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18 results for "justin"
1. New Testament, Acts, 17.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •justin martyr, on transmigration Found in books: Joosse (2021) 233
17.2. κατὰ δὲ τὸ εἰωθὸς τῷ Παύλῳ εἰσῆλθεν πρὸς αὐτοὺς καὶ ἐπὶ σάββατα τρία διελέξατο αὐτοῖς ἀπὸ τῶν γραφῶν, 17.2. Paul, as was his custom, went in to them, and for three Sabbath days reasoned with them from the Scriptures,
2. Tertullian, On The Soul, 34 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •justin martyr, on transmigration Found in books: Joosse (2021) 232
3. Theophilus, To Autolycus, 3.7.18 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •justin martyr, on transmigration Found in books: Joosse (2021) 232
4. Justin, Dialogue With Trypho, 4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •justin martyr, on transmigration Found in books: Joosse (2021) 233
4. Old Man: Is there, then, such and so great power in our mind? Or can a man not perceive by sense sooner? Will the mind of man see God at any time, if it is uninstructed by the Holy Spirit? Justin: Plato indeed says that the mind's eye is of such a nature, and has been given for this end, that we may see that very Being when the mind is pure itself, who is the cause of all discerned by the mind, having no color, no form, no greatness- nothing, indeed, which the bodily eye looks upon; but It is something of this sort, he goes on to say, that is beyond all essence, unutterable and inexplicable, but alone honourable and good, coming suddenly into souls well-dispositioned, on account of their affinity to and desire of seeing Him. Old Man: What affinity, then, is there between us and God? Is the soul also divine and immortal, and a part of that very regal mind? And even as that sees God, so also is it attainable by us to conceive of the Deity in our mind, and thence to become happy? Justin: Assuredly. Old Man: And do all the souls of all living beings comprehend Him? Or are the souls of men of one kind and the souls of horses and of asses of another kind? Justin: No. But the souls which are in all are similar. Old Man: Then, shall both horses and asses see, or have they seen at some time or other, God. Justin: No, for the majority of men will not, saving such as shall live justly, purified by righteousness, and by every other virtue. Old Man: It is not, therefore, on account of his affinity, that a man sees God, nor because he has a mind, but because he is temperate and righteous? Justin: Yes, and because he has that whereby he perceives God. Old Man: What then? Do goats or sheep injure any one? Justin: No one in any respect. Old Man: Therefore these animals will see [God], according to your account. Justin: No; for their body being of such a nature, is an obstacle to them. Old Man: If these animals could assume speech, be well assured that they would with greater reason ridicule our body; but let us now dismiss this subject, and let it be conceded to you as you say. Tell me, however, this: Does the soul see [God] so long as it is in the body, or after it has been removed from it? Justin: So long as it is in the form of a man, it is possible for it to attain to this by means of the mind; but especially when it has been set free from the body, and being apart by itself, it gets possession of that which it was wont continually and wholly to love. Old Man: Does it remember this, then [the sight of God], when it is again in the man? Justin: It does not appear to me so. Old Man: What, then, is the advantage to those who have seen [God]? Or what has he who has seen more than he who has not seen, unless he remember this fact, that he has seen? Justin: I cannot tell. Old Man: And what do those suffer who are judged to be unworthy of this spectacle? Justin: They are imprisoned in the bodies of certain wild beasts, and this is their punishment. Old Man: Do they know, then, that it is for this reason they are in such forms, and that they have committed some sin? Justin: I do not think so. Old Man: Then these reap no advantage from their punishment, as it seems: moreover, I would say that they are not punished unless they are conscious of the punishment. Justin: No indeed. Old Man: Therefore souls neither see God nor transmigrate into other bodies; for they would know that so they are punished, and they would be afraid to commit even the most trivial sin afterwards. But that they can perceive that God exists, and that righteousness and piety are honourable, I also quite agree with you. Justin: You are right.
