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23 results for "moth"
1. Septuagint, Lamentations, 29.8-29.13 (th cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •moth, as a symbol of destruction Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018) 157, 158
2. Hebrew Bible, Micah, 4.13, 7.4 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •moth, as a symbol of destruction Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018) 147, 149, 150, 158, 159, 160, 161, 162, 191
4.13. "קוּמִי וָדוֹשִׁי בַת־צִיּוֹן כִּי־קַרְנֵךְ אָשִׂים בַּרְזֶל וּפַרְסֹתַיִךְ אָשִׂים נְחוּשָׁה וַהֲדִקּוֹת עַמִּים רַבִּים וְהַחֲרַמְתִּי לַיהוָה בִּצְעָם וְחֵילָם לַאֲדוֹן כָּל־הָאָרֶץ׃", 7.4. "טוֹבָם כְּחֵדֶק יָשָׁר מִמְּסוּכָה יוֹם מְצַפֶּיךָ פְּקֻדָּתְךָ בָאָה עַתָּה תִהְיֶה מְבוּכָתָם׃", 4.13. "Arise and thresh, O daughter of Zion; For I will make thy horn iron, And I will make thy hoofs brass; And thou shalt beat in pieces many peoples; And thou shalt devote their gain unto the LORD, And their substance unto the Lord of the whole earth.", 7.4. "The best of them is as a brier; The most upright is worse than a thorn hedge; The day of thy watchmen, even thy visitation, is come; Now shall be their perplexity.",
3. Hebrew Bible, Ruth, 4.2-4.8 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •moth, as a symbol of destruction Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018) 191
4.2. "וַיִּקַּח עֲשָׂרָה אֲנָשִׁים מִזִּקְנֵי הָעִיר וַיֹּאמֶר שְׁבוּ־פֹה וַיֵּשֵׁבוּ׃", 4.2. "וְעַמִּינָדָב הוֹלִיד אֶת־נַחְשׁוֹן וְנַחְשׁוֹן הוֹלִיד אֶת־שַׂלְמָה׃", 4.3. "וַיֹּאמֶר לַגֹּאֵל חֶלְקַת הַשָּׂדֶה אֲשֶׁר לְאָחִינוּ לֶאֱלִימֶלֶךְ מָכְרָה נָעֳמִי הַשָּׁבָה מִשְּׂדֵה מוֹאָב׃", 4.4. "וַאֲנִי אָמַרְתִּי אֶגְלֶה אָזְנְךָ לֵאמֹר קְנֵה נֶגֶד הַיֹּשְׁבִים וְנֶגֶד זִקְנֵי עַמִּי אִם־תִּגְאַל גְּאָל וְאִם־לֹא יִגְאַל הַגִּידָה לִּי ואדע [וְאֵדְעָה] כִּי אֵין זוּלָתְךָ לִגְאוֹל וְאָנֹכִי אַחֲרֶיךָ וַיֹּאמֶר אָנֹכִי אֶגְאָל׃", 4.5. "וַיֹּאמֶר בֹּעַז בְּיוֹם־קְנוֹתְךָ הַשָּׂדֶה מִיַּד נָעֳמִי וּמֵאֵת רוּת הַמּוֹאֲבִיָּה אֵשֶׁת־הַמֵּת קניתי [קָנִיתָה] לְהָקִים שֵׁם־הַמֵּת עַל־נַחֲלָתוֹ׃", 4.6. "וַיֹּאמֶר הַגֹּאֵל לֹא אוּכַל לגאול־[לִגְאָל־] לִי פֶּן־אַשְׁחִית אֶת־נַחֲלָתִי גְּאַל־לְךָ אַתָּה אֶת־גְּאֻלָּתִי כִּי לֹא־אוּכַל לִגְאֹל׃", 4.7. "וְזֹאת לְפָנִים בְּיִשְׂרָאֵל עַל־הַגְּאוּלָּה וְעַל־הַתְּמוּרָה לְקַיֵּם כָּל־דָּבָר שָׁלַף אִישׁ נַעֲלוֹ וְנָתַן לְרֵעֵהוּ וְזֹאת הַתְּעוּדָה בְּיִשְׂרָאֵל׃", 4.8. "וַיֹּאמֶר הַגֹּאֵל לְבֹעַז קְנֵה־לָךְ וַיִּשְׁלֹף נַעֲלוֹ׃", 4.2. "And he took ten men of the elders of the city, and said: ‘Sit ye down here.’ And they sat down.", 4.3. "And he said unto the near kinsman: ‘Naomi, that is come back out of the field of Moab, selleth the parcel of land, which was our brother Elimelech’s;", 4.4. "and I thought to disclose it unto thee, saying: Buy it before them that sit here, and before the elders of my people. If thou wilt redeem it, redeem it; but if it will not be redeemed, then tell me, that I may know; for there is none to redeem it beside thee; and I am after thee.’ And he said: ‘I will redeem it.’", 4.5. "Then said Boaz: ‘What day thou buyest the field of the hand of Naomi—hast thou also bought of Ruth the Moabitess, the wife of the dead, to raise up the name of the dead upon his inheritance?’", 4.6. "And the near kinsman said: ‘I cannot redeem it for myself, lest I mar mine own inheritance; take thou my right of redemption on thee; for I cannot redeem it.’—", 4.7. "Now this was the custom in former time in Israel concerning redeeming and concerning exchanging, to confirm all things: a man drew off his shoe, and gave it to his neighbour; and this was the attestation in Israel.—", 4.8. "So the near kinsman said unto Boaz: ‘Buy it for thyself.’ And he drew off his shoe.",
4. Hebrew Bible, Psalms, 69.22 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •moth, as a symbol of destruction Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018) 191
69.22. "וַיִּתְּנוּ בְּבָרוּתִי רֹאשׁ וְלִצְמָאִי יַשְׁקוּנִי חֹמֶץ׃", 69.22. "Yea, they put poison into my food; And in my thirst they gave me vinegar to drink.",
5. Hebrew Bible, Hosea, 5.6 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •moth, as a symbol of destruction Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018) 191
5.6. "בְּצֹאנָם וּבִבְקָרָם יֵלְכוּ לְבַקֵּשׁ אֶת־יְהוָה וְלֹא יִמְצָאוּ חָלַץ מֵהֶם׃", 5.6. "With their flocks and with their herds they shall go To seek the LORD, but they shall not find Him; He hath withdrawn Himself from them.",
6. Hebrew Bible, Isaiah, 50.9, 51.8, 54.1 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •moth, as a symbol of destruction Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018) 150, 151, 159, 160, 191
