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48 results for "mimesis"
1. Hebrew Bible, Leviticus, 17-18, 20-26, 19 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Damm (2018) 203
2. Hebrew Bible, Psalms, 19.1, 138.8-138.11 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •imitation (see also mimesis), of an archetype Found in books: Gray (2021) 125
19.1. "לַמְנַצֵּחַ מִזְמוֹר לְדָוִד׃", 19.1. "יִרְאַת יְהוָה טְהוֹרָה עוֹמֶדֶת לָעַד מִשְׁפְּטֵי־יְהוָה אֱמֶת צָדְקוּ יַחְדָּו׃", 138.8. "יְהוָה יִגְמֹר בַּעֲדִי יְהוָה חַסְדְּךָ לְעוֹלָם מַעֲשֵׂי יָדֶיךָ אַל־תֶּרֶף׃", 19.1. "For the Leader. A Psalm of David.", 138.8. "The LORD will accomplish that which concerneth me; Thy mercy, O LORD, endureth for ever; Forsake not the work of Thine own hands.",
3. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 2-3, 1 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Damm (2018) 203
4. Hebrew Bible, Exodus, 4.6-4.7, 12.36, 33.11, 33.17 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •imitation (see also mimesis), of christ •imitation (see also mimesis), dependent upon interpretation •imitation (see also mimesis), of an archetype Found in books: Gray (2021) 113, 235, 238
4.6. "וַיֹּאמֶר יְהוָה לוֹ עוֹד הָבֵא־נָא יָדְךָ בְּחֵיקֶךָ וַיָּבֵא יָדוֹ בְּחֵיקוֹ וַיּוֹצִאָהּ וְהִנֵּה יָדוֹ מְצֹרַעַת כַּשָּׁלֶג׃", 4.7. "וַיֹּאמֶר הָשֵׁב יָדְךָ אֶל־חֵיקֶךָ וַיָּשֶׁב יָדוֹ אֶל־חֵיקוֹ וַיּוֹצִאָהּ מֵחֵיקוֹ וְהִנֵּה־שָׁבָה כִּבְשָׂרוֹ׃", 12.36. "וַיהוָה נָתַן אֶת־חֵן הָעָם בְּעֵינֵי מִצְרַיִם וַיַּשְׁאִלוּם וַיְנַצְּלוּ אֶת־מִצְרָיִם׃", 33.11. "וְדִבֶּר יְהוָה אֶל־מֹשֶׁה פָּנִים אֶל־פָּנִים כַּאֲשֶׁר יְדַבֵּר אִישׁ אֶל־רֵעֵהוּ וְשָׁב אֶל־הַמַּחֲנֶה וּמְשָׁרְתוֹ יְהוֹשֻׁעַ בִּן־נוּן נַעַר לֹא יָמִישׁ מִתּוֹךְ הָאֹהֶל׃", 33.17. "וַיֹּאמֶר יְהוָה אֶל־מֹשֶׁה גַּם אֶת־הַדָּבָר הַזֶּה אֲשֶׁר דִּבַּרְתָּ אֶעֱשֶׂה כִּי־מָצָאתָ חֵן בְּעֵינַי וָאֵדָעֲךָ בְּשֵׁם׃", 4.6. "And the LORD said furthermore unto him: ‘Put now thy hand into thy bosom.’ And he put his hand into his bosom; and when he took it out, behold, his hand was leprous, as white as snow.", 4.7. "And He said: ‘Put thy hand back into thy bosom.—And he put his hand back into his bosom; and when he took it out of his bosom, behold, it was turned again as his other flesh.—", 12.36. "And the LORD gave the people favour in the sight of the Egyptians, so that they let them have what they asked. And they despoiled the Egyptians.", 33.11. "And the LORD spoke unto Moses face to face, as a man speaketh unto his friend. And he would return into the camp; but his minister Joshua, the son of Nun, a young man, departed not out of the Tent.", 33.17. "And the LORD said unto Moses: ‘I will do this thing also that thou hast spoken, for thou hast found grace in My sight, and I know thee by name.’",
5. Hebrew Bible, Deuteronomy, 34.6 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •imitation (see also mimesis), of christ Found in books: Gray (2021) 201
34.6. "וַיִּקְבֹּר אֹתוֹ בַגַּיְ בְּאֶרֶץ מוֹאָב מוּל בֵּית פְּעוֹר וְלֹא־יָדַע אִישׁ אֶת־קְבֻרָתוֹ עַד הַיּוֹם הַזֶּה׃", 34.6. "And he was buried in the valley in the land of Moab over against Beth-peor; and no man knoweth of his sepulchre unto this day.",
6. Plato, Timaeus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •imitation (see also mimesis), of an archetype Found in books: Gray (2021) 127
7. Herodotus, Histories, 1.30.2, 7.8-7.11, 9.122 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •dionysius of halicarnassus, mimesis and imitation Found in books: Kirkland (2022) 86, 87
1.30.2. After Solon had seen everything and had thought about it, Croesus found the opportunity to say, “My Athenian guest, we have heard a lot about you because of your wisdom and of your wanderings, how as one who loves learning you have traveled much of the world for the sake of seeing it, so now I desire to ask you who is the most fortunate man you have seen.” 7.8. After the conquest of Egypt, intending now to take in hand the expedition against Athens, Xerxes held a special assembly of the noblest among the Persians, so he could learn their opinions and declare his will before them all. When they were assembled, Xerxes spoke to them as follows: ,“Men of Persia, I am not bringing in and establishing a new custom, but following one that I have inherited. As I learn from our elders, we have never yet remained at peace ever since Cyrus deposed Astyages and we won this sovereignty from the Medes. It is the will of heaven; and we ourselves win advantage by our many enterprises. No one needs