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153 results for "hermas"
1. Septuagint, Tobit, 4.7-4.11 (th cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas, inscription Found in books: Nasrallah (2019), Archaeology and the Letters of Paul, 137
4.7. Give alms from your possessions to all who live uprightly, and do not let your eye begrudge the gift when you make it. Do not turn your face away from any poor man, and the face of God will not be turned away from you. 4.8. If you have many possessions, make your gift from them in proportion; if few, do not be afraid to give according to the little you have. 4.9. So you will be laying up a good treasure for yourself against the day of necessity. 4.10. For charity delivers from death and keeps you from entering the darkness; 4.11. and for all who practice it charity is an excellent offering in the presence of the Most High.
2. Hebrew Bible, Psalms, 112.1 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Rosen-Zvi (2011), Demonic Desires: Yetzer Hara and the Problem of Evil in Late Antiquity. 121
112.1. "רָשָׁע יִרְאֶה וְכָעָס שִׁנָּיו יַחֲרֹק וְנָמָס תַּאֲוַת רְשָׁעִים תֹּאבֵד׃", 112.1. "הַלְלוּ יָהּ אַשְׁרֵי־אִישׁ יָרֵא אֶת־יְהוָה בְּמִצְוֺתָיו חָפֵץ מְאֹד׃", 112.1. "Hallelujah. Happy is the man that feareth the LORD, That delighteth greatly in His commandments.",
3. Hebrew Bible, Deuteronomy, 8.60, 19.19 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas, the Found in books: Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 206
19.19. "וַעֲשִׂיתֶם לוֹ כַּאֲשֶׁר זָמַם לַעֲשׂוֹת לְאָחִיו וּבִעַרְתָּ הָרָע מִקִּרְבֶּךָ׃", 19.19. "then shall ye do unto him, as he had purposed to do unto his brother; so shalt thou put away the evil from the midst of thee.",
4. Septuagint, Isaiah, 8.1 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Ward (2022), Clement and Scriptural Exegesis: The Making of a Commentarial Theologian, 73, 74
5. Hymn To Dionysus, To Dionysus, 11.3 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 365
6. Herodotus, Histories, a b c d\n0 '1.199 '1.199 '1 199 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 538
7. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 538
8. Diogenes Sinopensis, Letters, 34 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 84
9. Hellanicus of Lesbos, Fgrh I P. 104., 9.3, 19.5 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 365
10. Clitarchus Alexandrinus, Fragments, 32, 69-73 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Pevarello (2013), The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism. 96
11. Septuagint, Tobit, 4.7-4.11 (4th cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas, inscription Found in books: Nasrallah (2019), Archaeology and the Letters of Paul, 137
4.7. Give alms from your possessions to all who live uprightly, and do not let your eye begrudge the gift when you make it. Do not turn your face away from any poor man, and the face of God will not be turned away from you. 4.8. If you have many possessions, make your gift from them in proportion; if few, do not be afraid to give according to the little you have. 4.9. So you will be laying up a good treasure for yourself against the day of necessity. 4.10. For charity delivers from death and keeps you from entering the darkness; 4.11. and for all who practice it charity is an excellent offering in the presence of the Most High.
12. Menander, Fragments, '587 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 538
13. Menander, Fragments, '587 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 538
14. Menander, Fragments, '587 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 538
15. Hebrew Bible, Daniel, 7.13 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Moss (2010), The Other Christs: Imitating Jesus in Ancient Christian Ideologies of Martyrdom, 117
7.13. "חָזֵה הֲוֵית בְּחֶזְוֵי לֵילְיָא וַאֲרוּ עִם־עֲנָנֵי שְׁמַיָּא כְּבַר אֱנָשׁ אָתֵה הֲוָה וְעַד־עַתִּיק יוֹמַיָּא מְטָה וּקְדָמוֹהִי הַקְרְבוּהִי׃", 7.13. "I saw in the night visions, And, behold, there came with the clouds of heaven One like unto a son of man, And he came even to the Ancient of days, And he was brought near before Him.",
16. Septuagint, 2 Maccabees, 7.28 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas, the Found in books: Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 206
7.28. I beseech you, my child, to look at the heaven and the earth and see everything that is in them, and recognize that God did not make them out of things that existed. Thus also mankind comes into being.'
