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160 results for "old"
1. Archilochus, Fragments, 185-186, 4, 187 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 867
2. Archilochus, Fragments, 172-181, 185-186, 4, 187 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 867
3. Hesiod, Works And Days, 242-249, 251, 250 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 63
250. Their fathers, while the fleeces on the sheep
4. Homer, Iliad, 14.272 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 117
14.272. / So spake she, and Sleep waxed glad, and made answer saying:Come now, swear to me by the inviolable water of Styx, and with one hand lay thou hold of the bounteous earth, and with the other of the shimmering sea, that one and all they may be witnesses betwixt us twain, even the gods that are below with Cronos,
5. Semonides of Amorgos, Fragments, 7 (7th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •comedy, old Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 867
6. Theognis, Fragments, 138-140 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 111
7. Theognis, Fragments, 138-140 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 111
8. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 1431-1433, 1435-1436, 1434 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 120
1434. οὔ μοι φόβου μέλαθρον ἐλπὶς ἐμπατεῖ, 1434. Not mine the fancy — Fear will tread my palace
9. Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes, 42-46, 48, 47 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 120
47. θέντες λαπάξειν ἄστυ Καδμείων βίᾳ,
10. Aristophanes, Clouds, 1121-1125, 257, 331, 583, 595-606, 693, 1265 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Liapis and Petrides (2019), Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca, 38
1265. ἵππων ἐμῶν, ὦ Παλλὰς ὥς μ' ἀπώλεσας.
11. Aristophanes, Fragments, 682 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 111
12. Aristophanes, The Rich Man, 541, 635-636, 806, 1151 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 111
1151. πατρὶς γάρ ἐστι πᾶς' ἵν' ἂν πράττῃ τις εὖ.
13. Aristophanes, Frogs, 1, 10-19, 2, 20-29, 3, 30-37, 4-6, 664-665, 7, 701-702, 728-732, 747, 8-9, 932, 357 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 111
357. μηδὲ Κρατίνου τοῦ ταυροφάγου γλώττης Βακχεῖ' ἐτελέσθη,
14. Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 101-129, 630-632, 689, 21 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 111
21. οἷόν γέ που 'στιν αἱ σοφαὶ ξυνουσίαι.
15. Aristophanes, Wasps, 1122-1264, 1289, 274-278, 616-617, 77-80, 614 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Richlin (2018), Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy, 331
614. καταρασάμενος καὶ τονθορύσας. ἀλλ' ἢν μή μοι ταχὺ μάξῃ,
16. Aristophanes, Lysistrata, 139, 194, 200, 201, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 227, 228, 229, 230, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 236, 237, 450? (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 111
17. Aristophanes, Peace, 143, 424-429, 43, 430-438, 44-49, 608-609, 742-744, 746-747, 835-840, 871-875, 889-895, 929-934, 976, 745 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Richlin (2018), Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy, 31
745. ἵν' ὁ σύνδουλος σκώψας αὐτοῦ τὰς πληγὰς εἶτ' ἀνέροιτο,
18. Euripides, Hippolytus, None (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 84
19. Euripides, Medea, 1078-1079, 754 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 84
754. rend= Aegeus
20. Euripides, Orestes, 1496 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy (attic) •old comedy (attic), countering arrogance of elites •old comedy (attic), freedom of speech in Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 169
21. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 555-558, 368 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 167
22. Antiphanes, Fragments, 47 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •comedy, old Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 553
23. Hermippus Comicus, Fragments, 63 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •comedy, old Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 55
24. Herodotus, Histories, 3.98.3 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •comedy, old Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 553
3.98.3. There are many Indian nations, none speaking the same language; some of them are nomads, some not; some dwell in the river marshes and live on raw fish, which they catch from reed boats. Each boat is made of one joint of reed.
