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20 results for "oaths"
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 15.10-15.18, 24.1, 47.8 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •oaths, curses Found in books: Bickerman and Tropper (2007), Studies in Jewish and Christian History, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21
15.11. "וַיֵּרֶד הָעַיִט עַל־הַפְּגָרִים וַיַּשֵּׁב אֹתָם אַבְרָם׃", 15.12. "וַיְהִי הַשֶּׁמֶשׁ לָבוֹא וְתַרְדֵּמָה נָפְלָה עַל־אַבְרָם וְהִנֵּה אֵימָה חֲשֵׁכָה גְדֹלָה נֹפֶלֶת עָלָיו׃", 15.13. "וַיֹּאמֶר לְאַבְרָם יָדֹעַ תֵּדַע כִּי־גֵר יִהְיֶה זַרְעֲךָ בְּאֶרֶץ לֹא לָהֶם וַעֲבָדוּם וְעִנּוּ אֹתָם אַרְבַּע מֵאוֹת שָׁנָה׃", 15.14. "וְגַם אֶת־הַגּוֹי אֲשֶׁר יַעֲבֹדוּ דָּן אָנֹכִי וְאַחֲרֵי־כֵן יֵצְאוּ בִּרְכֻשׁ גָּדוֹל׃", 15.15. "וְאַתָּה תָּבוֹא אֶל־אֲבֹתֶיךָ בְּשָׁלוֹם תִּקָּבֵר בְּשֵׂיבָה טוֹבָה׃", 15.16. "וְדוֹר רְבִיעִי יָשׁוּבוּ הֵנָּה כִּי לֹא־שָׁלֵם עֲוֺן הָאֱמֹרִי עַד־הֵנָּה׃", 15.17. "וַיְהִי הַשֶּׁמֶשׁ בָּאָה וַעֲלָטָה הָיָה וְהִנֵּה תַנּוּר עָשָׁן וְלַפִּיד אֵשׁ אֲשֶׁר עָבַר בֵּין הַגְּזָרִים הָאֵלֶּה׃", 15.18. "בַּיּוֹם הַהוּא כָּרַת יְהוָה אֶת־אַבְרָם בְּרִית לֵאמֹר לְזַרְעֲךָ נָתַתִּי אֶת־הָאָרֶץ הַזֹּאת מִנְּהַר מִצְרַיִם עַד־הַנָּהָר הַגָּדֹל נְהַר־פְּרָת׃", 24.1. "וְאַבְרָהָם זָקֵן בָּא בַּיָּמִים וַיהוָה בֵּרַךְ אֶת־אַבְרָהָם בַּכֹּל׃", 24.1. "וַיִּקַּח הָעֶבֶד עֲשָׂרָה גְמַלִּים מִגְּמַלֵּי אֲדֹנָיו וַיֵּלֶךְ וְכָל־טוּב אֲדֹנָיו בְּיָדוֹ וַיָּקָם וַיֵּלֶךְ אֶל־אֲרַם נַהֲרַיִם אֶל־עִיר נָחוֹר׃", 47.8. "וַיֹּאמֶר פַּרְעֹה אֶל־יַעֲקֹב כַּמָּה יְמֵי שְׁנֵי חַיֶּיךָ׃", 15.10. "And he took him all these, and divided them in the midst, and laid each half over against the other; but the birds divided he not.", 15.11. "And the birds of prey came down upon the carcasses, and Abram drove them away.", 15.12. "And it came to pass, that, when the sun was going down, a deep sleep fell upon Abram; and, lo, a dread, even a great darkness, fell upon him.", 15.13. "And He said unto Abram: ‘Know of a surety that thy seed shall be a stranger in a land that is not theirs, and shall serve them; and they shall afflict them four hundred years;", 15.14. "and also that nation, whom they shall serve, will I judge; and afterward shall they come out with great substance.", 15.15. "But thou shalt go to thy fathers in peace; thou shalt be buried in a good old age.", 15.16. "And in the fourth generation they shall come back hither; for the iniquity of the Amorite is not yet full.’", 15.17. "And it came to pass, that, when the sun went down, and there was thick darkness, behold a smoking furnace, and a flaming torch that passed between these pieces.", 15.18. "In that day the LORD made a covet with Abram, saying: ‘Unto thy seed have I given this land, from the river of Egypt unto the great river, the river Euphrates;", 24.1. "And Abraham was old, well stricken in age; and the LORD had blessed Abraham in all things.", 47.8. "And Pharaoh said unto Jacob: ‘How many are the days of the years of thy life?’",
2. Hesiod, Works And Days, 285 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •self-curses, official oaths Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 377
285. It’s no use being good when wickedne
3. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 2.65-2.67 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •self-curses, official oaths Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 377
4. Sophocles, Women of Trachis, 1181 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •oaths, curses Found in books: Bickerman and Tropper (2007), Studies in Jewish and Christian History, 20
5. Euripides, Orestes, 1146-1147 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 35
6. Euripides, Iphigenia At Aulis, 1006-1008, 141-149, 151-154, 948-954, 150 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 35
7. Euripides, Alcestis, 1096 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •absent oaths, self-curses of Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 35