17. Septuagint, Wisdom of Solomon, 1.14 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas, the Found in books: Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 206
1.14. For he created all things that they might exist,and the generative forces of the world are wholesome,and there is no destructive poison in them;and the dominion of Hades is not on earth.
18. Philo of Alexandria, De Providentia, 2.40-2.41 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Iricinschi et al. (2013), Beyond the Gnostic Gospels: Studies Building on the Work of Elaine Pagels, 141
19. Philo of Alexandria, Who Is The Heir, 10.3-10.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Pevarello (2013), The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism. 151
20. Philo of Alexandria, On The Creation of The World, 130, 128 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Pevarello (2013), The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism. 151
128. These things, and more still are said in a philosophical spirit about the number seven, on account of which it has received the highest honours, in the highest nature. And it is honoured by those of the highest reputation among both Greeks and barbarians, who devote themselves to mathematical sciences. It was also greatly honoured by Moses, a man much attached to excellence of all sorts, who described its beauty on the most holy pillars of the law, and wrote it in the hearts of all those who were subject to him, commanding them at the end of each period of six days to keep the seventh holy; abstaining from all other works which are done in the seeking after and providing the means of life, devoting that day to the single object of philosophizing with a view to the improvement of their morals, and the examination of their consciences: for conscience being seated in the soul as a judge, is not afraid to reprove men, sometimes employing pretty vehement threats; at other times by milder admonitions, using threats in regard to matters where men appear to be disobedient, of deliberate purpose, and admonitions when their offences seem involuntary, through want of foresight, in order to prevent their hereafter offending in a similar manner. XLIV.
21. Horace, Sermones, 1.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 538
22. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Abraham, 248 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Pevarello (2013), The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism. 79
248. "We have now lived together a long time mutually pleasing each; but we have no children, which is the cause for which we ourselves came together, and for which also nature designed the original connection between husband and wife; nor indeed can there be any hope of your having any offspring by me, since I am now beyond the age of childbearing;
23. Philo of Alexandria, Questions On Genesis, 3.29 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Pevarello (2013), The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism. 79
24. Philo of Alexandria, On The Preliminary Studies, 41 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Pevarello (2013), The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism. 79
25. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 2.30 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Pevarello (2013), The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism. 79
2.30. and the mind is compared at one time to a virgin, and at another to a woman who is a widow, and again to one who is still united to a husband. It is compared to a virgin, when it preserves itself pure, and undefiled, free from the influence of pleasures and appetites, and likewise of pains and fears, treacherous passions, and then the father who begot it retains the regulation of it; and her principle, as in the case of a virtuous woman, she now being united to pure reason, in accordance with virtue, will exert a proper care to defend her, implanting in her, like a husband, the most excellent conceptions.
26. New Testament, James, 4.6 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 41
4.6. μείζονα δὲ δίδωσιν χάριν· διὸ λέγει Ὁ θεὸς ὑπερηφάνοις ἀντιτάσσεται ταπεινοῖς δὲ δίδωσιν χάριν. 4.6. But he gives more grace. Therefore it says, "God resists the proud, but gives grace to the humble."