25. Lysias, Orations, 6, 8 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 316
26. Plato, Cratylus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •comedy, old Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 643
27. Aristophanes, Fragments, 682 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 111
28. Aristophanes, Knights, -, 1067, 1099, 4, 5, 526, 527, 528, 8, 83, 9, ?, 0 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 111
29. Antiphanes, Fragments, 47 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •comedy, old Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 553
30. Aristophanes, Birds, 100-101, 1240, 1337-1339, 1375-1376, 194, 275, 525-536, 538, 630-635, 793-796, 851-852, 857, 537 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 120
537. τοῦτο καθ' ὑμῶν
31. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 10, 1003, 1004, 1005, 1006, 1007, 1015, 1016, 1017, 1071, 1089, 1090, 1091, 1092, 1093, 1094, 11, 1132, 1133, 1134, 1135, 1136, 1137, 1138, 1139, 1140, 1141, 1142, 1143, 1174, 1175, 1176, 1177, 1178, 1179, 1180, 1181, 1198, 12, 1225, 1229, 1230, 1231, 1232, 1233, 1234, 13, 137, 138, 139, 14, 140, 15, 16, 208, 209, 210, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 250, 251, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 257, 258, 259, 260, 261, 262, 263, 264, 265, 266, 267, 268, 269, 270, 271, 272, 273, 274, 275, 276, 277, 278, 279, 27?, 28, 281, 282, 283, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 377, 378, 379, 38, 380, 381, 382, 383, 384, 385, 386, 39, 410, 411, 412, 413, 414, 428, 429, 450, 451, 452, 453, 47, 48, 485, 486, 487, 488, 489, 49, 50, 51, 515, 516, 517, 518, 519, 520, 521, 522, 523, 524, 525, 526, 527, 528, 529, 530, 531, 532, 533, 534, 535, 536, 537, 544, 545, 546, 547, 548, 549, 550, 551, 552, 553, 554, 555, 556, 567, 568, 569, 570, 571, 572, 573, 574, 593, 594, 595, 596, 597, 598, 599, 6, 600, 601, 602, 603, 604, 605, 606, 612, 613, 623, 624, 625, 634, 635, 689, 690, 7, 720, 721, 750, 751, 752, 753, 754, 755, 756, 757, 758, 759, 760, 761, 762, 763, 791, 792, 793, 794, 795, 796, 797, 798, 799, 8, 874, 875, 876, 878, 879, 880, 9, 976, 977, 978, 979, 980, 981, 982, 983, 984, 985, 136 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 111
136. χρόνον μὲν οὐκ ἂν ἦμεν ἐν Θρᾴκῃ πολύν—
32. Theognis Tragicus, Fragments, 138-140 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 111
33. Aristophanes, Women of The Assembly, 1169-1175, 331-334, 352-371, 81, 80 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 111
80. τὴν τοῦ πανόπτου διφθέραν ἐνημμένος
34. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 2.38.2, 5.18 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •concept, in old comedy Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 115, 116
2.38.2. ἐπεσέρχεται δὲ διὰ μέγεθος τῆς πόλεως ἐκ πάσης γῆς τὰ πάντα, καὶ ξυμβαίνει ἡμῖν μηδὲν οἰκειοτέρᾳ τῇ ἀπολαύσει τὰ αὐτοῦ ἀγαθὰ γιγνόμενα καρποῦσθαι ἢ καὶ τὰ τῶν ἄλλων ἀνθρώπων. 2.38.2. while the magnitude of our city draws the produce of the world into our harbor, so that to the Athenian the fruits of other countries are as familiar a luxury as those of his own.
35. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 1391 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy (attic) Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 166
36. Demosthenes, Prooemia, 35.4-35.5, 45.1, 46.3, 48.2 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 349
37. Demosthenes, Orations, 1.19, 1.23, 3.32, 4.49, 6.23, 6.31, 8.7, 8.19, 8.28, 8.49, 9.7, 9.54, 9.65, 10.2, 10.5, 10.7, 10.17, 10.25, 13.16, 13.21, 14.38, 15.13, 16.13, 16.32, 18.13, 18.111, 18.129, 18.208, 18.251, 18.261, 18.294, 18.307, 19.24, 19.46, 19.52, 19.67, 19.122, 19.129-19.130, 19.141, 19.171-19.172, 19.180, 19.188, 19.192-19.195, 19.212, 19.215, 19.235, 19.262, 19.285, 20.21, 20.151, 21.2-21.3, 21.58, 21.109, 21.139, 21.198, 21.205, 21.207, 29.52, 29.57, 29.59, 50.13, 52.9, 52.14, 54.41 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 42; Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 4; Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 84, 349
38. Demosthenes, Prooemia, 35.4-35.5, 45.1, 46.3, 48.2 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 349
39. Theocritus, Idylls, 1.71-1.75, 7.41 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •comedy, old •old comedy (attic) Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 867; Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 63
40. Demades, Fragments, 95 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy Found in books: Amendola (2022), The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary, 65
41. Lycurgus, Against Leocrates, 140, 76 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 349
42. Alexis, Fragments, 57 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy Found in books: Liddel (2020), Decrees of Fourth-Century Athens (403/2-322/1 BC): Volume 2, Political and Cultural Perspectives, 218, 219
43. Aeschines, Letters, 1.28, 1.52, 1.55, 1.61, 1.69, 1.73, 1.76, 1.81, 1.88, 1.98, 1.108, 2.13, 3.172, 3.182, 3.212, 3.217, 3.228, 3.255 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 349
44. Theophrastus, Research On Plants, 8.2.4 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •comedy, old Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 553
45. Praxiphanes of Mytilene, Fragments, 21 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy (attic) Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 4
46. Plautus, Mercator, 672-673, 675, 674 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Richlin (2018), Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy, 31
47. Plautus, Poenulus, 10, 6-9, 5 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Richlin (2018), Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy, 30, 31
48. Plautus, Vidularia, None (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy, shtick in Found in books: Richlin (2018), Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy, 49
49. Plautus, Asinaria, 299-305, 548-549, 710, 550 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Richlin (2018), Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy, 31
50. Alexis, Fragments, 57 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy Found in books: Liddel (2020), Decrees of Fourth-Century Athens (403/2-322/1 BC): Volume 2, Political and Cultural Perspectives, 218, 219
51. Theognis Rhodius, Fragments, 138-140 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 111
52. Hermippus of Smyrna, Fragments, 63 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •comedy, old Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 55
