λιγύς περ ἐὼν ἀγορητής,
2.247
ἴσχεο, μηδʼ ἔθελʼ οἶος ἐριζέμεναι βασιλεῦσιν·
2.248
οὐ γὰρ ἐγὼ σέο φημὶ χερειότερον βροτὸν ἄλλον
2.249
ἔμμεναι, ὅσσοι ἅμʼ Ἀτρεΐδῃς ὑπὸ Ἴλιον ἦλθον. 2.250 τὼ οὐκ ἂν βασιλῆας ἀνὰ στόμʼ ἔχων ἀγορεύοις, 2.251 καί σφιν ὀνείδεά τε προφέροις, νόστόν τε φυλάσσοις. 2.252 οὐδέ τί πω σάφα ἴδμεν ὅπως ἔσται τάδε ἔργα, 2.253 ἢ εὖ ἦε κακῶς νοστήσομεν υἷες Ἀχαιῶν. 2.254 τὼ νῦν Ἀτρεΐδῃ Ἀγαμέμνονι ποιμένι λαῶν 2.255 ἧσαι ὀνειδίζων, ὅτι οἱ μάλα πολλὰ διδοῦσιν 2.256 ἥρωες Δαναοί· σὺ δὲ κερτομέων ἀγορεύεις. 2.257 ἀλλʼ ἔκ τοι ἐρέω, τὸ δὲ καὶ τετελεσμένον ἔσται· 2.258 εἴ κʼ ἔτι σʼ ἀφραίνοντα κιχήσομαι ὥς νύ περ ὧδε, 2.259 μηκέτʼ ἔπειτʼ Ὀδυσῆϊ κάρη ὤμοισιν ἐπείη, 2.260 μηδʼ ἔτι Τηλεμάχοιο πατὴρ κεκλημένος εἴην, 2.261 εἰ μὴ ἐγώ σε λαβὼν ἀπὸ μὲν φίλα εἵματα δύσω, 2.262 χλαῖνάν τʼ ἠδὲ χιτῶνα, τά τʼ αἰδῶ ἀμφικαλύπτει, 2.263 αὐτὸν δὲ κλαίοντα θοὰς ἐπὶ νῆας ἀφήσω 2.264 πεπλήγων ἀγορῆθεν ἀεικέσσι πληγῇσιν. 2.265 ὣς ἄρʼ ἔφη, σκήπτρῳ δὲ μετάφρενον ἠδὲ καὶ ὤμω 2.266 πλῆξεν· ὃ δʼ ἰδνώθη, θαλερὸν δέ οἱ ἔκπεσε δάκρυ· 2.267 σμῶδιξ δʼ αἱματόεσσα μεταφρένου ἐξυπανέστη 2.268 σκήπτρου ὕπο χρυσέου· ὃ δʼ ἄρʼ ἕζετο τάρβησέν τε, 2.269 ἀλγήσας δʼ ἀχρεῖον ἰδὼν ἀπομόρξατο δάκρυ. 2.270 οἳ δὲ καὶ ἀχνύμενοί περ ἐπʼ αὐτῷ ἡδὺ γέλασσαν· 2.271 ὧδε δέ τις εἴπεσκεν ἰδὼν ἐς πλησίον ἄλλον· 2.272 ὢ πόποι ἦ δὴ μυρίʼ Ὀδυσσεὺς ἐσθλὰ ἔοργε 2.273 βουλάς τʼ ἐξάρχων ἀγαθὰς πόλεμόν τε κορύσσων· 2.274 νῦν δὲ τόδε μέγʼ ἄριστον ἐν Ἀργείοισιν ἔρεξεν, 2.275 ὃς τὸν λωβητῆρα ἐπεσβόλον ἔσχʼ ἀγοράων. 2.276 οὔ θήν μιν πάλιν αὖτις ἀνήσει θυμὸς ἀγήνωρ 2.277 νεικείειν βασιλῆας ὀνειδείοις ἐπέεσσιν.
4.70
αἶψα μάλʼ ἐς στρατὸν ἐλθὲ μετὰ Τρῶας καὶ Ἀχαιούς, 4.71 πειρᾶν δʼ ὥς κε Τρῶες ὑπερκύδαντας Ἀχαιοὺς 4.72 ἄρξωσι πρότεροι ὑπὲρ ὅρκια δηλήσασθαι.
15.187
τρεῖς γάρ τʼ ἐκ Κρόνου εἰμὲν ἀδελφεοὶ οὓς τέκετο Ῥέα 15.188 Ζεὺς καὶ ἐγώ, τρίτατος δʼ Ἀΐδης ἐνέροισιν ἀνάσσων. 15.189 τριχθὰ δὲ πάντα δέδασται, ἕκαστος δʼ ἔμμορε τιμῆς· 15.190 ἤτοι ἐγὼν ἔλαχον πολιὴν ἅλα ναιέμεν αἰεὶ 15.191 παλλομένων, Ἀΐδης δʼ ἔλαχε ζόφον ἠερόεντα, 15.192 Ζεὺς δʼ ἔλαχʼ οὐρανὸν εὐρὺν ἐν αἰθέρι καὶ νεφέλῃσι·'' None
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2.6 to send to Agamemnon, son of Atreus, a baneful dream. So he spake, and addressed him with winged words:Up, go, thou baneful Dream, unto the swift ships of the Achaeans, and when thou art come to the hut of Agamemnon, son of Atreus,
2.24
So he took his stand above his head, in the likeness of the son of Neleus, even Nestor, whom above all the elders Agamemnon held in honour; likening himself to him, the Dream from heaven spake, saying:Thou sleepest, son of wise-hearted Atreus, the tamer of horses. To sleep the whole night through beseemeth not a man that is a counsellor,
2.37
So spoke the Dream, and departed, and left him there, pondering in his heart on things that were not to be brought to pass. For in sooth he deemed that he should take the city of Priam that very day, fool that he was! seeing he knew not what deeds Zeus was purposing,
2.51
but Agamemnon bade the clear-voiced heralds summon to the place of gathering the long-haired Achaeans. And they made summons, and the men gathered full quickly.But the king first made the council of the great-souled elders to sit down beside the ship of Nestor, the king Pylos-born.
2.110
My friends, Danaan warriors, squires of Ares, great Zeus, son of Cronos, hath ensnared me in grievous blindness of heart, cruel god! seeing that of old he promised me, and bowed his head thereto, that not until I had sacked well-walled Ilios should I get me home; but now hath he planned cruel deceit, and bids me return inglorious to Argos, 2.115 when I have lost much people. So, I ween, must be the good pleasure of Zeus, supreme in might, who hath laid low the heads of many cities, yea, and shall yet lay low, for his power is above all. A shameful thing is this even for the hearing of men that are yet to be, 2.120 how that thus vainly so goodly and so great a host of the Achaeans warred a bootless war, and fought with men fewer than they, and no end thereof hath as yet been seen. For should we be minded, both Achaeans and Trojans, to swear a solemn oath with sacrifice, and to number ourselves, 2.125 and should the Trojans be gathered together, even all they that have dwellings in the city, and we Achaeans be marshalled by tens, and choose, each company of us, a man of the Trojans to pour our wine, then would many tens lack a cup-bearer; so far, I deem, do the sons of the Achaeans outnumber the Trojans that dwell in the city. 2.130 But allies there be out of many cities, men that wield the spear, who hinder me mightily, and for all that I am fain, suffer me not to sack the well-peopled citadel of Ilios. Already have nine years of great Zeus gone by, 2.134 But allies there be out of many cities, men that wield the spear, who hinder me mightily, and for all that I am fain, suffer me not to sack the well-peopled citadel of Ilios. Already have nine years of great Zeus gone by, ' "2.135 and lo, our ships' timbers are rotted, and the tackling loosed; and our wives, I ween, and little children sit in our halls awaiting us; yet is our task wholly unaccomplished in furtherance whereof we came hither. Nay, come, even as I shall bid, let us all obey: " "2.139 and lo, our ships' timbers are rotted, and the tackling loosed; and our wives, I ween, and little children sit in our halls awaiting us; yet is our task wholly unaccomplished in furtherance whereof we came hither. Nay, come, even as I shall bid, let us all obey: " '2.140 let us flee with our ships to our dear native land; for no more is there hope that we shall take broad-wayed Troy. So spake he, and roused the hearts in the breasts of all throughout the multitude, as many as had not heard the council. And the gathering was stirred like the long sea-waves of the Icarian main, 2.145 which the East Wind or the South Wind has raised, rushing upon them from the clouds of father Zeus. And even as when the West Wind at its coming stirreth a deep cornfield with its violent blast, and the ears bow thereunder, even so was all their gathering stirred, and they with loud shouting rushed towards the ships; 2.150 and from beneath their feet the dust arose on high. And they called each one to his fellow to lay hold of the ships and draw them into the bright sea, and they set themselves to clear the launching-ways, and their shouting went up to heaven, so fain were they of their return home; and they began to take the props from beneath the ships. 2.154 and from beneath their feet the dust arose on high. And they called each one to his fellow to lay hold of the ships and draw them into the bright sea, and they set themselves to clear the launching-ways, and their shouting went up to heaven, so fain were they of their return home; and they began to take the props from beneath the ships. ' "