to tell you, who already know them well, which nations Cyrus and Cambyses and Darius my father subdued and added to our realm. ,Ever since I came to this throne, I have considered how I might not fall short of my predecessors in this honor, and not add less power to the Persians; and my considerations persuade me that we may win not only renown, but a land neither less nor worse, and more fertile, than that which we now possess; and we would also gain vengeance and requital. For this cause I have now summoned you together, that I may impart to you what I intend to do. ,It is my intent to bridge the Hellespont and lead my army through Europe to Hellas, so I may punish the Athenians for what they have done to the Persians and to my father. ,You saw that Darius my father was set on making an expedition against these men. But he is dead, and it was not granted him to punish them. On his behalf and that of all the Persians, I will never rest until I have taken Athens and burnt it, for the unprovoked wrong that its people did to my father and me. ,First they came to Sardis with our slave Aristagoras the Milesian and burnt the groves and the temples; next, how they dealt with us when we landed on their shores, when Datis and Artaphrenes were our generals, I suppose you all know. ,For these reasons I am resolved to send an army against them; and I reckon that we will find the following benefits among them: if we subdue those men, and their neighbors who dwell in the land of Pelops the Phrygian, we will make the borders of Persian territory and of the firmament of heaven be the same. ,No land that the sun beholds will border ours, but I will make all into one country, when I have passed over the whole of Europe. ,I learn that this is the situation: no city of men or any human nation which is able to meet us in battle will be left, if those of whom I speak are taken out of our way. Thus the guilty and the innocent will alike bear the yoke of slavery. ,This is how you would best please me: when I declare the time for your coming, every one of you must eagerly appear; and whoever comes with his army best equipped will receive from me such gifts as are reckoned most precious among us. ,Thus it must be done; but so that I not seem to you to have my own way, I lay the matter before you all, and bid whoever wishes to declare his opinion.” So spoke Xerxes and ceased. 7.9. After him Mardonius said: “Master, you surpass not only all Persians that have been but also all that shall be; besides having dealt excellently and truly with all other matters, you will not suffer the Ionians who dwell in Europe to laugh at us, which they have no right to do. ,It would be strange indeed if we who have subdued and made slaves of Sacae and Indians and Ethiopians and Assyrians and many other great nations, for no wrong done to the Persians but of mere desire to add to our power, will not take vengeance on the Greeks for unprovoked wrongs. ,What have we to fear from them? Have they a massive population or abundance of wealth? Their manner of fighting we know, and we know how weak their power is; we have conquered and hold their sons, those who dwell in our land and are called Ionians and Aeolians and Dorians. ,I myself have made trial of these men, when by your father's command I marched against them. I marched as far as Macedonia and almost to Athens itself, yet none came out to meet me in battle. ,Yet the Greeks are accustomed to wage wars, as I learn, and they do it most senselessly in their wrongheadedness and folly. When they have declared war against each other, they come down to the fairest and most level ground that they can find and fight there, so that the victors come off with great harm; of the vanquished I say not so much as a word, for they are utterly destroyed. ,Since they speak the same language, they should end their disputes by means of heralds or messengers, or by any way rather than fighting; if they must make war upon each other, they should each discover where they are in the strongest position and make the attempt there. The Greek custom, then, is not good; and when I marched as far as the land of Macedonia, it had not come into their minds to fight. ,But against you, O king, who shall make war? You will bring the multitudes of Asia, and all your ships. I think there is not so much boldness in Hellas as that; but if time should show me wrong in my judgment, and those men prove foolhardy enough to do battle with us, they would be taught that we are the greatest warriors on earth. Let us leave nothing untried; for nothing happens by itself, and all men's gains are the fruit of adventure.” 