53. Herodas, Mimes, 3.85 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Richlin (2018), Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy, 331
54. Demosthenes Bithynius, Fragments, None (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 349
55. Varro, On The Latin Language, 7.101 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy, shtick in Found in books: Richlin (2018), Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy, 331
56. Varro, On Agriculture, 1.17 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy, shtick in Found in books: Richlin (2018), Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy, 331
57. Cicero, On Duties, 3.77 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy, and the palliata Found in books: Richlin (2018), Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy, 162
3.77. C. Fimbriam consularem audiebam de patre nostro puer iudicem M. Lutatio Pinthiae fuisse, equiti Romano sane honesto, cum is sponsionem fecisset. NI VIR BONUS ESSET. Itaque ei dixisse Fimbriam se illam rem numquam iudicaturum, ne aut spoliaret fama probatum hominem, si contra iudicavisset, aut statuisse videretur virum bonum esse aliquem, cum ea res innumerabilibus officiis et laudibus contineretur. Huic igitur viro bono, quem Fimbria etiam, non modo Socrates noverat, nullo modo videri potest quicquam esse utile, quod non honestum sit. Itaque talis vir non modo facere, sed ne cogitare quidem quicquam audebit, quod non audeat praedicare. Haec non turpe est dubitare philosophos, quae ne rustici quidem dubitent? a quibus natum est id, quod iam contritum est vetustate, proverbium. Cum enim fidem alicuius bonitatemque laudant, dignum esse dicunt, quicum in tenebris mices. Hoc quam habet vim nisi illam, nihil expedire, quod non deceat, etiamsi id possis nullo refellente optinere? 3.77.  When I was a boy, I used to hear my father tell that Gaius Fimbria, an ex‑consul, was judge in a case of Marcus Lutatius Pinthia, a Roman knight of irreproachable character. On that occasion Pinthia had laid a wager to be forfeited "if he did not prove in court that he was a good man." Fimbria declared that he would never render a decision in such a case, for fear that he might either rob a reputable man of his good name, if he decided against him, or be thought to have pronounced someone a good man, when such a character is, as he said, established by the performance of countless duties and the possession of praiseworthy qualities without number. To this type of good man, then, known not only to a Socrates but even to a Fimbria, nothing can possibly seem expedient that is not morally right. Such a man, therefore, will never venture to think — to say nothing of doing — anything that he would not dare openly to proclaim. Is it not a shame that philosophers should be in doubt about moral questions on which even peasants have no doubts at all? For it is with peasants that the proverb, already trite with age, originated: when they praise a man's honour and honesty, they say, "He is a man with whom you can safely play at odd and even in the dark." What is the point of the proverb but this — that what is not proper brings no advantage, even if you can gain your end without anyone's being able to convict you of wrong?
58. Cicero, In Verrem, 2.4.119, 2.4.122-2.4.123, 2.4.137 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy (attic) Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 63
59. Polybius, Histories, 9.27.2 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Richlin (2018), Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy, 10
60. Horace, Ars Poetica, 220-229, 231-239, 230 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Liapis and Petrides (2019), Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca, 121
61. Strabo, Geography, 5.4.7, 6.2.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy (attic) Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 63, 97
5.4.7. After Dicaearchia is Neapolis, a city of the Cumaeans. At a later time it was re-colonised by Chalcidians, and also by some Pithecussaeans and Athenians, and hence, for this reason, was called Neapolis. A monument of Parthenope, one of the Sirens, is pointed out in Neapolis, and in accordance with an oracle a gymnastic contest is celebrated there. But at a still later time, as the result of a dissension, they admitted some of the Campani as fellow-inhabitants, and thus they were forced to treat their worst enemies as their best friends, now that they had alienated their proper friends. This is disclosed by the names of their demarchs, for the earliest names are Greek only, whereas the later are Greek mixed with Campanian. And very many traces of Greek culture are preserved there — gymnasia, ephebeia, phratriae, and Greek names of things, although the people are Romans. And at the present time a sacred contest is celebrated among them every four years, in music as well as gymnastics; it lasts for several days, and vies with the pmost famous of those celebrated in Greece. Here, too, there is a tunnel — the mountain between Dicaearchia and Neapolis having been tunneled like the one leading to Cumae, and a road having been opened up for a distance of many stadia that is wide enough to allow teams going in opposite directions to pass each other. And windows have been cut out at many places, and thus the light of day is brought down from the surface of the mountain along shafts that are of considerable depth. Furthermore, Neapolis has springs of hot water and bathing-establishments that are not inferior to those at Baiae, although it is far short of Baiae in the number of people, for at Baiae, where palace on palace has been built, one after another, a new city has arisen, not inferior to Dicaearchia. And greater vogue is given to the Greek mode of life at Neapolis by the people who withdraw thither from Rome for the sake of rest — I mean the class who have made their livelihood by training the young, or still others who, because of old age or infirmity, long to live in relaxation; and some of the Romans, too, taking delight in this way of living and observing the great number of men of the same culture as themselves sojourning there, gladly fall in love with the place and make it their permanent abode. 