2.225
Son of Atreus, with what art thou now again discontent, or what lack is thine? Filled are thy huts with bronze, and women full many are in thy huts, chosen spoils that we Achaeans give thee first of all, whensoe'er we take a citadel. Or dost thou still want gold also, " "2.229 Son of Atreus, with what art thou now again discontent, or what lack is thine? Filled are thy huts with bronze, and women full many are in thy huts, chosen spoils that we Achaeans give thee first of all, whensoe'er we take a citadel. Or dost thou still want gold also, " '2.230 which some man of the horse-taming Trojans shall bring thee out of Ilios as a ransom for his son, whom I haply have bound and led away or some other of the Achaeans? Or is it some young girl for thee to know in love, whom thou wilt keep apart for thyself? Nay, it beseemeth not one that is their captain to bring to ill the sons of the Achaeans. 2.235 Soft fools! base things of shame, ye women of Achaea, men no more, homeward let us go with our ships, and leave this fellow here in the land of Troy to digest his prizes, that so he may learn whether in us too there is aught of aid for him or no—for him that hath now done dishonour to Achilles, a man better far than he;
2.240
for he hath taken away, and keepeth his prize by his own arrogant act. of a surety there is naught of wrath in the heart of Achilles; nay, he heedeth not at all; else, son of Atreus, wouldest thou now work insolence for the last time. So spake Thersites, railing at Agamemnon, shepherd of the host. But quickly to his side came goodly Odysseus,
2.245
and with an angry glance from beneath his brows, chid him with harsh words, saying:Thersites of reckless speech, clear-voiced talker though thou art, refrain thee, and be not minded to strive singly against kings. For I deem that there is no viler mortal than thou amongst all those that with the sons of Atreus came beneath Ilios.
2.249
and with an angry glance from beneath his brows, chid him with harsh words, saying:Thersites of reckless speech, clear-voiced talker though thou art, refrain thee, and be not minded to strive singly against kings. For I deem that there is no viler mortal than thou amongst all those that with the sons of Atreus came beneath Ilios. ' "2.250 Wherefore 'twere well thou shouldst not take the name of kings in thy mouth as thou protest, to cast reproaches upon them, and to watch for home-going. In no wise do we know clearly as yet how these things are to be, whether it be for good or ill that we sons of the Achaeans shall return. Therefore dost thou now continually utter revilings against Atreus' son, Agamemnon, shepherd of the host, " "2.254 Wherefore 'twere well thou shouldst not take the name of kings in thy mouth as thou protest, to cast reproaches upon them, and to watch for home-going. In no wise do we know clearly as yet how these things are to be, whether it be for good or ill that we sons of the Achaeans shall return. Therefore dost thou now continually utter revilings against Atreus' son, Agamemnon, shepherd of the host, " '2.255 for that the Danaan warriors give him gifts full many; whereas thou pratest on with railings. But I will speak out to thee, and this word shall verily be brought to pass: if I find thee again playing the fool, even as now thou dost, then may the head of Odysseus abide no more upon his shoulders, 2.260 nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. 2.264 nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. 2.265 So spake Odysseus, and with his staff smote his back and shoulders; and Thersites cowered down, and a big tear fell from him, and a bloody weal rose up on his back beneath the staff of gold. Then he sate him down, and fear came upon him, and stung by pain with helpless looks he wiped away the tear. 2.270 But the Achaeans, sore vexed at heart though they were, broke into a merry laugh at him, and thus would one speak with a glance at his neighbour:Out upon it! verily hath Odysseus ere now wrought good deeds without number as leader in good counsel and setting battle in army, but now is this deed far the best that he hath wrought among the Argives, 2.275 eeing he hath made this scurrilous babbler to cease from his prating. Never again, I ween, will his proud spirit henceforth set him on to rail at kings with words of reviling. So spake the multitude; but up rose Odysseus, sacker of cities, the sceptre in his hand, and by his side flashing-eyed Athene,
4.70
Haste thee with all speed unto the host into the midst of Trojans and Achaeans, and contrive how that the Trojans may be first in defiance of their oaths to work evil upon the Achaeans that exult in their triumph. So saying, he stirred on Athene that was already eager, and down from the peaks of Olympus she went darting.
15.187
Out upon it, verily strong though he be he hath spoken overweeningly, if in sooth by force and in mine own despite he will restrain me that am of like honour with himself. For three brethren are we, begotten of Cronos, and born of Rhea,—Zeus, and myself, and the third is Hades, that is lord of the dead below. And in three-fold wise are all things divided, and unto each hath been apportioned his own domain. 15.190 I verily, when the lots were shaken, won for my portion the grey sea to be my habitation for ever, and Hades won the murky darkness, while Zeus won the broad heaven amid the air and the clouds; but the earth and high Olympus remain yet common to us all. Wherefore will I not in any wise walk after the will of Zeus; nay in quiet 15.192 I verily, when the lots were shaken, won for my portion the grey sea to be my habitation for ever, and Hades won the murky darkness, while Zeus won the broad heaven amid the air and the clouds; but the earth and high Olympus remain yet common to us all. Wherefore will I not in any wise walk after the will of Zeus; nay in quiet '' None
2. None, None, nan (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Aeschylus, local, in panhellenic ritual setting • Panhellenic sanctuaries, not quite panhellenic • Panhellenism • Panhellenism, Delphi and • Panhellenism, Panhellenic cult community, forging of • Panhellenism, contested visions of • Panhellenism, expressed in song • funerary, local myth in Panhellenic • insular, Panhellenic • locality, and Panhellenism

