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38 results for "palladium"
1. Homer, Iliad, 6.92, 6.273 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 162
6.92. / the robe that seemeth to her the fairest and amplest in her hall, and that is far dearest to her own self, this let her lay upon the knees of fair-haired Athene, and vow to her that she will sacrifice in her temple twelve sleek heifers that have not felt the goad, if she will have compassion 6.273. / driver of the spoil, with burnt-offerings, when thou hast gathered together the aged wives; and the robe that seemeth to thee the fairest and amplest in thy hall, and that is dearest far to thine own self, this do thou lay upon the knees of fair-haired Athene and vow to her that thou wilt sacrifice in her temple twelve sleek heifers that have not felt the goad,
2. Cicero, Philippicae, 9.14, 11.24 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58, 163
3. Cicero, Pro Scauro, 48 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 163
4. Cicero, In Verrem, 2.2.84-2.2.85 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58
5. Cicero, Letters To His Friends, 7.23, 7.23.1-7.23.2, 13.2 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58
6. Varro, On The Latin Language, 5.54 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 165
7. Varro, On Agriculture, 1.59.2 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58
8. Livy, History, 1.4.5, 1.45.4-1.45.5, 26.27.14 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 163, 165, 211
9. Ovid, Tristia, 3.1.31-3.1.34 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58, 211
10. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, 6.5.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58
11. Horace, Sermones, 2.3.16 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58
12. Hyginus, Fabulae (Genealogiae), 261 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 211
13. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 1.68-1.69, 2.66.5-2.66.6 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 162, 163
1.68. 1.  But the things which I myself know by having seen them and concerning which no scruple forbids me to write are as follows. They show you in Rome a temple built not far from the Forum in the short street that leads to the Carinae; it is a small shrine, and is darkened by the height of the adjacent buildings. The place is called in the native speech Velia. In this temple there are images of the Trojan gods which it is lawful for all to see, with an inscription showing them to be the Penates. ,2.  They are two seated youths holding spears, and are pieces of ancient workmanship. We have seen many other statues also of these gods in ancient temples and in all of them are represented two youths in military garb. These it is permitted to see, and it is also permitted to hear and to write about them what Callistratus, the author of the history of Samothrace, relates, and also Satyrus, who collected the ancient legends, and many others, too, among whom the poet Arctinus is the earliest we know of.,3.  At any rate, the following is the account they give. Chrysê, the daughter of Pallas, when she was married to Dardanus, brought for her dowry the gifts of Athena, that is, the Palladia and the sacred symbols of the Great Gods, in whose mysteries she had been instructed. When the Arcadians, fleeing from the deluge, left the Peloponnesus and established their abode in the Thracian island, Dardanus built there a temple to these gods, whose particular names he kept secret from all any others, and performed the mysteries in their honour which are observed to this day by the Samothracians.,4.  Then, when he was conducting the greater part of the people into Asia, he left the sacred rites and mysteries of the gods with those who remained in the island, but packed up and carried with him the Palladia and the images of the gods. And upon consulting the oracle concerning the place where he should settle, among other things that he learned he received this answer relating to the custody of the holy objects: "In the town thou buildest worship undying found To gods ancestral; guard them, sacrifice, Adore with choirs. For whilst these holy things In thy land remain, Zeus' daughter's gifts of old Bestowed upon thy souse, secure from harm Thy city shall abide forevermore." 1.69. 1.  Dardanus, accordingly, left the statues in the city which he founded and named after himself, but when Ilium was settled later, they were removed thither by his descendants; and the people of Ilium built a temple and a sanctuary for them upon the citadel and preserved them with all possible care, looking upon them as sent from Heaven and as pledges of the city's safety.,2.  And while the lower town was being captured, Aeneas, possessing himself of the citadel, took out of the sanctuary the images of the Great Gods and the Palladium which still remained (for Odysseus and Diomed, they say, when they came into Ilium by night, had stolen the other away), and carrying them with him out of the city, brought them into Italy.,3.  