8. Plato, Critias, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •oaths, curses Found in books: Bickerman and Tropper (2007), Studies in Jewish and Christian History, 20
119e. αὐτῷ θῦμα ἑλεῖν, ἄνευ σιδήρου ξύλοις καὶ βρόχοις ἐθήρευον, ὃν δὲ ἕλοιεν τῶν ταύρων, πρὸς τὴν στήλην προσαγαγόντες κατὰ κορυφὴν αὐτῆς ἔσφαττον κατὰ τῶν γραμμάτων. ἐν δὲ τῇ στήλῃ πρὸς τοῖς νόμοις ὅρκος ἦν μεγάλας ἀρὰς ἐπευχόμενος τοῖς ἀπειθοῦσιν. ΚΡΙ. ὅτʼ οὖν κατὰ τοὺς 119e. hunted after the bulls with staves and nooses but with no weapon of iron; and whatsoever bull they captured they led up to the pillar and cut its throat over the top of the pillar, raining down blood on the inscription. And inscribed upon the pillar, besides the laws, was an oath which invoked mighty curses upon them that disobeyed. Crit. When, then, they had done sacrifice according to their laws and were consecrating
9. Aristophanes, Lysistrata, 233-234, 531, 530 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 35
530. σοί γ' ὦ κατάρατε σιωπῶ 'γώ, καὶ ταῦτα κάλυμμα φορούσῃ
10. Aristophanes, Knights, 401, 832-835, 400 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 35
400. εἴ σε μὴ μισῶ, γενοίμην ἐν Κρατίνου κῴδιον,
11. Aristophanes, Women of The Assembly, 977 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •absent oaths, self-curses of Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 35
977. καὶ τὴν θύραν γ' ἤραττες. ἀποθάνοιμ' ἄρα.
12. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 152, 324, 476-478, 151 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 35
151. κάκιστ' ἀπολοίμην, εἴ τι τούτων πείθομαι
13. Aristophanes, Clouds, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 35
1255. θήσω πρυτανεῖ' ἢ μηκέτι ζῴην ἐγώ.
14. Aeschines, Letters, 2.87 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •self-curses, official oaths Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 377
15. Demosthenes, Orations, 24.149-24.151, 54.41 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •self-curses, official oaths Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 377
16. Cicero, On Duties, 3.104 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •oaths, curses Found in books: Bickerman and Tropper (2007), Studies in Jewish and Christian History, 15
3.104. Non fuit Iuppiter metuendus ne iratus noceret, qui neque irasci solet nec nocere. Haec quidem ratio non magis contra Reguli quam contra omne ius iurandum valet. Sed in iure iurando non qui metus, sed quae vis sit, debet intellegi; est enim ius iurandum affirmatio religiosa; quod autem affirmate quasi deo teste promiseris, id tenendum est. Iam enim non ad iram deorum, quae nulla est, sed ad iustitiam et ad fidem pertinet. Nam praeclare Ennius: Ó Fides alma ápta pinnis ét ius iurandúm Iovis! Qui ius igitur iurandum violat, is Fidem violat, quam in Capitolio vicinam Iovis optimi maximi, ut in Catonis oratione est, maiores nostri esse voluerunt. 3.104.  "He need not have been afraid that Jupiter in anger would inflict injury upon him; he is not wont to be angry or hurtful." This argument, at all events, has no more weight against Regulus's conduct than it has against the keeping of any other oath. But in taking an oath it is our duty to consider not what one may have to fear in case of violation but wherein its obligation lies: an oath is an assurance backed by religious sanctity; and a solemn promise given, as before God as one's witness, is to be sacredly kept. For the question no longer concerns the wrath of the gods (for there is no such thing) but the obligations of justice and good faith. For, as Ennius says so admirably: "Gracious Good Faith, on wings upborne; thou oath in Jupiter's great name!" Whoever, therefore, violates his oath violates Good Faith; and, as we find it stated in Cato's speech, our forefathers chose that she should dwell upon the Capitol "neighbour to Jupiter Supreme and Best."