 Found in books: Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 55; Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 198

3. None, None, nan (8th cent. BCE - 8th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Aeschylus, local, in panhellenic ritual setting • Panhellenic • Panhellenic ritual, featuring local myth • Panhellenic sanctuaries, exclusive • Panhellenic sanctuaries, not quite panhellenic • Panhellenism • Panhellenism, Delphi and • Panhellenism, Panhellenic cult community, forging of • Panhellenism, contested visions of • Panhellenism, expressed in song • funerary, local myth in Panhellenic • identity, general, local vs. central/Panhellenic • insular, Panhellenic • locality, and Panhellenism • panhellenism

 Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 138; Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 128; Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 83, 191, 194, 196; Lipka (2021), Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus, 52, 53

4. None, None, nan (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Panhellenic • panhellenism

 Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 138; Lipka (2021), Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus, 52

5. None, None, nan (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Panhellenic • Panhellenism • panhellenism

 Found in books: Bernabe et al. (2013), Redefining Dionysos, 138; Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 3; Lipka (2021), Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus, 52, 53

6. None, None, nan (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Aeschylus, local, in panhellenic ritual setting • Aigina, Aiginetans, Panhellenism • Athens, and Panhellenism • Panhellenic, sanctuaries and games • Panhellenism • Panhellenism, Delphi and • Panhellenism, competed over • Panhellenism, contested visions of • Panhellenism, economic dimension of • Panhellenism, expressed in song • Panhellenism, festivals propagating • Panhellenism, local cults claiming • Persian Wars, and Panhellenism • Zeus Hellanios, and claims to Panhellenism • Zeus Hellanios, myth of blending into Panhellenic ritual • funerary, local myth in Panhellenic • insular, Panhellenic • locality, and Panhellenism

 Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 202, 207; Papadodima (2022), Ancient Greek Literature and the Foreign: Athenian Dialogues II, 61

7. None, None, nan (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Panhellenic sanctuaries, exclusive • Panhellenism • Panhellenism, local claims to

 Found in books: Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 25; Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 9, 255

8. Herodotus, Histories, 6.35, 6.105, 7.139 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Aeschylus, local, in panhellenic ritual setting • Athens, and Panhellenism • Helen, epichoric vs. panhellenic, • Panhellenic • Panhellenic, • Panhellenism • Panhellenism, Delphi and • Panhellenism, Kimon vs. Themistokles • Panhellenism, competed over • Panhellenism, contested visions of • Panhellenism, economic dimension of • Panhellenism, expressed in song • Panhellenism, local claims to • Panhellenism, tool in social contexts • Persian Wars, and Panhellenism • Zeus Hellanios, and claims to Panhellenism • economy, early fifth-century, and definitions of Panhellenism • funerary, local myth in Panhellenic • games, Panhellenic • grain-supply, and Panhellenism • insular, Panhellenic • locality, and Panhellenism • panhellenism

 Found in books: Athanassaki and Titchener (2022), Plutarch's Cities, 112; Bowie (2021), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, 465; Gygax and Zuiderhoek (2021), Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity, 76; Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 215; Lipka (2021), Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus, 168; Marincola et al. (2021), Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians, 67; Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben (2020), Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity, 267

