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22 results for "mithridates"
1. Polybius, Histories, 4.56, 5.43.1, 5.90.1, 25.2.3-25.2.10 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •mithridates ii, king of pontos •mithridates v, king of pontos •mithridates iv philopator philadelphos, king of pontos Found in books: Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 232, 267
5.43.1. ρίαν. ὄντος δʼ αὐτοῦ κατὰ τοὺς καιροὺς τούτους περὶ Σελεύκειαν τὴν ἐπὶ τοῦ Ζεύγματος, παρῆν Διόγνητος ὁ ναύαρχος ἐκ Καππαδοκίας τῆς περὶ τὸν Εὔξεινον, ἄγων Λαοδίκην τὴν Μιθριδάτου τοῦ βασιλέως θυγατέρα, παρθένον οὖσαν, γυναῖκα τῷ βασιλεῖ κατωνομασμένην. 5.90.1. παραπλήσια δὲ τούτοις Προυσίας καὶ Μιθριδάτης, ἔτι δʼ οἱ κατὰ τὴν Ἀσίαν ὄντες δυνάσται τότε, λέγω δὲ Λυσανίαν, Ὀλύμπιχον, Λιμναῖον. 25.2.3. εἰρήνην ὑπάρχειν Εὐμένει καὶ Προυσίᾳ καὶ Ἀριαράθῃ πρὸς Φαρνάκην καὶ Μιθριδάτην εἰς τὸν πάντα χρόνον. 25.2.4. Γαλατίας μὴ ἐπιβαίνειν Φαρνάκην κατὰ μηδένα τρόπον. ὅσαι γεγόνασιν πρότερον συνθῆκαι Φαρνάκῃ πρὸς Γαλάτας, ἀκύρους ὑπάρχειν. 25.2.5. ὁμοίως Παφλαγονίας ἐκχωρεῖν, ἀποκαταστήσαντα τοὺς οἰκήτορας, οὓς πρότερον ἐξαγηόχει, σὺν δὲ τούτοις ὅπλα καὶ βέλη καὶ τὰς ἄλλας παρασκευάς. 25.2.6. ἀποδοῦναι δὲ καὶ Ἀριαράθῃ τῶν τε χωρίων ὅσα παρῄρητο μετὰ τῆς προϋπαρχούσης κατασκευῆς καὶ τοὺς ὁμήρους. 25.2.7. ἀποδοῦναι δὲ καὶ Τίον παρὰ τὸν Πόντον, ὃν μετά τινα χρόνον Εὐμένης ἔδωκε Προυσίᾳ πεισθεὶς μετὰ μεγάλης χάριτος. 25.2.8. ἐγράφη δὲ καὶ τοὺς αἰχμαλώτους ἀποκαταστῆσαι Φαρνάκην χωρὶς λύτρων καὶ τοὺς αὐτομόλους ἅπαντας· 25.2.9. πρὸς δὲ τούτοις τῶν χρημάτων καὶ τῆς γάζης, ἧς ἀπήνεγκε παρὰ Μορζίου καὶ Ἀριαράθου, ἀποδοῦναι τοῖς προειρημένοις βασιλεῦσιν ἐνακόσια τάλαντα, 25.2.10. καὶ τοῖς περὶ τὸν Εὐμένη τριακόσια προσθεῖναι τῆς εἰς τὸν πόλεμον δαπάνης. 4.56. 1.  Such was the state of affairs in Crete. At the same period Mithridates too went to war with Sinope, and this proved as it were the beginning and first occasion of the misfortunes which finally befell this city.,2.  The Sinopeans sent an embassy to Rhodes begging for assistance towards this war and the Rhodians passed a decree to appoint three commissioners and to place in their hands a sum of 140,000 drachmae on receiving which they were to supply the requirements of the Sinopeans.,3.  The commissioners got ready ten thousand jars of wine, three hundred talents of prepared hair, a hundred talents of prepared bow-string, a thousand complete suits of armour, three thousand gold pieces, and four catapults with their artillerymen,,4.  on receiving which the Sinopean envoys returned home. These things were sent because the Sinopeans were in great dread of Mithridates undertaking the siege of the city by land and sea, and they therefore were making all their preparations with this view.,5.  Sinope lies on the southern shore of the Pontus on the route to the Phasis and is situated on a peninsula running out to the open sea. The neck of this peninsula connecting it with Asia is not more than two stades in width and is absolutely closed by the city which is situated upon it;,6.  the rest of the peninsula runs out to the open sea and is flat and affords an easy approach to the town, but on its sea face it is very steep, difficult to anchor off, and with very few approaches from the sea.,7.  