7.10. Thus Mardonius smoothed Xerxes' resolution and stopped. The rest of the Persians held their peace, not daring to utter any opinion contrary to what had been put forward; then Artabanus son of Hystaspes, the king's uncle, spoke. Relying on his position, he said, ,“O king, if opposite opinions are not uttered, it is impossible for someone to choose the better; the one which has been spoken must be followed. If they are spoken, the better can be found; just as the purity of gold cannot be determined by itself, but when gold is compared with gold by rubbing, we then determine the better. ,Now I advised Darius, your father and my brother, not to lead his army against the Scythians, who have no cities anywhere to dwell in. But he hoped to subdue the nomadic Scythians and would not obey me; he went on the expedition and returned after losing many gallant men from his army. ,You, O king, are proposing to lead your armies against far better men than the Scythians—men who are said to be excellent warriors by sea and land. It is right that I should show you what danger there is in this. ,You say that you will bridge the Hellespont and march your army through Europe to Hellas. Now suppose you happen to be defeated either by land or by sea, or even both; the men are said to be valiant, and we may well guess that it is so, since the Athenians alone destroyed the great army that followed Datis and Artaphrenes to Attica. ,Suppose they do not succeed in both ways; but if they attack with their ships and prevail in a sea-fight, and then sail to the Hellespont and destroy your bridge, that, O king, is the hour of peril. ,It is from no wisdom of my own that I thus conjecture; it is because I know what disaster once almost overtook us, when your father, making a highway over the Thracian Bosporus and bridging the river Ister, crossed over to attack the Scythians. At that time the Scythians used every means of entreating the Ionians, who had been charged to guard the bridges of the Ister, to destroy the way of passage. ,If Histiaeus the tyrant of Miletus had consented to the opinion of the other tyrants instead of opposing it, the power of Persia would have perished. Yet it is dreadful even in the telling, that one man should hold in his hand all the king's fortunes. ,So do not plan to run the risk of any such danger when there is no need for it. Listen to me instead: for now dismiss this assembly; consider the matter by yourself and, whenever you so please, declare what seems best to you. ,A well-laid plan is always to my mind most profitable; even if it is thwarted later, the plan was no less good, and it is only chance that has baffled the design; but if fortune favor one who has planned poorly, then he has gotten only a prize of chance, and his plan was no less bad. ,You see how the god smites with his thunderbolt creatures of greatness and does not suffer them to display their pride, while little ones do not move him to anger; and you see how it is always on the tallest buildings and trees that his bolts fall; for the god loves to bring low all things of surpassing greatness. Thus a large army is destroyed by a smaller, when the jealous god sends panic or the thunderbolt among them, and they perish unworthily; for the god suffers pride in none but himself. ,Now haste is always the parent of failure, and great damages are likely to arise; but in waiting there is good, and in time this becomes clear, even though it does not seem so in the present. ,This, O king, is my advice to you. But you, Mardonius son of Gobryas, cease your foolish words about the Greeks, for they do not deserve to be maligned. By slandering the Greeks you incite the king to send this expedition; that is the end to which you press with all eagerness. Let it not be so. ,Slander is a terrible business; there are two in it who do wrong and one who suffers wrong. The slanderer wrongs another by accusing an absent man, and the other does wrong in that he is persuaded before he has learned the whole truth; the absent man does not hear what is said of him and suffers wrong in the matter, being maligned by the one and condemned by the other. ,If an army must by all means be sent against these Greeks, hear me now: let the king himself remain in the Persian land, and let us two stake our children's lives upon it; you lead out the army, choosing whatever men you wish and taking as great an army as you desire. ,If the king's fortunes fare as you say, let my sons be slain, and myself with them; but if it turns out as I foretell, let your sons be so treated, and you likewise, if you return. ,But if you are unwilling to submit to this and will at all hazards lead your army overseas to Hellas, then I think that those left behind in this place will hear that Mardonius has done great harm to Persia, and has been torn apart by dogs and birds in the land of Athens or of Lacedaemon, if not even before that on the way there; and that you have learned what kind of men you persuade the king to attack.” 