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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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20 results for "octavius"
1. Cicero, In Verrem, 2.4.122 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •octavius, portico of •portico of octavius Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 262
2. Cicero, Pro Murena, 76.1 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •octavius, portico of •portico of octavius Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 80
3. Horace, Letters, 1.1.70-1.1.71, 1.6.25-1.6.27, 2.1.34 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •octavius, portico of •portico of octavius Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 97, 262
4. Horace, Odes, 2.15 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •octavius, portico of •portico of octavius Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 97
5. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 1.79.11 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •octavius, portico of •portico of octavius Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 262
1.79.11.  But their life was that of herdsmen, and they lived by their own labour, generally upon the mountains in huts which they built, roofs and all, out of sticks and reeds. One of these, called the hut of Romulus, remained even to my day on the flank of the Palatine hill which faces towards the Circus, and it is preserved holy by those who have charge of these matters; they add nothing to it to render it more stately, but if any part of it is injured, either by storms or by the lapse of time, they repair the damage and restore the hut as nearly as possible to its former condition.
6. Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 1.491-1.496 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •octavius, portico of •portico of octavius Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 96
1.491. Seu pedibus vacuis illi spatiosa teretur 1.492. rend= 1.493. Et modo praecedas facito, modo terga sequaris, 1.494. rend= 1.495. Nec tibi de mediis aliquot transire columnas 1.496. rend=
7. Catullus, Poems, 55.3-55.8 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •octavius, portico of •portico of octavius Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 96
8. Sallust, Catiline, 12.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •octavius, portico of •portico of octavius Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 262
9. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.427-1.429, 6.850 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •octavius, portico of •portico of octavius Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 97, 262
1.427. Then with no followers save his trusty friend 1.428. Achates, he went forth upon his way, 1.429. two broad-tipped javelins poising in his hand. 6.850. of laurel groves; and hence to earth outpours
10. Augustus, Res Gestae Divi Augusti, 19 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •octavius, portico of •portico of octavius Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 97
11. Tacitus, Annals, 15.37 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •octavius, portico of •portico of octavius Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 80
15.37. Ipse quo fidem adquireret nihil usquam perinde laetum sibi, publicis locis struere convivia totaque urbe quasi domo uti. et celeberrimae luxu famaque epulae fuere quas a Tigellino paratas ut exemplum referam, ne saepius eadem prodigentia narranda sit. igitur in stagno Agrippae fabricatus est ratem cui superpositum convivium navium aliarum tractu moveretur. naves auro et ebore distinctae, remiges- que exoleti per aetates et scientiam libidinum componebantur. volucris et feras diversis e terris et animalia maris Oceano abusque petiverat. crepidinibus stagni lupanaria adstabant inlustribus feminis completa et contra scorta visebantur nudis corporibus. iam gestus motusque obsceni; et postquam tenebrae incedebant, quantum iuxta nemoris et circumiecta tecta consonare cantu et luminibus clarescere. ipse per licita atque inlicita foedatus nihil flagitii reliquerat quo corruptior ageret, nisi paucos post dies uni ex illo contaminatorum grege (nomen Pythagorae fuit) in modum sollemnium coniugiorum denupsisset. inditum imperatori flammeum, missi auspices, dos et genialis torus et faces nuptiales, cuncta denique spectata quae etiam in femina nox operit. 15.37.  He himself, to create the impression that no place gave him equal pleasure with Rome, began to serve banquets in the public places and to treat the entire city as his palace. In point of extravagance and notoriety, the most celebrated of the feasts was that arranged by Tigellinus; which I shall describe as a type, instead of narrating time and again the monotonous tale of prodigality. He constructed, then, a raft on the Pool of Agrippa, and superimposed a banquet, to be set in motion by other craft acting as tugs. The vessels were gay with gold and ivory, and the oarsmen were catamites marshalled according to their ages and their libidinous attainments. He had collected birds and wild beasts from the ends of the earth, and marine animals from the ocean itself. On the quays of the lake stood brothels, filled with women of high rank; and, opposite, naked harlots met the view. First came obscene gestures and dances; then, as darkness advanced, the whole of the neighbouring grove, together with the dwelling-houses around, began to echo with song and to glitter with lights. Nero himself, defiled by every natural and unnatural lust had left no abomination in reserve with which to crown his vicious existence; except that, a few days later, he became, with the full rites of legitimate marriage, the wife of one of that herd of degenerates, who bore the name of Pythagoras. The veil was drawn over the imperial head, witnesses were despatched to the scene; the dowry, the couch of wedded love, the nuptial torches, were there: everything, in fine, which night enshrouds even if a woman is the bride, was left open to the view.