The Sinopeans were fearful lest Mithridates should lay siege to them by throwing up works on the side of the city next Asia, while at the same time effecting a disembarkation on the opposite side and occupying the flat ground overlooking the city;,8.  and consequently they busied themselves with strengthening all round that part of the peninsula which was washed by the sea, blocking up the approaches from the sea by means of stakes and stockades and placing soldiers and stores of missiles at suitable spots, the whole peninsula being of no great size but quite easily defensible by a moderate force. 5.43.1.  He was now near Seleucia, the city at the crossing of the Euphrates, and there he was joined by Diognetus, the admiral from Cappadocia Pontica, bringing Laodice, the daughter of Mithridates, a virgin, the affianced bride of the king. 5.90.1.  Similar gifts were made by Prusias and Mithridates as well as by the other Asiatic princelets of the time, Lysanias, Olympichus, and Limnaeus. 25.2.3.  "There shall be peace between Eumenes, Prusias, and Ariarathes on the one hand and Pharnaces and Mithridates on the other for all time: Pharnaces shall not invade Galatia on any pretext: all treaties previously made between Pharnaces and the Galatians are revoked: he shall likewise retire from Paphlagonia, restoring to their homes those of the inhabitants whom he had formerly deported, and restoring at the same time all weapons, missiles, and material of war: 25.2.6.  he shall give up to Ariarathes all the places of which he robbed him in the same condition as he found them, and he shall return the hostages: he shall also give up Tium on the Pontus" — this city was shortly afterwards very gladly presented by Eumenes to Prusias who begged for it: 25.2.8.  "Pharnaces shall return all prisoners of war without ransom and all deserters. 25.2.9.  Likewise out of the money and treasure he carried off from Morzius and Ariarathes, he shall repay to the above kings nine hundred talents, 25.2.10.  paying in addition to Eumenes three hundred talents towards the expenses of the war.
2. Cicero, Letters, 5.16.4 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •mithridates vi eupator, king of pontos, racine’s play “mithridate,” Found in books: Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 289
3. Cicero, In Verrem, 2.2.159 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •mithridates ii, king of pontos •mithridates iv philopator philadelphos, king of pontos •mithridates v, king of pontos Found in books: Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 267
4. Livy, History, 31.23-31.26 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •mithridates of pontos Found in books: Brodd and Reed (2011), Rome and Religion: A Cross-Disciplinary Dialogue on the Imperial Cult, 85
5. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 20.111.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •mithridates ii, king of pontos •mithridates v, king of pontos Found in books: Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 232
20.111.4.  At about this time Mithridates, who was subject to Antigonus but appeared to be shifting his allegiance to Cassander, was slain at Cius in Mysia after having ruled that city and Myrlea for thirty-five years; and Mithridates, inheriting the kingdom, added many new subjects and was king of Cappadocia and Paphlagonia for thirty-six years.
