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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database

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Please note: the results are produced through a computerized process which may frequently lead to errors, both in incorrect tagging and in other issues. Please use with caution.
Due to load times, full text fetching is currently attempted for validated results only.
Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

For a list of book indices included, see here.


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All subjects (including unvalidated):
subject book bibliographic info
artemis/hunting, goddesses and, goats Simon (2021) 170, 171, 174, 175, 180, 182, 194
artemis/hunting, goddesses associated with, pastoralism Simon (2021) 168, 173, 185, 186
hunt Ekroth (2013) 292
Petrovic and Petrovic (2016) 185, 189, 191, 199
hunt, arthur surridge Gagné (2020) 234
hunt, calydonian boar Naiden (2013) 96
hunt, e. d. Kahlos (2019) 54, 55
Kraemer (2010) 160
hunt, erymathian boar Naiden (2013) 96
hunt, kings andgardens, persians Bremmer (2008) 38, 39
hunt, persians Bremmer (2008) 41, 49, 50
hunt/search, recollection, ἀνάμνησις, as a, θηρᾶν Ward (2022) 120, 128, 129, 184, 185
hunted, as crocodile or hippopotamus, seth, and horus Griffiths (1975) 174, 184
hunted, beasts, the, as the Sneed (2022) 144
hunting Bierl (2017) 281, 343
Clay and Vergados (2022) 220, 221, 321, 322, 323, 324, 325, 326, 327, 328, 329, 330, 332, 338, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 350, 351, 352, 353, 354, 355, 356
Corley (2002) 108, 138, 139, 183, 185, 186
Cosgrove (2022) 166, 346
Gagné (2020) 166, 167, 395
Hitch (2017) 53, 58
Huffman (2019) 571, 573, 574, 575
Humphreys (2018) 21, 386, 800, 1007
Kneebone (2020) 56, 71, 76, 80, 85, 88, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 126, 140, 256, 263, 264, 369, 409
Konig (2022) 24, 41, 154, 272, 273, 325
Mackay (2022) 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 83, 127, 138, 174, 176
Radicke (2022) 173, 189, 303, 304, 311, 496, 522, 523
Rosenblum (2016) 54, 112
Seaford (2018) 4, 5, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 316
Thonemann (2020) 88, 89, 149
hunting, a mobile cult community, potnia theron Kowalzig (2007) 278, 279, 280, 281, 282, 283, 290, 296, 297
hunting, and artemis, butchering, association with Simon (2021) 165, 168, 169, 170, 171, 175, 177, 179, 180, 181
hunting, and butchering, association of artemis with Simon (2021) 165, 168, 169, 170, 171, 175, 177, 179, 180, 181
hunting, and killing, bears Simon (2021) 168, 169
hunting, and sacrifice Hitch (2017) 49, 58
hunting, association of artemis with, butchering and Simon (2021) 165, 168, 169, 170, 171, 175, 177, 179, 180, 181
hunting, at ephesos Hitch (2017) 53
hunting, captatio, legacy Yona (2018) 47, 208, 210, 211, 297
hunting, childlessness, and testament Huebner and Laes (2019) 12
hunting, dress Edmondson (2008) 74, 77, 154, 290
hunting, education, xenophon, on Cosgrove (2022) 346
hunting, educational metaphor Hirshman (2009) 77, 78
hunting, forbidden Hitch (2017) 52
hunting, goddesses of crete Simon (2021) 168, 170, 171, 180
hunting, grounds in mysia, hadrian, emperor Marek (2019) 402
hunting, imagery, artemis, s. biagio at metapontion, bestial and Kowalzig (2007) 295, 296, 297, 309, 310, 395
hunting, imperial period Marek (2019) 402, 450
hunting, injury, asklepios, specific ailments cured Renberg (2017) 181
hunting, khoroi Kowalzig (2007) 364
hunting, metaphor Cueva et al. (2018a) 11
Pinheiro et al (2015) 45
hunting, plato, on Huffman (2019) 573
hunting, seth as a, hunter, Hitch (2017) 262
hunts, finds, plato, in grenfell and Johnson and Parker (2009) 257, 259
hunts, hunting, animal, venationes, before gladiator battles Marek (2019) 538, 540