7.11. Thus spoke Artabanus. Xerxes answered angrily, “Artabanus, you are my father's brother; that will save you from receiving the fitting reward of foolish words. But for your cowardly lack of spirit I lay upon you this disgrace, that you will not go with me and my army against Hellas, but will stay here with the women; I myself will accomplish all that I have said, with no help from you. ,May I not be the son of Darius son of Hystaspes son of Arsames son of Ariaramnes son of Teispes son of Cyrus son of Cambyses son of Teispes son of Achaemenes, if I do not have vengeance on the Athenians; I well know that if we remain at peace they will not; they will assuredly invade our country, if we may infer from what they have done already, for they burnt Sardis and marched into Asia. ,It is not possible for either of us to turn back: to do or to suffer is our task, so that what is ours be under the Greeks, or what is theirs under the Persians; there is no middle way in our quarrel. ,Honor then demands that we avenge ourselves for what has been done to us; thus will I learn what is this evil that will befall me when I march against these Greeks—men that even Pelops the Phrygian, the slave of my forefathers, did so utterly subdue that to this day they and their country are called by the name of their conqueror.” 9.122. This Artayctes who was crucified was the grandson of that Artembares who instructed the Persians in a design which they took from him and laid before Cyrus; this was its purport: ,“Seeing that Zeus grants lordship to the Persian people, and to you, Cyrus, among them, let us, after reducing Astyages, depart from the little and rugged land which we possess and occupy one that is better. There are many such lands on our borders, and many further distant. If we take one of these, we will all have more reasons for renown. It is only reasonable that a ruling people should act in this way, for when will we have a better opportunity than now, when we are lords of so many men and of all Asia?” ,Cyrus heard them, and found nothing to marvel at in their design; “Go ahead and do this,” he said; “but if you do so, be prepared no longer to be rulers but rather subjects. Soft lands breed soft men; wondrous fruits of the earth and valiant warriors grow not from the same soil.” ,The Persians now realized that Cyrus reasoned better than they, and they departed, choosing rather to be rulers on a barren mountain side than dwelling in tilled valleys to be slaves to others.
8. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Kirkland (2022) 59
9. Xenophon, Memoirs, 4.8.11 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •imitation (see also mimesis), of christ Found in books: Gray (2021) 235
4.8.11. τῶν δὲ Σωκράτην γιγνωσκόντων, οἷος ἦν, οἱ ἀρετῆς ἐφιέμενοι πάντες ἔτι καὶ νῦν διατελοῦσι πάντων μάλιστα ποθοῦντες ἐκεῖνον, ὡς ὠφελιμώτατον ὄντα πρὸς ἀρετῆς ἐπιμέλειαν. ἐμοὶ μὲν δή, τοιοῦτος ὢν οἷον ἐγὼ διήγημαι, εὐσεβὴς μὲν οὕτως ὥστε μηδὲν ἄνευ τῆς τῶν θεῶν γνώμης ποιεῖν, δίκαιος δὲ ὥστε βλάπτειν μὲν μηδὲ μικρὸν μηδένα, ὠφελεῖν δὲ τὰ μέγιστα τοὺς χρωμένους αὐτῷ, ἐγκρατὴς δὲ ὥστε μηδέποτε προαιρεῖσθαι τὸ ἥδιον ἀντὶ τοῦ βελτίονος, φρόνιμος δὲ ὥστε μὴ διαμαρτάνειν κρίνων τὰ βελτίω καὶ τὰ χείρω μηδὲ ἄλλου προσδεῖσθαι, ἀλλʼ αὐτάρκης εἶναι πρὸς τὴν τούτων γνῶσιν, ἱκανὸς δὲ καὶ λόγῳ εἰπεῖν τε καὶ διορίσασθαι τὰ τοιαῦτα, ἱκανὸς δὲ καὶ ἄλλως δοκιμάσαι τε καὶ ἁμαρτάνοντα ἐλέγξαι καὶ προτρέψασθαι ἐπʼ ἀρετὴν καὶ καλοκαγαθίαν, ἐδόκει τοιοῦτος εἶναι οἷος ἂν εἴη ἄριστός τε ἀνὴρ καὶ εὐδαιμονέστατος. εἰ δέ τῳ μὴ ἀρέσκει ταῦτα, παραβάλλων τὸ ἄλλων ἦθος πρὸς ταῦτα οὕτω κρινέτω. 