6. Strabo, Geography, 12.3.29, 12.3.37, 12.5.1, 13.2.3, 14.5.15 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •mithridates vi eupator, king of pontos •mithridates ii, king of pontos •mithridates iv philopator philadelphos, king of pontos •mithridates v, king of pontos Found in books: Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 205, 267, 319
12.3.29. Now as for Lesser Armenia, it was ruled by different persons at different times, according to the will of the Romans, and finally by Archelaus. But the Tibareni and Chaldaei, extending as far as Colchis, and Pharnacia and Trapezus are ruled by Pythodoris, a woman who is wise and qualified to preside over affairs of state. She is the daughter of Pythodorus of Tralles. She became the wife of Polemon and reigned along with him for a time, and then, when he died in the country of the Aspurgiani, as they are called, one of the barbarian tribes round Sindice, she succeeded to the rulership. She had two sons and a daughter by Polemon. Her daughter was married to Cotys the Sapaean, but he was treacherously slain, and she lived in widowhood, because she had children by him; and the eldest of these is now in power. As for the sons of Pythodoris, one of them as a private citizen is assisting his mother in the administration of her empire, whereas the other has recently been established as king of Greater Armenia. She herself married Archelaus and remained with him to the end; but she is living in widowhood now, and is in possession not only of the places above mentioned, but also of others still more charming, which I shall describe next. 12.3.37. The whole of the country around is held by Pythodoris, to whom belong, not only Phanaroea, but also Zelitis and Megalopolitis. Concerning Phanaroea I have already spoken. As for Zelitis, it has a city Zela, fortified on a mound of Semiramis, with the sanctuary of Anaitis, who is also revered by the Armenians. Now the sacred rites performed here are characterized by greater sanctity; and it is here that all the people of Pontus make their oaths concerning their matters of greatest importance. The large number of temple-servants and the honors of the priests were, in the time of the kings, of the same type as I have stated before, but at the present time everything is in the power of Pythodoris. Many persons had abused and reduced both the multitude of temple-servants and the rest of the resources of the sanctuary. The adjacent territory, also, was reduced, having been divided into several domains — I mean Zelitis, as it is called (which has the city Zela on a mound); for in, early times the kings governed Zela, not as a city, but as a sacred precinct of the Persian gods, and the priest was the master of the whole thing. It was inhabited by the multitude of temple-servants, and by the priest, who had an abundance of resources; and the sacred territory as well as that of the priest was subject to him and his numerous attendants. Pompey added many provinces to the boundaries of Zelitis, and named Zela, as he did Megalopolis, a city, and he united the latter and Culupene and Camisene into one state; the latter two border on both Lesser Armenia and Laviansene, and they contain rock-salt, and also an ancient fortress called Camisa, now in ruins. The later Roman prefects assigned a portion of these two governments to the priests of Comana, a portion to the priest of Zela, and a portion to Ateporix, a dynast of the family of tetrarchs of Galatia; but now that Ateporix has died, this portion, which is not large, is subject to the Romans, being called a province (and this little state is a political organization of itself, the people having incorporated Carana into it, from which fact its country is called Caranitis), whereas the rest is held by Pythodoris and Dyteutus. 