50.9. "הֵן אֲדֹנָי יְהוִה יַעֲזָר־לִי מִי־הוּא יַרְשִׁיעֵנִי הֵן כֻּלָּם כַּבֶּגֶד יִבְלוּ עָשׁ יֹאכְלֵם׃", 51.8. "כִּי כַבֶּגֶד יֹאכְלֵם עָשׁ וְכַצֶּמֶר יֹאכְלֵם סָס וְצִדְקָתִי לְעוֹלָם תִּהְיֶה וִישׁוּעָתִי לְדוֹר דּוֹרִים׃", 54.1. "רָנִּי עֲקָרָה לֹא יָלָדָה פִּצְחִי רִנָּה וְצַהֲלִי לֹא־חָלָה כִּי־רַבִּים בְּנֵי־שׁוֹמֵמָה מִבְּנֵי בְעוּלָה אָמַר יְהוָה׃", 54.1. "כִּי הֶהָרִים יָמוּשׁוּ וְהַגְּבָעוֹת תְּמוּטֶנָה וְחַסְדִּי מֵאִתֵּךְ לֹא־יָמוּשׁ וּבְרִית שְׁלוֹמִי לֹא תָמוּט אָמַר מְרַחֲמֵךְ יְהוָה׃", 50.9. "Behold, the Lord GOD will help me; Who is he that shall condemn me? Behold, they all shall wax old as a garment, The moth shall eat them up.", 51.8. "For the moth shall eat them up like a garment, And the worm shall eat them like wool; But My favour shall be for ever, And My salvation unto all generations.", 54.1. "Sing, O barren, thou that didst not bear, Break forth into singing, and cry aloud, thou that didst not travail; For more are the children of the desolate Than the children of the married wife, saith the LORD.",
7. Hebrew Bible, Amos, 4.13 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •moth, as a symbol of destruction Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018) 159, 191
4.13. "כִּי הִנֵּה יוֹצֵר הָרִים וּבֹרֵא רוּחַ וּמַגִּיד לְאָדָם מַה־שֵּׂחוֹ עֹשֵׂה שַׁחַר עֵיפָה וְדֹרֵךְ עַל־בָּמֳתֵי אָרֶץ יְהוָה אֱלֹהֵי־צְבָאוֹת שְׁמוֹ׃", 4.13. "For, lo, He that formeth the mountains, and createth the wind, And declareth unto man what is his thought, That maketh the morning darkness, And treadeth upon the high places of the earth; The LORD, the God of hosts, is His name.",
8. Pindar, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •moth, as a symbol of destruction Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018) 150
9. New Testament, James, 5.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •moth, as a symbol of destruction Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018) 150
5.2. ὁ πλοῦτος ὑμῶν σέσηπεν, καὶ τὰ ἱμάτια ὑμῶν σητόβρωτα γέγονεν, 5.2. Your riches are corrupted and your garments are moth-eaten.
10. New Testament, Galatians, 4.21-4.31 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •moth, as a symbol of destruction Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018) 159
4.21. Λέγετέ μοι, οἱ ὑπὸ νόμον θέλοντες εἶναι, τὸν νόμον οὐκ ἀκούετε; 4.22. γέγραπται γὰρ ὅτι Ἀβραὰμ δύο υἱοὺς ἔσχεν, ἕνα ἐκ τῆς παιδίσκης καὶ ἕνα ἐκ τῆς ἐλευθέρας· 4.23. ἀλλʼ ὁ [μὲν] ἐκ τῆς παιδίσκης κατὰ σάρκα γεγέννηται, ὁ δὲ ἐκ τῆς ἐλευθέρας διʼ ἐπαγγελίας. 4.24. ἅτινά ἐστιν ἀλληγορούμενα· αὗται γάρ εἰσιν δύο διαθῆκαι, μία μὲν ἀπὸ ὄρους Σινά, εἰς δουλείαν γεννῶσα, ἥτις ἐστὶν Ἅγαρ, 4.25. τὸ δὲ Ἅγαρ Σινὰ ὄρος ἐστὶν ἐν τῇ Ἀραβίᾳ, συνστοιχεῖ δὲ τῇ νῦν Ἰερουσαλήμ, δουλεύει γὰρ μετὰ τῶν τέκνων αὐτῆς· 4.26. ἡ δὲ ἄνω Ἰερουσαλὴμ ἐλευθέρα ἐστίν, 4.27. ἥτις ἐστὶν μήτηρ ἡμῶν· γέγραπται γάρ 4.28. ἡμεῖς δέ, ἀδελφοί, κατὰ Ἰσαὰκ ἐπαγγελίας τέκνα ἐσμέν· 4.29. ἀλλʼ ὥσπερ τότε ὁ κατὰ σάρκα γεννηθεὶς ἐδίωκε τὸν κατὰ πνεῦμα, οὕτως καὶ νῦν. 4.30. ἀλλὰ τί λέγει ἡ γραφή; Ἔκβαλε τὴν παιδίσκην καὶ τὸν υἱὸν αὐτῆς, οὐ γὰρ μὴ κληρονομήσει ὁ υἱὸς τῆς παιδίσκης μετὰ τοῦ υἱοῦ τῆς ἐλευθέρας. 4.31. διό, ἀδελφοί, οὐκ ἐσμὲν παιδίσκης τέκνα ἀλλὰ τῆς ἐλευθέρας. 4.21. Tell me, you that desire to be under the law, don't you listen to thelaw? 4.22. For it is written that Abraham had two sons, one by thehandmaid, and one by the free woman. 4.23. However, the son by thehandmaid was born according to the flesh, but the son by the free womanwas born through promise. 4.24. These things contain an allegory, forthese are two covets. One is from Mount Sinai, bearing children tobondage, which is Hagar. 4.25. For this Hagar is Mount Sinai inArabia, and answers to the Jerusalem that exists now, for she is inbondage with her children. 4.26. But the Jerusalem that is above isfree, which is the mother of us all. 4.27. For it is written,"Rejoice, you barren who don't bear. Break forth and shout, you that don't travail. For more are the children of the desolate than of her who has a husband." 4.28. Now we, brothers, as Isaac was, are children of promise. 4.29. But as then, he who was born according to the flesh persecutedhim who was born according to the Spirit, so also it is now. 4.30. However what does the Scripture say? "Throw out the handmaid and herson, for the son of the handmaid will not inherit with the son of thefree woman." 4.31. So then, brothers, we are not children of ahandmaid, but of the free woman.
11. New Testament, Luke, 12.32-12.34 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •moth, as a symbol of destruction Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018) 152, 157, 158, 162
12.32. μὴ φοβοῦ, τὸ μικρὸν ποίμνιον, ὅτι εὐδόκησεν ὁ πατὴρ ὑμῶν δοῦναι ὑμῖν τὴν βασιλείαν. 12.33. Πωλήσατε τὰ ὑπάρχοντα ὑμῶν καὶ δότε ἐλεημοσύνην· ποιήσατε ἑαυτοῖς βαλλάντια μὴ παλαιούμενα, θησαυρὸν ἀνέκλειπτον ἐν τοῖς οὐρανοῖς, 12.34. ὅπου κλέπτης οὐκ ἐγγίζει οὐδὲ σὴς διαφθείρει· ὅπου γάρ ἐστιν ὁ θησαυρὸς ὑμῶν, ἐκεῖ καὶ ἡ καρδία ὑμῶν ἔσται. 12.32. Don't be afraid, little flock, for it is your Father's good pleasure to give you the Kingdom. 12.33. Sell that which you have, and give gifts to the needy. Make for yourselves purses which don't grow old, a treasure in the heavens that doesn't fail, where no thief approaches, neither moth destroys. 12.34. For where your treasure is, there will your heart be also.