27. New Testament, Philemon, 1, 17, 6, 24 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 183
28. New Testament, Colossians, 1.27 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Ward (2022), Clement and Scriptural Exegesis: The Making of a Commentarial Theologian, 73
1.27. οἷς ἠθέλησεν ὁ θεὸς γνωρίσαι τί τὸ πλοῦτος τῆς δόξης τοῦ μυστηρίου τούτου ἐν τοῖς ἔθνεσιν, ὅ ἐστιν Χριστὸς ἐν ὑμῖν, ἡ ἐλπὶς τῆς δόξης· 1.27. to whom God was pleased to make known what are the riches of the glory of this mystery among the Gentiles, which is Christ in you, the hope of glory;
29. New Testament, Ephesians, 2.19, 4.4-4.6 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas, the Found in books: Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 179, 183, 185
2.19. Ἄρα οὖν οὐκέτι ἐστὲ ξένοι καὶ πάροικοι, ἀλλὰ ἐστὲ συνπολῖται τῶν ἁγίων καὶ οἰκεῖοι τοῦ θεοῦ, 4.4. ἓν σῶμα καὶ ἓν πνεῦμα, καθὼς [καὶ] ἐκλήθητε ἐν μιᾷ ἐλπίδι τῆς κλήσεως ὑμῶν· 4.5. εἷς κύριος, μία πίστις, ἓν βάπτισμα· εἷς θεὸς καὶ πατὴρ πάντων, 4.6. ὁ ἐπὶ πάντων καὶ διὰ πάντων καὶ ἐν πᾶσιν. 2.19. So then you are no longer strangers and sojourners, but you are fellow citizens with the saints, and of the household of God, 4.4. There is one body, and one Spirit, even as you also were called in one hope of your calling; 4.5. one Lord, one faith, one baptism, 4.6. one God and Father of all, who is over all, and through all, and in us all.
30. New Testament, Galatians, 4.24-4.26 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: O'Daly (2020), Augustine's City of God: A Reader's Guide (2nd edn), 58
4.24. ἅτινά ἐστιν ἀλληγορούμενα· αὗται γάρ εἰσιν δύο διαθῆκαι, μία μὲν ἀπὸ ὄρους Σινά, εἰς δουλείαν γεννῶσα, ἥτις ἐστὶν Ἅγαρ, 4.25. τὸ δὲ Ἅγαρ Σινὰ ὄρος ἐστὶν ἐν τῇ Ἀραβίᾳ, συνστοιχεῖ δὲ τῇ νῦν Ἰερουσαλήμ, δουλεύει γὰρ μετὰ τῶν τέκνων αὐτῆς· 4.26. ἡ δὲ ἄνω Ἰερουσαλὴμ ἐλευθέρα ἐστίν, 4.24. These things contain an allegory, forthese are two covets. One is from Mount Sinai, bearing children tobondage, which is Hagar. 4.25. For this Hagar is Mount Sinai inArabia, and answers to the Jerusalem that exists now, for she is inbondage with her children. 4.26. But the Jerusalem that is above isfree, which is the mother of us all.
31. Seneca The Younger, Letters, a b c d\n0 75.4 75.4 75 4 \n1 '94 '94 '94 None\n2 75.6 75.6 75 6 \n3 59.7 59.7 59 7 \n4 75.2 75.2 75 2 \n5 59.5 59.5 59 5 \n6 '95 '95 '95 None\n7 75.1 75.1 75 1 \n8 75.7 75.7 75 7 \n9 75.3 75.3 75 3 \n10 59.6 59.6 59 6 \n11 '100 '100 '100 None\n12 75.5 75.5 75 5 \n13 '40.2 '40.2 '40 2 \n14 '40.3 '40.3 '40 3 \n15 59.4 59.4 59 4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 410
32. Ignatius, To The Magnesians, 1.2, 7.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 183, 206
1.2. For being counted worthy to bear a most godly name, in these bonds, which I carry about, I sing the praise of the churches; and I pray that there may be in them union of the flesh and of the spirit which are Jesus Christ's, our never-failing life -- an union of faith and of love which is preferred before all things, and -- what is more than all -- an union with Jesus and with the Father; in whom if we endure patiently all the despite of the prince of this world and escape therefrom, we shall attain unto God. 7.2. Hasten to come together all of you, as to one temple, even God; as to one altar, even to one Jesus Christ, who came forth from One Father and is with One and departed unto One.