4.8.11. This was the tenor of his conversation with Hermogenes and with the others. All who knew what manner of man Socrates was and who seek after virtue continue to this day to miss him beyond all others, as the chief of helpers in the quest of virtue. For myself, I have described him as he was: so religious that he did nothing without counsel from the gods; so just that he did no injury, however small, to any man, but conferred the greatest benefits on all who dealt with him; so self-controlled that he never chose the pleasanter rather than the better course; so wise that he was unerring in his judgment of the better and the worse, and needed no counsellor, but relied on himself for his knowledge of them; masterly in expounding and defining such things; no less masterly in putting others to the test, and convincing them of error and exhorting them to follow virtue and gentleness. To me then he seemed to be all that a truly good and happy man must be. But if there is any doubter, let him set the character of other men beside these things; then let him judge.
10. Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics, 2.1-2.3 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •imitation (see also mimesis), of an archetype Found in books: Gray (2021) 75
11. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, The Arrangement of Words, 3.13-3.14, 3.16-3.17, 12.8-12.12 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Kirkland (2022) 60, 61
12. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 11.1.4-11.1.5 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dionysius of halicarnassus, mimesis and imitation Found in books: Kirkland (2022) 86, 87
11.1.4.  Men who are engaged in the conduct of civil affairs, among whom I for my part include also those philosophers who regard philosophy as consisting in the practice of fine actions rather than of fine words, have this in common with the rest of mankind, that they take pleasure in a comprehensive survey of all the circumstances that accompany events. And besides their pleasure, they have this advantage, that in difficult times they render great service to their countries as the result of the experience thus acquired and lead them as willing followers to that which is to their advantage, through the power of persuasion. 11.1.5.  For men most easily recognize the policies which either benefit or injure them when they perceive these illustrated by many examples; and those who advise them to make use of these are credited by them with prudence and great wisdom. It is for these reasons, therefore, that I have determined to report in accurate detail all the circumstances which attended the overthrow of the oligarchy, in so far as I consider them worthy of notice.
13. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Letter To Pompeius Geminus, 3.14, 3.16-3.17 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dionysius of halicarnassus, mimesis and imitation Found in books: Kirkland (2022) 51, 60, 61
14. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, De Veterum Censura, 1.7 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Kirkland (2022) 87
15. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, On Thucydides, 4.1, 4.3, 23.7 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Kirkland (2022) 51, 60, 61
16. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, On Lysias, 11 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dionysius of halicarnassus, mimesis and imitation Found in books: Kirkland (2022) 51
17. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, On Dinarchus, 7.5-7.6 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dionysius of halicarnassus, mimesis and imitation Found in books: Kirkland (2022) 59
18. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, On The Admirable Style of Demosthenes, 41.3 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dionysius of halicarnassus, mimesis and imitation Found in books: Kirkland (2022) 51, 60, 61
19. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, The Arrangement of Words, 3.13-3.14, 3.16-3.17, 12.8-12.12 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Kirkland (2022) 60, 61
20. New Testament, John, 1.18, 19.41 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •imitation (see also mimesis), in education •imitation (see also mimesis), of christ Found in books: Gray (2021) 201, 213
1.18. θεὸν οὐδεὶς ἑώρακεν πώποτε· μονογενὴς θεὸς ὁ ὢν εἰς τὸν κόλπον τοῦ πατρὸς ἐκεῖνος ἐξηγήσατο. 19.41. ἦν δὲ ἐν τῷ τόπῳ ὅπου ἐσταυρώθη κῆπος, καὶ ἐν τῷ κήπῳ μνημεῖον καινόν, ἐν ᾧ οὐδέπω οὐδεὶς ἦν τεθειμένος· 1.18. No one has seen God at any time. The one and only Son, who is in the bosom of the Father, he has declared him. 19.41. Now in the place where he was crucified there was a garden. In the garden a new tomb in which no man had ever yet been laid.