Arctinus, however, says that only one Palladium was given by Zeus to Dardanus and that this remained in Ilium, hidden in the sanctuary, till the city was being taken; but that from this a copy was made, differing in no respect from the original, and exposed to public view, on purpose to deceive those who might be planning to steal it, and that the Achaeans, having formed such a plan, took the copy away.,4.  I say, therefore, upon the authority of the men above-mentioned, that the holy objects brought into Italy by Aeneas were the images of the Great Gods, to whom the Samothracians, of all the Greeks, pay the greatest worship, and the Palladium, famous in legend, which they say is kept by the holy virgins in the temple of Vesta, where the perpetual fire is also preserved; but concerning these matters I shall speak hereafter. And there may also be other objects besides these which are kept secret from us who are not initiated. But let this suffice concerning the holy objects of the Trojans. 2.66.5.  Taking this incident, then, as an admitted fact, they add some conjectures of their own. Thus, some affirm that the objects preserved here are a part of those holy things which were once in Samothrace; that Dardanus removed them out of that island into the city which he himself had built, and that Aeneas, when he fled from the Troad, brought them along with the other holy things into Italy. But others declare that it is the Palladium that fell from Heaven, the same that was in the possession of the people of Ilium; for they hold that Aeneas, being well acquainted with it, brought it into Italy, whereas the Achaeans stole away the copy, — an incident about which many stories have been related both by poets and by historians. 2.66.6.  For my part, I find from very many evidences that there are indeed some holy things, unknown to the public, kept by the virgins, and not the fire alone; but what they are I do not think should be inquired into too curiously, either by me of by anyone else who wishes to observe the reverence due to the gods.
14. Ovid, Fasti, 2.411, 6.419-6.422, 6.424, 6.436-6.454 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 162, 163, 165
2.411. arbor erat: remanent vestigia, quaeque vocatur 6.419. moenia Dardanides nuper nova fecerat Ilus 6.420. (Ilus adhuc Asiae dives habebat opes): 6.421. creditur armiferae signum caeleste Minervae 6.422. urbis in Iliacae desiluisse iuga. 6.424. hoc superest illic, Pallada Roma tenet. 6.436. Vesta, quod assiduo lumine cuncta videt, 6.437. heu quantum timuere patres, quo tempore Vesta 6.438. arsit et est tectis obruta paene suis! 6.439. flagrabant sancti sceleratis ignibus ignes, 6.440. mixtaque erat flammae flamma profana piae. 6.441. attonitae flebant demisso crine ministrae: 6.442. abstulerat vires corporis ipse timor, 6.443. provolat in medium, et magna succurrite! voce 6.444. non est auxilium flere Metellus ait. 6.445. ‘pignora virgineis fatalia tollite palmis: 6.446. non ea sunt voto, sed rapienda manu. 6.447. me miserum! dubitatis?’ ait. dubitare videbat 6.448. et pavidas posito procubuisse genu. 6.449. haurit aquas tollensque manus, ignoscite, dixit 6.450. ‘sacra! vir intrabo non adeunda viro. 6.451. si scelus est, in me commissi poena redundet: 6.452. sit capitis damno Roma soluta mei.’ 6.453. dixit et inrupit, factum dea rapta probavit 6.454. pontificisque sui munere tuta fuit. 2.411. There was a tree: traces remain, which is now called 6.419. Ilus, scion of Dardanus, had founded a new city 6.420. (Ilus was still rich, holding the wealth of Asia) 6.421. A sky-born image of armed Minerva was said 6.422. To have fallen on the hillside near to Troy. 6.424. That’s all that’s left there: Rome has the Palladium.) 6.436. Vesta guards it: who sees all things by her unfailing light. 6.437. How worried the Senate was, when Vesta’s temple 6.438. Caught fire: and she was nearly buried by her own roof! 6.439. Holy fires blazed, fed by sinful fires, 6.440. Sacred and profane flames were merged. 6.441. The priestesses with streaming hair, wept in amazement: 6.442. Fear had robbed them of their bodily powers. 6.443. Metellus rushed into their midst, crying in a loud voice: 6.444. ‘Run and help, there’s no use in weeping. 6.445. Seize fate’s pledges in your virgin hands: 6.446. They won’t survive by prayers, but by action. 6.447. Ah me! Do you hesitate?’ he said. He saw them, 6.448. Hesitating, sinking in terror to their knees. 6.449. He took up water, and holding his hands aloft, cried: 6.450. ‘Forgive me, holy relics! A man enters where no man should. 6.451. If it’s wrong, let the punishment fall on me: 6.452. Let my life be the penalty, so Rome is free of harm.’ 6.453. He spoke and entered. The goddess he carried away 6.454. Was saved by her priest’s devotion, and she approved.
15. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 29.3.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58, 211
16. Plutarch, Lucullus, 39 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58
17. Martial, Epigrams, 9.59 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58
18. Plutarch, Tiberius And Gaius Gracchus, 4.2-4.4, 13.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58
19. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 31 (1st cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58
20. Arrian, Epicteti Dissertationes, 2.24.7 (1st cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58
21. Plutarch, Moralia, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 211
22. Tacitus, Dialogus De Oratoribus, 28.5-28.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58
23. Plutarch, Romulus, 4.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 165
4.1. ἦν δὲ πλησίον ἐρινεός, ὃν Ῥωμινάλιον ἐκάλουν, ἢ διὰ τὸν Ῥωμύλον ὡς οἱ πολλοὶ νομίζουσιν, ἢ διὰ τὸ τὰ μηρυκώμενα τῶν θρεμμάτων ἐκεῖ διὰ τὴν σκιὰν ἐνδιάζειν, ἢ μάλιστα διὰ τὸν τῶν βρεφῶν θηλασμόν, ὅτι τήν τε θηλὴν ῥοῦμαν ὠνόμαζον οἱ παλαιοί, καὶ θεόν τινα τῆς ἐκτροφῆς τῶν νηπίων ἐπιμελεῖσθαι δοκοῦσαν ὀνομάζουσι Ῥουμῖναν, καὶ θύουσιν αὐτῇ νηφάλια, καὶ γάλα τοῖς ἱεροῖς ἐπισπένδουσιν. 4.1. Now there was a wild fig-tree hard by, which they called Ruminalis, either from Romulus, as is generally thought, or because cud-chewing, or ruminating , animals spent the noon-tide there for the sake of the shade, or best of all, from the suckling of the babes there; for the ancient Romans called the teat ruma, and a certain goddess, who is thought to preside over the rearing of young children, is still called Rumilia, in sacrificing to whom no wine is used, and libations of milk are poured over her victims.
24. Statius, Siluae, 4.6 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58
25. Silius Italicus, Punica, 13.36-13.81 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 163
26. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 15.77, 34.92, 35.4-35.5, 35.26, 36.41 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58, 165
27. Martial, Epigrams, 9.59 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58
28. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 3.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58
3.6. To Annius Severus, Out of a legacy which I have come in for I have just bought a Corinthian bronze, small it is true, but a charming and sharply-cut piece of work, so far as I have any knowledge of art, and that, as in everything else perhaps, is very slight. But as for the statue in question even I can appreciate its merits. For it is a nude, and neither conceals its faults, if there are any, nor hides at all its strong points. It represents an old man in a standing posture; the bones, muscles, nerves, veins, and even the wrinkles appear quite life-like; the hair is thin and scanty on the forehead; the brow is broad; the face wizened; the neck thin; the shoulders are bowed; the breast is flat, and the belly hollow. The back too gives the same impression of age, as far as a back view can. The bronze itself, judging by the genuine colour, is old and of great antiquity. In fact, in every respect it is a work calculated to catch the eye of a connoisseur and to delight the eye of an amateur, and this is what tempted me to purchase it, although I am the merest novice. But I bought it not to keep it at home - for as yet I have no Corinthian art work in my house - but that I might put it up in my native country in some frequented place, and I specially had in mind the Temple of Jupiter. For the statue seems to me to be worthy of the temple, and the gift to be worthy of the god. So I hope that you will show me your usual kindness when I give you a commission, and that you will undertake the following for me. Will you order a pedestal to be made, of any marble you like, to be inscribed with my name and titles, if you think the latter ought to be mentioned? I will send you the statue as soon as I can find anyone who is not overburdened with luggage, or I will bring myself along with it, as I dare say you would prefer me to do. For, if only my duties allow me, I am intending to run down thither. You are glad that I promise to come, but you will frown when I add that I can only stay a few days. For the business which hitherto has kept me from getting away will not allow of my being absent any longer. Farewell.