33. Ignatius, To The Philadelphians, 8.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 206
8.1. I therefore did my own part, as a man composed unto union. But where there is division and anger, there God abideth not. Now the Lord forgiveth all men when they repent, if repenting they return to the unity of God and to the council of the bishop. I have faith in the grace of Jesus Christ, who shall strike off every fetter from you;
34. Ignatius, To The Romans, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas, the Found in books: Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 183
35. Ignatius, To The Smyrnaeans, 1.2, 3.3, 8.2, 12.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas, the Found in books: Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 185, 206
36. Ignatius, To The Trallians, 11.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas, the Found in books: Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 206
37. New Testament, Apocalypse, 2.1-3.22, 17.18, 18.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 365
38. New Testament, Acts, 2.42, 2.44, 2.45, 4.32-5.11 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 183
2.42. ἦσαν δὲ προσκαρτεροῦντες τῇ διδαχῇ τῶν ἀποστόλων καὶ τῇ κοινωνίᾳ, τῇ κλάσει τοῦ ἄρτου καὶ ταῖς προσευχαῖς. 2.42. They continued steadfastly in the apostles' teaching and fellowship, in the breaking of bread, and prayer.
39. New Testament, 2 Timothy, 2.14.0, 2.16, 2.23, 3.6 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 74
2.16. τὰς δὲ βεβήλους κενοφωνιας περιίστασο· ἐπὶ πλεῖον γὰρ προκόψουσιν ἀσεβείας, 2.23. τὰς δὲ μωρὰς καὶ ἀπαιδεύτους ζητήσεις παραιτοῦ, εἰδὼς ὅτι γεννῶσι μάχας· 3.6. ἐκ τούτων γάρ εἰσιν οἱ ἐνδύνοιτες εἰς τὰς οἰκίας καὶ αἰχμαλωτίζοντες γυναικάρια σεσωρευμένα ἁμαρτίαις, ἀγόμενα ἐπιθυμίαις ποικίλαις, 2.16. But shun empty chatter, for they will proceed further in ungodliness, 2.23. But refuse foolish and ignorant questionings, knowing that they generate strife. 3.6. For of these are those who creep into houses, and take captive gullible women loaded down with sins, led away by various lusts,
40. New Testament, 2 Corinthians, 8.23, 13.11 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Nasrallah (2019), Archaeology and the Letters of Paul, 135; Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 183, 185
8.23. εἴτε ὑπὲρ Τίτου, κοινωνὸς ἐμὸς καὶ εἰς ὑμᾶς συνεργός· εἴτε ἀδελφοὶ ἡμῶν, ἀπόστολοι ἐκκλησιῶν, δόξα Χριστοῦ. 13.11. Λοιπόν, ἀδελφοί, χαίρετε, καταρτίζεσθε, παρακαλεῖσθε, τὸ αὐτὸ φρονεῖτε, εἰρηνεύετε, καὶ ὁ θεὸς τῆς ἀγάπης καὶ εἰρήνης ἔσται μεθʼ ὑμῶν.
41. Mishnah, Avot, 4.1 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Rosen-Zvi (2011), Demonic Desires: Yetzer Hara and the Problem of Evil in Late Antiquity. 121