12.5.1. GALATIAThe Galatians, then, are to the south of the Paphlagonians. And of these there are three tribes; two of them, the Trocmi and the Tolistobogii, are named after their leaders, whereas the third, the Tectosages, is named after the tribe in Celtica. This country was occupied by the Galatae after they had wandered about for a long time, and after they had overrun the country that was subject to the Attalid and the Bithynian kings, until by voluntary cession they received the present Galatia, or Gallo-Graecia, as it is called. Leonnorius is generally reputed to have been the chief leader of their expedition across to Asia. The three tribes spoke the same language and differed from each other in no respect; and each was divided into four portions which were called tetrarchies, each tetrarchy having its own tetrarch, and also one judge and one military commander, both subject to the tetrarch, and two subordinate commanders. The Council of the twelve tetrarchs consisted of three hundred men, who assembled at Drynemetum, as it was called. Now the Council passed judgment upon murder cases, but the tetrarchs and the judges upon all others. Such, then, was the organization of Galatia long ago, but in my time the power has passed to three rulers, then to two; and then to one, Deiotarus, and then to Amyntas, who succeeded him. But at the present time the Romans possess both this country and the whole of the country that became subject to Amyntas, having united them into one province. 13.2.3. Mitylene has produced famous men: in early times, Pittacus, one of the Seven Wise Men; and the poet Alcaeus, and his brother Antimenidas, who, according to Alcaeus, won a great struggle when fighting on the side of the Babylonians, and rescued them from their toils by killing a warrior, the royal wrestler (as he says), who was but one short of five cubits in height. And along with these flourished also Sappho, a marvellous woman; for in all the time of which we have record I do not know of the appearance of any woman who could rival Sappho, even in a slight degree, in the matter of poetry. The city was in those times ruled over by several tyrants because of the dissensions among the inhabitants; and these dissensions are the subject of the Stasiotic poems, as they are called, of Alcaeus. And also Pittacus was one of the tyrants. Now Alcaeus would rail alike at both Pittacus and the rest, Myrsilus and Melanchrus and the Cleanactidae and certain others, though even he himself was not innocent of revolutionary attempts; but even Pittacus himself used monarchy for the overthrow of the oligarchs, and then, after overthrowing them, restored to the city its independence. Diophanes the rhetorician was born much later; but Potamon, Lesbocles, Crinagoras, and Theophanes the historian in my time. Theophanes was also a statesman; and he became a friend to Pompey the Great, mostly through his very ability, and helped him to succeed in all his achievements; whence he not only adorned his native land, partly through Pompey and partly through himself, but also rendered himself the most illustrious of all the Greeks. He left a son, Marcus Pompey, whom Augustus Caesar once set up as Procurator of Asia, and who is now counted among the first of the friends of Tiberius. The Athenians were in danger of suffering an irreparable disgrace when they voted that all Mitylenaeans from youth upwards should be slain, but they changed their minds and their counter-decree reached the generals only one day before the order was to be executed. 14.5.15. Among the other philosophers from Tarsus,whom I could well note and tell their names, are Plutiades and Diogenes, who were among those philosophers that went round from city to city and conducted schools in an able manner. Diogenes also composed poems, as if by inspiration, when a subject was given him — for the most part tragic poems; and as for grammarians whose writings are extant, there are Artemidorus and Diodorus; and the best tragic poet among those enumerated in the Pleias was Dionysides. But it is Rome that is best able to tell us the number of learned men from this city; for it is full of Tarsians and Alexandrians. Such is Tarsus.
