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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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20 results for "labor"
1. Aristophanes, Women of The Assembly, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Richlin (2018) 248
2. Aristophanes, The Rich Man, 338, 337 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Richlin (2018) 248
337. καίτοι λόγος γ' ἦν νὴ τὸν ̔Ηρακλέα πολὺς
3. Aristophanes, Frogs, 1, 10-11, 2-3, 5-9, 4 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Richlin (2018) 99
4. τοῦτο δὲ φύλαξαι: πάνυ γάρ ἐστ' ἤδη χολή.
4. Aristotle, Politics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •labor, banausic Found in books: Richlin (2018) 99
5. Menander, Samia, 510, 512, 511 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Richlin (2018) 248
6. Plautus, Vidularia, 21 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •labor, banausic Found in books: Richlin (2018) 99
7. Plautus, Captiui, 266, 268-269, 267 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Richlin (2018) 248
8. Polybius, Histories, 3.20.5 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •labor, banausic Found in books: Richlin (2018) 248
3.20.5. πρὸς μὲν οὖν τὰ τοιαῦτα τῶν συγγραμμάτων οἷα γράφει Χαιρέας καὶ Σωσύλος οὐδὲν ἂν δέοι πλέον λέγειν· οὐ γὰρ ἱστορίας, ἀλλὰ κουρεακῆς καὶ πανδήμου λαλιᾶς ἔμοιγε δοκοῦσι τάξιν ἔχειν καὶ δύναμιν. 3.20.5.  No further criticism, indeed, of such works as those of Chaereas and Sosylus is necessary; they rank in authority, it seems to me, not with history, but with the common gossip of a barber's shop.
9. Terence, Phormio, 88-89, 91-93, 90 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Richlin (2018) 248
90. Plerumque eam opperiri dum inde iret domum.
10. Cicero, On Duties, 1.150 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •labor, banausic Found in books: Richlin (2018) 99
1.150. Iam de artificiis et quaestibus, qui liberales habendi, qui sordidi sint, haec fere accepimus. Primum improbantur ii quaestus, qui in odia hominum incurrunt, ut portitorum, ut faeneratorum. Illiberales autem et sordidi quaestus mercennariorum omnium, quorum operae, non quorum artes emuntur; est enim in illis ipsa merces auctoramentum servitutis. Sordidi etiam putandi, qui mercantur a mercatoribus, quod statim vendant; nihil enim proficiant, nisi admodum mentiantur; nec vero est quicquam turpius vanitate. Opificesque omnes in sordida arte versantur; nec enim quicquam ingenuum habere potest officina. Minimeque artes eae probandae, quae ministrae sunt voluptatum: Cetárii, lanií, coqui, fartóres, piscatóres, ut ait Terentius; adde hue, si placet, unguentarios, saltatores totumque ludum talarium. 1.150.  Now in regard to trades and other means of livelihood, which ones are to be considered becoming to a gentleman and which ones are vulgar, we have been taught, in general, as follows. First, those means of livelihood are rejected as undesirable which incur people's ill-will, as those of tax-gatherers and usurers. Unbecoming to a gentleman, too, and vulgar are the means of livelihood of all hired workmen whom we pay for mere manual labour, not for artistic skill; for in their case the very wage they receive is a pledge of their slavery. Vulgar we must consider those also who buy from wholesale merchants to retail immediately; for they would get no profits without a great deal of downright lying; and verily, there is no action that is meaner than misrepresentation. And all mechanics are engaged in vulgar trades; for no workshop can have anything liberal about it. Least respectable of all are those trades which cater for sensual pleasures: "Fishmongers, butchers, cooks, and poulterers, And fishermen," as Terence says. Add to these, if you please, the perfumers, dancers, and the whole corps de ballet.
11. Horace, Sermones, 1.7.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •labor, banausic Found in books: Richlin (2018) 248
12. Livy, History, 22.25.18-26.4 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •labor, banausic Found in books: Richlin (2018) 63
13. Plutarch, Moralia, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Richlin (2018) 248
14. Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory, 1.8.19, 1.9.2, 5.11.19 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •labor, banausic Found in books: Richlin (2018) 339
1.8.19.  The man who pores over every page even though it be wholly unworthy of reading, is capable of devoting his attention to the investigation of old wives' tales. And yet the commentaries of teachers of literature are full of such encumbrances to learning and strangely unfamiliar to their own authors. 1.9.2.  Their pupils should learn to paraphrase Aesop's fables, the natural successors of the fairy stories of the nursery, in simple and restrained language and subsequently to set down this paraphrase in writing with the same simplicity of style: they should begin by analysing each verse, then give its meaning in different language, and finally proceed to a freer paraphrase in which they will be permitted now to abridge and now to embellish the original, so far as this may be done without losing the poet's meaning. 5.11.19.  Again those fables which, at length they did not originate with Aesop (for Hesiod seems to have been the first to write them), are best known by Aesop's name, are specially attractive to rude and uneducated minds, which are less suspicious than others in their reception of fictions and, when pleased, readily agree with the arguments from which their pleasure is derived. Thus Menenius Agrippa is said to have reconciled the plebs to the patricians by his fable of the limbs' quarrel with the belly.
15. Plutarch, Nicias, 30 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •labor, banausic Found in books: Richlin (2018) 248
16. Columella, De Re Rustica, 1.8.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •labor, banausic Found in books: Richlin (2018) 248
1.8.2. Socors et somniculosum genus id mancipiorum, note target="
17. Quintilian, Institutio Oratoria, 1.8.19, 1.9.2, 5.11.19 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •labor, banausic Found in books: Richlin (2018) 339
1.8.19.  The man who pores over every page even though it be wholly unworthy of reading, is capable of devoting his attention to the investigation of old wives' tales. And yet the commentaries of teachers of literature are full of such encumbrances to learning and strangely unfamiliar to their own authors. 1.9.2.  Their pupils should learn to paraphrase Aesop's fables, the natural successors of the fairy stories of the nursery, in simple and restrained language and subsequently to set down this paraphrase in writing with the same simplicity of style: they should begin by analysing each verse, then give its meaning in different language, and finally proceed to a freer paraphrase in which they will be permitted now to abridge and now to embellish the original, so far as this may be done without losing the poet's meaning. 5.11.19.  Again those fables which, at length they did not originate with Aesop (for Hesiod seems to have been the first to write them), are best known by Aesop's name, are specially attractive to rude and uneducated minds, which are less suspicious than others in their reception of fictions and, when pleased, readily agree with the arguments from which their pleasure is derived. Thus Menenius Agrippa is said to have reconciled the plebs to the patricians by his fable of the limbs' quarrel with the belly.
18. Gellius, Attic Nights, 5.3.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •labor, banausic Found in books: Richlin (2018) 99
19. Phaedrus, Fables, None  Tagged with subjects: •labor, banausic Found in books: Richlin (2018) 339
20. Panegyrici Latini, Panegyrici Latini, None  Tagged with subjects: •labor, banausic Found in books: Richlin (2018) 99