4.1. "בֶּן זוֹמָא אוֹמֵר, אֵיזֶהוּ חָכָם, הַלּוֹמֵד מִכָּל אָדָם, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (תהלים קיט) מִכָּל מְלַמְּדַי הִשְׂכַּלְתִּי כִּי עֵדְוֹתֶיךָ שִׂיחָה לִּי. אֵיזֶהוּ גִבּוֹר, הַכּוֹבֵשׁ אֶת יִצְרוֹ, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (משלי טז) טוֹב אֶרֶךְ אַפַּיִם מִגִּבּוֹר וּמשֵׁל בְּרוּחוֹ מִלֹּכֵד עִיר. אֵיזֶהוּ עָשִׁיר, הַשָּׂמֵחַ בְּחֶלְקוֹ, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (תהלים קכח) יְגִיעַ כַּפֶּיךָ כִּי תֹאכֵל אַשְׁרֶיךָ וְטוֹב לָךְ. אַשְׁרֶיךָ, בָּעוֹלָם הַזֶּה. וְטוֹב לָךְ, לָעוֹלָם הַבָּא. אֵיזֶהוּ מְכֻבָּד, הַמְכַבֵּד אֶת הַבְּרִיּוֹת, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (שמואל א ב) כִּי מְכַבְּדַי אֲכַבֵּד וּבֹזַי יֵקָלּוּ: \n", 4.1. "Ben Zoma said:Who is wise? He who learns from every man, as it is said: “From all who taught me have I gained understanding” (Psalms 119:99). Who is mighty? He who subdues his [evil] inclination, as it is said: “He that is slow to anger is better than the mighty; and he that rules his spirit than he that takes a city” (Proverbs 16:3). Who is rich? He who rejoices in his lot, as it is said: “You shall enjoy the fruit of your labors, you shall be happy and you shall prosper” (Psalms 128:2) “You shall be happy” in this world, “and you shall prosper” in the world to come. Who is he that is honored? He who honors his fellow human beings as it is said: “For I honor those that honor Me, but those who spurn Me shall be dishonored” (I Samuel 2:30).",
42. Mishnah, Berachot, 9.5 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Rosen-Zvi (2011), Demonic Desires: Yetzer Hara and the Problem of Evil in Late Antiquity. 56
9.5. "חַיָּב אָדָם לְבָרֵךְ עַל הָרָעָה כְּשֵׁם שֶׁהוּא מְבָרֵךְ עַל הַטּוֹבָה, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (דברים ו) וְאָהַבְתָּ אֵת יְיָ אֱלֹהֶיךָ בְּכָל לְבָבְךָ וּבְכָל נַפְשְׁךָ וּבְכָל מְאֹדֶךָ. בְּכָל לְבָבְךָ, בִּשְׁנֵי יְצָרֶיךָ, בְּיֵצֶר טוֹב וּבְיֵצֶר רָע. וּבְכָל נַפְשְׁךָ, אֲפִלּוּ הוּא נוֹטֵל אֶת נַפְשֶׁךָ. וּבְכָל מְאֹדֶךָ, בְּכָל מָמוֹנֶךָ. דָּבָר אַחֵר בְּכָל מְאֹדֶךָ, בְּכָל מִדָּה וּמִדָּה שֶׁהוּא מוֹדֵד לְךָ הֱוֵי מוֹדֶה לוֹ בִּמְאֹד מְאֹד. לֹא יָקֵל אָדָם אֶת רֹאשׁוֹ כְּנֶגֶד שַׁעַר הַמִּזְרָח, שֶׁהוּא מְכֻוָּן כְּנֶגֶד בֵּית קָדְשֵׁי הַקָּדָשִׁים. לֹא יִכָּנֵס לְהַר הַבַּיִת בְּמַקְלוֹ, וּבְמִנְעָלוֹ, וּבְפֻנְדָּתוֹ, וּבְאָבָק שֶׁעַל רַגְלָיו, וְלֹא יַעֲשֶׂנּוּ קַפַּנְדַּרְיָא, וּרְקִיקָה מִקַּל וָחֹמֶר. כָּל חוֹתְמֵי בְרָכוֹת שֶׁהָיוּ בַמִּקְדָּשׁ, הָיוּ אוֹמְרִים מִן הָעוֹלָם. מִשֶּׁקִּלְקְלוּ הַמִּינִין, וְאָמְרוּ, אֵין עוֹלָם אֶלָּא אֶחָד, הִתְקִינוּ שֶׁיְּהוּ אוֹמְרִים, מִן הָעוֹלָם וְעַד הָעוֹלָם. וְהִתְקִינוּ, שֶׁיְּהֵא אָדָם שׁוֹאֵל אֶת שְׁלוֹם חֲבֵרוֹ בַּשֵּׁם, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (רות ב) וְהִנֵּה בֹעַז בָּא מִבֵּית לֶחֶם, וַיֹּאמֶר לַקּוֹצְרִים יְיָ עִמָּכֶם, וַיֹּאמְרוּ לוֹ, יְבָרֶכְךָ יְיָ. וְאוֹמֵר (שופטים ו) יְיָ עִמְּךָ גִּבּוֹר הֶחָיִל. וְאוֹמֵר (משלי כג) אַל תָּבוּז כִּי זָקְנָה אִמֶּךָ. וְאוֹמֵר (תהלים קיט) עֵת לַעֲשׂוֹת לַייָ הֵפֵרוּ תוֹרָתֶךָ. רַבִּי נָתָן אוֹמֵר, הֵפֵרוּ תוֹרָתֶךָ עֵת לַעֲשׂוֹת לַייָ: \n", 9.5. "One must bless [God] for the evil in the same way as one blesses for the good, as it says, “And you shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul and with all