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67 results for "natural"
1. Hebrew Bible, Exodus, 7.8-7.13 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 184
7.8. "וַיֹּאמֶר יְהוָה אֶל־מֹשֶׁה וְאֶל־אַהֲרֹן לֵאמֹר׃", 7.9. "כִּי יְדַבֵּר אֲלֵכֶם פַּרְעֹה לֵאמֹר תְּנוּ לָכֶם מוֹפֵת וְאָמַרְתָּ אֶל־אַהֲרֹן קַח אֶת־מַטְּךָ וְהַשְׁלֵךְ לִפְנֵי־פַרְעֹה יְהִי לְתַנִּין׃", 7.11. "וַיִּקְרָא גַּם־פַּרְעֹה לַחֲכָמִים וְלַמְכַשְּׁפִים וַיַּעֲשׂוּ גַם־הֵם חַרְטֻמֵּי מִצְרַיִם בְּלַהֲטֵיהֶם כֵּן׃", 7.12. "וַיַּשְׁלִיכוּ אִישׁ מַטֵּהוּ וַיִּהְיוּ לְתַנִּינִם וַיִּבְלַע מַטֵּה־אַהֲרֹן אֶת־מַטֹּתָם׃", 7.13. "וַיֶּחֱזַק לֵב פַּרְעֹה וְלֹא שָׁמַע אֲלֵהֶם כַּאֲשֶׁר דִּבֶּר יְהוָה׃", 7.8. "And the LORD spoke unto Moses and unto Aaron, saying:", 7.9. "’When Pharaoh shall speak unto you, saying: Show a wonder for you; then thou shalt say unto Aaron: Take thy rod, and cast it down before Pharaoh, that it become a serpent.’", 7.10. "And Moses and Aaron went in unto Pharaoh, and they did so, as the LORD had commanded; and Aaron cast down his rod before Pharaoh and before his servants, and it became a serpent.", 7.11. "Then Pharaoh also called for the wise men and the sorcerers; and they also, the magicians of Egypt, did in like manner with their secret arts.", 7.12. "For they cast down every man his rod, and they became serpents; but Aaron’s rod swallowed up their rods.", 7.13. "And Pharaoh’s heart was hardened, and he hearkened not unto them; as the LORD had spoken.",
2. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 5.18 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 78
5.18. videtur enim ad exitum venisse quaestio. Propemodum id quidem. Verum tamen mathematicorum iste mos est, non est philosophorum. nam geometrae cum aliquid docere volunt, si quid ad eam rem pertinet eorum quae ante docuerunt, id sumunt pro concesso et probato, illud modo explicant, de quo ante nihil scriptum est; philosophi quamcumque rem habent in manibus, in eam quae conveniunt, congerunt omnia, etsi alio loco disputata sunt. quod ni ita esset, cur Stoicus, si esset essent V 1 quaesitum, satisne ad beate vivendum virtus posset, multa diceret? cui satis esset respondere se ante docuisse se ... docuisse s sed ... docuisset X si... docuisset V c s non recte nihil bonum esse nisi quod honestum esset, hoc probato consequens esse beatam vitam virtute esse contentam, contemptam, -a KR et quo modo hoc sit consequens illi, sic illud huic, ut, si beata vita vita V 2 s om. X virtute contenta contemptam, -a KR sit, nisi honestum quod quod o e corr. K c sit, nihil aliud sit bonum.
3. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 1.24 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 168
1.24. for the present I will confine myself to expressing my surprise at their stupidity in holding that a being who is immortal and also blessed is of a spherical shape, merely on the ground that Plato pronounces a sphere to be the most beautiful of all figures. For my own part, on the score of appearance I prefer either a cylinder or a cube or a cone or a pyramid. Then, what mode of existence is assigned to their spherical deity? Why, he is in a state of rotation, spinning round with a velocity that surpasses all powers of conception. But what room there can be in such an existence for steadfastness of mind and for happiness, I cannot see. Also, why should a condition that is painful in the human body, if even the smallest part of it is affected, be supposed to be painless in the deity? Now clearly the earth, being a part of the world, is also a part of god. Yet we see that vast portions of the earth's surface are uninhabitable deserts, being either scorched by the sun's proximity, or frost-bound and covered with snow owing to its extreme remoteness. But if the world is god, these, being parts of the world, must be regarded as limbs of god, undergoing the extremes of heat and cold respectively.
4. Ovid, Tristia, 5.12.61-5.12.68 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 168
5. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.62-1.79, 1.271-1.289, 6.137-6.141, 6.524-6.526 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 182, 270
1.62. Humana ante oculos foede cum vita iaceret 1.63. in terris oppressa gravi sub religione, 1.64. quae caput a caeli regionibus ostendebat 1.65. horribili super aspectu mortalibus instans, 1.66. primum Graius homo mortalis tollere contra 1.67. est oculos ausus primusque obsistere contra; 1.68. quem neque fama deum nec fulmina nec minitanti 1.69. murmure compressit caelum, sed eo magis acrem 1.70. inritat animi virtutem, effringere ut arta 1.71. naturae primus portarum claustra cupiret. 1.72. ergo vivida vis animi pervicit et extra 1.73. processit longe flammantia moenia mundi 1.74. atque omne immensum peragravit mente animoque, 1.75. unde refert nobis victor quid possit oriri, 1.76. quid nequeat, finita potestas denique cuique 1.77. qua nam sit ratione atque alte terminus haerens. 1.78. quare religio pedibus subiecta vicissim 1.79. opteritur, nos exaequat victoria caelo. 1.271. Principio venti vis verberat incita corpus 1.272. ingentisque ruit navis et nubila differt, 1.273. inter dum rapido percurrens turbine campos 1.274. arboribus magnis sternit montisque supremos 1.275. silvifragis vexat flabris: ita perfurit acri 1.276. cum fremitu saevitque minaci murmure pontus. 1.277. sunt igitur venti ni mirum corpora caeca, 1.278. quae mare, quae terras, quae denique nubila caeli 1.279. verrunt ac subito vexantia turbine raptant, 1.280. nec ratione fluunt alia stragemque propagant 1.281. et cum mollis aquae fertur natura repente 1.282. flumine abundanti, quam largis imbribus auget 1.283. montibus ex altis magnus decursus aquai 1.284. fragmina coniciens silvarum arbustaque tota, 1.285. nec validi possunt pontes venientis aquai 1.286. vim subitam tolerare: ita magno turbidus imbri 1.287. molibus incurrit validis cum viribus amnis, 1.288. dat sonitu magno stragem volvitque sub undis 1.289. grandia saxa, ruit qua quidquid fluctibus obstat. 6.137. Fit quoque ut inter dum validi vis incita venti 6.138. perscindat nubem perfringens impete recto; 6.139. nam quid possit ibi flatus manifesta docet res, 6.140. hic, ubi lenior est, in terra cum tamen alta 6.141. arbusta evolvens radicibus haurit ab imis. 6.524. hic ubi sol radiis tempestatem inter opacam 6.525. adversa fulsit nimborum aspargine contra, 6.526. tum color in nigris existit nubibus arqui.
6. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, 1.1.17 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 78
7. New Testament, 1 Timothy, 1.3-1.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 87
1.3. Καθὼς παρεκάλεσά σε προσμεῖναι ἐν Ἐφέσῳ, πορευόμενος εἰς Μακεδονίαν, ἵνα παραγγείλῃς τισὶν μὴ ἑτεροδιδασκαλεῖν 1.4. μηδὲ προσέχειν μύθοις καὶ γενεαλογίαις ἀπεράντοις,αἵτινες ἐκζητήσεις παρέχουσι μᾶλλον ἢ οἰκονομίαν θεοῦ τὴν ἐν πίστει, 1.3. As I exhorted you to stay at Ephesus when I was going into Macedonia, that you might charge certain men not to teach a different doctrine, 1.4. neither to pay attention to myths and endless genealogies, which cause disputes, rather than God's stewardship, which is in faith --
8. New Testament, Acts, 17.16-17.33 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 187
17.16. Ἐν δὲ ταῖς Ἀθήναις ἐκδεχομένου αὐτοὺς τοῦ Παύλου, παρωξύνετο τὸ πνεῦμα αὐτοῦ ἐν αὐτῷ θεωροῦντος κατείδωλον οὖσαν τὴν πόλιν. 17.17. διελέγετο μὲν οὖν ἐν τῇ συναγωγῇ τοῖς Ἰουδαίοις καὶ τοῖς σεβομένοις καὶ ἐν τῇ ἀγορᾷ κατὰ πᾶσαν ἡμέραν πρὸς τοὺς παρατυγχάνοντας. 17.18. τινὲς δὲ καὶ τῶν Ἐπικουρίων καὶ Στωικῶν φιλοσόφων συνέβαλλον αὐτῷ, καί τινες ἔλεγον Τί ἂν θέλοι ὁ σπερμολόγος οὗτος λέγειν; οἱ δέ Ξένων δαιμονίων δοκεῖ καταγγελεὺς εἶναι· 17.19. ὅτι τὸν Ἰησοῦν καὶ τὴν ἀνάστασιν εὐηγγελίζετο. ἐπιλαβόμενοι δὲ αὐτοῦ ἐπὶ τὸν Ἄρειον Πάγον ἤγαγον, λέγοντες Δυνάμεθα γνῶναι τίς ἡ καινὴ αὕτη [ἡ] ὑπὸ σοῦ λαλουμένη διδαχή; 17.20. ξενίζοντα γάρ τινα εἰσφέρεις εἰς τὰς ἀκοὰς ἡμῶν·βουλόμεθα οὖν γνῶναι τίνα θέλει ταῦτα εἶναι. 17.21. Ἀθηναῖοι δὲ πάντες καὶ οἱ ἐπιδημοῦντες ξένοι εἰς οὐδὲν ἕτερον ηὐκαίρουν ἢ λέγειν τι ἢ ἀκούειν τι καινότερον. 17.22. σταθεὶς δὲ Παῦλος ἐν μέσῳ τοῦ Ἀρείου Πάγου ἔφη Ἄνδρες Ἀθηναῖοι, κατὰ πάντα ὡς δεισιδαιμονεστέρους ὑμᾶς θεωρῶ· 17.23. διερχόμενος γὰρ καὶ ἀναθεωρῶν τὰ σεβάσματα ὑμῶν εὗρον καὶ βωμὸν ἐν ᾧ ἐπεγέγραπτο ΑΓΝΩΣΤΩ ΘΕΩ. ὃ οὖν ἀγνοοῦντες εὐσεβεῖτε, τοῦτο ἐγὼ καταγγέλλω ὑμῖν. 17.24. ὁ θεὸς ὁ ποιήσας τὸν κόσμον καὶ πάντατὰ ἐν αὐτῷ, οὗτος οὐρανοῦ καὶ γῆς ὑπάρχων κύριος οὐκ ἐν χειροποιήτοις ναοῖς κατοικεῖ 17.25. οὐδὲ ὑπὸ χειρῶν ἀνθρωπίνων θεραπεύεται προσδεόμενός τινος, αὐτὸςδιδοὺς πᾶσι ζωὴν καὶ πνοὴν καὶ τὰ πάντα· 17.26. ἐποίησέν τε ἐξ ἑνὸς πᾶν ἔθνος ανθρώπων κατοικεῖν ἐπὶ παντὸς προσώπου τῆς γῆς, ὁρίσας προστεταγμένους καιροὺς καὶ τὰς ὁροθεσίας τῆς κατοικίας αὐτῶν, 17.27. ζητεῖν τὸν θεὸν εἰ ἄρα γε ψηλαφήσειαν αὐτὸν καὶ εὕροιεν, καί γε οὐ μακρὰν ἀπὸ ἑνὸς ἑκάστου ἡμῶν ὑπάρχοντα. 17.28. ἐν αὐτῷ γὰρ ζῶμεν καὶ κινούμεθα καὶ ἐσμέν, ὡς καί τινες τῶν καθʼ ὑμᾶς ποιητῶν εἰρήκασιν q type="spoken" 17.29. γένος οὖν ὑπάρχοντες τοῦ θεοῦ οὐκ ὀφείλομεν νομίζειν χρυσῷ ἢ ἀργύρῳ ἢ λίθῳ, χαράγματι τέχνής καὶ ἐνθυμήσεως ἀνθρώπου, τὸ θεῖον εἶναι ὅμοιον. 