12. New Testament, Matthew, 6.16-6.21 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •moth, as a symbol of destruction Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018) 151, 152, 157, 158, 162
6.16. Ὅταν δὲ νηστεύητε, μὴ γίνεσθε ὡς οἱ ὑποκριταὶ σκυθρωποί, ἀφανίζουσιν γὰρ τὰ πρόσωπα αὐτῶν ὅπως φανῶσιν τοῖς ἀνθρώποις νηστεύοντες· ἀμὴν λέγω ὑμῖν, ἀπέχουσιν τὸν μισθὸν αὐτῶν. 6.17. σὺ δὲ νηστεύων ἄλειψαί σου τὴν κεφαλὴν καὶ τὸ πρόσωπόν σου νίψαι, 6.18. ὅπως μὴ φανῇς τοῖς ἀνθρώποις νηστεύων ἀλλὰ τῷ πατρί σου τῷ ἐν τῷ κρυφαίῳ· καὶ ὁ πατήρ σου ὁ βλέπων ἐν τῷ κρυφαίῳ ἀποδώσει σοι. 6.19. Μὴ θησαυρίζετε ὑμῖν θησαυροὺς ἐπὶ τῆς γῆς, ὅπου σὴς καὶ βρῶσις ἀφανίζει, καὶ ὅπου κλέπται διορύσσουσιν καὶ κλέπτουσιν· 6.20. θησαυρίζετε δὲ ὑμῖν θησαυροὺς ἐν οὐρανῷ, ὅπου οὔτε σὴς οὔτε βρῶσις ἀφανίζει, καὶ ὅπου κλέπται οὐ διορύσσουσιν οὐδὲ κλέπτουσιν· 6.21. ὅπου γάρ ἐστιν ὁ θησαυρός σου, ἐκεῖ ἔσται [καὶ] ἡ καρδία σου. 6.16. "Moreover when you fast, don't be like the hypocrites, with sad faces. For they disfigure their faces, that they may be seen by men to be fasting. Most assuredly I tell you, they have received their reward. 6.17. But you, when you fast, anoint your head, and wash your face; 6.18. so that you are not seen by men to be fasting, but by your Father who is in secret, and your Father, who sees in secret, will reward you. 6.19. "Don't lay up treasures for yourselves on the earth, where moth and rust consume, and where thieves break through and steal; 6.20. but lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust consume, and where thieves don't break through and steal; 6.21. for where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.
13. Tosefta, Peah, 4.18 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •moth, as a symbol of destruction Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018) 157, 158
4.18. "מעשה במונבז המלך שעמד ובזבז את כל אוצרותיו בשני בצורת אמרו לו אחיו אבותיך גנזו אוצרות והוסיפו על [של] אבותם ואתה עמדת ובזבזת את כל אוצרותיך שלך ושל אבותיך אמר להם אבותי גנזו אוצרות למטה ואני גנזתי למעלה שנא' (תהילים פ״ה:י״ב) אמת מארץ תצמח וגו' אבותי גנזו [אוצרות] במקום שהיד שולטת בו ואני גנזתי אוצרות במקום שאין היד שולטת בו שנאמר (תהילים פ״ט:ט״ו) צדק ומשפט מכון כסאך וגו' אבותי גנזו אוצרות שאין עושין פירות ואני גנזתי אוצרות שעושין פירות שנאמר (ישעיהו ג׳:י׳) אמרו צדיק כי טוב [וגו'] אבותי גנזו אוצרות של ממון ואני גנזתי אוצרות של נפשות שנא' (משלי י״א:ל׳) פרי צדיק עץ חיים ולוקח נפשות חכם אבותי גנזו אוצרות לאחרים ואני גנזתי לעצמי שנא' (דברים כ״ד:י״ג) ולך תהיה צדקה לפני ה' אלהיך אבותי גנזו אוצרות בעוה\"ז ואני גנזתי לעוה\"ב שנא' (ישעיהו נ״ח:ח׳) והלך לפניך צדקך צדקה וגמילת חסדים שקולין כנגד כל מצות שבתורה אלא שהצדקה בחיים וגמ\"ח בחיים ובמתים צדקה בעניים גמילות חסדים בעניים ובעשירים צדקה בממונו גמילות חסדים בממונו ובגופו.",
14. Babylonian Talmud, Menachot, None (3rd cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •moth, as a symbol of destruction Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018) 159, 160
87a. b the flour- /b like white scum that floats on the surface, b nor from /b the wine at b bottom of /b the cask b due to the sediment /b that collects there. b Rather, one brings from /b the wine in b its middle third. /b , b How does /b the Temple treasurer b inspect /b the wine to determine that it is from the middle of the cask? b The treasurer sits /b alongside the cask b and /b has b the /b measuring b reed in his hand. /b The spigot is opened and the wine begins to flow. When he sees that the wine emerging b draws /b with it b chalk /b -like scum b [ i hagir /i ], he /b immediately b knocks with the reed /b to indicate that the spigot should be closed., b Rabbi Yosei, son of Rabbi Yehuda, says: /b Wine b in which there is flour- /b like white scum is b unfit /b for libations, b as it is stated /b with regard to animal offerings: b “Unblemished they shall be for you…and their meal offering /b shall be fine flour mixed with b oil…unblemished they shall be for you, and their libations” /b (Numbers 28:19–20, 31). This indicates that animal offerings, meal offerings, and libations must all be brought from flawless products. Therefore, the presence of flour-like white scum in wine renders it unfit., strong GEMARA: /strong The mishna teaches: b One may not bring /b libations from b sweet /b wine, b nor /b from b boiled /b wine, b nor /b from wine produced from b smoked /b grapes, b and if one did bring /b a libation from such wine, it is b not valid. /b The Gemara asks: b But doesn’t the first clause teach: One may not bring libations from sweet wine made from sun-dried grapes, but if one did bring /b a libation from such wine it is b valid? /b How can one clause teach that a libation of one type of sweet wine is valid, and the other clause teach that a libation of another type of sweet wine is not valid?, b Ravina said: /b The text of the mishna is corrupt. To correct it, b combine /b the two clauses into one b and teach /b with regard to all the wines mentioned that they are unfit to be used for libations. b Rav Ashi said: /b The text of the mishna is correct. The reason for the difference between the two wines is that b the sweetness /b of grapes sweetended b by the sun is not objectionable, /b so libations of wine made from such grapes are valid, while b sweetness /b that results from the sugars b of the fruit /b itself b is objectionable, /b so libations of wine made from such grapes are not valid.,§ The mishna teaches: b One may not bring /b wine b aged /b for one year; this is b the statement of Rabbi /b Yehuda HaNasi, b but the Rabbis deem it valid. /b The Gemara provides the source for Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi’s ruling. b Rabbi Ḥizkiyya said: What is the reasoning of Rabbi /b Yehuda HaNasi? b The verse states /b with regard to the libations that accompany the New Moon offering: “And their libations: Half a i hin /i for a bull, a third of a i hin /i for a ram, and a quarter of a i hin /i b for a lamb, of wine” /b (Numbers 28:14). The juxtaposition of the terms lamb and wine teaches that b just as a lamb /b is fit to be used as an offering only if brought b in its /b first b year, so too wine /b is fit to be used as a libation only if it is b in its /b first b year. /b ,The Gemara ask: b If /b so, take the analogy further and conclude that b just as /b if one offers b a lamb in /b its b second year, /b it is b not valid, so too /b a libation of b wine in /b its b second year /b is b not valid. And if you would say /b that this is b indeed /b the i halakha /i , that is difficult: b But isn’t it taught /b in a i baraita /i that b wine in /b its b second year may not be brought /b i ab initio /i , but b if one did bring it /b as a libation, it is b valid? /b That i baraita /i certainly expresses the opinion of Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi, as b whom did you hear who said /b that aged wine b may not be brought? /b Only b Rabbi /b Yehuda HaNasi, who explicitly states this opinion in the mishna. b And yet he says /b in the i baraita /i : b If one did bring /b a libation of aged wine, it is b valid. /b According to Rabbi Ḥizkiyya’s explanation of Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi’s opinion, such an opinion is illogical., b Rather, Rava said: This is the reasoning of Rabbi /b Yehuda HaNasi: b As it is written /b in the verse exhorting a person not to be enticed by fine wines: b “Look not upon the wine when it is red” /b (Proverbs 23:31). Evidently, the redness of wine is indicative of its quality. After a year, wine begins to lose its redness and so it should not be used, i ab initio /i . Nevertheless, it is still of a sufficient quality to be acceptable, after the fact.,§ The mishna teaches: b One may not bring /b wine produced from b grapes suspended /b on stakes or trees; rather, one brings wine produced from grapes at foot height and from vineyards that are cultivated. The definition of vineyards that are cultivated is clarified in a i baraita /i that b taught: Vineyards that are cultivated twice a year. /b This is done by hoeing the earth underneath the vines.,The Gemara relates the efficacy of cultivating the land twice a year: b Rav Yosef had a tract /b of land b that was /b used b an orchard [ i depardeisa /i ] /b to b which he /b used to b give an extra hoeing, and /b consequently b it produced wine /b of such superior quality that when preparing the wine for drinking it required b a dilution using twice /b the amount b of water /b than that which is usually used to dilute wine.,§ The mishna teaches: When people produced wine for libations b they would not collect /b the wine b into large barrels, /b as it causes the wine to spoil; rather, it would be placed in small casks. The Sages b taught /b in a i baraita /i : The b casks /b referred to by the mishna are b flasks /b that are made in b Lod and /b that b are medium-sized. /b ,The Gemara adds another i halakha /i : When storing casks containing wine for libations, b they should not be placed in twos, /b i.e., one atop the other, but b rather singly, /b i.e., each one should be placed separately.,§ The mishna teaches: b How does /b the Temple treasurer b inspect /b wine to determine that it is from the middle of the cask? The b treasurer sits /b alongside the cask b and /b has b the /b measuring b reed in his hand. /b The spigot is opened and the wine begins to flow. If he sees that the wine emerging b draws /b with it b chalk /b -like scum, b he /b immediately b knocks with the reed /b to indicate that the spigot should be closed. The precise point at which he knocks is clarified in a i baraita /i that b taught: /b If the wine b draws /b with it b chalk /b -like scum, which comes b from the sediment, he knocks with the reed. /b ,The Gemara challenges: Why does the treasurer knock with the reed; b let him /b simply b speak. /b The Gemara explains: This b supports /b the opinion b of Rabbi Yoḥa, as Rabbi Yoḥa said: Just as speech is beneficial to the /b incense b spices, so is speech detrimental to wine, /b and so the treasurer avoids speaking.,§ The mishna teaches: b Rabbi Yosei, son of Rabbi Yehuda, says: /b Wine in which there is flour-like white scum is unfit for libations. b Rabbi Yoḥa raises a dilemma /b concerning such wine: If b one consecrated it /b to be used as a libation, b what is /b the i halakha /i with regard to whether b he should be flogged for /b consecrating b it due to /b the prohibition against consecrating b a flawed /b item as an offering? Does one say that b since it /b is b unfit, it is comparable to a blemished /b animal? b Or perhaps, /b the prohibition to consecrate b a flawed /b item b applies only to an animal. /b The Gemara concludes: The dilemma b shall stand /b unresolved.,§ Having discussed which flours, oils, and wine are fit to be offered in the Temple, the Gemara considers which animals are of sufficient quality to be used as offerings. b The Sages taught /b in a i baraita /i : The choicest b rams /b are those b from Moab; /b the choicest b lambs /b are those b from Hebron; /b the choicest b calves /b are those b from Sharon; /b and the choicest b fledglings, /b i.e., doves and pigeons, are those b from the King’s Mountain. /b , b Rabbi Yehuda says: One should bring lambs whose height is like their width, /b i.e., they are so robust that they are as wide as they are tall. b Rava bar Rav Sheila said: What is the reason of Rabbi Yehuda? As it is written: /b “And He will give the rain for your seed, with which you sow the ground, and bread of the produce of the ground, and it shall be fat and bountiful; b your cattle shall graze in wide pastures [ i kar nirḥav /i ] on that day” /b (Isaiah 30:23). The word “ i kar /i ” can also mean a lamb, and “ i nirḥav /i ” means wide. Accordingly, Rabbi Yehuda interprets this verse, on a homiletical level, to be alluding to robust sheep.,The chapter concludes by quoting an additional prophecy of Isaiah concerning the rebuilding of Eretz Yisrael: It b is written: “I have set watchmen upon your walls, Jerusalem; they shall never be silent day nor night; those who remind the Lord, take no rest” /b (Isaiah 62:6). This is referring to the angels appointed by God to bring the redemption. The Gemara asks: b What /b do these watchmen b say /b to remind the Lord? b This /b is what b Rava bar Rav Sheila said: /b They recite the verse: b “You will arise and have compassion upon Zion; /b for it is time to be gracious to her, for the appointed time has come” (Psalms 102:14)., b Rav Naḥman bar Yitzḥak says: /b They recite the verse: b “The Lord builds up Jerusalem, /b He gathers together the dispersed of Israel” (Psalms 147:2). The Gemara asks: b And initially, /b when the Temple still stood and the Jewish people were gathered together in Eretz Yisrael, b what would /b the watchmen b say? Rava bar Rav Sheila says: /b They would say: b “For the Lord has chosen Zion; He has desired it for His habitation. /b This is My resting place forever; here will I dwell for I have desired it” (Psalms 132:13–14).,, strong MISHNA: /strong b Two /b sizes of b measuring vessels for dry /b substances b were /b used b in the Temple /b for measuring flour for the meal offerings. One held b a tenth /b of an ephah b and /b the other held b one-half of a tenth /b of an ephah. b Rabbi Meir says: /b There were three measuring vessels; one that held b a tenth /b of an ephah, another one that also held b a tenth /b of an ephah, b and /b a third one that held b one /b - b half of a tenth /b of an ephah., b What /b purpose b did /b the b tenth /b of an ephah measuring