List of validated texts:
13 validated results for "hunt"
1. Hebrew Bible, Deuteronomy, 14.5 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • hunting

 Found in books: Corley (2002) 186; Rosenblum (2016) 54


14.5. אַיָּל וּצְבִי וְיַחְמוּר וְאַקּוֹ וְדִישֹׁן וּתְאוֹ וָזָמֶר׃''. None
14.5. the hart, and the gazelle, and the roebuck, and the wild goat, and the pygarg, and the antelope, and the mountain-sheep.''. None
2. None, None, nan (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • hunt • hunting

 Found in books: Beck (2021) 72, 73, 74, 77, 78, 81; Konig (2022) 325


3. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 135-137 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis, hunting and butchering, association with • butchering and hunting, association of Artemis with • goats, Artemis/hunting goddesses and • hunting • hunting and butchering, association of Artemis with • hunting, forbidden

 Found in books: Hitch (2017) 52; Seaford (2018) 5, 7; Simon (2021) 175


135.
135.
4. Euripides, Bacchae, 1145-1146 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Dionysos, Dionysos as hunter • hunting

 Found in books: Bernabe et al (2013) 53; Clay and Vergados (2022) 353


1145. τειχέων ἔσω τῶνδʼ, ἀνακαλοῦσα Βάκχιον'1146. τὸν ξυγκύναγον, τὸν ξυνεργάτην ἄγρας, '. None
1145. on the ill-fated prey, calling Bacchus her fellow hunter, her accomplice in the chase, the glorious victor—in whose service she wins a triumph of tears.And as for me, I will depart out of the way of this calamity before Agave reaches the house.'1146. on the ill-fated prey, calling Bacchus her fellow hunter, her accomplice in the chase, the glorious victor—in whose service she wins a triumph of tears.And as for me, I will depart out of the way of this calamity before Agave reaches the house. '. None
5. Xenophon, The Persian Expedition, 5.3.9 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Ephesos, hunting at • hunt • hunting

 Found in books: Ekroth (2013) 292; Hitch (2017) 53


5.3.9. ἐποίησε δὲ καὶ βωμὸν καὶ ναὸν ἀπὸ τοῦ ἱεροῦ ἀργυρίου, καὶ τὸ λοιπὸν δὲ ἀεὶ δεκατεύων τὰ ἐκ τοῦ ἀγροῦ ὡραῖα θυσίαν ἐποίει τῇ θεῷ, καὶ πάντες οἱ πολῖται καὶ οἱ πρόσχωροι ἄνδρες καὶ γυναῖκες μετεῖχον τῆς ἑορτῆς. παρεῖχε δὲ ἡ θεὸς τοῖς σκηνοῦσιν ἄλφιτα, ἄρτους, οἶνον, τραγήματα, καὶ τῶν θυομένων ἀπὸ τῆς ἱερᾶς νομῆς λάχος, καὶ τῶν θηρευομένων δέ.''. None
5.3.9. After this Clearchus gathered together his own soldiers, those who had come over to him, and any others who wanted to be present, and spoke as follows: Fellow-soldiers, it is clear that the relation of Cyrus to us is precisely the same as ours to him; that is, we are no longer his soldiers, since we decline to follow him, and likewise he is no longer our paymaster.
5.3.9. Here Xenophon built an altar and a temple with the sacred money, and from that time forth he would every year take the tithe of the products of the land in their season and offer sacrifice to the goddess, all the citizens and the men and women of the neighbourhood taking part in the festival. And the goddess would provide for the banqueters barley meal and loaves of bread, wine and sweetmeats, and a portion of the sacrificial victims from the sacred herd as well as of the victims taken in the chase. ''. None
6. Xenophon, The Education of Cyrus, 1.6.28-1.6.29 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • deception, and hunting images • hunting