17.30. τοὺς μὲν οὖν χρόνους τῆς ἀγνοίας ὑπεριδὼν ὁ θεὸς τὰ νῦν ἀπαγγέλλει τοῖς ἀνθρώποις πάντας πανταχοῦ μετανοεῖν, 17.31. καθότι ἔστησεν ἡμέραν ἐν ᾗ μέλλει κρίνειν τὴν οἰκουμένην ἐν δικαιοσύνῃ ἐν ἀνδρὶ ᾧ ὥρισεν, πίστιν παρασχὼν πᾶσιν ἀναστήσας αὐτὸν ἐκ νεκρῶν. 17.32. ἀκούσαντες δὲ ἀνάστασιν νεκρῶν οἱ μὲν ἐχλεύαζον οἱ δὲ εἶπαν Ἀκουσόμεθά σου περὶ τούτου καὶ πάλιν. 17.33. οὕτως ὁ Παῦλος ἐξῆλθεν ἐκ μέσου αὐτῶν· 17.16. Now while Paul waited for them at Athens, his spirit was provoked within him as he saw the city full of idols. 17.17. So he reasoned in the synagogue with Jews and the devout persons, and in the marketplace every day with those who met him. 17.18. Some of the Epicurean and Stoic philosophers also encountered him. Some said, "What does this babbler want to say?"Others said, "He seems to be advocating foreign demons," because he preached Jesus and the resurrection. 17.19. They took hold of him, and brought him to the Areopagus, saying, "May we know what this new teaching is, which is spoken by you? 17.20. For you bring certain strange things to our ears. We want to know therefore what these things mean." 17.21. Now all the Athenians and the strangers living there spent their time in nothing else, but either to tell or to hear some new thing. 17.22. Paul stood in the midst of the Areopagus, and said, "You men of Athens, I perceive that you are very religious in all things. 17.23. For as I passed along, and observed the objects of your worship, I found also an altar with this inscription: 'TO AN UNKNOWN GOD.' What therefore you worship in ignorance, this I announce to you. 17.24. The God who made the world and all things in it, he, being Lord of heaven and earth, dwells not in temples made with hands, 17.25. neither is he served by men's hands, as though he needed anything, seeing he himself gives to all life and breath, and all things. 17.26. He made from one blood every nation of men to dwell on all the surface of the earth, having determined appointed seasons, and the bounds of their habitation, 17.27. that they should seek the Lord, if perhaps they might reach out for him and find him, though he is not far from each one of us. 17.28. 'For in him we live, and move, and have our being.' As some of your own poets have said, 'For we are also his offspring.' 17.29. Being then the offspring of God, we ought not to think that the Divine Nature is like gold, or silver, or stone, engraved by art and device of man. 17.30. The times of ignorance therefore God overlooked. But now he commands that all men everywhere should repent, 17.31. because he has appointed a day in which he will judge the world in righteousness by the man whom he has ordained; whereof he has given assurance to all men, in that he has raised him from the dead." 17.32. Now when they heard of the resurrection of the dead, some mocked; but others said, "We want to hear you yet again concerning this." 17.33. Thus Paul went out from among them.