vessel b serve? /b It was the vessel b with which one would measure /b flour b for all the meal offerings. One would not measure /b the flour by using a measuring vessel of a size that held the entire volume of flour required at once, i.e., b neither with /b a vessel of b three- /b tenths of an ephah b for /b the meal offering accompanying the sacrifice of b a bull, nor with /b a vessel of b two /b -tenths of an ephah b for /b the meal offering accompanying the sacrifice of b a ram. Rather, one measures /b the flour for b them /b by repeatedly using the tenth of an ephah measuring vessel to measure the required number of b tenths. /b , b What /b purpose b did /b the b one /b - b half of a tenth /b of an ephah measuring vessel b serve? /b It was the vessel b with which one would measure /b the flour for the b High Priest’s griddle-cake /b offering. A tenth of an ephah was required each day; he sacrificed b half /b of it b in the morning and /b the other b half /b of it b in the afternoon. /b , strong GEMARA: /strong The Gemara cites a i baraita /i that clarifies Rabbi Meir’s opinion. It b is taught /b in a i baraita /i that b Rabbi Meir would say: What /b is the meaning when b the verse states: “A tenth, a tenth, for every lamb” /b (Numbers 28:29)? The fact the word “tenth” appears twice b teaches that there were two /b measuring vessels that each held b a tenth /b of an ephah b in the Temple. One /b of them held that volume when it was b heaped, and /b the other b one /b was slightly larger and held that same volume when the flour was b leveled /b with the rim.,The one that held a tenth of an ephah when b heaped /b was the vessel b with which one would measure /b the flour b for all the meal offerings. /b
15. Babylonian Talmud, Eruvin, None (3rd cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •moth, as a symbol of destruction Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018) 158, 159, 160, 161, 162
101a. big strongמתני׳ /strong /big הדלת שבמוקצה וחדקים שבפרצה ומחצלות אין נועלין בהן אלא אם כן גבוהים מן הארץ:, big strongגמ׳ /strong /big ורמינהו דלת הנגררת ומחצלת הנגררת וקנקן הנגרר בזמן שקשורין ותלויין נועלין בהן בשבת ואין צריך לומר ביום טוב,אמר אביי בשיש להם ציר רבא אמר בשהיה להן ציר,מיתיבי דלת הנגררת ומחצלת הנגררת וקנקן הנגרר בזמן שקשורין ותלויין וגבוהים מן הארץ אפילו מלא נימא נועלין בהן ואם לאו אין נועלין בהן,אביי מתרץ לטעמיה ורבא מתרץ לטעמיה אביי מתרץ לטעמיה או שיש להן ציר או שגבוהין מן הארץ רבא מתרץ לטעמיה כשהיה להן ציר או שגבוהין מן הארץ,ת"ר סוכי קוצים וחבילין שהתקינן לפירצה שבחצר בזמן שקשורין ותלויין נועלין בהן בשבת וא"צ לומר ביו"ט,תני ר' חייא דלת אלמנה הנגררת אין נועלין בה היכי דמי דלת אלמנה איכא דאמרי דחד שיפא ואיכא דאמרי דלית ליה גשמה,אמר רב יהודה האי מדורתא ממעלה למטה שרי ממטה למעלה אסיר,וכן ביעתא וכן קידרא וכן פוריא וכן חביתא,א"ל ההוא צדוקי לרבי יהושע בן חנניה חדקאה דכתיב בכו (מיכה ז, ד) טובם כחדק אמר ליה שטיא שפיל לסיפיה דקרא דכתיב ישר ממסוכה ואלא מאי טובם כחדק כשם שחדקים הללו מגינין על הפירצה כך טובים שבנו מגינים עלינו דבר אחר טובם כחדק שמהדקין את הרשעים לגיהנם שנאמר (מיכה ד, יג) קומי ודושי בת ציון כי קרנך אשים ברזל ופרסותיך אשים נחושה והדיקות עמים רבים וגו':, big strongמתני׳ /strong /big לא יעמוד אדם ברשות היחיד ויפתח ברשות הרבים ברשות הרבים ויפתח ברשות היחיד אא"כ עשה מחיצה גבוה עשרה טפחים דברי ר' מאיר,אמרו לו מעשה בשוק של פטמים שהיה בירושלים שהיו נועלין ומניחין את המפתח בחלון שעל גבי הפתח רבי יוסי אומר שוק של צמרים הוה:, big strongגמ׳ /strong /big ורבנן אמר רבי מאיר רשות הרבים ומהדרו אינהו כרמלית דאמר רבה בר בר חנה אמר רבי יוחנן ירושלים אלמלא דלתותיה ננעלות בלילה חייבין עליה משום רשות הרבים,אמר רב פפא כאן קודם שנפרצו בה פרצות כאן לאחר שנפרצו בה פרצות,רבא אמר סיפא אתאן לשערי גינה והכי קאמר וכן לא יעמוד ברשות היחיד ויפתח בכרמלית בכרמלית ויפתח ברשות היחיד 101a. strong MISHNA: /strong With regard to b the door to a rear court, /b i.e., a door that opens from a house to the courtyard situated behind it, which is typically not a proper door but merely a wooden board without hinges that closes off the doorway; b and /b likewise b bundles of thorns /b that seal b a breach; and /b reed b mats, one /b may b not close /b an opening b with them /b on Shabbat. This would be considered building or completing a building, b unless they /b remain b above the ground /b even when they are open., strong GEMARA: /strong b And /b the Gemara b raises a contradiction /b from a i baraita /i : With regard to b a door, or a mat, or a lattice [ i kankan /i ] that drag /b along the ground and are used for closing up openings, b when they are tied and suspended /b in place b one /b may b close /b an opening b with them on Shabbat; and needless to say /b this is permitted b on a Festival. /b According to the i baraita /i , the critical factor is apparently that they must be tied and suspended, not that they have to be held up above the ground., b Abaye said: /b The i baraita /i is referring b to /b ones b that have a hinge. /b As they are considered proper doors, closing them does not appear like building. b Rava said: /b The i baraita /i is referring even b to /b doors b that /b once b had a hinge, /b even though they no longer have one. These partitions also bear the clear form of a door, and therefore one’s action does not have the appearance of building.,The Gemara b raises an objection /b from another i baraita /i : With regard to b a door, or a mat, or a lattice that drag /b along the ground, b when they are tied and suspended /b in place b and /b they are held b above the ground even by /b as little as b a hairbreadth, one /b may b close /b an opening b with them. However, if /b they are b not /b raised in this manner, b one /b may b not close /b an opening b with them. /b Clearly, these doors must indeed be raised above the ground as well.,The Gemara answers: b Abaye reconciles /b the objection b in accordance with his reasoning, and Rava reconciles /b the objection b in accordance with his reasoning. /b The Gemara elaborates: b Abaye reconciles /b the objection b in accordance with his reasoning /b by adding to the i baraita /i : They must b either have a hinge or /b be held b above the ground. Rava /b likewise b reconciles /b the objection b in accordance with his reasoning, /b as he reads: They must b have had a hinge or /b else be held b above the ground. /b , b The Sages taught /b a i baraita /i : With regard to b branches of thorn bushes or bundles /b of wood b that were arranged /b so that they sealed off b a breach in a courtyard, when they are tied and suspended /b in place, b one /b may b close /b an opening b with them on Shabbat; and needless to say, /b this is permitted b on a Festival. /b , b Rabbi Ḥiyya taught /b a i baraita /i : With regard to b a widowed door that drags /b along the ground, b one /b may b not close /b an opening b with it. /b The Gemara asks: b What are the circumstances /b of b a widowed door? Some say /b it refers to a door built b from a single plank, /b which does not look like a door, b and others say /b it is b a door that does not have a lower doorsill /b ( i ge’onim /i ) and that touches the ground when closed.,With regard to activities that are prohibited because of their similarity to building, the Gemara cites a teaching that b Rav Yehuda said: /b When arranging a pile of wood for b a fire /b on a Festival, if the logs are arranged b from the top down, /b i.e., the upper logs are temporarily suspended in the air while the lower logs are inserted below them, b it is permitted. /b However, if the wood is placed from b the bottom up, it is prohibited, /b as the arrangement of wood in the regular manner is a form of building., b And the same /b applies to b eggs /b that are to be arranged in a pile, b and the same /b applies to b a cauldron /b that is to be set down on a fire by means of supports, b and the same /b applies to a b bed /b that will be placed on its frame, b and the same /b applies to b barrels /b arranged in a cellar. In all these cases, the part that goes on top must be temporarily suspended in the air while the lower section is inserted beneath it.,With regard to bundles of thorns used to seal a breach, the Gemara cites a related incident: b A certain heretic /b once b said to Rabbi Yehoshua ben Ḥaya: Man of thorns! For it says about you: “The best of them is as a brier” /b (Micah 7:4), which indicates that even Israel’s best are merely thorns. b He said to him: Fool, go down to the end of the verse: “The most upright is worse than a thorn hedge,” /b a derogatory expression meant as praise. b Rather, what is /b the meaning of b the best of them is as a brier? /b It means that b just as these thorns protect a breach, so the best among us protect us. Alternatively: The best of them is as a brier [ i ḥedek /i ] /b means b that they grind [ i mehaddekin /i ] the nations of the world into Gehenna, as it is stated: “Arise and thresh, O daughter of Zion, for I will make your horn iron, and I will make your hoofs brass, and you shall beat in pieces [ i vahadikot /i ] many peoples; /b and you shall devote their gain to God, and their substance to the God of the whole earth” (Micah 4:13)., strong MISHNA: /strong b A person /b may b not stand in the private domain and open /b a door located b in the public domain /b with a key, lest he inadvertently transfer the key from one domain to the other. Likewise, one may not stand b in the public domain and open /b a door b in the private domain /b with a key, b unless /b in the latter case b he erected a partition ten handbreadths high /b around the door and stands inside it. This is b the statement of Rabbi Meir. /b ,The Rabbis b said to him: /b There was b an incident at the poultry dealers’ market in Jerusalem, /b where they would fatten fowl for slaughter (Rabbeinu Ḥael), b and they would lock /b the doors to their shops b and place the key in the window that was over the door, /b which was more than ten handbreadths off the ground, and nobody was concerned about the possible violation of any prohibition. b Rabbi Yosei says: /b That place b was a market of wool dealers. /b , strong GEMARA: /strong The Gemara asks: b And /b those b Rabbis, /b who cited the case of the poultry dealers of Jerusalem to rebut Rabbi Meir’s opinion, b Rabbi Meir spoke /b to them about unlocking a door in a private domain while standing b in the public domain, and they responded /b with an incident involving b a i karmelit /i . As Rabba bar bar Ḥana said /b that b Rabbi Yoḥa said: /b With regard to b Jerusalem, were it not /b for the fact that b its doors are locked at night, one would be liable for /b carrying in b it /b on Shabbat, b because /b its thoroughfares have the status of b the public domain. /b However, since Jerusalem’s doors are typically locked, it is considered one large i karmelit /i , which is subject to rabbinic prohibitions. How, then, could a proof be cited from the markets of Jerusalem with regard to the transfer of objects between a public domain and a private domain, which is prohibited by Torah law?, b Rav Pappa said: Here, /b in the statement of Rabbi Yoha, Jerusalem was considered a i karmelit /i during the period b before breaches were made in its /b walls. Its doors did not turn it into a public domain, as they were locked. Whereas b there, /b the Rabbis in the mishna are referring to the time b after breaches had been made in /b the walls, and it therefore acquired the status of a public domain., b Rava said: In the latter clause /b of the mishna b we came to /b a different issue, i.e., the final section of the mishna is not designed to counter Rabbi Meir’s statement with regard to the public domain. Rather, it refers b to /b the b gates of a garden /b with an area greater than two i beit se’a /i in size, whose legal status is that of a i karmelit /i . Consequently, the mishna b is saying as follows: And likewise, /b one may b not stand in the private domain and open /b a door b in a i karmelit /i ; /b neither may one stand b in a i karmelit /i and open /b a door b in the private domain, /b
16. Babylonian Talmud, Berachot, None (3rd cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018) 153
18b. בן איש חי אטו כולי עלמא בני מתי נינהו אלא בן איש חי שאפי' במיתתו קרוי חי רב פעלים מקבצאל שריבה וקבץ פועלים לתורה והוא הכה את שני אריאל מואב שלא הניח כמותו לא במקדש ראשון ולא במקדש שני,והוא ירד והכה את הארי בתוך הבור ביום השלג איכא דאמרי דתבר גזיזי דברדא ונחת וטבל איכא דאמרי דתנא סיפרא דבי רב ביומא דסיתוא.,והמתים אינם יודעים מאומה אלו רשעים שבחייהן קרויין מתים שנאמר (יחזקאל כא, ל) ואתה חלל רשע נשיא ישראל ואי בעית אימא מהכא (דברים יז, ו) על פי שנים עדים או (על פי) שלשה עדים יומת המת חי הוא אלא המת מעיקרא:,בני ר' חייא נפוק לקרייתא אייקר להו תלמודייהו הוו קא מצערי לאדכוריה א"ל חד לחבריה ידע אבון בהאי צערא א"ל אידך מנא ידע והא כתיב (איוב יד, כא) יכבדו בניו ולא ידע,א"ל אידך ולא ידע והא כתיב (איוב יד, כב) אך בשרו עליו יכאב ונפשו עליו תאבל ואמר רבי יצחק קשה רמה למת כמחט בבשר החי,אמרי בצערא דידהו ידעי בצערא דאחרינא לא ידעי,ולא והתניא מעשה בחסיד אחד שנתן דינר לעני בערב ר"ה בשני בצורת והקניטתו אשתו והלך ולן בבית הקברות ושמע שתי רוחות שמספרות זו לזו אמרה חדא לחברתה חברתי בואי ונשוט בעולם ונשמע מאחורי הפרגוד מה פורענות בא לעולם אמרה לה חברתה איני יכולה שאני קבורה במחצלת של קנים אלא לכי את ומה שאת שומעת אמרי לי הלכה היא ושטה ובאה ואמרה לה חברתה חברתי מה שמעת מאחורי הפרגוד אמרה לה שמעתי שכל הזורע ברביעה ראשונה ברד מלקה אותו הלך הוא וזרע ברביעה שניה של כל העולם כולו לקה שלו לא לקה,לשנה האחרת הלך ולן בבית הקברות ושמע אותן שתי רוחות שמספרות זו עם זו אמרה חדא לחברתה בואי ונשוט בעולם ונשמע מאחורי הפרגוד מה פורענות בא לעולם אמרה לה חברתי לא כך אמרתי לך איני יכולה שאני קבורה