6.2.4. Syracuse was founded by Archias, who sailed from Corinth about the same time that Naxos and Megara were colonized. It is said that Archias went to Delphi at the same time as Myscellus, and when they were consulting the oracle, the god asked them whether they chose wealth or health; now Archias chose wealth, and Myscellus health; accordingly, the god granted to the former to found Syracuse, and to the latter Croton. And it actually came to pass that the Crotoniates took up their abode in a city that was exceedingly healthful, as I have related, and that Syracuse fell into such exceptional wealth that the name of the Syracusans was spread abroad in a proverb applied to the excessively extravagant — the tithe of the Syracusans would not be sufficient for them. And when Archias, the story continues, was on his voyage to Sicily, he left Chersicrates, of the race of the Heracleidae, with a part of the expedition to help colonize what is now called Corcyra, but was formerly called Scheria; Chersicrates, however, ejected the Liburnians, who held possession of the island, and colonized it with new settlers, whereas Archias landed at Zephyrium, found that some Dorians who had quit the company of the founders of Megara and were on their way back home had arrived there from Sicily, took them up and in common with them founded Syracuse. And the city grew, both on account of the fertility of the soil and on account of the natural excellence of its harbors. Furthermore, the men of Syracuse proved to have the gift of leadership, with the result that when the Syracusans were ruled by tyrants they lorded it over the rest, and when set free themselves they set free those who were oppressed by the barbarians. As for these barbarians, some were native inhabitants, whereas others came over from the mainland. The Greeks would permit none of them to lay hold of the seaboard, but were not strong enough to keep them altogether away from the interior; indeed, to this day the Siceli, the Sicani, the Morgetes, and certain others have continued to live in the island, among whom there used to be Iberians, who, according to Ephorus, were said to be the first barbarian settlers of Sicily. Morgantium, it is reasonable to suppose, was settled by the Morgetes; it used to be a city, but now it does not exist. When the Carthaginians came over they did not cease to abuse both these people and the Greeks, but the Syracusans nevertheless held out. But the Romans later on ejected the Carthaginians and took Syracuse by siege. And in our own time, because Pompeius abused, not only the other cities, but Syracuse in particular, Augustus Caesar sent a colony and restored a considerable part of the old settlement; for in olden times it was a city of five towns, with a wall of one hundred and eighty stadia. Now it was not at all necessary to fill out the whole of this circuit, but it was necessary, he thought, to build up in a better way only the part that was settled — the part adjacent to the Island of Ortygia which had a sufficient circuit to make a notable city. Ortygia is connected with the mainland, near which it lies, by a bridge, and has the fountain of Arethusa, which sends forth a river that empties immediately into the sea. People tell the mythical story that the river Arethusa is the Alpheius, which latter, they say, rises in the Peloponnesus, flows underground through the sea as far as Arethusa, and then empties thence once more into the sea. And the kind of evidence they adduce is as follows: a certain cup, they think, was thrown out into the river at Olympia and was discharged into the fountain; and again, the fountain was discolored as the result of the sacrifices of oxen at Olympia. Pindar follows these reports when he says: O resting-place august of Alpheius, Ortygia, scion of famous Syracuse. And in agreement with Pindar Timaeus the historian also declares the same thing. Now if the Alpheius fell into a pit before joining the sea, there would be some plausibility in the view that the stream extends underground from Olympia as far as Sicily, thereby preserving its potable water unmixed with the sea; but since the mouth of the river empties into the sea in full view, and since near this mouth, on the transit, there is no mouth visible that swallows up the stream of the river (though even so the water could not remain fresh; yet it might, the greater part of it at least, if it sank into the underground channel), the thing is absolutely impossible. For the water of Arethusa bears testimony against it, since it is potable; and that the stream of the river should hold together through so long a transit without being diffused with the seawater, that is, until it falls into the fancied underground passage, is utterly mythical. Indeed, we can scarcely believe this in the case of the Rhodanus, although its stream does hold together when it passes through a lake, keeping its course visible; in this case, however, the distance is short and the lake does not rise in waves, whereas in case of the sea in question, where there are prodigious storms and surging waves, the tale is foreign to all plausibility. And the citing of the story of the cup only magnifies the falsehood, for a cup does not of itself readily follow the current of any stream, to say nothing of a stream that flows so great a distance and through such passages. Now there are many rivers in many parts of the world that flow underground, but not for such a distance; and even if this is possible, the stories aforesaid, at least, are impossible, and those concerning the river Inachus are like a myth: For it flows from the heights of Pindus, says Sophocles, and from Lacmus, from the land of the Perrhaebians, into the lands of the Amphilochians and Acarians, and mingles with the waters of Achelous, and, a little below, he adds, whence it cleaves the waves to Argos and comes to the people of Lyrceium. Marvellous tales of this sort are stretched still further by those who make the Inopus cross over from the Nile to Delos. And Zoilus the rhetorician says in his Eulogy of the Tenedians that the Alpheius rises in Tenedos — the man who finds fault with Homer as a writer of myths! And Ibycus says that the Asopus in Sikyon rises in Phrygia. But the statement of Hecataeus is better, when he says that the Inachus among the Amphilochians, which flows from Lacmus, as does also the Aeas, is different from the river of Argos, and that it was named by Amphilochus, the man who called the city Argos Amphilochicum. Now Hecataeus says that this river does empty into the Achelous, but that the Aeas flows towards the west into Apollonia. On either side of the island of Ortygia is a large harbor; the larger of the two is eighty stadia in circuit. Caesar restored this city and also Catana; and so, in the same way, Centoripa, because it contributed much to the overthrow of Pompeius. Centoripa lies above Catana, bordering on the Aetnaean mountains, and on the Symaethus River, which flows into the territory of Catana.