21. New Testament, Hebrews, 1.3 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •imitation (see also mimesis), of an archetype Found in books: Gray (2021) 127
1.3. ὃς ὢν ἀπαύγασμα τῆς δόξης καὶ χαρακτὴρ τῆς ὑποστάσεως αὐτοῦ, φέρων τε τὰ πάντα τῷ ῥήματι τῆς δυνάμεως αὐτοῦ, καθαρισμὸν τῶν ἁμαρτιῶν ποιησάμενοςἐκάθισεν ἐν δεξιᾷτῆς μεγαλωσύνης ἐν ὑψηλοῖς, 1.3. His Son is the radiance of his glory, the very image of his substance, and upholding all things by the word of his power, when he had by himself made purification for our sins, sat down on the right hand of the Majesty on high;
22. New Testament, Colossians, 1.15 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •imitation (see also mimesis), in education Found in books: Gray (2021) 213
1.15. ὅς ἐστιν εἰκὼν τοῦ θεοῦ τοῦ ἀοράτου, πρωτότοκος πάσης κτίσεως, 1.15. who is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of all creation.
23. New Testament, Acts, 19.1-19.7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •imitation (see also mimesis), of angels Found in books: Gray (2021) 111
19.1. Ἐγένετο δὲ ἐν τῷ τὸν Ἀπολλὼ εἶναι ἐν Κορίνθῳ Παῦλον διελθόντα τὰ ἀνωτερικὰ μέρη ἐλθεῖν εἰς Ἔφεσον καὶ εὑρεῖν τινὰς μαθητάς, 19.2. εἶπέν τε πρὸς αὐτούς Εἰ πνεῦμα ἅγιον ἐλάβετε πιστεύσαντες; οἱ δὲ πρὸς αὐτόν Ἀλλʼ οὐδʼ εἰ πνεῦμα ἅγιον ἔστιν ἠκούσαμεν. 19.3. εἶπέν τε Εἰς τί οὖν ἐβαπτίσθητε; οἱ δὲ εἶπαν Εἰς τὸ Ἰωάνου βάπτισμα. 19.4. εἶπεν δὲ Παῦλος Ἰωάνης ἐβάπτισεν βάπτισμα μετανοίας, τῷ λαῷ λέγων εἰς τὸν ἐρχόμενον μετʼ αὐτὸν ἵνα πιστεύσωσιν, τοῦτʼ ἔστιν εἰς τὸν Ἰησοῦν. 19.5. ἀκούσαντες δὲ ἐβαπτίσθησαν εἰς τὸ ὄνομα τοῦ κυρίου Ἰησοῦ· 19.6. καὶ ἐπιθέντος αὐτοῖς τοῦ Παύλου χεῖρας ἦλθε τὸ πνεῦμα τὸ ἅγιον ἐπʼ αὐτούς, ἐλάλουν τε γλώσσαις καὶ ἐπροφήτευον. 19.7. ἦσαν δὲ οἱ πάντες ἄνδρες ὡσεὶ δώδεκα. 19.1. It happened that, while Apollos was at Corinth, Paul, having passed through the upper country, came to Ephesus, and found certain disciples. 19.2. He said to them, "Did you receive the Holy Spirit when you believed?"They said to him, "No, we haven't even heard that there is a Holy Spirit." 19.3. He said, "Into what then were you baptized?"They said, "Into John's baptism." 19.4. Paul said, "John indeed baptized with the baptism of repentance, saying to the people that they should believe in the one who would come after him, that is, on Jesus." 19.5. When they heard this, they were baptized into the name of the Lord Jesus. 19.6. When Paul had laid his hands on them, the Holy Spirit came on them, and they spoke with other languages, and prophesied. 19.7. They were about twelve men in all.