7. Appian, The Mithridatic Wars, 112540, 112549, 31-41, 929, 96444, 30 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Brodd and Reed (2011), Rome and Religion: A Cross-Disciplinary Dialogue on the Imperial Cult, 85
8. Plutarch, Sulla, 13.2-13.3, 14.3-14.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Brodd and Reed (2011), Rome and Religion: A Cross-Disciplinary Dialogue on the Imperial Cult, 86
13.2. καὶ τὰ χείριστα τῶν Μιθριδατικῶν συνερρυηκότα νοσημάτων καὶ παθῶν εἰς ἑαυτὸν ἀνειληφώς, καὶ τῇ πόλει μυρίους μὲν πολέμους, πολλὰς δὲ τυραννίδας καὶ στάσεις διαπεφευγυίᾳ πρότερον ὥσπερ νόσημα θανατηφόρον εἰς τοὺς ἐσχάτους καιροὺς ἐπιτιθέμενος· ὅς, χιλίων δραχμῶν ὠνίου τοῦ μεδίμνου τῶν πυρῶν ὄντος ἐν ἄστει τότε, τῶν ἀνθρώπων σιτουμένων τὸ περὶ τὴν ἀκρόπολιν φυόμενον παρθένιον, 13.3. ὑποδήματα δὲ καὶ ληκύθους ἑφθὰς ἐσθιόντων, αὐτὸς ἐνδελεχῶς πότοις μεθημερινοῖς καὶ κώμοις χρώμενος καὶ πυρριχίζων καὶ γελωτοποιῶν πρὸς τοὺς πολεμίους τὸν μὲν ἱερὸν τῆς θεοῦ λύχνον ἀπεσβηκότα διὰ σπάνιν ἐλαίου περιεῖδε, τῇ δὲ ἱεροφάντιδι πυρῶν ἡμίεκτον προσαιτούσῃ πεπέρεως ἔπεμψε, τοὺς δὲ βουλευτὰς καὶ ἱερεῖς ἱκετεύοντας οἰκτεῖραι τὴν πόλιν καὶ διαλύσασθαι πρὸς Σύλλαν τοξεύμασι βάλλων διεσκέδασεν. 14.3. αὐτός δὲ Σύλλας τὸ μεταξὺ τῆς Πειραϊκῆς πύλης καὶ τῆς ἱερᾶς κατασκάψας καὶ συνομαλύνας, περὶ μέσας νύκτας εἰσήλαυνε, φρικώδης ὑπό τε σάλπιγξι καὶ κέρασι πολλοῖς, ἀλαλαγμῷ καὶ κραυγῇ τῆς δυνάμεως ἐφʼ ἁρπαγὴν καὶ φόνον ἀφειμένης ὑπʼ αὐτοῦ, καὶ φερομένης διὰ τῶν στενωπῶν τῶν στενωπῶν Bekker, after Coraës: στενωπῶν . ἐσπασμένοις τοῖς ξίφεσιν, ὥστε ἀριθμὸν μηδένα γενέσθαι τῶν ἀποσφαγέντων, ἀλλὰ τῷ τόπῳ τοῦ ῥυέντος αἵματος ἔτι νῦν μετρεῖσθαι τὸ πλῆθος. 14.4. ἄνευ γὰρ τῶν κατὰ τὴν ἄλλην πόλιν ἀναιρεθέντων ὁ περὶ τὴν ἀγορὰν φόνος ἐπέσχε πάντα τὸν ἐντὸς τοῦ Διπύλου Κεραμεικόν πολλοῖς δὲ λέγεται καὶ διὰ πυλῶν κατακλύσαι τὸ προάστειον. ἀλλὰ τῶν οὕτως ἀποθανόντων, τοσούτων γενομένων, οὐκ ἐλάσσονες ἦσαν οἱ σφᾶς αὐτοὺς διαφθείροντες οἴκτῳ καὶ πόθῳ τῆς πατρίδος ὡς ἀναιρεθησομένης. τοῦτο γὰρ ἀπογνῶναι καὶ φοβηθῆναι τὴν σωτηρίαν ἐποίησε τοὺς βελτίστους, οὐδὲν ἐν τῷ Σύλλᾳ φιλάνθρωπον οὐδὲ μέτριον ἐλπίσαντας. 13.2. 13.3. 14.3. 14.4.
9. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 36.6.45 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •mithridates of pontos Found in books: Brodd and Reed (2011), Rome and Religion: A Cross-Disciplinary Dialogue on the Imperial Cult, 86
10. Plutarch, Demetrius, 4.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 232
4.4. συνεὶς δὲ ἐκεῖνος ἀπέδρα νυκτὸς εἰς Καππαδοκίαν. καὶ ταχὺ τὴν Ἀντιγόνῳ γενομένην ὄψιν ὕπαρ αὐτῷ συνετέλει τὸ χρεών. πολλῆς γὰρ καὶ ἀγαθῆς ἐκράτησε χώρας, καὶ τὸ τῶν Ποντικῶν βασιλέων γένος ὀγδόῃ που διαδοχῇ παυσάμενον ὑπὸ Ῥωμαίων ἐκεῖνος παρέσχε. ταῦτα μὲν οὖν εὐφυΐας δείγματα τοῦ Δημητρίου πρὸς ἐπιείκειαν καὶ δικαιοσύνην. 4.4.
11. Plutarch, Pompey, 28 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •mithridates vi eupator, king of pontos, racine’s play “mithridate,” Found in books: Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 289
12. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.4.5, 1.8.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •mithridates ii, king of pontos Found in books: Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 205