your might” (Deuteronomy 6:5). “With all your heart,” with your two impulses, the evil impulse as well as the good impulse. “With all your soul” even though he takes your soul [life] away from you. “With all your might” with all your money. Another explanation, “With all your might” whatever treatment he metes out to you. One should not show disrespect to the Eastern Gate, because it is in a direct line with the Holy of Holies. One should not enter the Temple Mount with a staff, or with shoes on, or with a wallet, or with dusty feet; nor should one make it a short cut, all the more spitting [is forbidden]. All the conclusions of blessings that were in the Temple they would say, “forever [lit. as long as the world is].” When the sectarians perverted their ways and said that there was only one world, they decreed that they should say, “for ever and ever [lit. from the end of the world to the end of the world]. They also decreed that a person should greet his fellow in God’s name, as it says, “And behold Boaz came from Bethlehem and said to the reapers, ‘May the Lord be with you.’ And they answered him, “May the Lord bless you’” (Ruth 2:. And it also says, “The Lord is with your, you valiant warrior” (Judges 6:12). And it also says, “And do not despise your mother when she grows old” (Proverbs 23:22). And it also says, “It is time to act on behalf of the Lord, for they have violated Your teaching” (Psalms 119:126). Rabbi Natan says: [this means] “They have violated your teaching It is time to act on behalf of the Lord.”",
43. Anon., Didache, 8.1, 9.4, 10.5, 13.1, 13.4-13.7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 185; Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 103
44. New Testament, 1 Timothy, None (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 538
6.4. τετύφωται, μηδὲν ἐπιστάμενος, ἀλλὰ νοσῶν περὶ ζητήσεις καὶ λογομαχίας, ἐξ ὧν γίνεται φθόνος, ἔρις, βλασφημίαι, ὑπόνοιαι πονηραί, 6.4. he is conceited, knowing nothing, but obsessed with arguments, disputes, and word battles, from which come envy, strife, reviling, evil suspicions,
45. New Testament, 1 Corinthians, 1.26-1.28, 7.2, 7.5, 7.35, 11.20 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 84; Pevarello (2013), The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism. 79, 96; Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 185
1.26. Βλέπετε γὰρ τὴν κλῆσιν ὑμῶν, ἀδελφοί, ὅτι οὐ πολλοὶ σοφοὶ κατὰ σάρκα, οὐ πολλοὶ δυνατοί, οὐ πολλοὶ εὐγενεῖς· 1.27. ἀλλὰ τὰ μωρὰ τοῦ κόσμου ἐξελέξατο ὁ θεός, ἵνα καταισχύνῃ τοὺς σοφούς, καὶ τὰ ἀσθενῆ τοῦ κόσμου ἐξελέξατο ὁ θεός, ἵνα καταισχύνῃ τὰ ἰσχυρά, 1.28. καὶ τὰ ἀγενῆ τοῦ κόσμου καὶ τὰ ἐξουθενημένα ἐξελέξατο ὁ θεός, [καὶ] τὰ μὴ ὄντα, ἵνα τὰ ὄντα καταργήσῃ, 7.2. διὰ δὲ τὰς πορνείας ἕκαστος τὴν ἑαυτοῦ γυναῖκα ἐχέτω, καὶ ἑκάστη τὸν ἴδιον ἄνδρα ἐχέτω. 7.5. μὴ ἀποστερεῖτε ἀλλήλους, εἰ μήτι [ἂν] ἐκ συμφώνου πρὸς καιρὸν ἵνα σχολάσητε τῇ προσευχῇ καὶ πάλιν ἐπὶ τὸ αὐτὸ ἦτε, ἵνα μὴ πειράζῃ ὑμᾶς ὁ Σατανᾶς διὰ τὴν ἀκρασίαν [ὑμῶν]. 