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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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5 results for "iconography"
1. Hebrew Bible, 1 Samuel, 16.16, 18.10 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Carr (2004), Writing on the Tablet of the Heart: Origins of Scripture and Literature, 124
16.16. "יֹאמַר־נָא אֲדֹנֵנוּ עֲבָדֶיךָ לְפָנֶיךָ יְבַקְשׁוּ אִישׁ יֹדֵעַ מְנַגֵּן בַּכִּנּוֹר וְהָיָה בִּהְיוֹת עָלֶיךָ רוּחַ־אֱלֹהִים רָעָה וְנִגֵּן בְּיָדוֹ וְטוֹב לָךְ׃", 16.16. "Let our lord now command thy servants, who are before thee, to seek out a man, who knows how to play on the lyre: and it shall come to pass, when the evil spirit from God is upon thee, that he will play with his hand, and thou shalt be well.", 18.10. "And it came to pass on the morrow, that an evil spirit from God came upon Sha᾽ul, and he raved in the midst of the house: and David played with his hand, as at other times: and the spear was in Sha᾽ul’s hand.",
2. Hebrew Bible, Isaiah, 28.9-28.13 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •iconography and textuality Found in books: Carr (2004), Writing on the Tablet of the Heart: Origins of Scripture and Literature, 124
28.9. "אֶת־מִי יוֹרֶה דֵעָה וְאֶת־מִי יָבִין שְׁמוּעָה גְּמוּלֵי מֵחָלָב עַתִּיקֵי מִשָּׁדָיִם׃", 28.11. "כִּי בְּלַעֲגֵי שָׂפָה וּבְלָשׁוֹן אַחֶרֶת יְדַבֵּר אֶל־הָעָם הַזֶּה׃", 28.12. "אֲשֶׁר אָמַר אֲלֵיהֶם זֹאת הַמְּנוּחָה הָנִיחוּ לֶעָיֵף וְזֹאת הַמַּרְגֵּעָה וְלֹא אָבוּא שְׁמוֹעַ׃", 28.13. "וְהָיָה לָהֶם דְּבַר־יְהוָה צַו לָצָו צַו לָצָו קַו לָקָו קַו לָקָו זְעֵיר שָׁם זְעֵיר שָׁם לְמַעַן יֵלְכוּ וְכָשְׁלוּ אָחוֹר וְנִשְׁבָּרוּ וְנוֹקְשׁוּ וְנִלְכָּדוּ׃", 28.9. "Whom shall one teach knowledge? And whom shall one make to understand the message? Them that are weaned from the milk, Them that are drawn from the breasts?", 28.10. "For it is precept by precept, precept by precept, Line by line, line by line; Here a little, there a little.", 28.11. "For with stammering lips and with a strange tongue Shall it be spoken to this people;", 28.12. "To whom it was said: ‘This is the rest, Give ye rest to the weary; And this is the refreshing’; Yet they would not hear.", 28.13. "And so the word of the LORD is unto them Precept by precept, precept by precept, Line by line, line by line; Here a little, there a little; That they may go, and fall backward, and be broken, And snared, and taken.",
3. Aristophanes, Frogs, 1114-1115, 1117-1119, 1116 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Carr (2004), Writing on the Tablet of the Heart: Origins of Scripture and Literature, 93
1116. νῦν δὲ καὶ παρηκόνηνται.
4. Herodotus, Histories, 4.78 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •iconography and textuality Found in books: Carr (2004), Writing on the Tablet of the Heart: Origins of Scripture and Literature, 94
4.78. This, then, was how Anacharsis fared, owing to his foreign ways and consorting with Greeks; and a great many years afterward, Scyles, son of Ariapithes, suffered a like fate. Scyles was one of the sons born to Ariapithes, king of Scythia; but his mother was of Istria, and not native-born; and she taught him to speak and read Greek. ,As time passed, Ariapithes was treacherously killed by Spargapithes, king of the Agathyrsi, and Scyles inherited the kingship and his father's wife, a Scythian woman whose name was Opoea, and she bore Scyles a son, Oricus. ,So Scyles was king of Scythia; but he was in no way content with the Scythian way of life, and was much more inclined to Greek ways, from the upbringing that he had received. So this is what he would do: he would lead the Scythian army to the city of the Borysthenites (who say that they are Milesians), and when he arrived there would leave his army in the suburb of the city, ,while he himself, entering within the walls and shutting the gates, would take off his Scythian apparel and put on Greek dress; and in it he would go among the townsfolk unattended by spearmen or any others (who would guard the gates, lest any Scythian see him wearing this apparel), and in every way follow the Greek manner of life, and worship the gods according to Greek usage. ,When he had spent a month or more like this, he would put on Scythian dress and leave the city. He did this often; and he built a house in Borysthenes, and married a wife of the people of the country and brought her there.
5. Palestinian Talmud, Bava Metzia, 3.8-3.13 (2nd cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •iconography and textuality Found in books: Carr (2004), Writing on the Tablet of the Heart: Origins of Scripture and Literature, 124