9. Statius, Achilleis, 1.11 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 182
10. Plutarch, On Being A Busybody, 5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 86
11. Suetonius, De Poetis, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 284
12. Suetonius, Domitianus, 10.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 78
13. Philostratus The Athenian, Life of Apollonius, 7.3 (2nd cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 78
7.3. ̓Απολλωνίου, κἂν ἄριστα ἑτέρων φαίνηται: τὸ μὲν τοίνυν τοῦ ̓Ελεάτου ἔργον καὶ οἱ τὸν Κότυν ἀπεκτονότες οὔπω ἀξιόλογα, Θρᾷκας γὰρ καὶ Γέτας δουλοῦσθαι μὲν ῥᾴδιον, ἐλευθεροῦν δὲ εὔηθες, οὐδὲ γὰρ τῇ ἐλευθερίᾳ χαίρουσιν, ἅτε, οἶμαι, οὐκ αἰσχρὸν ἡγούμενοι τὸ δουλεύειν. Πλάτων δὲ ὡς μὲν οὐ σοφόν τι ἔπαθε τὰ ἐν Σικελίᾳ διορθούμενος μᾶλλον ἢ τὰ ̓Αθήνησιν, ἢ ὡς εἰκότως ἐπράθη σφαλείς τε καὶ σφήλας, οὐ λέγω διὰ τοὺς δυσχερῶς ἀκροωμένους. τὰ δὲ τοῦ ̔Ρηγίνου πρὸς Διονύσιον μὲν ἐτολμᾶτο τυραννεύοντα οὐ βεβαίως Σικελίας, ὁ δ' ὑπ' ἐκείνου πάντως ἀποθανὼν ἄν, εἰ καὶ μὴ ὑπὸ ̔Ρηγίνων ἐβλήθη, θαυμαστόν, οἶμαι, οὐδὲν ἔπραττε τὸν ὑπὲρ τῆς ἑτέρων ἐλευθερίας θάνατον μᾶλλον ἢ τὸν ὑπὲρ τῆς αὑτοῦ δουλείας αἱρούμενος. Καλλισθένης δὲ τὸ δόξαι κακὸς οὐδ' ἂν νῦν διαφύγοι, τοὺς γὰρ αὐτοὺς ἐπαινέσας καὶ διαβαλὼν ἢ διέβαλεν, οὓς ἐνόμισεν ἐπαίνων ἀξίους, ἢ ἐπῄνεσεν, οὓς ἐχρῆν διαβάλλοντα φαίνεσθαι, καὶ ἄλλως ὁ μὲν καθιστάμενος ἐς τὸ λοιδορεῖσθαι τοῖς ἀγαθοῖς ἀνδράσιν οὐκ ἔχει ἀποδρᾶναι τὸ μὴ οὐ δόξαι βάσκανος, ὁ δὲ τοὺς πονηροὺς κολακεύων ἐπαίνοις αὐτὸς ἀποίσεται τὴν αἰτίαν τῶν ἁμαρτηθέντων σφίσιν, οἱ γὰρ κακοὶ κακίους ἐπαινούμενοι. Διογένης δὲ πρὸ Χαιρωνείας μὲν εἰπὼν ταῦτα πρὸς τὸν Φίλιππον κἂν ἐφύλαξε τὸν ἄνδρα καθαρὸν τῶν ἐπ' ̓Αθηναίους ὅπλων, εἰργασμένοις δ' ἐπιστὰς ὠνείδιζε μέν, οὐ μὴν διωρθοῦτο. Κράτης δὲ καὶ αἰτίαν ἂν λάβοι πρὸς ἀνδρὸς φιλοπόλιδος μὴ ξυναράμενος ̓Αλεξάνδρῳ τῆς βουλῆς, ᾗ ἐς τὸ ἀνοικίσαι τὰς Θήβας ἐχρῆτο. ̓Απολλώνιος δὲ οὔθ' ὑπὲρ πατρίδος κινδυνευούσης δείσας οὔτε τοῦ σώματος ἀπογνοὺς οὔτ' ἐς ἀνοήτους ὑπαχθεὶς λόγους οὔθ' ὑπὲρ Μυσῶν ἢ Γετῶν οὔτε πρὸς ἄνδρα, ὃς ἦρχε νήσου μιᾶς ἢ χώρας οὐ μεγάλης, ἀλλ' ὑφ' ᾧ θάλαττά τε ἦν καὶ γῆ πᾶσα, πρὸς τοῦτον, ἐπειδὴ πικρῶς ἐτυράννευε, παρέταττεν ἑαυτὸν ὑπὲρ τοῦ τῶν ἀρχομένων κέρδους, χρησάμενος μὲν τῇ διανοίᾳ ταύτῃ καὶ πρὸς Νέρωνα, ἡγείσθω δ' οὖν τις ἀκροβολισμοὺς 7.3. About the conduct of Zeno of Elea then, and about the murder of Cotys there is nothing very remarkable; for as it is easy to enslave Thracians and Getae, so it is an act of folly to liberate them; for indeed they do not appreciate freedom, because, I imagine, they do not esteem slavery to be base. I will not say that Plato somewhat lacked wisdom when he set himself to reform the affairs of Sicily rather than those of Athens, or that he was sold in all fairness when, after deceiving others, he found himself deceived, for I fear to offend my readers. But the despotic sway of Dionysius over Sicily was not solidly based when Phyton of Rhegium made his attempt against him, and in any case he would have been put to death by him, even if the people of that city had not shot their bolts at him; his achievement, then, I think, was by no means wonderful: he only preferred to die in behalf of the liberty of others rather than to endure the death penalty to make himself a slave. And as for Callisthenes, even today he cannot acquit himself of baseness; for in first commending and then attacking one and the same set of people, he either attacked those whom he felt to be worthy of praise, or he praised those whom he ought to have been openly attacking. Moreover a person who sets himself to abuse good men cannot escape the charge of being envious, while he who flatters the wicked by his very praises of them draws down upon his own head the guilt of their misdeeds, for evil men are only rendered more evil when you praise them. And Diogenes, if he had addressed Philip in the way he did before the battle of Chaeronea instead of after it, might have preserved him from the guilt of taking up arms against Athens; but instead of doing so he waited till harm was done, when he could only reproach him, not reform him. As for Crates, he must needs incur the censure of every patriot for not seconding Alexander in his design of recolonizing Thebes. But Apollonius had not to fear for any country that was endangered, nor was he in despair of his own life, nor was he reduced to silly and idle speeches, nor was he championing the cause of Mysians or Getae, nor was he face to face with one who was only sovereign of a single island or of an inconsiderable country, but he confronted one who was master both of sea and land, at a time when his tyranny was harsh and bitter; and he took his stand against the tyrant in behalf of the welfare of the subjects, with the same spirit of purpose as he had taken his stand against Nero.