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6.35 ἐν δὲ τῇσι Ἀθήνῃσι τηνικαῦτα εἶχε μὲν τὸ πᾶν κράτος Πεισίστρατος, ἀτὰρ ἐδυνάστευέ γε καὶ Μιλτιάδης ὁ Κυψέλου ἐὼν οἰκίης τεθριπποτρόφου, τὰ μὲν ἀνέκαθεν ἀπʼ Αἰακοῦ τε καὶ Αἰγίνης γεγονώς, τὰ δὲ νεώτερα Ἀθηναῖος, Φιλαίου τοῦ Αἴαντος παιδὸς γενομένου πρώτου τῆς οἰκίης ταύτης Ἀθηναίου. οὗτος ὁ Μιλτιάδης κατήμενος ἐν τοῖσι προθύροισι τοῖσι ἑωυτοῦ, ὁρέων τοὺς Δολόγκους παριόντας ἐσθῆτα ἔχοντας οὐκ ἐγχωρίην καὶ αἰχμὰς προσεβώσατο καί σφι προσελθοῦσι ἐπηγγείλατο καταγωγὴν καὶ ξείνια. οἳ δὲ δεξάμενοι καὶ ξεινισθέντες ὑπʼ αὐτοῦ ἐξέφαινον πᾶν τὸ μαντήιον, ἐκφήναντες δὲ ἐδέοντο αὐτοῦ τῷ θεῷ μιν πείθεσθαι. Μιλτιάδεα δὲ ἀκούσαντα παραυτίκα ἔπεισε ὁ λόγος οἷα ἀχθόμενόν τε τῇ Πεισιστράτου ἀρχῇ καὶ βουλόμενον ἐκποδὼν εἶναι. αὐτίκα δὲ ἐστάλη ἐς Δελφούς, ἐπειρησόμενος τὸ χρηστήριον εἰ ποιοίη τά περ αὐτοῦ οἱ Δόλογκοι προσεδέοντο.
6.105
καὶ πρῶτα μὲν ἐόντες ἔτι ἐν τῷ ἄστεϊ οἱ στρατηγοὶ ἀποπέμπουσι ἐς Σπάρτην κήρυκα Φειδιππίδην Ἀθηναῖον μὲν ἄνδρα, ἄλλως δὲ ἡμεροδρόμην τε καὶ τοῦτο μελετῶντα· τῷ δή, ὡς αὐτός τε ἔλεγε Φειδιππίδης καὶ Ἀθηναίοισι ἀπήγγελλε, περὶ τὸ Παρθένιον ὄρος τὸ ὑπὲρ Τεγέης ὁ Πὰν περιπίπτει· βώσαντα δὲ τὸ οὔνομα τοῦ Φειδιππίδεω τὸν Πᾶνα Ἀθηναίοισι κελεῦσαι ἀπαγγεῖλαι, διʼ ὅ τι ἑωυτοῦ οὐδεμίαν ἐπιμελείην ποιεῦνται ἐόντος εὐνόου Ἀθηναίοισι καὶ πολλαχῇ γενομένου σφι ἤδη χρησίμου, τὰ δʼ ἔτι καὶ ἐσομένου. καὶ ταῦτα μὲν Ἀθηναῖοι, καταστάντων σφι εὖ ἤδη τῶν πρηγμάτων, πιστεύσαντες εἶναι ἀληθέα ἱδρύσαντο ὑπὸ τῇ ἀκροπόλι Πανὸς ἱρόν, καὶ αὐτὸν ἀπὸ ταύτης τῆς ἀγγελίης θυσίῃσι ἐπετείοισι καὶ λαμπάδι ἱλάσκονται.
7.139
ἐνθαῦτα ἀναγκαίῃ ἐξέργομαι γνώμην ἀποδέξασθαι ἐπίφθονον μὲν πρὸς τῶν πλεόνων ἀνθρώπων, ὅμως δὲ τῇ γέ μοι φαίνεται εἶναι ἀληθὲς οὐκ ἐπισχήσω. εἰ Ἀθηναῖοι καταρρωδήσαντες τὸν ἐπιόντα κίνδυνον ἐξέλιπον τὴν σφετέρην, ἢ καὶ μὴ ἐκλιπόντες ἀλλὰ μείναντες ἔδοσαν σφέας αὐτοὺς Ξέρξῃ, κατὰ τὴν θάλασσαν οὐδαμοὶ ἂν ἐπειρῶντο ἀντιούμενοι βασιλέι. εἰ τοίνυν κατὰ τὴν θάλασσαν μηδεὶς ἠντιοῦτο Ξέρξῃ, κατά γε ἂν τὴν ἤπειρον τοιάδε ἐγίνετο· εἰ καὶ πολλοὶ τειχέων κιθῶνες ἦσαν ἐληλαμένοι διὰ τοῦ Ἰσθμοῦ Πελοποννησίοισι, προδοθέντες ἂν Λακεδαιμόνιοι ὑπὸ τῶν συμμάχων οὐκ ἑκόντων ἀλλʼ ὑπʼ ἀναγκαίης, κατὰ πόλις ἁλισκομένων ὑπὸ τοῦ ναυτικοῦ στρατοῦ τοῦ βαρβάρου, ἐμουνώθησαν, μουνωθέντες δὲ ἂν καὶ ἀποδεξάμενοι ἔργα μεγάλα ἀπέθανον γενναίως. ἢ ταῦτα ἂν ἔπαθον, ἢ πρὸ τοῦ ὁρῶντες ἂν καὶ τοὺς ἄλλους Ἕλληνας μηδίζοντας ὁμολογίῃ ἂν ἐχρήσαντο πρὸς Ξέρξην. καὶ οὕτω ἂν ἐπʼ ἀμφότερα ἡ Ἑλλὰς ἐγίνετο ὑπὸ Πέρσῃσι. τὴν γὰρ ὠφελίην τὴν τῶν τειχέων τῶν διὰ τοῦ Ἰσθμοῦ ἐληλαμένων οὐ δύναμαι πυθέσθαι ἥτις ἂν ἦν, βασιλέος ἐπικρατέοντος τῆς θαλάσσης. νῦν δὲ Ἀθηναίους ἄν τις λέγων σωτῆρας γενέσθαι τῆς Ἑλλάδος οὐκ ἂν ἁμαρτάνοι τὸ ἀληθές. οὗτοι γὰρ ἐπὶ ὁκότερα τῶν πρηγμάτων ἐτράποντο, ταῦτα ῥέψειν ἔμελλε· ἑλόμενοι δὲ τὴν Ἑλλάδα περιεῖναι ἐλευθέρην, τοῦτο τὸ Ἑλληνικὸν πᾶν τὸ λοιπόν, ὅσον μὴ ἐμήδισε, αὐτοὶ οὗτοι ἦσαν οἱ ἐπεγείραντες καὶ βασιλέα μετά γε θεοὺς ἀνωσάμενοι. οὐδὲ σφέας χρηστήρια φοβερὰ ἐλθόντα ἐκ Δελφῶν καὶ ἐς δεῖμα βαλόντα ἔπεισε ἐκλιπεῖν τὴν Ἑλλάδα, ἀλλὰ καταμείναντες ἀνέσχοντο τὸν ἐπιόντα ἐπὶ τὴν χώρην δέξασθαι.'' None
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6.35 At that time in Athens, Pisistratus held all power, but Miltiades son of Cypselus also had great influence. His household was rich enough to maintain a four-horse chariot, and he traced his earliest descent to Aeacus and Aegina, though his later ancestry was Athenian. Philaeus son of Ajax was the first of that house to be an Athenian. ,Miltiades was sitting on his porch when he saw the Dolonci go by with their foreign clothing and spears, so he called out to them, and when they came over, he invited them in for lodging and hospitality. They accepted, and after he entertained them, they revealed the whole story of the oracle to him and asked him to obey the god. ,He was persuaded as soon as he heard their speech, for he was tired of Pisistratus' rule and wanted to be away from it. He immediately set out for Delphi to ask the oracle if he should do what the Dolonci asked of him. " "
6.35
At that time in Athens, Pisistratus held all power, but Miltiades son of Cypselus also had great influence. His household was rich enough to maintain a four-horse chariot, and he traced his earliest descent to Aeacus and Aegina, though his later ancestry was Athenian. Philaeus son of Ajax was the first of that house to be an Athenian. ,Miltiades was sitting on his porch when he saw the Dolonci go by with their foreign clothing and spears, so he called out to them, and when they came over, he invited them in for lodging and hospitality. They accepted, and after he entertained them, they revealed the whole story of the oracle to him and asked him to obey the god. ,He was persuaded as soon as he heard their speech, for he was tired of Pisistratus' rule and wanted to be away from it. He immediately set out for Delphi to ask the oracle if he should do what the Dolonci asked of him. " "
6.105