24. New Testament, Luke, 9.58, 23.53-23.55 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •imitation (see also mimesis), of christ Found in books: Gray (2021) 201
9.58. καὶ εἶπεν αὐτῷ [ὁ] Ἰησοῦς Αἱ ἀλώπεκες φωλεοὺς ἔχουσιν καὶ τὰ πετεινὰ τοῦ οὐρανοῦ κατασκηνώσεις, ὁ δὲ υἱὸς τοῦ ἀνθρώπου οὐκ ἔχει ποῦ τὴν κεφαλὴν κλίνῃ. 23.53. καὶ καθελὼν ἐνετύλιξεν αὐτὸ σινδόνι, καὶ ἔθηκεν αὐτὸν ἐν μνήματι λαξευτῷ οὗ οὐκ ἦν οὐδεὶς οὔπω κείμενος. 23.54. Καὶ ἡμέρα ἦν παρασκευῆς, καὶ σάββατον ἐπέφωσκεν. 23.55. Κατακολουθήσασαι δὲ αἱ γυναῖκες, αἳτινες ἦσαν συνεληλυθυῖαι ἐκ τῆς Γαλιλαίας αὐτῷ, ἐθεάσαντο τὸ μνημεῖον καὶ ὡς ἐτέθη τὸ σῶμα αὐτοῦ, 9.58. Jesus said to him, "The foxes have holes, and the birds of the sky have nests, but the Son of Man has no place to lay his head." 23.53. He took it down, and wrapped it in a linen cloth, and laid him in a tomb that was cut in stone, where no one had ever been laid. 23.54. It was the day of the Preparation, and the Sabbath was drawing near. 23.55. The women, who had come with him out of Galilee, followed after, and saw the tomb, and how his body was laid.
25. New Testament, Mark, 15.46 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •imitation (see also mimesis), of christ Found in books: Gray (2021) 201
15.46. καὶ ἀγοράσας σινδόνα καθελὼν αὐτὸν ἐνείλησεν τῇ σινδόνι καὶ ἔθηκεν αὐτὸν ἐν μνήματι ὃ ἦν λελατομημένον ἐκ πέτρας, καὶ προσεκύλισεν λίθον ἐπὶ τὴν θύραντοῦ μνημείου. 15.46. He bought a linen cloth, and taking him down, wound him in the linen cloth, and laid him in a tomb which had been cut out of a rock. He rolled a stone against the door of the tomb.
26. New Testament, 2 Timothy, 1.6 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •imitation (see also mimesis), of angels Found in books: Gray (2021) 111
1.6. διʼ ἣν αἰτίαν ἀναμιμνήσκω σε ἀναζωπυρεῖν τὸ χάρισμα τοῦ θεοῦ, ὅ ἐστιν ἐν σοὶ διὰ τῆς ἐπιθέσεως τῶν χειρῶν μου· 1.6. For this cause, I remind you that you should stir up the gift of God which is in you through the laying on of my hands.
27. New Testament, Romans, 1.20 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •imitation (see also mimesis), of an archetype Found in books: Gray (2021) 125
1.20. τὰ γὰρ ἀόρατα αὐτοῦ ἀπὸ κτίσεως κόσμου τοῖς ποιήμασιν νοούμενα καθορᾶται, ἥ τε ἀΐδιος αὐτοῦ δύναμις καὶ θειότης, εἰς τὸ εἶναι αὐτοὺς ἀναπολογήτους, 1.20. For the invisible things of him since the creation of the world are clearly seen, being perceived through the things that are made, even his everlasting power and divinity; that they may be without excuse.