14. Hippolytus, Refutation of All Heresies, 6.29 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 283
6.29. The quaternion, then, advocated by Valentinus, is a source of the everlasting nature having roots; and Sophia (is the power) from whom the animal and material creation has derived its present condition. But Sophia is called Spirit, and the Demiurge Soul, and the Devil the ruler of this world, and Beelzebub the (ruler) of demons. These are the statements which they put forward. But further, in addition to these, rendering, as I have previously mentioned, their entire system of doctrine (akin to the) arithmetical (art), (they determine) that the thirty Aeons within the Pleroma have again, in addition to these, projected other Aeons, according to the (numerical) proportion (adopted by the Pythagoreans), in order that the Pleroma might be formed into an aggregate, according to a perfect number. For how the Pythagoreans divided (the celestial sphere) into twelve and thirty and sixty parts, and how they have minute parts of diminutive portions, has been made evident. In this manner these (followers of Valentinus) subdivide the parts within the Pleroma. Now likewise the parts in the Ogdoad have been subdivided, and there has been projected Sophia, which is, according to them, mother of all living creatures, and the Joint Fruit of the Pleroma, (who is) the Logos, (and other Aeons,) who are celestial angels that have their citizenship in Jerusalem which is above, which is in heaven. For this Jerusalem is Sophia, she (that is) outside (the Pleroma), and her spouse is the Joint Fruit of the Pleroma. And the Demiurge projected souls; for this (Sophia) is the essence of souls. This (Demiurge), according to them, is Abraham, and these (souls) the children of Abraham. From the material and divilish essence the Demiurge fashioned bodies for the souls. This is what has been declared: And God formed man, taking clay from the earth, and breathed upon his face the breath of life, and man was made into a living soul. Genesis 2:7 This, according to them, is the inner man, the natural (man), residing in the material body: Now a material (man) is perishable, incomplete, (and) formed out of the devilish essence. And this is the material man, as it were, according to them an inn, or domicile, at one time of soul only, at another time of soul and demons, at another time of soul and Logoi. And these are the Logoi that have been dispersed from above, from the Joint Fruit of the Pleroma and (from) Sophia, into this world. And they dwell in an earthly body, with a soul, when demons do not take up their abode with that soul. This, he says, is what has been written in Scripture: On this account I bend my knees to the God and Father and Lord of our Lord Jesus Christ, that God would grant you to have Christ dwelling in the inner man, Ephesians 3:14-18 - that is, the natural (man), not the corporeal (one), - that you may be able to understand what is the depth, which is the Father of the universe, and what is the breadth, which is Staurus, the limit of the Pleroma, or what is the length, that is, the Pleroma of the Aeons. Wherefore, he says, the natural man receives not the things of the Spirit of God, for they are foolishness unto him; 1 Corinthians 2:14 but folly, he says, is the power of the Demiurge, for he was foolish and devoid of understanding, and imagined himself to be fabricating the world. He was, however, ignorant that Sophia, the Mother, the Ogdoad, was really the cause of all the operations performed by him who had no consciousness in reference to the creation of the world.
15. Gellius, Attic Nights, 1.9.6-1.9.7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 78
16. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 67.13.2-67.13.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 78
67.13.2.  But the deeds now to be related — deeds which he performed as emperor — cannot be described in similar terms. I refer to his killing of Arulenus Rusticus because he was a philosopher and because he called Thrasea holy, and to his slaying of Herennius Senecio because in his long career he had stood for no office after his quaestorship and because he had written the biography of Helvidius Priscus. 67.13.3.  Many others also perished as a result of this same charge of philosophizing, and all the philosophers that were left in Rome were banished once more. One Juventius Celsus, however, who had taken a leading part in conspiring with certain others against Domitian and had been accused of this, saved his life in a remarkable way.
17. Tertullian, Prescription Against Heretics, 6-7 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 86, 283
18. Porphyry, Life of Pythagoras, 5.37 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 79
19. Eusebius of Caesarea, Preparation For The Gospel, 14.18.2, 15.46-15.53 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 78, 154
20. Eusebius of Caesarea, Ecclesiastical History, 5.20.2 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 216
5.20.2. At the close of the treatise we have found a most beautiful note which we are constrained to insert in this work. It runs as follows:I adjure you who may copy this book, by our Lord Jesus Christ, and by his glorious advent when he comes to judge the living and the dead, to compare what you shall write, and correct it carefully by this manuscript, and also to write this adjuration, and place it in the copy.
21. Prudentius, Contra Symmachum, 2.90, 2.146, 2.203, 2.220-2.227 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 185, 186
22. Prudentius, Apotheosis, None (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 186
23. Prudentius, On The Crown of Martyrdom, 9 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 184
24. Paulinus of Nola, Carmina, 10.19-10.22 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 182
25. Julian (Emperor), Letters, 89 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 154
26. Prudentius, Hamartigenia, None (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 185
27. Prudentius, Psychomachia, 34-35 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 182
28. Augustine, Confessions, 9.4 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 184
9.4. 7. And the day arrived on which, in very deed, I was to be released from the Professorship of Rhetoric, from which in intention I had been already released. And done it was; and Thou delivered my tongue whence You had already delivered my heart; and full of joy I blessed You for it, and retired with all mine to the villa. What I accomplished here in writing, which was now wholly devoted to Your service, though still, in this pause as it were, panting from the school of pride, my books testify, - those in which I disputed with my friends, and those with myself alone before You; and what with the absent Nebridius, my letters testify. And when can I find time to recount all Your great benefits which You bestowed upon us at that time, especially as I am hasting on to still greater mercies? For my memory calls upon me, and pleasant it is to me, O Lord, to confess unto You, by what inward goads You subdued me, and how Thou made me low, bringing down the mountains and hills of my imaginations, and straightened my crookedness, and smooth my rough ways; Luke 3:5 and by what means Thou also subdued that brother of my heart, Alypius, unto the name of Your only-begotten, our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, which he at first refused to have inserted in our writings. For he rather desired that they should savour of the cedars of the schools, which the Lord has now broken down, than of the wholesome herbs of the Church, hostile to serpents. 