במחצלת של קנים אלא לכי את ומה שאת שומעת בואי ואמרי לי הלכה ושטה ובאה ואמרה לה חברתה חברתי מה שמעת מאחורי הפרגוד אמרה לה שמעתי שכל הזורע ברביעה שניה שדפון מלקה אותו הלך וזרע ברביעה ראשונה של כל העולם כולו נשדף ושלו לא נשדף,אמרה לו אשתו מפני מה אשתקד של כל העולם כולו לקה ושלך לא לקה ועכשיו של כל העולם כולו נשדף ושלך לא נשדף סח לה כל הדברים הללו אמרו לא היו ימים מועטים עד שנפלה קטטה בין אשתו של אותו חסיד ובין אמה של אותה ריבה אמרה לה לכי ואראך בתך שהיא קבורה במחצלת של קנים,לשנה האחרת הלך ולן בבית הקברות ושמע אותן רוחות שמספרות זו עם זו אמרה לה חברתי בואי ונשוט בעולם ונשמע מאחורי הפרגוד מה פורענות בא לעולם אמרה לה חברתי הניחני דברים שביני לבינך כבר נשמעו בין החיים אלמא ידעי,דילמא איניש אחרינא שכיב ואזיל ואמר להו,ת"ש דזעירי הוה מפקיד זוזי גבי אושפזיכתיה עד דאתי ואזיל לבי רב שכיבה אזל בתרה לחצר מות אמר לה זוזי היכא אמרה ליה זיל שקלינהו מתותי בצנורא דדשא בדוך פלן ואימא לה לאימא תשדר לי מסרקאי וגובתאי דכוחלא בהדי פלניתא דאתיא למחר אלמא ידעי,[דלמא] דומה קדים ומכריז להו,ת"ש דאבוה דשמואל הוו קא מפקדי גביה זוזי דיתמי כי נח נפשיה לא הוה שמואל גביה הוו קא קרו ליה בר אכיל זוזי דיתמי אזל אבתריה לחצר מות אמר להו בעינא אבא אמרו ליה אבא טובא איכא הכא אמר להו בעינא אבא בר אבא אמרו ליה אבא בר אבא נמי טובא איכא הכא אמר להו בעינא אבא בר אבא אבוה דשמואל היכא אמרו ליה סליק למתיבתא דרקיעא אדהכי חזייה ללוי דיתיב אבראי אמר ליה אמאי יתבת אבראי מאי טעמא לא סלקת אמר ליה דאמרי לי כל כי הנך שני דלא סליקת למתיבתא דרבי אפס ואחלישתיה לדעתיה לא מעיילינן לך למתיבתא דרקיעא,אדהכי והכי אתא אבוה חזייה דהוה קא בכי ואחיך אמר ליה מאי טעמא קא בכית אמר ליה דלעגל קא אתית מאי טעמא אחיכת דחשיבת בהאי עלמא טובא אמר ליה אי חשיבנא נעיילוה ללוי ועיילוהו ללוי,אמר ליה זוזי דיתמי היכא אמר ליה זיל שקלינהו באמתא דרחיא עילאי ותתאי דידן ומיצעי דיתמי אמר ליה מאי טעמא עבדת הכי אמר ליה אי גנובי גנבי מגנבו מדידן אי אכלה ארעא אכלה מדידן אלמא דידעי דילמא שאני שמואל כיון דחשיב קדמי ומכרזי פנו מקום .,ואף ר' יונתן הדר ביה דאמר רבי שמואל בר נחמני אמר ר' יונתן מנין למתים שמספרים זה עם זה שנאמר (דברים לד, ד) ויאמר ה' אליו זאת הארץ אשר נשבעתי לאברהם ליצחק וליעקב לאמר מאי לאמר אמר הקדוש ברוך הוא למשה לך אמור להם לאברהם ליצחק וליעקב שבועה שנשבעתי לכם כבר קיימתיה לבניכם 18b. He was referred to in the verse as b son of a living man. /b The Gemara wonders: b Is that to say, /b the fact that the Bible referred to him with that appellation, b that all others are children of the dead? Rather, /b the verse should be explained as follows: b The son of a living man /b who lives forever, b who even in death is referred to as living. Man of Kabze’el who had done mighty deeds, as he accumulated and gathered many workers for /b the sake of the b Torah. Who killed the two lion-hearted men [ i Ariel /i ] of Moab, as /b after his death b he left no one his equal, in either the First Temple or the Second Temple /b periods, as the Temple is called i Ariel /i (see Isaiah 29:1), and the two i Ariel /i refers to the two Temples.,The Sages disagreed over the interpretation of the rest of the verse: b “And who descended and slew the lion in the pit on the snowy day.” Some say /b that this means b that he broke blocks of hail and descended and immersed himself /b in the water to purify himself. b Others say that he learned /b all of b the i Sifra /i , /b the i halakhic /i midrash on the book of Leviticus b of the school of Rav, /b on a b winter’s day. /b ,In contrast to the righteous, who are referred to as living even after their death, the verse states explicitly: b “The dead know nothing.” These are the wicked, who /b even b during their lives are called dead, as /b the prophet Ezekiel b said /b in reference to a king of Israel who was alive: b “And you are a slain, wicked prince of Israel” /b (Ezekiel 21:30). b And if you wish, say /b instead that the proof is b from here: “At the mouth of two witnesses or three witnesses the dead shall be put to death” /b (Deuteronomy 17:6). This is puzzling. As long as the accused has not been sentenced to death, he b is alive. Rather, /b this person who is wicked is considered b dead from the outset. /b ,The Gemara relates a story on this topic: b The sons of Rabbi Ḥiyya went out to the villages /b to oversee the laborers. b They forgot what they had learned and were struggling to recall it. One /b of them b said to the other: /b Does b our /b deceased b father know of /b our b anguish? The other said to him: From where would he know? Isn’t it written: “His sons are honored yet he shall not know it, /b they come to sorrow and he shall not understand them” (Job 14:21)? The dead do not know., b The other said /b back b to him: And /b do the dead truly b not know? Isn’t it written: “Only in his flesh does he feel pain, in his soul does he mourn” /b (Job 14:22)? Based on this verse b Rabbi Yitzḥak said: /b Gnawing b maggots are as excruciating to the dead as /b the stab of b a needle to the flesh of the living. /b The dead must have the capacity to feel and know.,In order to reconcile this contradiction b they said: /b They b know of their own pain but do not know of the pain of others. /b ,The Gemara challenges this: b And /b is it so that the dead do b not /b know of the pain of others? b Wasn’t it taught /b in a i baraita /i : There was b an incident involving a pious man who gave a poor man a dinar on the eve of Rosh HaShana during drought years, and his wife mocked him /b for giving so large a sum at so difficult a time? b And /b in order to escape her incessant mockery, b he went and slept in the cemetery. /b That night in his dream (Ritva, i HaKotev /i , Maharsha), b he heard two spirits conversing with each other. One said to the other: My friend, let us roam the world and hear from behind the heavenly curtain [ i pargod /i ], /b which separates the Divine Presence from the world, b what calamity will befall the world. The other spirit said to her: /b I b cannot /b go with you, b as I am buried in a mat of reeds, but you go, and tell me what you hear. She went, and roamed, and came /b back. b The other spirit said: My friend, what did you hear from behind the heavenly curtain? She replied: I heard that anyone who sows during the first rainy season /b of this year, b hail /b will fall and b strike his /b crops. Hearing this, the pious man b went and sowed /b his seeds b during the second rainy season. /b Ultimately, the crops of b the entire world were stricken /b by hail b and his /b crops b were not stricken. /b , b The following year, /b on the eve of Rosh HaShana, the same pious man b went and slept in the cemetery /b at his own initiative, and again b he heard the two spirits conversing with each other. One said to the other: Let us roam the world and hear from behind the heavenly curtain what calamity will befall the world. She said to her: My friend, have I not /b already b told you /b that b I cannot, as I am buried in a mat