12. Tacitus, Agricola, 21 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •octavius, portico of •portico of octavius Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 96
13. Suetonius, Titus, 8.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •octavius, portico of •portico of octavius Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 80
14. Martial, Epigrams, 5.10.5-5.10.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •octavius, portico of •portico of octavius Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 262
15. Martial, Epigrams, 5.10.5-5.10.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •octavius, portico of •portico of octavius Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 262
16. Tertullian, On The Games, 2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •octavius, portico of •portico of octavius Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 80
2. Then, again, every one is ready with the argument that all things, as we teach, were created by God, and given to man for his use, and that they must be good, as coming all from so good a source; but that among them are found the various constituent elements of the public shows, such as the horse, the lion, bodily strength, and musical voice. It cannot, then, be thought that what exists by God's own creative will is either foreign or hostile to Him; and if it is not opposed to Him, it cannot be regarded as injurious to His worshippers, as certainly it is not foreign to them. Beyond all doubt, too, the very buildings connected with the places of public amusement, composed as they are of rocks, stones, marbles, pillars, are things of God, who has given these various things for the earth's embellishment; nay, the very scenes are enacted under God's own heaven. How skilful a pleader seems human wisdom to herself, especially if she has the fear of losing any of her delights - any of the sweet enjoyments of worldly existence! In fact, you will find not a few whom the imperilling of their pleasures rather than their life holds back from us. For even the weakling has no strong dread of death as a debt he knows is due by him; while the wise man does not look with contempt on pleasure, regarding it as a precious gift - in fact, the one blessedness of life, whether to philosopher or fool. Now nobody denies what nobody is ignorant of - for Nature herself is teacher of it - that God is the Maker of the universe, and that it is good, and that it is man's by free gift of its Maker. But having no intimate acquaintance with the Highest, knowing Him only by natural revelation, and not as His friends- afar off, and not as those who have been brought near to Him - men cannot but be in ignorance alike of what He enjoins and what He forbids in regard to the administration of His world. They must be ignorant, too, of the hostile power which works against Him, and perverts to wrong uses the things His hand has formed; for you cannot know either the will or the adversary of a God you do not know. We must not, then, consider merely by whom all things were made, but by whom they have been perverted. We shall find out for what use they were made at first, when we find for what they were not. There is a vast difference between the corrupted state and that of primal purity, just because there is a vast difference between the Creator and the corrupter. Why, all sorts of evils, which as indubitably evils even the heathens prohibit, and against which they guard themselves, come from the works of God. Take, for instance, murder, whether committed by iron, by poison, or by magical enchantments. Iron and herbs and demons are all equally creatures of God. Has the Creator, withal, provided these things for man's destruction? Nay, He puts His interdict on every sort of man-killing by that one summary precept, You shall not kill. Moreover, who but God, the Maker of the world, put in its gold, brass, silver, ivory, wood, and all the other materials used in the manufacture of idols? Yet has He done this that men may set up a worship in opposition to Himself? On the contrary idolatry in His eyes is the crowning sin. What is there offensive to God which is not God's? But in offending Him, it ceases to be His; and in ceasing to be His, it is in His eyes an offending thing. Man himself, guilty as he is of every iniquity, is not only a work of God - he is His image, and yet both in soul and body he has severed himself from his Maker. For we did not get eyes to minister to lust, and the tongue for speaking evil with, and ears to be the receptacle of evil speech, and the throat to serve the vice of gluttony, and the belly to be gluttony's ally, and the genitals for unchaste excesses, and hands for deeds of violence, and the feet for an erring life; or was the soul placed in the body that it might become a thought-manufactory of snares, and fraud, and injustice? I think not; for if God, as the righteous ex-actor of innocence, hates everything like malignity - if He hates utterly such plotting of evil, it is clear beyond a doubt, that, of all things that have come from His hand, He has made none to lead to works which He condemns, even though these same works may be carried on by things of His making; for, in fact, it is the one ground of condemnation, that the creature misuses the creation. We, therefore, who in our knowledge of the Lord have obtained some knowledge also of His foe - who, in our discovery of the Creator, have at the same time laid hands upon the great corrupter, ought neither to wonder nor to doubt that, as the prowess of the corrupting and God-opposing angel overthrew in the beginning the virtue of man, the work and image of God, the possessor of the world, so he has entirely changed man's nature - created, like his own, for perfect sinlessness - into his own state of wicked enmity against his Maker, that in the very thing whose gift to man, but not to him, had grieved him, he might make man guilty in God's eyes, and set up his own supremacy.
17. Anon., Mekhilta Derabbi Shimeon Ben Yohai, 5.9 (2nd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •octavius, portico of •portico of octavius Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 96
18. Pliny The Younger, Panegyric, 49.4-49.5 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •octavius, portico of •portico of octavius Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 80
19. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 1.4.33-1.4.34 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •octavius, portico of •portico of octavius Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 97
20. Velleius Paterculus, Roman History, 1.11.5, 2.1, 2.1.1-2.1.2, 2.81.3  Tagged with subjects: •octavius, portico of •portico of octavius Found in books: Jenkyns (2013), God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination, 80, 96, 97