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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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Please note: the results are produced through a computerized process which may frequently lead to errors, both in incorrect tagging and in other issues. Please use with caution.
Due to load times, full text fetching is currently attempted for validated results only.
Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

For a list of book indices included, see here.


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All subjects (including unvalidated):
subject book bibliographic info
nicomachus Cornelli (2013), In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category, 10, 48, 184, 194, 407, 408, 409, 410, 411, 412, 413, 414, 416, 417, 426, 447
Corrigan and Rasimus (2013), Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World, 175, 176, 177, 193, 383, 385, 386, 564
Cosgrove (2022), Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine, 91, 92
Huffman (2019), A History of Pythagoreanism, 41, 44, 284
Inwood and Warren (2020), Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy, 194
Omeara (2005), Platonopolis: Platonic Political Philosophy in Late Antiquity 64
Rasimus (2009), Paradise Reconsidered in Gnostic Mythmaking: Rethinking Sethianism in Light of the Ophite Evidence, 32, 179
Riess (2012), Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens, 197
Trapp et al. (2016), In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns, 56
Vazques and Ross (2022), Time and Cosmology in Plato and the Platonic Tradition, 47
nicomachus, calendars, sacred, of Mikalson (2016), New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society, 106, 109, 144, 167, 168, 173, 176, 191, 192, 199, 218, 232, 235, 240
nicomachus, commentary on d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 171
nicomachus, flavianus O'Daly (2020), Augustine's City of God: A Reader's Guide (2nd edn), 5, 6
Van Nuffelen (2012), Orosius and the Rhetoric of History, 74, 78
nicomachus, flavianus, virius Masterson (2016), Man to Man: Desire, Homosociality, and Authority in Late-Roman Manhood. 20
nicomachus, his apollo and artemis Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 275
nicomachus, his bacchants Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 275
nicomachus, his magna mater Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 275
nicomachus, his scylla Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 275
nicomachus, introduction to arithmetic, asclepius, commentary on d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 171
nicomachus, introduction to arithmetics, commentary on d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 170
nicomachus, of gerasa Bianchetti et al. (2015), Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition, 44
Geljon and Runia (2019), Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 235
Horkey (2019), Cosmos in the Ancient World, 25, 34
Janowitz (2002b), Icons of Power: Ritual Practices in Late Antiquity, 5, 6, 59
Motta and Petrucci (2022), Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity, 188
Wardy and Warren (2018), Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy, 200
nicomachus, on arithmetic d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 176
nicomachus, on division of mathematics d'Hoine and Martijn (2017), All From One: A Guide to Proclus, 175
nicomachus, the anagrapheus Mikalson (2016), New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society, 106, 109, 121, 124, 144, 167, 168, 173, 176, 191, 199, 232, 240
nicomachus, virius flavianus, senator Bruun and Edmondson (2015), The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy, 378

List of validated texts:
8 validated results for "nicomachus"
1. None, None, nan (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Nicomachus, the anagrapheus • Nikomachos, reviser of the sacrificial calendar • calendars, sacred, of Nicomachus

 Found in books: Mikalson (2016), New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society, 167; Papazarkadas (2011), Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens, 80

2. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 4.30.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Divinities (Greek and Roman), Nikomachos • Machaon, sons Nikomachos and Gorgasos • Nicomachus • Pharae, sanctuary of Nikomachos and Gorgasos

 Found in books: Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 307; Trapp et al. (2016), In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns, 56

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4.30.3 καὶ τάδε ἄλλα ἤκουσα ἐν Φαραῖς, Διοκλεῖ θυγατέρα ἐπὶ τοῖς διδύμοις παισὶν Ἀντίκλειαν γενέσθαι, τῆς δὲ Νικόμαχόν τε εἶναι καὶ Γόργασον, πατρὸς δὲ Μαχάονος τοῦ Ἀσκληπιοῦ· τούτους καταμεῖναί τε αὐτοῦ καὶ ὡς ὁ Διοκλῆς ἐτελεύτησε τὴν βασιλείαν ἐκδέξασθαι. διαμεμένηκε δὲ αὐτοῖς καὶ ἐς τόδε ἔτι νοσήματά τε καὶ τοὺς πεπηρωμένους τῶν ἀνθρώπων ἰᾶσθαι· καί σφισιν ἀντὶ τούτων θυσίας ἐς τὸ ἱερὸν καὶ ἀναθήματα ἄγουσιν. ἔστι δὲ καὶ Τύχης ναὸς Φαραιάταις καὶ ἄγαλμα ἀρχαῖον.'' None
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4.30.3 I heard also at Pharae that besides the twins a daughter Anticleia was born to Diocles, and that her children were Nicomachus and Gorgasus, by Machaon the son of Asclepius. They remained at Pharae and succeeded to the kingdom on the death of Diocles. The power of healing diseases and curing the maimed has remained with them to this day, and in return for this, sacrifices and votive offerings are brought to their sanctuary. The people of Pharae possess also a temple of Fortune (Tyche) and an ancient image.'' None
3. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 8.25 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Nicomachus

 Found in books: Cornelli (2013), In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category, 447; Corrigan and Rasimus (2013), Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World, 383