29. Festus Sextus Pompeius, De Verborum Significatione, None (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58, 211
30. Censorinus, De Die Natali, 23.6 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 211
31. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 3.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58
3.6. To Annius Severus, Out of a legacy which I have come in for I have just bought a Corinthian bronze, small it is true, but a charming and sharply-cut piece of work, so far as I have any knowledge of art, and that, as in everything else perhaps, is very slight. But as for the statue in question even I can appreciate its merits. For it is a nude, and neither conceals its faults, if there are any, nor hides at all its strong points. It represents an old man in a standing posture; the bones, muscles, nerves, veins, and even the wrinkles appear quite life-like; the hair is thin and scanty on the forehead; the brow is broad; the face wizened; the neck thin; the shoulders are bowed; the breast is flat, and the belly hollow. The back too gives the same impression of age, as far as a back view can. The bronze itself, judging by the genuine colour, is old and of great antiquity. In fact, in every respect it is a work calculated to catch the eye of a connoisseur and to delight the eye of an amateur, and this is what tempted me to purchase it, although I am the merest novice. But I bought it not to keep it at home - for as yet I have no Corinthian art work in my house - but that I might put it up in my native country in some frequented place, and I specially had in mind the Temple of Jupiter. For the statue seems to me to be worthy of the temple, and the gift to be worthy of the god. So I hope that you will show me your usual kindness when I give you a commission, and that you will undertake the following for me. Will you order a pedestal to be made, of any marble you like, to be inscribed with my name and titles, if you think the latter ought to be mentioned? I will send you the statue as soon as I can find anyone who is not overburdened with luggage, or I will bring myself along with it, as I dare say you would prefer me to do. For, if only my duties allow me, I am intending to run down thither. You are glad that I promise to come, but you will frown when I add that I can only stay a few days. For the business which hitherto has kept me from getting away will not allow of my being absent any longer. Farewell.
32. Servius, Commentary On The Aeneid, 2.116, 2.166, 7.188, 8.90 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 163, 165, 211
33. Procopius, De Bellis, 5.15.9-5.15.14 (6th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 163
34. Aurelius Victor, De Viris Illustribus, 7  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 211
35. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, 7.3.1  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 211
36. Strabo, Geography, 13.1.41  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 162
13.1.41. So the Ilians tell us, but Homer expressly states that the city was wiped out: The day shall come when sacred Ilios shall perish; and surely we have utterly destroyed the steep city of Priam, by means of counsels and persuasiveness; and in the tenth year the city of Priam was destroyed. And other such evidences of the same thing are set forth; for example, that the wooden image of Athena now to be seen stands upright, whereas Homer clearly indicates that it was sitting, for orders are given to put the robe upon Athena's knees Hom. Il. 6.(compare that never should there sit upon his knees a dear child). For it is better to interpret it in this way than, as some do, to interpret it as meaning to put the robe 'beside' her knees, comparing the words and she sits upon the hearth in the light of the fire, which they take to mean beside the hearth. For how could one conceive of the dedication of a robe beside the knees? Moreover, others, changing the accent on γούνασιν accenting it γουνάσιν, like θυιάσιν (in whichever of two ways they interpret it), talk on endlessly. . . There are to be seen many of the ancient wooden images of Athena in a sitting posture, as, for example, in Phocaea, Massalia, Rome, Chios, and several other places. Also the more recent writers agree that the city was wiped out, among whom is the orator Lycurgus, who, in mentioning the city of the Ilians, says: Who has not heard that once for all it was razed to the ground by the Greeks, and is uninhabited?
37. Plutarch, Tiberius Gracchus, 1  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 58
38. Florus Lucius Annaeus, Letters, 1.2.3  Tagged with subjects: •palladium, as talisman Found in books: Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 162