While still in the city, the generals first sent to Sparta the herald Philippides, an Athenian and a long-distance runner who made that his calling. As Philippides himself said when he brought the message to the Athenians, when he was in the Parthenian mountain above Tegea he encountered Pan. ,Pan called out Philippides' name and bade him ask the Athenians why they paid him no attention, though he was of goodwill to the Athenians, had often been of service to them, and would be in the future. ,The Athenians believed that these things were true, and when they became prosperous they established a sacred precinct of Pan beneath the Acropolis. Ever since that message they propitiate him with annual sacrifices and a torch-race. " "
6.105
While still in the city, the generals first sent to Sparta the herald Philippides, an Athenian and a long-distance runner who made that his calling. As Philippides himself said when he brought the message to the Athenians, when he was in the Parthenian mountain above Tegea he encountered Pan. ,Pan called out Philippides' name and bade him ask the Athenians why they paid him no attention, though he was of goodwill to the Athenians, had often been of service to them, and would be in the future. ,The Athenians believed that these things were true, and when they became prosperous they established a sacred precinct of Pan beneath the Acropolis. Ever since that message they propitiate him with annual sacrifices and a torch-race. " 7.139 Here I am forced to declare an opinion which will be displeasing to most, but I will not refrain from saying what seems to me to be true. ,Had the Athenians been panic-struck by the threatened peril and left their own country, or had they not indeed left it but remained and surrendered themselves to Xerxes, none would have attempted to withstand the king by sea. What would have happened on land if no one had resisted the king by sea is easy enough to determine. ,Although the Peloponnesians had built not one but many walls across the Isthmus for their defense, they would nevertheless have been deserted by their allies (these having no choice or free will in the matter, but seeing their cities taken one by one by the foreign fleet), until at last they would have stood alone. They would then have put up quite a fight and perished nobly. ,Such would have been their fate. Perhaps, however, when they saw the rest of Hellas siding with the enemy, they would have made terms with Xerxes. In either case Hellas would have been subdued by the Persians, for I cannot see what advantage could accrue from the walls built across the isthmus, while the king was master of the seas. ,As it is, to say that the Athenians were the saviors of Hellas is to hit the truth. It was the Athenians who held the balance; whichever side they joined was sure to prevail. choosing that Greece should preserve her freedom, the Athenians roused to battle the other Greek states which had not yet gone over to the Persians and, after the gods, were responsible for driving the king off. ,Nor were they moved to desert Hellas by the threatening oracles which came from Delphi and sorely dismayed them, but they stood firm and had the courage to meet the invader of their country.
7.139
Here I am forced to declare an opinion which will be displeasing to most, but I will not refrain from saying what seems to me to be true. ,Had the Athenians been panic-struck by the threatened peril and left their own country, or had they not indeed left it but remained and surrendered themselves to Xerxes, none would have attempted to withstand the king by sea. What would have happened on land if no one had resisted the king by sea is easy enough to determine. ,Although the Peloponnesians had built not one but many walls across the Isthmus for their defense, they would nevertheless have been deserted by their allies (these having no choice or free will in the matter, but seeing their cities taken one by one by the foreign fleet), until at last they would have stood alone. They would then have put up quite a fight and perished nobly. ,Such would have been their fate. Perhaps, however, when they saw the rest of Hellas siding with the enemy, they would have made terms with Xerxes. In either case Hellas would have been subdued by the Persians, for I cannot see what advantage could accrue from the walls built across the isthmus, while the king was master of the seas. ,As it is, to say that the Athenians were the saviors of Hellas is to hit the truth. It was the Athenians who held the balance; whichever side they joined was sure to prevail. choosing that Greece should preserve her freedom, the Athenians roused to battle the other Greek states which had not yet gone over to the Persians and, after the gods, were responsible for driving the king off. ,Nor were they moved to desert Hellas by the threatening oracles which came from Delphi and sorely dismayed them, but they stood firm and had the courage to meet the invader of their country. '" None
9. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 3.58, 4.97-4.98, 4.101 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Aigina, Aiginetans, Panhellenism • Akhaia, Akhaians (epic, also Atreids), importance for Panhellenic standing • Panhellenism • Panhellenism, local claims to • Panhellenism, tool in social contexts • Thespiai, Panhellenism • identity, general, local vs. central/Panhellenic • soteria (in Greek antiquity), Panhellenic deliverance