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8.25 The principle of all things is the monad or unit; arising from this monad the undefined dyad or two serves as material substratum to the monad, which is cause; from the monad and the undefined dyad spring numbers; from numbers, points; from points, lines; from lines, plane figures; from plane figures, solid figures; from solid figures, sensible bodies, the elements of which are four, fire, water, earth and air; these elements interchange and turn into one another completely, and combine to produce a universe animate, intelligent, spherical, with the earth at its centre, the earth itself too being spherical and inhabited round about. There are also antipodes, and our down is their up.'' None
4. Epigraphy, Ig I , 84
 Tagged with subjects: • Law Code of Nikomachos • Nicomachus, the anagrapheus • Nikomachos, reviser of the sacrificial calendar • calendars, sacred, of Nicomachus

 Found in books: Lalone (2019), Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess, 169; Mikalson (2016), New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society, 121, 218; Papazarkadas (2011), Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens, 72, 82, 85

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84 Gods. Decree 1 The Council and the People decided. Pandionis was in prytany, Aristoxenos was secretary, Antiochides was chairman, Antiphon was archon (418/7); Adosios proposed: to fence in the sanctuary (hieron) of Kodros and Neleus and Basile and (5) to lease (misthōsai) the sacred precinct (temenos) according to the specifications (suggraphas). Let the official sellers (pōlētai) make the contract (apomisthōsantōn) for the fencing in. Let the king (basileus) lease (apomisthōsatō) the sacred precinct according to the specifications, and let him despatch the boundary-commissioners (horistas) to demarcate these sanctuaries (hiera) so that they may be in the best and most pious condition. The money for the fencing in shall come from the sacred precinct. They shall carry out these provisions before the end of this Council\'s term of office, (10) otherwise each shall be liable to a fine of one thousand drachmas according to what has been proposed (eiremena). Decree 2 Adosios proposed: in other respects in accordance with the Council’s proposal, but let the king (basileus) and the official sellers (pōlētai) lease (misthōsatō) the sacred precinct of Neleus and Basile for twenty years according to the specifications. The lessee (misthōsamenos) shall fence in the sanctuary (hieron) of Kodros and Neleus and Basile at his own expense. Whatever (15) rent the sacred precinct may produce in each year, let him deposit the money in the ninth prytany (prutaneias) with the receivers (apodektai), and let the receivers (apodektais) hand it over to the treasurers of the Other Gods according to the law. If the king (basileus) or anyone else of those instructed about these matters does not carry out what has been decreed in the prytany (prutaneias) of Aigeis, (20) let him be liable to a fine of 10,000 drachmas. The purchaser of the mud (ilun) shall remove it from the ditch (taphro) during this very Council after paying to Neleus the price at which he made the purchase. Let the king (basileus) erase the name of the purchaser of the mud (ilun) once he has paid the fee (misthōsin). Let the king (basileus) write up instead (anteggraphsato) on the wall the name of the lessee (misthōsamenos) of the sacred precinct and for how much he has rented (misthōsētai) it (25) and the names of the guarantors in accordance with the law that concerns the sacred precincts (temenōn). So that anyone who wishes may be able to know, let the secretary (grammateus) of the Council inscribe this decree on a stone stele and place it in the Neleion next to the railings (ikria).10 Let the payment officers (kolakretai) give the money to this end. The king (basileus) shall lease (misthoun) the sacred precinct of Neleus and of Basile on the following terms: (30) that the lessee (misthōsamenos) fence in the sanctuary (hieron) of Kodros and Neleus and Basile according to the specifications (suggraphas) during the term of the Council that is about to enter office, and that he work the sacred precinct of Neleus and Basile on the following terms: that he plant young sprouts of olive trees, no fewer than 200, and more if he wishes; that the lessee (misthōsamenos) have control of the ditch (taphro) and the water from Zeus,11 (35) as much as flows in between the Dionysion and the gates whence the initiates march out to the sea, and as much as flows in between the public building (oikias tes demosias)12 and the gates leading out to the bath of Isthmonikos; lease (misthoun) it for twenty years. text from Attic Inscriptions Online, IG I3
84 - Decree on the administration of the property of Kodros, Neleus and Basile
'' None
5. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Nicomachus, the anagrapheus • Nikomachos, reviser of the sacrificial calendar • calendars, sacred, of Nicomachus

 Found in books: Mikalson (2016), New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society, 199; Papazarkadas (2011), Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens, 80

6. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Law Code of Nikomachos • Nicomachus, the anagrapheus • Nikomachos, reviser of the sacrificial calendar • calendars, sacred, of Nicomachus

 Found in books: Lalone (2019), Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess, 169; Mikalson (2016), New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society, 121, 218; Papazarkadas (2011), Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens, 72, 82, 85

7. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Nicomachus, the anagrapheus • Nikomachos, reviser of the sacrificial calendar • calendars, sacred, of Nicomachus

 Found in books: Mikalson (2016), New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society, 106, 167, 199, 232, 235; Papazarkadas (2011), Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens, 81, 82

8. None, None, nan
 Tagged with subjects: • Nikomachos • Nikomachos, reviser of the sacrificial calendar

 Found in books: Mackil and Papazarkadas (2020), Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B, 16; Papazarkadas (2011), Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens, 82




Please note: the results are produced through a computerized process which may frequently lead to errors, both in incorrect tagging and in other issues. Please use with caution.
Due to load times, full text fetching is currently attempted for validated results only.
Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

For a list of book indices included, see here.