8. What utterances sent I up unto You, my God, when I read the Psalms of David, those faithful songs and sounds of devotion which exclude all swelling of spirit, when new to Your true love, at rest in the villa with Alypius, a catechumen like myself, my mother cleaving unto us - in woman's garb truly, but with a man's faith, with the peacefulness of age, full of motherly love and Christian piety! What utterances used I to send up unto You in those Psalms, and how was I inflamed towards You by them, and burned to rehearse them, if it were possible, throughout the whole world, against the pride of the human race! And yet they are sung throughout the whole world, and none can hide himself from Your heat. With what vehement and bitter sorrow was I indigt at the Manich ans; whom yet again I pitied, for that they were ignorant of those sacraments, those medicaments, and were mad against the antidote which might have made them sane! I wished that they had been somewhere near me then, and, without my being aware of their presence, could have beheld my face, and heard my words, when I read the fourth Psalm in that time of my leisure - how that Psalm wrought upon me. When I called upon You, Thou heard me, O God of my righteousness; You have enlarged me when I was in distress; have mercy upon me, and hear my prayer. Oh that they might have heard what I uttered on these words, without my knowing whether they heard or no, lest they should think that I spoke it because of them! For, of a truth, neither should I have said the same things, nor in the way I said them, if I had perceived that I was heard and seen by them; and had I spoken them, they would not so have received them as when I spoke by and for myself before You, out of the private feelings of my soul. 9. I alternately quaked with fear, and warmed with hope, and with rejoicing in Your mercy, O Father. And all these passed forth, both by my eyes and voice, when Your good Spirit, turning unto us, said, O you sons of men, how long will you be slow of heart? How long will you love vanity, and seek after leasing? For I had loved vanity, and sought after leasing. And You, O Lord, had already magnified Your Holy One, raising Him from the dead, and setting Him at Your right hand, Ephesians 1:20 whence from on high He should send His promise, Luke 24:49 the Paraclete, the Spirit of Truth. John 14:16-17 And He had already sent Him, Acts 2:1-4 but I knew it not; He had sent Him, because He was now magnified, rising again from the dead, and ascending into heaven. For till then the Holy Ghost was not yet given, because that Jesus was not yet glorified. John 7:39 And the prophet cries out, How long will you be slow of heart? How long will you love vanity, and seek after leasing? Know this, that the Lord has magnified His Holy One. He cries out, How long? He cries out, Know this, and I, so long ignorant, loved vanity, and sought after leasing. And therefore I heard and trembled, because these words were spoken unto such as I remembered that I myself had been. For in those phantasms which I once held for truths was there vanity and leasing. And I spoke many things loudly and earnestly, in the sorrow of my remembrance, which, would that they who yet love vanity and seek after leasing had heard! They would perchance have been troubled, and have vomited it forth, and You would hear them when they cried unto You; for by a true death in the flesh He died for us, who now makes intercession for us Romans 8:34 with You. 10. I read further, Be angry, and sin not. Ephesians 4:26 And how was I moved, O my God, who had now learned to be angry with myself for the things past, so that in the future I might not sin! Yea, to be justly angry; for that it was not another nature of the race of darkness which sinned for me, as they affirm it to be who are not angry with themselves, and who treasure up to themselves wrath against the day of wrath, and of the revelation of Your righteous judgment. Romans 2:5 Nor were my good things now without, nor were they sought after with eyes of flesh in that sun; for they that would have joy from without easily sink into oblivion, and are wasted upon those things which are seen and temporal, and in their starving thoughts do lick their very shadows. Oh, if only they were wearied out with their fasting, and said, Who will show us any good? And we would answer, and they hear, O Lord. The light of Your countece is lifted up upon us. For we are not that Light, which lights every man, John 1:9 but we are enlightened by You, that we, who were sometimes darkness, may be light in You. Ephesians 5:8 Oh that they could behold the internal Eternal, which having tasted I gnashed my teeth that I could not show It to them, while they brought me their heart in their eyes, roaming abroad from You, and said, Who will show us any good? But there, where I was angry with myself in my chamber, where I was inwardly pricked, where I had offered my sacrifice, slaying my old man, and beginning the resolution of a new life, putting my trust in You, - there had Thou begun to grow sweet unto me, and to put gladness in my heart. And I cried out as I read this outwardly, and felt it inwardly. Nor would I be increased with worldly goods, wasting time and being wasted by time; whereas I possessed in Your eternal simplicity other grain, and wine, and oil. 11. And with a loud cry from my heart, I called out in the following verse, Oh, in peace! and the self-same! Oh, what said he, I will lay me down and sleep! For who shall hinder us, when shall be brought to pass the saying that is written, Death is swallowed up in victory? 1 Corinthians 15:54 And You are in the highest degree the self-same, who changest not; and in You is the rest which forgets all labour, for there is no other beside You, nor ought we to seek after those many other things which are not what You are; but Thou, Lord, only makest me to dwell in hope. These things I read, and was inflamed; but discovered not what to do with those deaf and dead, of whom I had been a pestilent member - a bitter and a blind declaimer against the writings be-honied with the honey of heaven and luminous with Your own light; and I was consumed on account of the enemies of this Scripture. 12. When shall I call to mind all that took place in those holidays? Yet neither have I forgotten, nor will I be silent about the severity of Your scourge, and the amazing quickness of Your mercy. Thou at that time tortured me with toothache; and when it had become so exceeding great that I was not able to speak, it came into my heart to urge all my friends who were present to pray for me to You, the God of all manner of health. And I wrote it down on wax, and gave it to them to read. Presently, as with submissive desire we bowed our knees, that pain departed. But what pain? Or how did it depart? I confess to being much afraid, my Lord my God, seeing that from my earliest years I had not experienced such pain. And Your purposes were profoundly impressed upon me; and, rejoicing in faith, I praised Your name. And that faith suffered me not to be at rest in regard to my past sins, which were not yet forgiven me by Your baptism.