62. Livy, History, 24.21.9 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy (attic) Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 63
63. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 11.72, 13.82, 16.70.6, 16.83.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy (attic) Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 63
11.72. 1.  In Sicily, as soon as the tyranny of Syracuse had been overthrown and all the cities of the island had been liberated, the whole of Sicily was making great strides toward prosperity. For the Sicilian Greeks were at peace, and the land they cultivated was fertile, so that the abundance of their harvests enabled them soon to increase their estates and to fill the land with slaves and domestic animals and every other accompaniment of prosperity, taking in great revenues on the one hand and spending nothing upon the wars to which they had been accustomed.,2.  But later on they were again plunged into wars and civil strife for the following reasons. After the Syracusans had overthrown the tyranny of Thrasybulus, they held a meeting of the Assembly, and after deliberating on forming a democracy of their own they all voted uimously to make a colossal statue of Zeus the Liberator and each year to celebrate with sacrifices the Festival of Liberation and hold games of distinction on the day on which they had overthrown the tyrant and liberated their native city; and they also voted to sacrifice to the gods, in connection with the games, four hundred and fifty bulls and to use them for the citizens' feast.,3.  As for all the magistracies, they proposed to assign them to the original citizens, but the aliens who had been admitted to citizenship under Gelon they did not see fit to allow to share in this dignity, either because they judged them to be unworthy or because they were suspicious lest men who had been brought up in the way of tyranny and had served in war under a monarch might attempt a revolution. And that is what actually happened. For Gelon had enrolled as citizens more than ten thousand foreign mercenaries, and of these there were left at the time in question more than seven thousand. 13.82. 1.  Now the sacred buildings which they constructed, and especially the temple of Zeus, bear witness to the grand manner of the men of that day. of the other sacred buildings some have been burned and others completely destroyed because of the many times the city has been taken in war, but the completion of the temple of Zeus, which was ready to receive its roof, was prevented by the war; and after the war, since the city had been completely destroyed, never in the subsequent years did the Acragantini find themselves able to finish their buildings.,2.  The temple has a length of three hundred and forty feet, a width of sixty, and a height of one hundred and twenty not including the foundation. And being as it is the largest temple in Sicily, it may not unreasonably be compared, so far as magnitude of its substructure is concerned, with the temples outside of Sicily; for even though, as it turned out, the design could not be carried out, the scale of the undertaking at any rate is clear.,3.  And though all other men build their temples either with walls forming the sides or with rows of columns, thrown enclosing their sanctuaries, this temple combines both these plans; for the columns were built in with the walls, the part extending outside the temple being rounded and that within square; and the circumference of the outer part of the column which extends from the wall is twenty feet and the body of a man may be contained in the fluting, while that of the inner part is twelve feet.,4.  The porticoes were of enormous size and height, and in the east pediment they portrayed The Battle between the Gods and the Giants which excelled in size and beauty, and in the west The Capture of Troy, in which each one of the heroes may be seen portrayed in a manner appropriate to his rôle.,5.  There was at that time also an artificial pool outside the city, seven stades in circumference and twenty cubits deep; into this they brought water and ingeniously contrived to produce a multitude of fish of every variety for their public feastings, and with the fish swans spent their time and a vast multitude of every other kind of bird, so that the pool was an object of great delight to gaze upon.,6.  And witness to the luxury of the inhabitants is also the extravagant cost of the monuments which they erected, some adorned with sculptured race-horses and others with the pet birds kept by girls and boys in their homes, monuments which Timaeus says he had seen extant even in his own lifetime.,7.  And in the Olympiad previous to the one we are discussing, namely, the Ninety-second, when Exaenetus of Acragas won the "stadion," he was conducted into the city in a chariot and in the procession there were, not to speak of the other things, three hundred chariots belonging to citizens of Acragas.,8.  Speaking generally, they led from youth onward a manner of life which was luxurious, wearing as they did exceedingly delicate clothing and gold ornaments and, besides, using strigils and oil-flasks made of silver and even of gold. 16.70.6.  He instituted also the annual office that is held in highest honour, which the Syracusans call the "amphipoly" of Zeus Olympius. To this, the first priest elected was Callimenes, the son of Alcadas, and henceforth the Syracusans continued to designate the years by these officials down to the time of my writing this history and of the change in their form of government. For when the Romans shared their citizenship with the Greeks of Sicily, the office of these priests became insignificant, after having been important for over three hundred years. Such was the condition of affairs in Sicily. 16.83.2.  It was by reason of the funds so acquired that many large constructions were completed in that period. There was, first, the structure in Syracuse on the Island called the "Hall of the Sixty Couches," which surpassed all the other buildings of Sicily in size and grandeur. This was built by Agathocles the despot, and since, in its pretentiousness, it went beyond the temples of the gods, so it received a mark of Heaven's displeasure in being struck by lightning. Then there were the towers along the shore of the Little Harbour with their mosaic inscriptions of varicoloured stones, proclaiming the name of their founder, Agathocles. Comparable to these but a little later, in the time of Hiero the king, there was built the Olympieium in the market and the altar beside the theatre, a stade in length and proportionally high and broad.