17. Tacitus, Annals, 12.47 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •oaths, curses Found in books: Bickerman and Tropper (2007), Studies in Jewish and Christian History, 21
12.47. Ac primo Radamistus in amplexus eius effusus simulare obsequium, socerum ac parentem appellare; adicit ius iurandum, non ferro, non veneno vim adlaturum; simul in lucum propinquum trahit, provisum illic sacrificii paratum dictitans, ut diis testibus pax firmaretur. mos est regibus, quoties in societatem coeant, implicare dextras pollicesque inter se vincire nodoque praestringere: mox ubi sanguis in artus se extremos suffuderit, levi ictu cruorem eliciunt atque invicem lambunt. id foedus arcanum habetur quasi mutuo cruore sacratum. sed tunc qui ea vincla admovebat, decidisse simulans genua Mithridatis invadit ipsumque prosternit; simulque concursu plurium iniciuntur catenae. ac compede, quod dedecorum barbaris, trahebatur; mox quia vulgus duro imperio habitum, probra ac verbera intentabat. et erant contra qui tantam fortunae commutationem misera- rentur; secutaque cum parvis liberis coniunx cuncta lamentatione complebat. diversis et contectis vehiculis abduntur, dum Pharasmanis iussa exquirerentur. illi cupido regni fratre et filia potior animusque sceleribus paratus; visui tamen consuluit, ne coram interficeret. et Radamistus, quasi iuris iurandi memor, non ferrum, non venenum in sororem et patruum expromit, sed proiectos in humum et veste multa gravique opertos necat. filii quoque Mithridatis quod caedibus parentum inlacrimaverant trucidati sunt. 12.47.  The first act of Radamistus was to throw himself into his arms with affected devotion and to address him as father-in‑law and parent. He followed with an oath that neither by steel nor by poison would he practise against his life. At the same moment, he hurried him into a neighbouring grove, where, he informed him, the apparatus of sacrifice had been provided in order that their peace might be ratified before the attesting gods. The procedure in the case of two kings meeting to conclude an alliance is to unite their right hands, tie the thumbs together, and tighten the pressure by a knot: then, when the blood has run to the extremities, a slight incision gives it outlet, and each prince licks it in turn. A mystical character is attached to the agreement thus sealed and counter-sealed in blood. But, on this occasion, the person who was fastening the bonds feigned to slip, and, grasping Mithridates by the knees, threw him prostrate: at the same instant, a number of men rushed up and put him in irons. He was dragged off by his shackles, to barbarians a supreme indignity; and before long the populace, which had experienced the rigour of his sway, was levelling against him its insults and its blows. There were also, on the other hand, some found to pity so complete a reversal of fortune; and his wife, who followed with their infant children, filled the place with her laments. The prisoners were stowed out of sight in separate and covered vehicles, until the orders of Pharasmanes should be ascertained. To him the desire of a crown outweighed a brother and a daughter, and his temper was prompt to crime: still he shewed consideration for his eyes by not having them killed in his presence. Radamistus, too mindful apparently of his oath, produced neither steel nor poison for the destruction of his sister and uncle, but had them tossed on the ground and smothered under a heavy pile of clothes. Mithridates' sons were also slaughtered, since they had shed tears at the murder of their parents.
18. Shenoute, Canons, 25 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •curses, for breaking monastic oaths Found in books: Dilley (2019), Monasteries and the Care of Souls in Late Antique Christianity: Cognition and Discipline, 86
19. Epigraphy, Seg, 57 576  Tagged with subjects: •self-curses, official oaths Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 377
20. Anon., Hippocratic Oath, 0  Tagged with subjects: •self-curses, official oaths Found in books: Sommerstein and Torrance (2014), Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece, 377