28. Plutarch, Alexander The Great, 1.1-1.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •imitation (see also mimesis), of an archetype Found in books: Gray (2021) 75
1.1. τὸν Ἀλεξάνδρου τοῦ βασιλέως βίον καὶ τοῦ Καίσαρος, ὑφʼ οὗ κατελύθη Πομπήϊος, ἐν τούτῳ τῷ βιβλίῳ γράφοντες, διὰ τὸ πλῆθος τῶν ὑποκειμένων πράξεων οὐδὲν ἄλλο προεροῦμεν ἢ παραιτησόμεθα τοὺς ἀναγινώσκοντας, ἐὰν μὴ πάντα μηδὲ καθʼ ἕκαστον ἐξειργασμένως τι τῶν περιβοήτων ἀπαγγέλλωμεν, ἀλλὰ ἐπιτέμνοντες τὰ πλεῖστα, μὴ συκοφαντεῖν. 1.2. οὔτε γὰρ ἱστορίας γράφομεν, ἀλλὰ βίους, οὔτε ταῖς ἐπιφανεστάταις πράξεσι πάντως ἔνεστι δήλωσις ἀρετῆς ἢ κακίας, ἀλλὰ πρᾶγμα βραχὺ πολλάκις καὶ ῥῆμα καὶ παιδιά τις ἔμφασιν ἤθους ἐποίησε μᾶλλον ἢ μάχαι μυριόνεκροι καὶ παρατάξεις αἱ μέγισται καὶ πολιορκίαι πόλεων. 1.1. It is the life of Alexander the king, and of Caesar, who overthrew Pompey, that I am writing in this book, and the multitude of the deeds to be treated is so great that I shall make no other preface than to entreat my readers, in case I do not tell of all the famous actions of these men, nor even speak exhaustively at all in each particular case, but in epitome for the most part, not to complain. 1.2. For it is not Histories that I am writing, but Lives; and in the most illustrious deeds there is not always a manifestation of virtue or vice, nay, a slight thing like a phrase or a jest often makes a greater revelation of character than battles where thousands fall, or the greatest armaments, or sieges of cities.
29. Theon Aelius, Exercises, 71 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dionysius of halicarnassus, mimesis and imitation Found in books: Kirkland (2022) 58
30. Longinus, On The Sublime, 26.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •dionysius of halicarnassus, mimesis and imitation Found in books: Kirkland (2022) 58
31. Lucian, Athletics, 30 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •imitation (see also mimesis), of christ Found in books: Gray (2021) 81
32. Marcus Aurelius Emperor of Rome, Meditations, 3.4.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •imitation (see also mimesis), of christ Found in books: Gray (2021) 81
33. Clement of Alexandria, Miscellanies, 1.23-1.28 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •imitation (see also mimesis), of an archetype Found in books: Gray (2021) 106
34. Hermogenes, Rhetorical Exercises, 7, 22 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Kirkland (2022) 58
35. Origen, Against Celsus, 8.8.17-8.8.18 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •imitation (see also mimesis), in education Found in books: Gray (2021) 213
36. John Chrysostom, Homilies On 2 Corinthians, 26 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •imitation (see also mimesis), of christ Found in books: Gray (2021) 81
37. Gregory of Nyssa, De Virginitate, 31.296 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •imitation (see also mimesis), of an archetype Found in books: Gray (2021) 211
38. Gregory of Nyssa, De Virginitate (Recensio Altera), 31.296 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •imitation (see also mimesis), of an archetype Found in books: Gray (2021) 211
39. Gregory of Nyssa, Life of Makrina, 1, 10-11, 18, 28-29, 5-9, 51 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Gray (2021) 240
40. Gregory of Nyssa, De Vita Mosis, 1.1-1.16, 1.20-1.22, 1.29, 2.1-2.5, 2.13, 2.19-2.53, 2.56, 2.95-2.96, 2.112-2.116, 2.154, 2.162-2.169, 2.305-2.321 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •imitation (see also mimesis), dependent upon interpretation •imitation (see also mimesis), in education •imitation (see also mimesis), of an archetype •imitation (see also mimesis), of christ Found in books: Gray (2021) 2, 46, 47, 68, 106, 113, 127, 133, 211, 212, 213, 235, 238
41. Aphthonius, Progymnasmata, 8 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •imitation (see also mimesis), of an archetype Found in books: Gray (2021) 238
42. Plutarch, Tiberius And Caius Gracchus, 9.4-9.5  Tagged with subjects: •imitation (see also mimesis), of christ Found in books: Gray (2021) 201
43. Gregory of Nyssa, De Professione Christiana, 29.138.24-139.4  Tagged with subjects: •imitation (see also mimesis), of an archetype Found in books: Gray (2021) 125
45. Gregory of Nyssa, Vita Gregorii Thaumaturgi, 23-27, 51-53, 95, 2  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Gray (2021) 2
46. Nt, Matthew, 8.20, 27.59-27.60  Tagged with subjects: •imitation (see also mimesis), of christ Found in books: Gray (2021) 201
47. Gregory of Nyssa, De Perfectione, 30.178.15-30.178.17  Tagged with subjects: •imitation (see also mimesis), of an archetype Found in books: Gray (2021) 75
48. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Epitome, Fr., 3.3  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Kirkland (2022) 60, 61