 Found in books: Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 52; Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 109, 387; Pucci (2016), Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay, 115

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3.58 , Still, in the name of the gods who once presided over our confederacy, and of our own good service in the Hellenic cause, we adjure you to relent; to recall the decision which we fear that the Thebans may have obtained from you; to ask back the gift that you have given them, that they disgrace not you by slaying us; to gain a pure instead of a guilty gratitude, and not to gratify others to be yourselves rewarded with shame. ,Our lives may be quickly taken, but it will be a heavy task to wipe away the infamy of the deed; as we are no enemies whom you might justly punish, but friends forced into taking arms against you. ,To grant us our lives would be, therefore, a righteous judgment; if you consider also that we are prisoners who surrendered of their own accord, stretching out our hands for quarter, whose slaughter Hellenic law forbids, and who besides were always your benefactors. ,Look at the sepulchres of your fathers, slain by the Medes and buried in our country, whom year by year we honored with garments and all other dues, and the first fruits of all that our land produced in their season, as friends from a friendly country and allies to our old companions in arms! Should you not decide aright, your conduct would be the very opposite to ours. Consider only: ,Pausanias buried them thinking that he was laying them in friendly ground and among men as friendly; but you, if you kill us and make the Plataean territory Theban, will leave your fathers and kinsmen in a hostile soil and among their murderers, deprived of the honors which they now enjoy. What is more, you will enslave the land in which the freedom of the Hellenes was won, make desolate the temples of the gods to whom they prayed before they overcame the Medes, and take away your ancestral sacrifices from those who founded and instituted them.
4.97
, The Boeotians set up a trophy, took up their own dead, and stripped those of the enemy, and leaving a guard over them retired to Tanagra, there to take measures for attacking Delium . ,Meanwhile a herald came from the Athenians to ask for the dead, but was met and turned back by a Boeotian herald, who told him that he would effect nothing until the return of himself the Boeotian herald, and who then went on to the Athenians, and told them on the part of the Boeotians that they had done wrong in transgressing the law of the Hellenes. ,of what use was the universal custom protecting the temples in an invaded country if the Athenians were to fortify Delium and live there, acting exactly as if they were on unconsecrated ground, and drawing and using for their purposes the water which they, the Boeotians, never touched except for sacred uses? ,Accordingly for the god as well as for themselves, in the name of the deities concerned, and of Apollo, the Boeotians invited them first to evacuate the temple, if they wished to take up the dead that belonged to them. 4.98 , After these words from the herald, the Athenians sent their own herald to the Boeotians to say that they had not done any wrong to the temple, and for the future would do it no more harm than they could help; not having occupied it originally in any such design, but to defend themselves from it against those who were really wronging them. ,The law of the Hellenes was that conquest of a country, whether more or less extensive, carried with it possession of the temples in that country, with the obligation to keep up the usual ceremonies, at least as far as possible. ,The Boeotians and most other people who had turned out the owners of a country, and put themselves in their places by force, now held as of right the temples which they originally entered as usurpers. ,If the Athenians could have conquered more of Boeotia this would have been the case with them: as things stood, the piece of it which they had got they should treat as their own, and not quit unless obliged. ,The water they had disturbed under the impulsion of a necessity which they had not wantonly incurred, having been forced to use it in defending themselves against the Boeotians who had first invaded Attica . ,Besides, anything done under the pressure of war and danger might reasonably claim indulgence even in the eye of the god; or why, pray, were the altars the asylum for involuntary offences? Transgression also was a term applied to presumptuous offenders, not to the victims of adverse circumstances. ,In short, which were most impious—the Boeotians who wished to barter dead bodies for holy places, or the Athenians who refused to give up holy places to obtain what was theirs by right? , The condition of evacuating Boeotia must therefore be withdrawn. They were no longer in Boeotia . They stood where they stood by the right of the sword. All that the Boeotians had to do was to tell them to take up their dead under a truce according to the national custom.
4.101
, Soon after the fall of Delium, which took place seventeen days after the battle, the Athenian herald, without knowing what had happened, came again for the dead, which were now restored by the Boeotians, who no longer answered as at first. ,Not quite five hundred Boeotians fell in the battle, and nearly one thousand Athenians, including Hippocrates the general, besides a great number of light troops and camp followers. , Soon after this battle Demosthenes, after the failure of his voyage to Siphae and of the plot on the town, availed himself of the Acarian and Agraean troops and of the four hundred Athenian heavy infantry which he had on board, to make a descent on the Sicyonian coast. ,Before however all his ships had come to shore, the Sicyonians came up and routed and chased to their ships those that had landed, killing some and taking others prisoners; after which they set up a trophy, and gave back the dead under truce. , About the same time with the affair of Delium took place the death of Sitalces, king of the Odrysians, who was defeated in battle, in a campaign against the TribalIi; Seuthes, son of Sparadocus, his nephew, succeeding to the kingdom of the Odrysians, and of the rest of Thrace ruled by Sitalces. '' None
10. None, None, nan (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Panhellenism • identity, general, local vs. central/Panhellenic