64. Horace, Sermones, 1.1, 1.5.56, 1.7.19 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy (attic) •old comedy, and the palliata Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 155; Richlin (2018), Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy, 162
65. Demosthenes Ophthalmicus, Fragments, None (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 349
66. Suetonius, Tiberius, 6.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy (attic) Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 97
67. Plutarch, Nicias, 14.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy (attic) Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 63
14.5. ἔτι δὲ τοῦ Ἀλκιβιάδου παρόντος ἑξήκοντα ναυσὶ πλεύσαντες ἐπὶ Συρακούσας, τὰς μὲν ἄλλας ἀνεῖχον ὑπὲρ τοῦ λιμένος ἔξω παρατάξαντες, δέκα δὲ κατήλαυνον εἴσω κατασκοπῆς εἵνεκα· καὶ Λεοντίνους ἐπὶ τὴν οἰκείαν ἀποκαλοῦσαι διὰ κήρυκος, αὗται λαμβάνουσι ναῦν πολεμίαν σανίδας κομίζουσαν, εἰς ἃς ἀπεγράφοντο κατὰ φυλὰς αὑτοὺς οἱ Συρακούσιοι· κείμεναι δʼ ἄπωθεν τῆς πόλεως ἐν ἱερῷ Διὸς Ὀλυμπίου τότε πρὸς ἐξέτασιν καὶ κατάλογον τῶν ἐν ἡλικίᾳ μετεπέμφθησαν. 14.5.
68. Plutarch, On Compliancy, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy (attic) •old comedy (attic), countering arrogance of elites •old comedy (attic), freedom of speech in Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 167
533d. injuring ourselves without the pleasure got by those who indulge courtesans and flatterers, but loathing and resenting the brazen importunity that overthrows and masters our reason. For to no one more aptly than to those who wring concessions from us by their importunity can we say Iknow the evil Iset out to do — in giving false testimony, rendering an unjust verdict, voting for an inexpedient measure, or borrowing for one who will never repay. Thus it is facility, more than in any other disorder, that regret is not subsequent to the act, but present from the first: when we give, we chafe; when we testify, we are ashamed;
69. Plutarch, On The Education of Children, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy (attic) •old comedy (attic), written by women Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 168
70. Suetonius, Augustus, 89.1-89.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 97, 169
71. Plutarch, On The Fortune Or Virtue of Alexander The Great, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy (attic) Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 4
72. Plutarch, Letter of Condolence To Apollonius, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy (attic) •old comedy (attic), written by women Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 168
73. Plutarch, Brutus, 29.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy (attic) Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 4
29.6. τὰ μὲν γὰρ ἔτι τούτων πρεσβύτερα, Κίνναι καὶ Μάριοι καὶ Κάρβωνες, ἆθλον ἐν μέσῳ καὶ λείαν προθέμενοι τὴν πατρίδα, μονονουχὶ ῥητῶς ὑπὲρ τυραννίδος ἐπολέμησαν. 29.6.
74. Josephus Flavius, Against Apion, 1.254-1.255 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 117
1.254. 28. Now, for the first occasion of this fiction, Manetho supposes what is no better than a ridiculous thing; for he says that “King Amenophis desired to see the gods.” What gods, I pray, did he desire to see? If he meant the gods whom their laws ordained to be worshipped, the ox, the goat, the crocodile, and the baboon, he saw them already; 1.255. but for the heavenly gods, how could he see them, and what should occasion this his desire? To be sure, it was because another king before him had already seen them. He had then been informed what sort of gods they were, and after what manner they had been seen, insomuch that he did not stand in need of any new artifice for obtaining this sight.
75. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 32.94 (1st cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy (attic) •old comedy (attic), countering arrogance of elites •old comedy (attic), freedom of speech in •old comedy (attic), written by women Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 168, 169
32.94.  Just as in the case of comedies and revues when the poets bring upon the scene a drunken Carion or a Davus, they do not arouse much laughter, yet the sight of a Heracles in that condition does seem comical, a Heracles who staggers and, as usually portrayed, is clad in womanish saffron; in much the same way also, if a populace of such size as yours warbles all through life or, it may be, plays charioteer without the horses, it becomes a disgrace and a laughing stock. Indeed this is precisely what Euripides says befell Heracles in his madness: Then striding to a car he thought was there, He stepped within its rails and dealt a blow, As if he held the goad within his hand.
76. Philostratus The Athenian, Lives of The Sophists, 1.25.534, 1.25.541-1.25.542, 2.1.549, 2.1.559-2.1.562 (2nd cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy (attic) •old comedy (attic), countering arrogance of elites •old comedy (attic), freedom of speech in Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 169
77. Marcus Aurelius Emperor of Rome, Meditations, 7.38-7.43, 11.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy (attic) •old comedy (attic), countering arrogance of elites •old comedy (attic), freedom of speech in Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 166, 167
78. Philostratus The Athenian, Letters, 73, 66 (2nd cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 488
79. Aelius Aristidesthe Isthmian Oration, The Isthmian Oration Regarding Poseidon, None (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 120
80. Longus, Daphnis And Chloe, 1.2.1, 1.10.1, 1.19.1, 2.2.1, 3.15-3.19, 3.24.2, 4.5.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •comedy, old Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 421, 553
1.2.1. 1.10.1. 1.19.1. 2.2.1. 3.24.2.