 Found in books: Clay and Vergados (2022) 321, 322; Hesk (2000) 124, 125


1.6.28. πῶς μήν, ἔφη, παῖδας ὄντας ἡμᾶς καὶ ἐφήβους τἀναντία τούτων ἐδιδάσκετε; ναὶ μὰ Δίʼ, ἔφη, καὶ νῦν πρὸς τοὺς φίλους τε καὶ πολίτας· ὅπως δέ γε τοὺς πολεμίους δύναισθε κακῶς ποιεῖν οὐκ οἶσθα μανθάνοντας ὑμᾶς πολλὰς κακουργίας; οὐ δῆτα, ἔφη, ἔγωγε, ὦ πάτερ. τίνος μὴν ἕνεκα, ἔφη, ἐμανθάνετε τοξεύειν; τίνος δʼ ἕνεκα ἀκοντίζειν; τίνος δʼ ἕνεκα δολοῦν ὗς ἀγρίους καὶ πλέγμασι καὶ ὀρύγμασι; τί δʼ ἐλάφους ποδάγραις καὶ ἁρπεδόναις; τί δὲ λέουσι καὶ ἄρκτοις καὶ παρδάλεσιν οὐκ εἰς τὸ ἴσον καθιστάμενοι ἐμάχεσθε, ἀλλὰ μετὰ πλεονεξίας τινὸς αἰεὶ ἐπειρᾶσθε ἀγωνίζεσθαι πρὸς αὐτά; ἢ οὐ πάντα γιγνώσκεις ταῦτα ὅτι κακουργίαι τέ εἰσι καὶ ἀπάται καὶ δολώσεις καὶ πλεονεξίαι; 1.6.29. ναὶ μὰ Δίʼ, ἔφη, θηρίων γε· ἀνθρώπων δὲ εἰ καὶ δόξαιμι βούλεσθαι ἐξαπατῆσαί τινα, πολλὰς πληγὰς οἶδα λαμβάνων. οὐδὲ γὰρ τοξεύειν, οἶμαι, οὐδʼ ἀκοντίζειν ἄνθρωπον ἐπετρέπομεν ὑμῖν, ἀλλʼ ἐπὶ σκοπὸν βάλλειν ἐδιδάσκομεν, ἵνα γε νῦν μὲν μὴ κακουργοίητε τοὺς φίλους, εἰ δέ ποτε πόλεμος γένοιτο, δύναισθε καὶ ἀνθρώπων στοχάζεσθαι· καὶ ἐξαπατᾶν δὲ καὶ πλεονεκτεῖν οὐκ ἐν ἀνθρώποις ἐπαιδεύομεν ὑμᾶς, ἀλλʼ ἐν θηρίοις, ἵνα μηδʼ ἐν τούτοις τοὺς φίλους βλάπτοιτε, εἰ δέ ποτε πόλεμος γένοιτο, μηδὲ τούτων ἀγύμναστοι εἴητε.''. None
1.6.28. Aye, by Zeus, said he; and so we would have you still towards your friends and fellow-citizens; but, that you might be able to hurt your enemies, do you not know that you all were learning many villainies? No, indeed, father, said he; not I, at any rate. Why said he, did you learn to shoot, and why to throw the spear? Why did you learn to ensnare wild boars with nets and pitfalls, and deer with traps and toils? And why were you not used to confront lions and bears and leopards in a fair fight face to face instead of always trying to contend against them with some advantage on your side? Why, do you not know that all this is villainy and deceit and trickery and taking unfair advantage? 1.6.29. Yes, by Zeus, said he, toward wild animals however; but if I ever even seemed to wish to deceive a man, I know that I got a good beating for it. Yes said he; for, methinks, we did not permit you to shoot at people nor to throw your spear at them; but we taught you to shoot at a mark, in order that you might not for the time at least do harm to your friends, but, in case there should ever be a war, that you might be able to aim well at men also. And we instructed you likewise to deceive and to take advantage, not in the case of men but of beasts, in order that you might not injure your friends by so doing, but, if there should ever be a war, that you might not be unpractised in these arts. ''. None
7. None, None, nan (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Plato, on hunting • Xenophon, On Hunting, education • hunting

