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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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13 results for "iseum"
1. Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 1.78 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •iseum campensis Found in books: Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 398
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2. Suetonius, Caligula, 57.10 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •iseum campensis Found in books: Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 400
3. Suetonius, Domitianus, 1.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •iseum campensis Found in books: Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 398
4. Tacitus, Histories, 3.74 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •iseum campensis Found in books: Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 398
3.74.  Domitian was concealed in the lodging of a temple attendant when the assailants broke into the citadel; then through the cleverness of a freedman he was dressed in a linen robe and so was able to join a crowd of devotees without being recognized and to escape to the house of Cornelius Primus, one of his father's clients, near the Velabrum, where he remained in concealment. When his father came to power, Domitian tore down the lodging of the temple attendant and built a small chapel to Jupiter the Preserver with an altar on which his escape was represented in a marble relief. Later, when he had himself gained the imperial throne, he dedicated a great temple of Jupiter the Guardian, with his own effigy in the lap of the god. Sabinus and Atticus were loaded with chains and taken before Vitellius, who received them with no angry word or look, although the crowd cried out in rage, asking for the right to kill them and demanding rewards for accomplishing this task. Those who stood nearest were the first to raise these cries, and then the lowest plebeians with mingled flattery and threats began to demand the punishment of Sabinus. Vitellius stood on the steps of the palace and was about to appeal to them, when they forced him to withdraw. Then they ran Sabinus through, mutilated him, and cut off his head, after which they dragged his headless body to the Gemonian stairs.
5. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, 1.3.4, 7.3.8 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •iseum campensis Found in books: Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 398
6. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 18.65-18.80, 19.24, 19.106 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •iseum campensis Found in books: Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 398, 400
18.65. 4. About the same time also another sad calamity put the Jews into disorder, and certain shameful practices happened about the temple of Isis that was at Rome. I will now first take notice of the wicked attempt about the temple of Isis, and will then give an account of the Jewish affairs. 18.66. There was at Rome a woman whose name was Paulina; one who, on account of the dignity of her ancestors, and by the regular conduct of a virtuous life, had a great reputation: she was also very rich; and although she was of a beautiful countece, and in that flower of her age wherein women are the most gay, yet did she lead a life of great modesty. She was married to Saturninus, one that was every way answerable to her in an excellent character. 18.67. Decius Mundus fell in love with this woman, who was a man very high in the equestrian order; and as she was of too great dignity to be caught by presents, and had already rejected them, though they had been sent in great abundance, he was still more inflamed with love to her, insomuch that he promised to give her two hundred thousand Attic drachmae for one night’s lodging; 18.68. and when this would not prevail upon her, and he was not able to bear this misfortune in his amours, he thought it the best way to famish himself to death for want of food, on account of Paulina’s sad refusal; and he determined with himself to die after such a manner, and he went on with his purpose accordingly. 18.69. Now Mundus had a freed-woman, who had been made free by his father, whose name was Ide, one skillful in all sorts of mischief. This woman was very much grieved at the young man’s resolution to kill himself, (for he did not conceal his intentions to destroy himself from others,) and came to him, and encouraged him by her discourse, and made him to hope, by some promises she gave him, that he might obtain a night’s lodging with Paulina; 18.70. and when he joyfully hearkened to her entreaty, she said she wanted no more than fifty thousand drachmae for the entrapping of the woman. So when she had encouraged the young man, and gotten as much money as she required, she did not take the same methods as had been taken before, because she perceived that the woman was by no means to be tempted by money; but as she knew that she was very much given to the worship of the goddess Isis, she devised the following stratagem: 18.71. She went to some of Isis’s priests, and upon the strongest assurances [of concealment], she persuaded them by words, but chiefly by the offer of money, of twenty-five thousand drachmae in hand, and as much more when the thing had taken effect; and told them the passion of the young man, and persuaded them to use all means possible to beguile the woman. 18.72. So they were drawn in to promise so to do, by that large sum of gold they were to have. Accordingly, the oldest of them went immediately to Paulina; and upon his admittance, he desired to speak with her by herself. When that was granted him, he told her that he was sent by the god Anubis, who was fallen in love with her, and enjoined her to come to him. 18.73. Upon this she took the message very kindly, and valued herself greatly upon this condescension of Anubis, and told her husband that she had a message sent her, and was to sup and lie with Anubis; so he agreed to her acceptance of the offer, as fully satisfied with the chastity of his wife. 18.74. Accordingly, she went to the temple, and after she had supped there, and it was the hour to go to sleep, the priest shut the doors of the temple, when, in the holy part of it, the lights were also put out. Then did Mundus leap out, (for he was hidden therein,) and did not fail of enjoying her, who was at his service all the night long, as supposing he was the god; 18.75. and when he was gone away, which was before those priests who knew nothing of this stratagem were stirring, Paulina came early to her husband, and told him how the god Anubis had appeared to her. Among her friends, also, she declared how great a value she put upon this favor, 18.76. who partly disbelieved the thing, when they reflected on its nature, and partly were amazed at it, as having no pretense for not believing it, when they considered the modesty and the dignity of the person. 18.77. But now, on the third day after what had been done, Mundus met Paulina, and said, “Nay, Paulina, thou hast saved me two hundred thousand drachmae, which sum thou sightest have added to thy own family; yet hast thou not failed to be at my service in the manner I invited thee. As for the reproaches thou hast laid upon Mundus, I value not the business of names; but I rejoice in the pleasure I reaped by what I did, while I took to myself the name of Anubis.” 18.78. When he had said this, he went his way. But now she began to come to the sense of the grossness of what she had done, and rent her garments, and told her husband of the horrid nature of this wicked contrivance, and prayed him not to neglect to assist her in this case. So he discovered the fact to the emperor; 18.79. whereupon Tiberius inquired into the matter thoroughly by examining the priests about it, and ordered them to be crucified, as well as Ide, who was the occasion of their perdition, and who had contrived the whole matter, which was so injurious to the woman. He also demolished the temple of Isis, and gave order that her statue should be thrown into the river Tiber; 18.80. while he only banished Mundus, but did no more to him, because he supposed that what crime he had committed was done out of the passion of love. And these were the circumstances which concerned the temple of Isis, and the injuries occasioned by her priests. I now return to the relation of what happened about this time to the Jews at Rome, as I formerly told you I would. 19.24. 4. Now at this time came on the horse-races [Circensian games]; the view of which games was eagerly desired by the people of Rome, for they come with great alacrity into the hippodrome [circus] at such times, and petition their emperors, in great multitudes, for what they stand in need of; who usually did not think fit to deny them their requests, but readily and gratefully granted them. 19.106. And although there be those that say it was so contrived on purpose by Cherea, that Caius should not be killed at one blow, but should be punished more severely by a multitude of wounds;
7. Juvenal, Satires, 6.513-6.541 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •iseum campensis Found in books: Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 398
8. Lucan, Pharsalia, 8.831-8.833 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •iseum campensis Found in books: Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 400
9. Tertullian, To The Heathen, 1.10.17 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •iseum campensis Found in books: Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 398
10. Tertullian, Apology, 6.8 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •iseum campensis Found in books: Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 398
6.8. maiestatem contulistis. Ubi religio, ubi veneratio maioribus debita a vobis? Habitu, victu, instructu, sensu, ipso denique sermone proavis renuntiastis.
11. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 40.47-3-4, 56.24.1 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 398
12. Apol., Met., 11.9  Tagged with subjects: •iseum campensis Found in books: Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 406