29. Symmachus, Relationes, 3.10 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 185
30. Synesius of Cyrene, Dion, 16 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 254
31. Synesius of Cyrene, Letters, None (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 254
32. Synesius of Cyrene, Letters, None (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 254
33. Ammianus Marcellinus, History, 15.1.4, 29.2.6 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 79
15.1.4. For even if he ruled the infinity of worlds postulated by Democritus, of which Alexander the Great dreamed under the stimulus of Anaxarchus, yet from reading or hearsay he should have considered that (as the astronomers uimously teach) the circuit of the whole earth, which to us seems endless, compared with the greatness of the universe has the likeness of a mere tiny point. 29.2.6. Amid the crash of so many ruins Heliodorus, that hellish contriver with Palladius of all evils, being a mathematician I.e., an astrologer, a caster of nativities. (in the parlance of the vulgar) and pledged by secret instructions from the imperial court, after he had been cajoled by every enticement of kindness to induce him to reveal what he knew or could invent, now put forth his deadly stings.
34. Augustine, The City of God, 6.3, 21.8 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 78, 175
6.3. He wrote forty-one books of antiquities. These he divided into human and divine things. Twenty-five he devoted to human things, sixteen to divine things; following this plan in that division - namely, to give six books to each of the four divisions of human things. For he directs his attention to these considerations: who perform, where they perform, when they perform, what they perform. Therefore in the first six books he wrote concerning men; in the second six, concerning places; in the third six, concerning times; in the fourth and last six, concerning things. Four times six, however, make only twenty-four. But he placed at the head of them one separate work, which spoke of all these things conjointly. In divine things, the same order he preserved throughout, as far as concerns those things which are performed to the gods. For sacred things are performed by men in places and times. These four things I have mentioned he embraced in twelve books, allotting three to each. For he wrote the first three concerning men, the following three concerning places, the third three concerning times, and the fourth three concerning sacred rites - showing who should perform, where they should perform, when they should perform, what they should perform, with most subtle distinction. But because it was necessary to say - and that especially was expected - to whom they should perform sacred rites, he wrote concerning the gods themselves the last three books; and these five times three made fifteen. But they are in all, as we have said, sixteen. For he put also at the beginning of these one distinct book, speaking by way of introduction of all which follows; which being finished, he proceeded to subdivide the first three in that five-fold distribution which pertain to men, making the first concerning high priests, the second concerning augurs, the third concerning the fifteen men presiding over the sacred ceremonies. The second three he made concerning places, speaking in one of them concerning their chapels, in the second concerning their temples, and in the third concerning religious places. The next three which follow these, and pertain to times - that is, to festival days - he distributed so as to make one concerning holidays, the other concerning the circus games, and the third concerning scenic plays. of the fourth three, pertaining to sacred things, he devoted one to consecrations, another to private, the last to public, sacred rites. In the three which remain, the gods themselves follow this pompous train, as it were, for whom all this culture has been expended. In the first book are the certain gods, in the second the uncertain, in the third, and last of all, the chief and select gods. 21.8. But if they reply that their reason for not believing us when we say that human bodies will always burn and yet never die, is that the nature of human bodies is known to be quite otherwise constituted; if they say that for this miracle we cannot give the reason which was valid in the case of those natural miracles, viz., that this is the natural property, the nature of the thing - for we know that this is not the nature of human flesh - we find our answer in the sacred writings, that even this human flesh was constituted in one fashion before there was sin - was constituted, in fact, so that it could not die - and in another fashion after sin, being made such as we see it in this miserable state of mortality, unable to retain enduring life. And so in the resurrection of the dead shall it be constituted differently from its present well-known condition. But as they do not believe these writings of ours, in which we read what nature man had in paradise, and how remote he was from the necessity of death - and indeed, if they did believe them, we should of course have little trouble in debating with them the future punishment of the damned, - we must produce from the writings of their own most learned authorities some instances to show that it is possible for a thing to become different from what it was formerly known characteristically to be. From the book of Marcus Varro, entitled, of the Race of the Roman People, I cite word for word the following instance: There occurred a remarkable celestial portent; for Castor records that, in the brilliant star Venus, called Vesperugo by Plautus, and the lovely Hesperus by Homer, there occurred so strange a prodigy, that it changed its color, size, form, course, which never happened before nor since. Adrastus of Cyzicus, and Dion of Naples, famous mathematicians, said that this occurred in the reign of Ogyges. So great an author as Varro would certainly not have called this a portent had it not seemed to be contrary to nature. For we say that all portents are contrary to nature; but they are not so. For how is that contrary to nature which happens by the will of God, since the will of so mighty a Creator is certainly the nature of each created thing? A portent, therefore, happens not contrary to nature, but contrary to what we know as nature. But who can number the multitude of portents recorded in profane histories? Let us then at present fix our attention on this one only which concerns the matter in hand. What is there so arranged by the Author of the nature of heaven and earth as the exactly ordered course of the stars? What is there established by laws so sure and inflexible? And yet, when it pleased Him who with sovereignty and supreme power regulates all He has created, a star conspicuous among the rest by its size and splendor changed its color, size, form, and, most wonderful of all, the order and law of its course! Certainly that phenomenon disturbed the canons of the astronomers, if there were any then, by which they tabulate, as by unerring computation, the past and future movements of the stars, so as to take upon them to affirm that this which happened to the morning star (Venus) never happened before nor since. But we read in the divine books that even the sun itself stood still when a holy man, Joshua the Son of Nun, had begged this from God until victory should finish the battle he had begun; and that it even went