 Found in books: Cosgrove (2022) 346; Huffman (2019) 573


8. Polybius, Histories, 4.18.10 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Potnia theron, hunting a mobile cult community • hunting, forbidden

 Found in books: Hitch (2017) 52; Kowalzig (2007) 290


4.18.10. καὶ παραγενόμενοι πρὸς τὸ τῆς Ἀρτέμιδος ἱερόν, ὃ κεῖται μὲν μεταξὺ Κλείτορος καὶ Κυναίθης, ἄσυλον δὲ νενόμισται παρὰ τοῖς Ἕλλησιν, ἀνετείνοντο διαρπάσειν τὰ θρέμματα τῆς θεοῦ καὶ τἄλλα τὰ περὶ τὸν ναόν.''. None
4.18.10. \xa0On arriving at the temple of Artemis which lies between Cleitor and Cynaetha, and is regarded as inviolable by the Greeks, they threatened to lift the cattle of the goddess and plunder the other property about the temple. <''. None
9. None, None, nan (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Hunting • hunting

 Found in books: Clay and Vergados (2022) 324; Radicke (2022) 522


10. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.19.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Black Hunter, the • goats, Artemis/hunting goddesses and

 Found in books: Hesk (2000) 91; Simon (2021) 182


1.19.6. διαβᾶσι δὲ τὸν Ἰλισὸν χωρίον Ἄγραι καλούμενον καὶ ναὸς Ἀγροτέρας ἐστὶν Ἀρτέμιδος· ἐνταῦθα Ἄρτεμιν πρῶτον θηρεῦσαι λέγουσιν ἐλθοῦσαν ἐκ Δήλου, καὶ τὸ ἄγαλμα διὰ τοῦτο ἔχει τόξον. τὸ δὲ ἀκούσασι μὲν οὐχ ὁμοίως ἐπαγωγόν, θαῦμα δʼ ἰδοῦσι, στάδιόν ἐστι λευκοῦ λίθου. μέγεθος δὲ αὐτοῦ τῇδε ἄν τις μάλιστα τεκμαίροιτο· ἄνωθεν ὄρος ὑπὲρ τὸν Ἰλισὸν ἀρχόμενον ἐκ μηνοειδοῦς καθήκει τοῦ ποταμοῦ πρὸς τὴν ὄχθην εὐθύ τε καὶ διπλοῦν. τοῦτο ἀνὴρ Ἀθηναῖος Ἡρώδης ᾠκοδόμησε, καί οἱ τὸ πολὺ τῆς λιθοτομίας τῆς Πεντελῆσιν ἐς τὴν οἰκοδομὴν ἀνηλώθη.''. None
1.19.6. Across the Ilisus is a district called Agrae and a temple of Artemis Agrotera (the Huntress). They say that Artemis first hunted here when she came from Delos, and for this reason the statue carries a bow. A marvel to the eyes, though not so impressive to hear of, is a race-course of white marble, the size of which can best be estimated from the fact that beginning in a crescent on the heights above the Ilisus it descends in two straight lines to the river bank. This was built by Herodes, an Athenian, and the greater part of the Pentelic quarry was exhausted in its construction. ''. None
11. None, None, nan (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)
 Tagged with subjects: • Legacy-hunting • recollection (ἀνάμνησις), as a hunt/search (θηρᾶν)

