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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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8 results for "money"
1. Plutarch, On Tranquility of Mind, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •money, and value for aristippus Found in books: Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 396
469c. but tried to find sour wine for his own luncheon; and when one of his slaves was asked by the other what he had left his master doing, he answered, "Hunting bad when good was at hand." Most persons, in fact, do pass by the excellent and palatable conditions of their lot and hasten to those that are unpleasant and disagreeable. Aristippus, however, was not one of these, but was wise enough, like one who weighs things in a balance, by weighing the bad against the better, to rise above the conditions in which he found himself and thus to lighten his spirits. At any rate, when he had lost a fine estate, he asked one of those who made a great pretence of condoling with him and sharing in his ill humour at misfortune,"Isn't it true that you have only one small bit of land, while Ihave three farms remaining?" When the person agreed that this was so,
2. Plutarch, Fragments, 42 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •money, and value for aristippus Found in books: Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 395
3. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 2.66, 2.75, 2.78, 2.91, 2.93 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •money, and value for aristippus Found in books: Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 395, 396, 397
2.66. He was capable of adapting himself to place, time and person, and of playing his part appropriately under whatever circumstances. Hence he found more favour than anybody else with Dionysius, because he could always turn the situation to good account. He derived pleasure from what was present, and did not toil to procure the enjoyment of something not present Hence Diogenes called him the king's poodle Timon, too, sneered at him for luxury in these words:Such was the delicate nature of Aristippus, who groped after error by touch.He is said to have ordered a partridge to be bought at a cost of fifty drachmae, and, when someone censured him, he inquired, Would not you have given an obol for it? and, being answered in the affirmative, rejoined, Fifty drachmae are no more to me. 2.75. To those who censured him his defence was, I have Lais, not she me; and it is not abstinence from pleasures that is best, but mastery over them without ever being worsted. to one who reproached him with extravagance in catering, he replied, Wouldn't you have bought this if you could have got it for three obols? The answer being in the affirmative, Very well, then, said Aristippus, I am no longer a lover of pleasure, it is you who are a lover of money. One day Simus, the steward of Dionysius, a Phrygian by birth and a rascally fellow, was showing him costly houses with tesselated pavements, when Aristippus coughed up phlegm and spat in his face. And on his resenting this he replied, I could not find any place more suitable. 2.78. But some make his answer to have been, When I needed wisdom, I went to Socrates; now that I am in need of money, I come to you. He used to complain of mankind that in purchasing earthenware they made trial whether it rang true, but had no regular standard by which to judge life. Others attribute this remark to Diogenes. One day Dionysius over the wine commanded everybody to put on purple and dance. Plato declined, quoting the line:I could not stoop to put on women's robes.Aristippus, however, put on the dress and, as he was about to dance, was ready with the repartee:Even amid the Bacchic revelryTrue modesty will not be put to shame. 2.91. They do not accept the doctrine that every wise man lives pleasantly and every fool painfully, but regard it as true for the most part only. It is sufficient even if we enjoy but each single pleasure as it comes. They say that prudence is a good, though desirable not in itself but on account of its consequences; that we make friends from interested motives, just as we cherish any part of the body so long as we have it; that some of the virtues are found even in the foolish; that bodily training contributes to the acquisition of virtue; that the sage will not give way to envy or love or superstition, since these weaknesses are due to mere empty opinion; he will, however, feel pain and fear, these being natural affections; 2.93. They also held that nothing is just or honourable or base by nature, but only by convention and custom. Nevertheless the good man will be deterred from wrong-doing by the penalties imposed and the prejudices that it would arouse. Further that the wise man really exists. They allow progress to be attainable in philosophy as well as in other matters. They maintain that the pain of one man exceeds that of another, and that the senses are not always true and trustworthy.The school of Hegesias, as it is called, adopted the same ends, namely pleasure and pain. In their view there is no such thing as gratitude or friendship or beneficence, because it is not for themselves that we choose to do these things but simply from motives of interest, apart from which such conduct is nowhere found.
4. Stobaeus, Anthology, 3.17.17, 3.37.24 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •money, and value for aristippus Found in books: Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 395
5. Suidas Thessalius, Fragments, None  Tagged with subjects: •money, and value for aristippus Found in books: Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 396
6. Aristippus of Cyrene, Ssr Iv A, 126, 226, 31-32, 51, 55, 69, 73-74, 76, 79, 82, 98  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 395
7. Anon., Socraticorum Epistulae, 27  Tagged with subjects: •money, and value for aristippus Found in books: Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 396, 397
8. Plutarch, [De Vita Et Poesia Homeri], 2.150  Tagged with subjects: •money, and value for aristippus Found in books: Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 397