5. Lactantius, Epitome Divinarum Institutionum, 63.9 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •justin martyr, on transmigration Found in books: Joosse (2021) 233
6. Eusebius of Caesarea, Preparation For The Gospel, 13.16.12 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •justin martyr, on transmigration Found in books: Joosse (2021) 233
7. Pamphilus Caesariensis 240-310, Apologia Pro Origene, 177-182, 184-188, 183 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Joosse (2021) 232
8. Athanasius, Life of Anthony, 74.7 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •justin martyr, on transmigration Found in books: Joosse (2021) 233
9. Augustine, The City of God, 12.27 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •justin martyr, on transmigration Found in books: Joosse (2021) 233
12.27. With good cause, therefore, does the true religion recognize and proclaim that the same God who created the universal cosmos, created also all the animals, souls as well as bodies. Among the terrestrial animals man was made by Him in His own image, and, for the reason I have given, was made one individual, though he was not left solitary. For there is nothing so social by nature, so unsocial by its corruption, as this race. And human nature has nothing more appropriate, either for the prevention of discord, or for the healing of it, where it exists, than the remembrance of that first parent of us all, whom God was pleased to create alone, that all men might be derived from one, and that they might thus be admonished to preserve unity among their whole multitude. But from the fact that the woman was made for him from his side, it was plainly meant that we should learn how dear the bond between man and wife should be. These works of God do certainly seem extraordinary, because they are the first works. They who do not believe them, ought not to believe any prodigies; for these would not be called prodigies did they not happen out of the ordinary course of nature. But, is it possible that anything should happen in vain, however hidden be its cause, in so grand a government of divine providence? One of the sacred Psalmists says, Come, behold the works of the Lord, what prodigies He has wrought in the earth. Why God made woman out of man's side, and what this first prodigy prefigured, I shall, with God's help, tell in another place. But at present, since this book must be concluded, let us merely say that in this first man, who was created in the beginning, there was laid the foundation, not indeed evidently, but in God's foreknowledge, of these two cities or societies, so far as regards the human race. For from that man all men were to be derived - some of them to be associated with the good angels in their reward, others with the wicked in punishment; all being ordered by the secret yet just judgment of God. For since it is written, All the paths of the Lord are mercy and truth, neither can His grace be unjust, nor His justice cruel.
10. Augustine, On Christian Doctrine, 2.40 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •justin martyr, on transmigration Found in books: Joosse (2021) 232
2.40. 60. Moreover, if those who are called philosophers, and especially the Platonists, have said anything that is true and in harmony with our faith, we are not only not to shrink from it, but to claim it for our own use from those who have unlawful possession of it. For, as the Egyptians had not only the idols and heavy burdens which the people of Israel hated and fled from, but also vessels and ornaments of gold and silver, and garments, which the same people when going out of Egypt appropriated to themselves, designing them for a better use, not doing this on their own authority, but by the command of God, the Egyptians themselves, in their ignorance, providing them with things which they themselves were not making a good use of; in the same way all branches of heathen learning have not only false and superstitious fancies and heavy burdens of unnecessary toil, which every one of us, when going out under the leadership of Christ from the fellowship of the heathen, ought to abhor and avoid; but they contain also liberal instruction which is better adapted to the use of the truth, and some most excellent precepts of morality; and some truths in regard even to the worship of the One God are found among them. Now these are, so to speak, their gold and silver, which they did not create themselves, but dug out of the mines of God's providence which are everywhere scattered abroad, and are perversely and unlawfully prostituting to the worship of devils. These, therefore, the Christian, when he separates himself in spirit from the miserable fellowship of these men, ought to take away from them, and to devote to their proper use in preaching the gospel. Their garments, also - that is, human institutions such as are adapted to that intercourse with men which is indispensable in this life - we must take and turn to a Christian use. 61. And what else have many good and faithful men among our brethren done? Do we not see with what a quantity of gold and silver and garments Cyprian, that most persuasive teacher and most blessed martyr, was loaded when he came out of Egypt? How much Lactantius brought with him? And Victorinus, and Optatus, and Hilary, not to speak of living men! How much Greeks out of number have borrowed! And prior to all these, that most faithful servant of God, Moses, had done the same thing; for of him it is written that he was learned in all the wisdom of the Egyptians. Acts 7:22 And to none of all these would heathen superstition (especially in those times when, kicking against the yoke of Christ, it was persecuting the Christians) have ever furnished branches of knowledge it held useful, if it had suspected they were about to turn them to the use of worshipping the One God, and thereby overturning the vain worship of idols. But they gave their gold and their silver and their garments to the people of God as they were going out of Egypt, not knowing how the things they gave would be turned to the service of Christ. For what was done at the time of the exodus was no doubt a type prefiguring what happens now. And this I say without prejudice to any other interpretation that may be as good, or better.
11. Theodoret of Cyrus, Cure of The Greek Maladies, 9.34 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •justin martyr, on transmigration Found in books: Joosse (2021) 233
12. Basil of Caesarea, Homiliae In Hexaemeron, 8.2 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •justin martyr, on transmigration Found in books: Joosse (2021) 233
13. Epiphanius, Panarion, 1.5.2.4 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •justin martyr, on transmigration Found in books: Joosse (2021) 233
14. Boethius, De Consolatione, None (5th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Joosse (2021) 233
16. Ficino, Theologia Platonica, 17  Tagged with subjects: •justin martyr, on transmigration Found in books: Joosse (2021) 233
17. Jerome, Ad Avitum, 4.3  Tagged with subjects: •justin martyr, on transmigration Found in books: Joosse (2021) 232
18. Nemesius, On The Nature of Man, 2.117-2.119  Tagged with subjects: •justin martyr, on transmigration Found in books: Joosse (2021) 233