 Found in books: Cain (2013) 161; Ward (2022) 184


12. Strabo, Geography, 5.1.9
 Tagged with subjects: • Artemis, hunting and butchering, association with • Calydonian boar hunt • Erymathian boar hunt • butchering and hunting, association of Artemis with • goats, Artemis/hunting goddesses and • hunting and butchering, association of Artemis with

 Found in books: Naiden (2013) 96; Simon (2021) 175


5.1.9. That Diomedes did hold sovereignty over the country around this sea, is proved both by the Diomedean islands, and the traditions concerning the Daunii and Argos-Hippium. of these we shall narrate as much as may be serviceable to history, and shall leave alone the numerous falsehoods and myths; such, for instance, as those concerning Phaethon and the Heliades changed into alders near the river Eridanus, which exists nowhere, although said to be near the Po; of the islands Electrides, opposite the mouths of the Po, and the Meleagrides, found in them; none of which things exist in these localities. However, some have narrated that honours are paid to Diomedes amongst the Heneti, and that they sacrifice to him a white horse; two groves are likewise pointed out, one sacred to the Argian Juno, and the other to the Aetolian Diana. They have too, as we might expect, fictions concerning these groves; for instance, that the wild beasts in them grow tame, that the deer herd with wolves, and they suffer men to approach and stroke them; and that when pursued by dogs, as soon as they have reached these groves, the dogs no longer pursue them. They say, too, that a certain person, well known for the facility with which he offered himself as a pledge for others, being bantered on this subject by some hunters who came up with him having a wolf in leash, they said in jest, that if he would become pledge for the wolf and pay for the damage he might do, they would loose the bonds. To this the man consented, and they let loose the wolf, who gave chase to a herd of horses unbranded, and drove them into the stable of the person who had become pledge for him. The man accepted the gift, branded the horses with the representation of a wolf, and named them Lucophori. They were distinguished rather for their swiftness than gracefulness. His heirs kept the same brand and the same name for this race of horses, and made it a rule never to part with a single mare, in order that they might remain sole possessors of the race, which became famous. At the present day, however, as we have before remarked, this rage for horse-breeding has entirely ceased. After the Timavum comes the sea-coast of Istria as far as Pola, which appertains to Italy. Between the two is the fortress of Tergeste, distant from Aquileia 180 stadia. Pola is situated in a gulf forming a kind of port, and containing some small islands, fruitful, and with good harbours. This city was anciently founded by the Colchians sent after Medea, who not being able to fulfil their mission, condemned themselves to exile. As Callimachus says, It a Greek would call The town of Fugitives, but in their tongue 'Tis Pola named. The different parts of Transpadana are inhabited by the Heneti and the Istrii as far as Pola; above the Heneti, by the Carni, the Cenomani, the Medoaci, and the Symbri. These nations were formerly at enmity with the Romans, but the Cenomani and Heneti allied themselves with that nation, both prior to the expedition of Hannibal, when they waged war with the Boii and Symbrii, and also after that time."". None
13. Vergil, Aeneis, 4.137, 12.948-12.949
 Tagged with subjects: • Hunter, R.L. • Hunting • hunting

 Found in books: Mackay (2022) 138; Morrison (2020) 25; Radicke (2022) 311; Stephens and Winkler (1995) 222


4.137. Sidoniam picto chlamydem circumdata limbo.
12.948. eripiare mihi? Pallas te hoc volnere, Pallas 12.949. immolat et poenam scelerato ex sanguine sumit,''. None
4.137. for thee and for thy boy! Your names should be
12.948. his forehead of triumphant snow. All eyes 12.949. of Troy, Rutulia, and Italy ''. None



Please note: the results are produced through a computerized process which may frequently lead to errors, both in incorrect tagging and in other issues. Please use with caution.
Due to load times, full text fetching is currently attempted for validated results only.
Full texts for Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts is kindly supplied by Sefaria; for Greek and Latin texts, by Perseus Scaife, for the Quran, by Tanzil.net

For a list of book indices included, see here.