back, that the promise of fifteen years added to the life of king Hezekiah might be sealed by this additional prodigy. But these miracles, which were vouchsafed to the merits of holy men, even when our adversaries believe them, they attribute to magical arts; so Virgil, in the lines I quoted above, ascribes to magic the power to Turn rivers backward to their source, And make the stars forget their course. For in our sacred books we read that this also happened, that a river turned backward, was stayed above while the lower part flowed on, when the people passed over under the above-mentioned leader, Joshua the Son of Nun; and also when Elias the prophet crossed; and afterwards, when his disciple Elisha passed through it: and we have just mentioned how, in the case of king Hezekiah the greatest of the stars forgot its course. But what happened to Venus, according to Varro, was not said by him to have happened in answer to any man's prayer. Let not the sceptics then benight themselves in this knowledge of the nature of things, as if divine power cannot bring to pass in an object anything else than what their own experience has shown them to be in its nature. Even the very things which are most commonly known as natural would not be less wonderful nor less effectual to excite surprise in all who beheld them, if men were not accustomed to admire nothing but what is rare. For who that thoughtfully observes the countless multitude of men, and their similarity of nature, can fail to remark with surprise and admiration the individuality of each man's appearance, suggesting to us, as it does, that unless men were like one another, they would not be distinguished from the rest of the animals; while unless, on the other hand, they were unlike, they could not be distinguished from one another, so that those whom we declare to be like, we also find to be unlike? And the unlikeness is the more wonderful consideration of the two; for a common nature seems rather to require similarity. And yet, because the very rarity of things is that which makes them wonderful, we are filled with much greater wonder when we are introduced to two men so like, that we either always or frequently mistake in endeavoring to distinguish between them. But possibly, though Varro is a heathen historian, and a very learned one, they may disbelieve that what I have cited from him truly occurred; or they may say the example is invalid, because the star did not for any length of time continue to follow its new course, but returned to its ordinary orbit. There is, then, another phenomenon at present open to their observation, and which, in my opinion, ought to be sufficient to convince them that, though they have observed and ascertained some natural law, they ought not on that account to prescribe to God, as if He could not change and turn it into something very different from what they have observed. The land of Sodom was not always as it now is; but once it had the appearance of other lands, and enjoyed equal if not richer fertility; for, in the divine narrative, it was compared to the paradise of God. But after it was touched [by fire] from heaven, as even pagan history testifies, and as is now witnessed by those who visit the spot, it became unnaturally and horribly sooty in appearance; and its apples, under a deceitful appearance of ripeness, contain ashes within. Here is a thing which was of one kind, and is of another. You see how its nature was converted by the wonderful transmutation wrought by the Creator of all natures into so very disgusting a diversity - an alteration which after so long a time took place, and after so long a time still continues. As therefore it was not impossible to God to create such natures as He pleased, so it is not impossible to Him to change these natures of His own creation into whatever He pleases, and thus spread abroad a multitude of those marvels which are called monsters, portents, prodigies, phenomena, and which if I were minded to cite and record, what end would there be to this work? They say that they are called monsters, because they demonstrate or signify something; portents, because they portend something; and so forth. But let their diviners see how they are either deceived, or even when they do predict true things, it is because they are inspired by spirits, who are intent upon entangling the minds of men (worthy, indeed, of such a fate) in the meshes of a hurtful curiosity, or how they light now and then upon some truth, because they make so many predictions. Yet, for our part, these things which happen contrary to nature, and are said to be contrary to nature (as the apostle, speaking after the manner of men, says, that to graft the wild olive into the good olive, and to partake of its fatness, is contrary to nature), and are called monsters, phenomena, portents, prodigies, ought to demonstrate, portend, predict that God will bring to pass what He has foretold regarding the bodies of men, no difficulty preventing Him, no law of nature prescribing to Him His limit. How He has foretold what He is to do, I think I have sufficiently shown in the preceding book, culling from the sacred Scriptures, both of the New and Old Testaments, not, indeed, all the passages that relate to this, but as many as I judged to suffice for this work.
35. Augustine, Contra Academicos, 3.19.42 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 169
36. Jerome, Chronicon Eusebii (Interpretatio Chronicae Eusebii Pamphili), None (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 78
37. Jerome, Letters, 61.2, 80.3 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 216, 219
38. Theodosius Ii Emperor of Rome, Theodosian Code, 16.5.62-16.5.63 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 79
39. Isidore of Seville, Sententiae, 3.13.1 (6th cent. CE - 7th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 284
40. Isidore of Seville, De Natura Rerum, 31.1 (6th cent. CE - 7th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 270
41. Isidore of Seville, Etymologies, 8.1.1, 8.3.1, 8.3.3, 8.3.6-8.3.7, 8.6.2-8.6.4, 8.6.7-8.6.16, 8.6.18, 8.6.22-8.6.23, 8.7.1-8.7.2, 8.7.9, 8.11.2, 8.11.11, 13.2, 18.45, 18.51 (6th cent. CE - 7th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 283, 284
42. Augustine, Letters, 118.1.1, 118.1.3-118.1.5, 118.2.9-118.2.10, 118.3.13, 118.3.16, 118.4.23 (7th cent. CE - 7th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 86, 168, 169
44. Anon., Constitutiones Sirmondianae, 6  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 79
45. Suidas Thessalius, Fragments, None  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 78
46. Seneca The Younger, Carmina, 7.25.5  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 86
47. Poggio, Epistulae, 9.32  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 156
48. Plinius, Epistulae, 3.11  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 78
51. Prudentius, Praefatio Operum, 10-12, 8-9, 7  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 184
52. Anon., Hisperica Famina, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 267
57. Anon., Vita Symeonis Stylitae Iunioris, 164, 162  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 105
60. John Chrysostom, Homiliae In 1 Tim., 1.2-1.3  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 87
66. Theophanes, Theophanes, 6241  Tagged with subjects: •natural philosophy, natural philosophers Found in books: Rohmann (2016), Christianity, Book-Burning and Censorship in Late Antiquity, 105