81. Lucian, Nero, 9, 8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 166
82. Lucian, The Lover of Lies, 2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •true stories, odysseus letter, and old comedy Found in books: Mheallaigh (2014), Reading Fiction with Lucian: Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality, 174
83. Lucian, How To Write History, 62 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •true stories, odysseus letter, and old comedy Found in books: Mheallaigh (2014), Reading Fiction with Lucian: Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality, 170
84. Lucian, A True Story, 1.2-1.3, 1.7, 1.29, 2.28, 2.31, 2.47 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •true stories, odysseus letter, and old comedy Found in books: Mheallaigh (2014), Reading Fiction with Lucian: Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174
85. Aelius Aristides, The Isthmian Oration: Regarding Poseidon, None (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 120
86. Philostratus The Athenian, Life of Apollonius, a b c d\n0 "1.2" "1.2" "1 2" \n1 "1.14" "1.14" "1 14" (2nd cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Serafim and Papioannou (2023), Nonverbal Behaviour in Ancient Literature: Athenian Dialogues III 209
87. Philostratus The Athenian, Nero, 8-9 (2nd cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 166
88. Galen, On The Causes of Disease, None (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •true stories, odysseus letter, and old comedy Found in books: Mheallaigh (2014), Reading Fiction with Lucian: Fakes, Freaks and Hyperreality, 170
89. Heliodorus, Ethiopian Story, 3.5.6, 7.17.1, 9.3-9.4 (2nd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •comedy, old Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 434, 553
90. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 59.5, 63.24.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy (attic) •old comedy (attic), countering arrogance of elites •old comedy (attic), freedom of speech in •old comedy (attic), written by women Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 155, 163, 166, 167, 168, 169, 172
59.5. 1.  This was the kind of emperor into whose hands the Romans were then delivered. Hence the deeds of Tiberius, though they were felt to have been very harsh, were nevertheless as far superior to those of Gaius as the deeds of Augustus were to those of his successor.,2.  For Tiberius always kept the power in his own hands and used others as agents for carrying out his wishes; whereas Gaius was ruled by the charioteers and gladiators, and was the slave of the actors and others connected with the stage. Indeed, he always kept Apelles, the most famous of the tragedians of that day, with him even in public.,3.  Thus he by himself and they by themselves did without let or hindrance all that such persons would naturally dare to do when given power. Everything that pertained to their art he arranged and settled on the slightest pretext in the most lavish manner, and he compelled the praetors and the consuls to do the same, so that almost every day some performance of the kind was sure to be given.,4.  At first he was but a spectator and listener at these and would take sides for or against various performers like one of the crowd; and one time, when he was vexed with those of opposing tastes, he did not go to the spectacle. But as time went on, he came to imitate, and to contend in many events,,5.  driving chariots, fighting as a gladiator, giving exhibitions of pantomimic dancing, and acting in tragedy. So much for his regular behaviour. And once he sent an urgent summons at night to the leading men of the senate, as if for some important deliberation, and then danced before them.  
91. Achilles Tatius, The Adventures of Leucippe And Cleitophon, 2.35-2.38, 5.11 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •comedy, old Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 421
92. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 45.1-45.14 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •comedy, old Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 220
93. Gellius, Attic Nights, 2.23.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy, and the palliata Found in books: Richlin (2018), Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy, 10
94. Athenaeus, The Learned Banquet, None (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •comedy, old Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 42
95. Julian (Emperor), Letters, None (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •comedy, old Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 434
96. Julian (Emperor), Letters, None (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •comedy, old Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 434
97. Libanius, Orations, a b c d\n0 "64.62" "64.62" "64 62" (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •comedy, old Found in books: Serafim and Papioannou (2023), Nonverbal Behaviour in Ancient Literature: Athenian Dialogues III 209
98. Scriptores Historiae Augustae, Hadrian, 19.6, 26.4 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy (attic) •old comedy (attic), countering arrogance of elites •old comedy (attic), freedom of speech in Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 169
99. Julian (Emperor), Letters, None (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •comedy, old Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 434
100. Justinian, Digest, 40.11 (5th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy, shtick in Found in books: Richlin (2018), Slave Theater in the Roman Republic: Plautus and Popular Comedy, 246
101. Phrynichus, Comasts, 15  Tagged with subjects: •comedy, old Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 47
102. Pherecrates, Persians, 137.6-137.8  Tagged with subjects: •comedy, old Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 55
103. Aristophanes, Storks Fr., 444  Tagged with subjects: •comedy, old Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 43
104. Philochorus, Fgrh 328, None  Tagged with subjects: •comedy, old Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 42
105. Papyri, P.Kãƒæ’ƀ™Ã‚¶Ln, 6.245  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy (attic) •old comedy (attic), countering arrogance of elites •old comedy (attic), freedom of speech in Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 169
106. Aristophanes, Proagon, 482  Tagged with subjects: •comedy, old Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 43
107. Cratinus, Wine-Flask, 203  Tagged with subjects: •comedy, old Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 55
108. Papyri, P.Oxy., 2465  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy (attic) Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 63
109. Papyri, Psi, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Amendola (2022), The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary, 65
110. Aristophanes, Friers, 513  Tagged with subjects: •comedy, old Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 42
111. Hildegarde of Bingen, Sciv., 8.82  Tagged with subjects: •concept, in old comedy Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 114