 Found in books: Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 220; Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 98

11. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 4.61, 11.29 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Aeschylus, local, in panhellenic ritual setting • Aigina, Aiginetans, Panhellenism • Akhaia, Akhaians (epic, also Atreids), importance for Panhellenic standing • Panhellenism • Panhellenism, Delphi and • Panhellenism, expressed in song • Panhellenism, local claims to • Panhellenism, local cults claiming • Panhellenism, tool in social contexts • Thespiai, Panhellenism • Zeus Hellanios, and claims to Panhellenism • Zeus Hellanios, myth of blending into Panhellenic ritual • funerary, local myth in Panhellenic • identity, general, local vs. central/Panhellenic • insular, Panhellenic • locality, and Panhellenism • soteria (in Greek antiquity), Panhellenic deliverance

 Found in books: Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 52, 53, 68; Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 90, 181, 387

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4.61 1. \xa0Minos, when he learned of the fate which had befallen his son, came to Athens and demanded satisfaction for the murder of Androgeos. And when no one paid any attention to him, he declared war against the Athenians and uttered imprecations to Zeus, calling down drought and famine throughout the state of the Athenians. And when drought quickly prevailed about Attica and Greece and the crops were destroyed, the heads of the communities gathered together and inquired of the god what steps they could take to rid themselves of their present evils. The god made answer to them that they should go to Aeacus, the son of Zeus and Aeginê, the daughter of Asopus, and ask him to off up prayers on their behalf.,2. \xa0And when they had done as they had been commanded, among the rest of the Greeks, the drought was broken, but among the Athenians alone it continued; wherefore the Athenians were compelled to make inquiry of the god how they might be rid of their present evils. Thereupon the god made answer that they could do so if they would render to Minos such satisfaction for the murder of Androgeos as he might demand.,3. \xa0The Athenians obeyed the order of the god, and Minos commanded them that they should give seven youths and as many maidens every nine years to the Minotaur for him to devour, for as long a time as the monster should live. And when the Athenians gave them, the inhabitants of Attica were rid of their evils and Minos ceased warring on Athens. At the expiration of nine years Minos came again to Attica accompanied by a great fleet and demanded and received the fourteen young people.,4. \xa0Now Theseus was one of those who were to set forth, and Aegeus made the agreement with the captain of the vessel that, if Theseus should overcome the Minotaur, they should sail back with their sails white, but if he died, they should be black, just as they had been accustomed to do on the previous occasion. When they had landed in Crete, Ariadnê, the daughter of Minos, became enamoured of Theseus, who was unusually handsome, and Theseus, after conversing with her and securing her assistance, both slew the Minotaur and got safely away, since he had learned from her the way out of the labyrinth.,5. \xa0In making his way back to his native land he carried off Ariadnê and sailed out unobserved during the night, after which he put in at the island which at that time was called Dia, but is now called Naxos. At this same time, the myths relate, Dionysus showed himself on the island, and because of the beauty of Ariadnê he took the maiden away from Theseus and kept her as his lawful wife, loving her exceedingly. Indeed, after her death he considered her worthy of immortal honours because of the affection he had for her, and placed among the stars of heaven the "Crown of Ariadnê.",6. \xa0But Theseus, they say, being vexed exceedingly because the maiden had been taken from him, and forgetting because of his grief the command of Aegeus, came to port in Attica with the black sails.,7. \xa0And of Aegeus, we are told, witnessing the return of the ship and thinking that his son was dead, performed an act which was at the same time heroic and a calamity; for he ascended the acropolis and then, because he was disgusted with life by reason of his excessive grief, cast himself down from the height.,8. \xa0After Aegeus had died, Theseus, succeeding to the kingship, ruled over the masses in accordance with the laws and performed many deeds which contributed to the aggrandisement of his native land. The most notable thing which he accomplished was the incorporation of the demes, which were small in size but many in number, into the city of Athens;,9. \xa0since from that time on the Athenians were filled with pride by reason of the importance of their state and aspired to the leadership of the Greeks. But for our part, now that we have set forth these facts at sufficient length, we shall record what remains to be said about Theseus.
4.61
\xa0Minos, when he learned of the fate which had befallen his son, came to Athens and demanded satisfaction for the murder of Androgeos. And when no one paid any attention to him, he declared war against the Athenians and uttered imprecations to Zeus, calling down drought and famine throughout the state of the Athenians. And when drought quickly prevailed about Attica and Greece and the crops were destroyed, the heads of the communities gathered together and inquired of the god what steps they could take to rid themselves of their present evils. The god made answer to them that they should go to Aeacus, the son of Zeus and Aeginê, the daughter of Asopus, and ask him to off up prayers on their behalf.,\xa0And when they had done as they had been commanded, among the rest of the Greeks, the drought was broken, but among the Athenians alone it continued; wherefore the Athenians were compelled to make inquiry of the god how they might be rid of their present evils. Thereupon the god made answer that they could do so if they would render to Minos such satisfaction for the murder of Androgeos as he might demand.,\xa0The Athenians obeyed the order of the god, and Minos commanded them that they should give seven youths and as many maidens every nine years to the Minotaur for him to devour, for as long a time as the monster should live. And when the Athenians gave them, the inhabitants of Attica were rid of their evils and Minos ceased warring on Athens. At the expiration of nine years Minos came again to Attica accompanied by a great fleet and demanded and received the fourteen young people.,\xa0Now Theseus was one of those who were to set forth, and Aegeus made the agreement with the captain of the vessel that, if Theseus should overcome the Minotaur, they should sail back with their sails white, but if he died, they should be black, just as they had been accustomed to do on the previous occasion. When they had landed in Crete, Ariadnê, the daughter of Minos, became enamoured of Theseus, who was unusually handsome, and Theseus, after conversing with her and securing her assistance, both slew the Minotaur and got safely away, since he had learned from her the way out of the labyrinth.,\xa0In making his way back to his native land he carried off Ariadnê and sailed out unobserved during the night, after which he put in at the island which at that time was called Dia, but is now called Naxos. At this same time, the myths relate, Dionysus showed himself on the island, and because of the beauty of Ariadnê he took the maiden away from Theseus and kept her as his lawful wife, loving her exceedingly. Indeed, after her death he considered her worthy of immortal honours because of the affection he had for her, and placed among the stars of heaven the "Crown of Ariadnê.",\xa0But Theseus, they say, being vexed exceedingly because the maiden had been taken from him, and forgetting because of his grief the command of Aegeus, came to port in Attica with the black sails.,\xa0And of Aegeus, we are told, witnessing the return of the ship and thinking that his son was dead, performed an act which was at the same time heroic and a calamity; for he ascended the acropolis and then, because he was disgusted with life by reason of his excessive grief, cast himself down from the height.,\xa0After Aegeus had died, Theseus, succeeding to the kingship, ruled over the masses in accordance with the laws and performed many deeds which contributed to the aggrandisement of his native land. The most notable thing which he accomplished was the incorporation of the demes, which were small in size but many in number, into the city of Athens;,\xa0since from that time on the Athenians were filled with pride by reason of the importance of their state and aspired to the leadership of the Greeks. But for our part, now that we have set forth these facts at sufficient length, we shall record what remains to be said about Theseus.
11.29
1. \xa0When Mardonius and his army had returned to Thebes, the Greeks gathered in congress decreed to make common cause with the Athenians and advancing to Plataea in a body, to fight to a finish for liberty, and also to make a vow to the gods that, if they were victorious, the Greeks would unite in celebrating the Festival of Liberty on that day and would hold the games of the Festival in Plataea.,2. \xa0And when the Greek forces were assembled at the Isthmus, all of them agreed that they should swear an oath about the war, one that would make staunch the concord among them and would compel entrenchment nobly to endure the perils of the battle.,3. \xa0The oath ran as follows: "I\xa0will not hold life dearer than liberty, nor will\xa0I desert the leaders, whether they be living or dead, but I\xa0will bury all the allies who have perished in the battle; and if I\xa0overcome the barbarians in the war, I\xa0will not destroy any one of the cities which have participated in the struggle; nor will\xa0I rebuild any one of the sanctuaries which have been burnt or demolished, but I\xa0will let them be and leave them as a reminder to coming generations of the impiety of the barbarians.",4. \xa0After they had sworn the oath, they marched to Boeotia through the pass of Cithaeron, and when they had descended as far as the foothills near Erythrae, they pitched camp there. The command over the Athenians was held by Aristeides, and the supreme command by Pausanias, who was the guardian of the son of Leonidas.11.29 \xa0When Mardonius and his army had returned to Thebes, the Greeks gathered in congress decreed to make common cause with the Athenians and advancing to Plataea in a body, to fight to a finish for liberty, and also to make a vow to the gods that, if they were victorious, the Greeks would unite in celebrating the Festival of Liberty on that day and would hold the games of the Festival in Plataea.,\xa0And when the Greek forces were assembled at the Isthmus, all of them agreed that they should swear an oath about the war, one that would make staunch the concord among them and would compel entrenchment nobly to endure the perils of the battle.,\xa0The oath ran as follows: "I\xa0will not hold life dearer than liberty, nor will\xa0I desert the leaders, whether they be living or dead, but I\xa0will bury all the allies who have perished in the battle; and if I\xa0overcome the barbarians in the war, I\xa0will not destroy any one of the cities which have participated in the struggle; nor will\xa0I rebuild any one of the sanctuaries which have been burnt or demolished, but I\xa0will let them be and leave them as a reminder to coming generations of the impiety of the barbarians.",\xa0After they had sworn the oath, they marched to Boeotia through the pass of Cithaeron, and when they had descended as far as the foothills near Erythrae, they pitched camp there. The command over the Athenians was held by Aristeides, and the supreme command by Pausanias, who was the guardian of the son of Leonidas. ' None
12. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.4.4, 1.18.5, 2.29.7-2.29.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Aeschylus, local, in panhellenic ritual setting • Aigina, Aiginetans, Panhellenism • Athens, and Panhellenism • Panhellenic • Panhellenic sanctuaries, exclusive • Panhellenic sanctuaries, not quite panhellenic • Panhellenism • Panhellenism, Delphi and • Panhellenism, Panhellenic cult community, forging of • Panhellenism, competed over • Panhellenism, contested visions of • Panhellenism, economic dimension of • Panhellenism, expressed in song • Panhellenism, local claims to • Panhellenism, local cults claiming • Panhellenism, tool in social contexts • Persian Wars, and Panhellenism • Zeus Hellanios, and claims to Panhellenism • Zeus Hellanios, myth of blending into Panhellenic ritual • economy, early fifth-century, and definitions of Panhellenism • funerary, local myth in Panhellenic • grain-supply, and Panhellenism • identity, general, local vs. central/Panhellenic • insular, Panhellenic • locality, and Panhellenism • soteria (in Greek antiquity), Panhellenic deliverance • theoria, and Panhellenic identity