1.4.5. Γαλατῶν δὲ οἱ πολλοὶ ναυσὶν ἐς τὴν Ἀσίαν διαβάντες τὰ παραθαλάσσια αὐτῆς ἐλεηλάτουν· χρόνῳ δὲ ὕστερον οἱ Πέργαμον ἔχοντες, πάλαι δὲ Τευθρανίαν καλουμένην, ἐς ταύτην Γαλάτας ἐλαύνουσιν ἀπὸ θαλάσσης. οὗτοι μὲν δὴ τὴν ἐκτὸς Σαγγαρίου χώραν ἔσχον Ἄγκυραν πόλιν ἑλόντες Φρυγῶν, ἣν Μίδας ὁ Γορδίου πρότερον ᾤκισεν—ἄγκυρα δέ, ἣν ὁ Μίδας ἀνεῦρεν, ἦν ἔτι καὶ ἐς ἐμὲ ἐν ἱερῷ Διὸς καὶ κρήνη Μίδου καλουμένη· ταύτην οἴνῳ κεράσαι Μίδαν φασὶν ἐπὶ τὴν θήραν τοῦ Σιληνοῦ—, ταύτην τε δὴ τὴν Ἄγκυραν εἷλον καὶ Πεσσινοῦντα τὴν ὑπὸ τὸ ὄρος τὴν Ἄγδιστιν, ἔνθα καὶ τὸν Ἄττην τεθάφθαι λέγουσι. 1.8.1. ἀπαιτεῖ δὲ ὁ λόγος δηλῶσαι καὶ τὰ ἐς Ἄτταλον ἔχοντα, ὅτι καὶ οὗτος τῶν ἐπωνύμων ἐστὶν Ἀθηναίοις. ἀνὴρ Μακεδὼν Δόκιμος ὄνομα, στρατηγὸς Ἀντιγόνου, Λυσιμάχῳ παραδοὺς ὕστερον αὑτὸν καὶ τὰ χρήματα, Φιλέταιρον Παφλαγόνα εἶχεν εὐνοῦχον. ὅσα μὲν δὴ Φιλεταίρῳ πεπραγμένα ἐς τὴν ἀπόστασίν ἐστι τὴν ἀπὸ Λυσιμάχου καὶ ὡς Σέλευκον ἐπηγάγετο, ἔσται μοι τῶν ἐς Λυσίμαχον παρενθήκη· ὁ δὲ Ἄτταλος Ἀττάλου μὲν παῖς ὤν, ἀδελφιδοῦς δὲ Φιλεταίρου, τὴν ἀρχὴν Εὐμένους παραδόντος ἔσχεν ἀνεψιοῦ. μέγιστον δέ ἐστίν οἱ τῶν ἔργων· Γαλάτας γὰρ ἐς τὴν γῆν, ἣν ἔτι καὶ νῦν ἔχουσιν, ἀναφυγεῖν ἠνάγκασεν ἀπὸ θαλάσσης. 1.4.5. The greater number of the Gauls crossed over to Asia by ship and plundered its coasts. Some time after, the inhabitants of Pergamus , that was called of old Teuthrania, drove the Gauls into it from the sea. Now this people occupied the country on the farther side of the river Sangarius capturing Ancyra , a city of the Phrygians, which Midas son of Gordius had founded in former time. And the anchor, which Midas found, A legend invented to explain the name “ Ancyra ,” which means anchor. was even as late as my time in the sanctuary of Zeus, as well as a spring called the Spring of Midas, water from which they say Midas mixed with wine to capture Silenus. Well then, the Pergameni took Ancyra and Pessinus which lies under Mount Agdistis, where they say that Attis lies buried. 1.8.1. It is pertinent to add here an account of Attalus, because he too is one of the Athenian eponymoi. A Macedonian of the name of Docimus, a general of Antigonus, who afterwards surrendered both himself and his property to Lysimachus, had a Paphlagonian eunuch called Philetaerus. All that Philetaerus did to further the revolt from Lysimachus, and how he won over Seleucus, will form an episode in my account of Lysimachus. Attalus, however, son of Attalus and nephew of Philetaerus, received the kingdom from his cousin Eumenes, who handed it over. The greatest of his achievements was his forcing the Gauls to retire from the sea into the country which they still hold.
13. Augustus, Seg, 37.957  Tagged with subjects: •mithridates v, king of pontos Found in books: Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 255
14. Epigraphy, Ms, 4.12  Tagged with subjects: •mithridates vi eupator, king of pontos Found in books: Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 319
15. Augustus, Syll.3, 709  Tagged with subjects: •mithridates v, king of pontos Found in books: Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 270
16. Memnon Fr., Fr., Fgrh 434, 1.16  Tagged with subjects: •mithridates ii, king of pontos •mithridates v, king of pontos Found in books: Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 232
17. Epigraphy, Head, Hn2, 724, 716  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 289
18. Ancient Near Eastern Sources, Cuneiform Tablet, None  Tagged with subjects: •mithridates ii, king of pontos Found in books: Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 205
19. Apollonios of Aphrodisias, Stephanos of Byzantion P., None  Tagged with subjects: •mithridates ii, king of pontos Found in books: Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 205
20. Epigraphy, Moretti, Igur, 9  Tagged with subjects: •mithridates ii, king of pontos •mithridates iv philopator philadelphos, king of pontos •mithridates v, king of pontos Found in books: Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 267
21. Epigraphy, Ig, None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 255
22. Georgios Synkellos, Ecloga Chronographica P., None  Tagged with subjects: •mithridates ii, king of pontos •mithridates v, king of pontos Found in books: Marek (2019), In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World, 232