of reeds? Rather, you go, and tell me what you hear. She went, and roamed, and returned. The other /b spirit b said to her: My friend, what did you hear from behind the curtain? She said to her: I heard that those who sow during the second rainy season blight will strike his /b crops. That pious man b went and sowed during the first rainy season. /b Since everyone else sowed during the second rainy season, ultimately, the crops b of the entire world were blighted and his /b crops b were not blighted. /b ,The pious man’s b wife said to him: Why is it that last year, /b the crops b of the entire world were stricken and yours were not stricken, and now /b this year, the crops b of the entire world were blighted and yours were not blighted? He related to her the entire story. They said: It was not /b even b a few days /b later that b a quarrel fell between the pious man’s wife and the mother of the young woman /b who was buried there. The pious man’s wife b said to her /b scornfully: b Go and I will show you your daughter, /b and you will see that b she is buried in a mat of reeds. /b , b The following year, he /b again b went and slept in the cemetery, and heard the same spirits conversing with each other. One said /b to the other: b My friend, let us roam the world and hear from behind the heavenly curtain what calamity will befall the world. She said to her: My friend, leave me /b alone, as b words that /b we have privately exchanged b between us have already been heard among the living. Apparently, /b the dead b know /b what transpires in this world.,The Gemara responds: This is no proof; b perhaps another person, /b who heard about the conversation of the spirits secondhand, b died and /b he b went and told them /b that they had been overheard.,With regard to the deceased’s knowledge of what transpires, b come /b and b hear /b a proof, as it is told: b Ze’iri would deposit /b his b dinars with his innkeeper. While he was going and coming to /b and from b the school of Rav, she died, /b and he did not know where she had put the money. b So he went after her to /b her grave in b the cemetery and said to her: Where are the dinars? She replied: Go and get them from beneath the hinge of the door in such and such a place, and tell my mother /b that b she should send me my comb and a tube of eyeshadow with such and such a woman who will /b die b and come here tomorrow. Apparently, /b the dead b know /b what transpires in this world.,The Gemara rejects this proof: b Perhaps /b the angel b Duma, /b who oversees the dead, b comes beforehand and announces to them /b that a particular individual will arrive the next day, but they themselves do not know.,The Gemara cites another proof: b Come /b and b hear, /b as it is told: b They would deposit the money of orphans with Shmuel’s father /b for safekeeping. b When Shmuel’s father died, Shmuel was not with him, /b and did not learn from him the location of the money. Since he did not return it, Shmuel was called: b Son of /b him who b consumes the money of orphans. /b Shmuel b went after /b his father b to the cemetery and said to /b the dead: b I want Abba. /b The dead b said to him: There are many Abbas here. He told them: I want Abba bar Abba. They said /b to him: b There are also many people named Abba bar Abba here. He told them: I want Abba bar Abba, the father of Shmuel. Where /b is he? b They replied: Ascend to the yeshiva on high. Meanwhile, he saw /b his friend b Levi sitting outside /b the yeshiva, away from the rest of the deceased. b He asked him: Why do you sit outside? Why did you not ascend /b to the yeshiva? b He replied: Because they tell me /b that for b all those years /b that b you didn’t enter the yeshiva of Rabbi Afes, and /b thereby b upset him, we will not grant you entry to the yeshiva on high. /b , b Meanwhile, /b Shmuel’s b father came /b and Shmuel b saw that he was crying and laughing. /b Shmuel b said to /b his father: b Why are you crying? /b His father b replied: /b Because b you will come here soon. /b Shmuel continued and asked: b Why are you laughing? /b His father replied: Because b you are extremely important in this world. /b Shmuel b said to him: If I am important, then let them grant Levi entry /b to the yeshiva. b And /b so it was b that they granted Levi entry /b to the yeshiva.,Shmuel b said to /b his father: b Where is the orphans’ money? He said to him: Go /b and b retrieve it from the millhouse, /b where you will find b the uppermost and the lowermost /b money b is ours, and /b the money b in the middle /b belongs to b the orphans. /b Shmuel b said to him: Why did you do that? He replied: If thieves stole, they would steal from our /b money on top, which the thief would see first. b If the earth swallowed up /b any of it, it would swallow b from our /b money, on the bottom. b Apparently, /b the dead, in this case Shmuel’s father, b know /b when others will die. Since Shmuel did not die the next day, clearly the angel Duma could not have informed them ( i Tosafot /i ). The Gemara responds: b Perhaps Shmuel is different, /b and b because he is so important they announce beforehand: Clear place /b for his arrival.,In any case, with regard to the crux of the issue, b Rabbi Yonatan also reconsidered /b his opinion, b as Rabbi Shmuel bar Naḥmani said /b that b Rabbi Yonatan said: From where /b is it derived b that the dead converse with each other? As it is stated: “And the Lord said to him, this is the land that I swore to Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, saying: /b I will give it to your offspring” (Deuteronomy 34:4). b What is /b the meaning of b “saying”? /b It means that b God told Moses: Go and tell Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, /b that b the oath that I swore to you I have already fulfilled for your descendants. /b
17. Nag Hammadi, The Gospel of Thomas, 76 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •moth, as a symbol of destruction Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018) 158
18. Claudianus, Carmina Minora\Carminum Minorum Corpusculum, None (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •moth, as a symbol of destruction Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018) 149
19. Jerome, Commentaria In Xii Prophetas Minoras, 100, 99, 101 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018) 149
20. Asterius, Pg, None  Tagged with subjects: •moth, as a symbol of destruction Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018) 160
22. Anon., Gospel of Thomas, 76  Tagged with subjects: •moth, as a symbol of destruction Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018) 158
23. Demosthenes, In Phaed., 7  Tagged with subjects: •moth, as a symbol of destruction Found in books: Bar Asher Siegal (2018) 150