 Found in books: Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 117; Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 56, 68; Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 84, 182, 200, 212, 213, 219

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1.4.4 οὗτοι μὲν δὴ τοὺς Ἕλληνας τρόπον τὸν εἰρημένον ἔσωζον, οἱ δὲ Γαλάται Πυλῶν τε ἐντὸς ἦσαν καὶ τὰ πολίσματα ἑλεῖν ἐν οὐδενὶ τὰ λοιπὰ ποιησάμενοι Δελφοὺς καὶ τὰ χρήματα. τοῦ θεοῦ διαρπάσαι μάλιστα εἶχον σπουδήν. καί σφισιν αὐτοί τε Δελφοὶ καὶ Φωκέων ἀντετάχθησαν οἱ τὰς πόλεις περὶ τὸν Παρνασσὸν οἰκοῦντες, ἀφίκετο δὲ καὶ δύναμις Αἰτωλῶν· τὸ γὰρ Αἰτωλικὸν προεῖχεν ἀκμῇ νεότητος τὸν χρόνον τοῦτον. ὡς δὲ ἐς χεῖρας συνῄεσαν, ἐνταῦθα κεραυνοί τε ἐφέροντο ἐς τοὺς Γαλάτας καὶ ἀπορραγεῖσαι πέτραι τοῦ Παρνασσοῦ, δείματά τε ἄνδρες ἐφίσταντο ὁπλῖται τοῖς βαρβάροις· τούτων τοὺς μὲν ἐξ Ὑπερβορέων λέγουσιν ἐλθεῖν, Ὑπέροχον καὶ Ἀμάδοκον, τὸν δὲ τρίτον Πύρρον εἶναι τὸν Ἀχιλλέως· ἐναγίζουσι δὲ ἀπὸ ταύτης Δελφοὶ τῆς συμμαχίας Πύρρῳ, πρότερον ἔχοντες ἅτε ἀνδρὸς πολεμίου καὶ τὸ μνῆμα ἐν ἀτιμίᾳ.
1.18.5
πλησίον δὲ ᾠκοδόμητο ναὸς Εἰλειθυίας, ἣν ἐλθοῦσαν ἐξ Ὑπερβορέων ἐς Δῆλον γενέσθαι βοηθὸν ταῖς Λητοῦς ὠδῖσι, τοὺς δὲ ἄλλους παρʼ αὐτῶν φασι τῆς Εἰλειθυίας μαθεῖν τὸ ὄνομα· καὶ θύουσί τε Εἰλειθυίᾳ Δήλιοι καὶ ὕμνον ᾄδουσιν Ὠλῆνος. Κρῆτες δὲ χώρας τῆς Κνωσσίας ἐν Ἀμνισῷ γενέσθαι νομίζουσιν Εἰλείθυιαν καὶ παῖδα Ἥρας εἶναι· μόνοις δὲ Ἀθηναίοις τῆς Εἰλειθυίας κεκάλυπται τὰ ξόανα ἐς ἄκρους τοὺς πόδας. τὰ μὲν δὴ δύο εἶναι Κρητικὰ καὶ Φαίδρας ἀναθήματα ἔλεγον αἱ γυναῖκες, τὸ δὲ ἀρχαιότατον Ἐρυσίχθονα ἐκ Δήλου κομίσαι.
2.29.7
ἐπειργασμένοι δέ εἰσι κατὰ τὴν ἔσοδον οἱ παρὰ Αἰακόν ποτε ὑπὸ τῶν Ἑλλήνων σταλέντες· αἰτίαν δὲ τὴν αὐτὴν Αἰγινήταις καὶ οἱ λοιποὶ λέγουσιν. αὐχμὸς τὴν Ἑλλάδα ἐπὶ χρόνον ἐπίεζε καὶ οὔτε τὴν ἐκτὸς ἰσθμοῦ χώραν οὔτε Πελοποννησίοις ὗεν ὁ θεός, ἐς ὃ ἐς Δελφοὺς ἀπέστειλαν ἐρησομένους τὸ αἴτιον ὅ τι εἴη καὶ αἰτήσοντας ἅμα λύσιν τοῦ κακοῦ. τούτοις ἡ Πυθία εἶπε Δία ἱλάσκεσθαι, χρῆναι δέ, εἴπερ ὑπακούσει σφίσιν, Αἰακὸν τὸν ἱκετεύσαντα εἶναι. 2.29.8 οὕτως Αἰακοῦ δεησομένους ἀποστέλλουσιν ἀφʼ ἑκάστης πόλεως· καὶ ὁ μὲν τῷ Πανελληνίῳ Διὶ θύσας καὶ εὐξάμενος τὴν Ἑλλάδα γῆν ἐποίησεν ὕεσθαι, τῶν δὲ ἐλθόντων ὡς αὐτὸν εἰκόνας ταύτας ἐποιήσαντο οἱ Αἰγινῆται. τοῦ περιβόλου δὲ ἐντὸς ἐλαῖαι πεφύκασιν ἐκ παλαιοῦ καὶ βωμός ἐστιν οὐ πολὺ ἀνέχων ἐκ τῆς γῆς· ὡς δὲ καὶ μνῆμα οὗτος ὁ βωμὸς εἴη Αἰακοῦ, λεγόμενόν ἐστιν ἐν ἀπορρήτῳ.'' None
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1.4.4 So they tried to save Greece in the way described, but the Gauls, now south of the Gates, cared not at all to capture the other towns, but were very eager to sack Delphi and the treasures of the god. They were opposed by the Delphians themselves and the Phocians of the cities around Parnassus ; a force of Aetolians also joined the defenders, for the Aetolians at this time were pre-eminent for their vigorous activity. When the forces engaged, not only were thunderbolts and rocks broken off from Parnassus hurled against the Gauls, but terrible shapes as armed warriors haunted the foreigners. They say that two of them, Hyperochus and Amadocus, came from the Hyperboreans, and that the third was Pyrrhus son of Achilles. Because of this help in battle the Delphians sacrifice to Pyrrhus as to a hero, although formerly they held even his tomb in dishonor, as being that of an enemy.
1.18.5
Hard by is built a temple of Eileithyia, who they say came from the Hyperboreans to Delos and helped Leto in her labour; and from Delos the name spread to other peoples. The Delians sacrifice to Eileithyia and sing a hymn of Olen . But the Cretans suppose that Eileithyia was born at Auunisus in the Cnossian territory, and that Hera was her mother. Only among the Athenians are the wooden figures of Eileithyia draped to the feet. The women told me that two are Cretan, being offerings of Phaedra, and that the third, which is the oldest, Erysichthon brought from Delos .
2.29.7
Wrought in relief at the entrance are the envoys whom the Greeks once dispatched to Aeacus. The reason for the embassy given by the Aeginetans is the same as that which the other Greeks assign. A drought had for some time afflicted Greece, and no rain fell either beyond the Isthmus or in the Peloponnesus, until at last they sent envoys to Delphi to ask what was the cause and to beg for deliverance from the evil. The Pythian priestess bade them propitiate Zeus, saying that he would not listen to them unless the one to supplicate him were Aeacus. 2.29.8 And so envoys came with a request to Aeacus from each city. By sacrifice and prayer to Zeus, God of all the Greeks (Panellenios), he caused rain to fall upon the earth, and the Aeginetans made these likenesses of those who came to him. Within the enclosure are olive trees that have grown there from of old, and there is an altar which is raised but a little from the ground. That this altar is also the tomb of Aeacus is told as a holy secret.'' None
13. Epigraphy, Seg, 33.147
 Tagged with subjects: • Aeschylus, local, in panhellenic ritual setting • Panhellenic ritual, featuring local myth • Panhellenism • Panhellenism, Delphi and • Panhellenism, Panhellenic cult community, forging of • Panhellenism, contested visions of • Panhellenism, expressed in song • Zeus Hellanios, myth of blending into Panhellenic ritual • gods, timai in Panhellenic persona • insular, Panhellenic • locality, and Panhellenism

 Found in books: Jim (2022), Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece, 89; Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 222

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33.147 Face A (front) . . . Hekatombaion: . . . and for the . . . to provide lunch (aristom) . . . a drachma each (5) . . . the Proerosia offering (?) (tēn prēro-), . . . the Delphinion, a goat . . . for Hekate . . . _ . . . a full-grown victim (teleom), to be sold (praton). (10) Metageitnion: for Zeus Kataibates in the sacred enclosure (sēkōi) by the Delphini?on, a full-grown victim (teleon), to be sold (praton). _ An oath victim (horkōmosion) is to be provided for the audits (euthunas). Boedromion: the Proerosia; for Zeus Polieus, a select (kriton) sheep, a select piglet; at Automenai (?) (ep&' None
14. Strabo, Geography, 9.3.9
 Tagged with subjects: • Aeschylus, local, in panhellenic ritual setting • Panhellenic • Panhellenic ritual, featuring local myth • Panhellenic sanctuaries, exclusive • Panhellenic sanctuaries, not quite panhellenic • Panhellenism • Panhellenism, Delphi and • Panhellenism, Panhellenic cult community, forging of • Panhellenism, expressed in song • funerary, local myth in Panhellenic • insular, Panhellenic • locality, and Panhellenism • theoria, and Panhellenic identity

 Found in books: Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 114; Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 195, 199, 200

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9.3.9 of the temples, the one with wings must be placed among the myths; the second is said to be the work of Trophonius and Agamedes; and the present temple was built by the Amphictyons. In the sacred precinct is to be seen the tomb of Neoptolemus, which was made in accordance with an oracle, Machaereus, a Delphian, having slain him because, according to the myth, he was asking the god for redress for the murder of his father; but according to all probability it was because he had attacked the sanctuary. Branchus, who presided over the sanctuary at Didyma, is called a descendant of Machaereus.'' None
15. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Panhellenic • festivals, Panhellenic

 Found in books: Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 370; Lupu (2005), Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) 104




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