112. Anon., Carmina Convivalia, None  Tagged with subjects: •comedy, old Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 867
113. Julian, Orations, 3, 1  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 434
114. Aristophanes, Deserters, 225  Tagged with subjects: •comedy, old Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 47
115. Andocides, Orations, 3.15  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 316
116. Aristophanes Boeotus, Fragments, 682  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 111
117. Epigraphy, Inscr. De Delos, 69  Tagged with subjects: •concept, in old comedy Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 116
118. Epigraphy, Ig, 5.2.118, 7.1761, 7.1773.22-7.1773.24, 7.1776.24-7.1776.26, 12.4.845, 14.3  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy (attic) •old comedy (attic), countering arrogance of elites •old comedy (attic), freedom of speech in •old comedy (attic), written by women Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 63, 168, 169
119. Various, Anthologia Palatina, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Liapis and Petrides (2019), Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca, 121
120. Anon., Suda, φ358  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy (attic) Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 163
121. Hypereides, Orations, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Liddel (2020), Decrees of Fourth-Century Athens (403/2-322/1 BC): Volume 2, Political and Cultural Perspectives, 219, 220
122. Callimachus, Hymns, 1  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy (attic) Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 63
123. Photius, Bibliotheca (Library, Bibl.), None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 421, 488
124. Stobaeus, Eclogues, 4.19.4  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy (attic) Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 155
125. Anon., Scholia On Aristophanes Ach., 504-507  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 114
126. Lydus, On Months, 4.42  Tagged with subjects: •comedy, old Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 643
127. Pherecrates, Deserters, 34  Tagged with subjects: •comedy, old Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 47
128. Cratinus, Laws Fr., 322  Tagged with subjects: •comedy, old Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 44
129. Sositheus, Daphnis Or Lityerses, 2  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy Found in books: Liapis and Petrides (2019), Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca, 121
130. Astydamas Junior, Herakles, None  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy Found in books: Liapis and Petrides (2019), Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca, 38
131. Metagenes, Philothyt?S (Pcg Fr., None  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy Found in books: Liapis and Petrides (2019), Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca, 38
132. Xenocles Senior, Likymnios, 2  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy Found in books: Liapis and Petrides (2019), Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca, 38
133. Epigraphy, Or, 155  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy Found in books: Liddel (2020), Decrees of Fourth-Century Athens (403/2-322/1 BC): Volume 2, Political and Cultural Perspectives, 213
134. Aristophanes, Holkades, None  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 111
135. Aristophanes, Gerytades, None  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 111
137. Epigraphy, Seg, 54.787  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 168; Liapis and Petrides (2019), Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca, 121
138. Epigraphy, Roesch, Ithesp, 358  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy (attic) •old comedy (attic), countering arrogance of elites •old comedy (attic), freedom of speech in •old comedy (attic), written by women Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 155, 163, 166, 167, 168, 169, 172
139. Epigraphy, Ogis, 54  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy (attic) Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 63
141. Epigraphy, Ivo, 56  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy (attic) Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 97
142. Gregory of Nazianzus, Or. In Pulch., 23  Tagged with subjects: •concept, in old comedy Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 115
143. Various, Rhetores Graeci, None  Tagged with subjects: •comedy, old Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 220
144. Epigraphy, Ig I , 1453  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy Found in books: Liddel (2020), Decrees of Fourth-Century Athens (403/2-322/1 BC): Volume 2, Political and Cultural Perspectives, 213
145. Demades, Fr., Bnj, 102  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy Found in books: Amendola (2022), The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary, 65
146. Anon., Anonymus Seguerianus, 165  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy Found in books: Amendola (2022), The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary, 65
147. Papyri, Mper N.S. I, None  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy Found in books: Amendola (2022), The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary, 65
148. Euripides, Trgf Fr., 208, 287, 48  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 155
149. Marcellinus, Hist., 29-30  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 4
150. Hermippos, Phormophoroi, 63.1-63.9  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Laemmle (2021), Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration, 353, 354, 355
151. Anon., Antiatticist, β20, κ21, ε22  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Laemmle (2021), Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration, 183
152. Anon., Anonymus De Comoedia P., None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 44
153. Menander Rhetor, Rhetorics, 333.31-334.5, 336.29, 336.30, 338.28  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 220
154. Aristophanes, Banqueters, 225  Tagged with subjects: •comedy, old Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 47
155. Cratinus, Nemesis, 322  Tagged with subjects: •comedy, old Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 44
156. Eupolis, Cities, 221  Tagged with subjects: •comedy, old Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 46
158. Aristophanes, Telmessians, 546, 545  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bowie (2023), Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels. 44
159. Arrian, Epict. Diss., 1.24.16, 1.28.7, 1.28.31-1.28.33, 2.16.30-2.16.31, 4.5.15  Tagged with subjects: •old comedy (attic) •old comedy (attic), countering arrogance of elites •old comedy (attic), freedom of speech in •old comedy (attic), written by women Found in books: Csapo et al. (2022), Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World, 166, 167, 168
160. Papyri, Bgu, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Kowalzig (2007), Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece, 114, 116