7.35. τοῦτο δὲ πρὸς τὸ ὑμῶν αὐτῶν σύμφορον λέγω, οὐχ ἵνα βρόχον ὑμῖν ἐπιβάλω, ἀλλὰ πρὸς τὸ εὔσχημον καὶ εὐπάρεδρον τῷ κυρίῳ ἀπερισπάστως. 11.20. Συνερχομένων οὖν ὑμῶν ἐπὶ τὸ αὐτὸ οὐκ ἔστιν κυριακὸν δεῖπνον φαγεῖν, 1.26. For you seeyour calling, brothers, that not many are wise according to the flesh,not many mighty, and not many noble; 1.27. but God chose the foolishthings of the world that he might put to shame those who are wise. Godchose the weak things of the world, that he might put to shame thethings that are strong; 1.28. and God chose the lowly things of theworld, and the things that are despised, and the things that are not,that he might bring to nothing the things that are: 7.2. But, because of sexualimmoralities, let each man have his own wife, and let each woman haveher own husband. 7.5. Don't deprive one another, unless it is by consent for aseason, that you may give yourselves to fasting and prayer, and may betogether again, that Satan doesn't tempt you because of your lack ofself-control. 7.35. This Isay for your own profit; not that I may ensnare you, but for that whichis appropriate, and that you may attend to the Lord withoutdistraction. 11.20. When therefore you assemble yourselves together, itis not possible to eat the Lord's supper.
46. New Testament, Hebrews, 1.1, 1.3-1.4, 1.6-1.7, 1.13-1.14, 11.33, 12.22 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas •shepherd of hermas, the Found in books: Moss (2010), The Other Christs: Imitating Jesus in Ancient Christian Ideologies of Martyrdom, 116; O'Daly (2020), Augustine's City of God: A Reader's Guide (2nd edn), 58; Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 185
1.1. ΠΟΛΥΜΕΡΩΣ ΚΑΙ ΠΟΛΥΤΡΟΠΩΣ πάλαι ὁ θεὸς λαλήσας τοῖς πατράσιν ἐν τοῖς προφήταις 1.3. ὃς ὢν ἀπαύγασμα τῆς δόξης καὶ χαρακτὴρ τῆς ὑποστάσεως αὐτοῦ, φέρων τε τὰ πάντα τῷ ῥήματι τῆς δυνάμεως αὐτοῦ, καθαρισμὸν τῶν ἁμαρτιῶν ποιησάμενοςἐκάθισεν ἐν δεξιᾷτῆς μεγαλωσύνης ἐν ὑψηλοῖς, 1.4. τοσούτῳ κρείττων γενόμενος τῶν ἀγγέλων ὅσῳ διαφορώτερον παρʼ αὐτοὺς κεκληρονόμηκεν ὄνομα. 1.6. ὅταν δὲ πάλιν εἰσαγάγῃ τὸν πρωτότοκον εἰς τὴν οἰκουμένην, λέγει 1.7. καὶ πρὸς μὲν τοὺς ἀγγέλους λέγει 1.13. πρὸς τίνα δὲ τῶν ἀγγέλων εἴρηκέν ποτε 1.14. οὐχὶ πάντες εἰσὶν λειτουργικὰ πνεύματα εἰς διακονίαν ἀποστελλόμενα διὰ τοὺς μέλλοντας κληρονομεῖν σωτηρίαν; 11.33. οἳ διὰ πίστεως κατηγωνίσαντο βασιλείας, ἠργάσαντο δικαιοσύνην, ἐπέτυχον ἐπαγγελιῶν, ἔφραξαν στόματα λεόντων, 12.22. ἀλλὰ προσεληλύθατε Σιὼν ὄρει καὶ πόλει θεοῦ ζῶντος, Ἰερουσαλὴμ ἐπουρανίῳ, καὶ μυριάσιν ἀγγέλων, πανηγύρει 1.1. God, having in the past spoken to the fathers through the prophets at many times and in various ways, 1.3. His Son is the radiance of his glory, the very image of his substance, and upholding all things by the word of his power, when he had by himself made purification for our sins, sat down on the right hand of the Majesty on high; 1.4. having become so much better than the angels, as he has inherited a more excellent name than they have. 1.6. Again, when he brings in the firstborn into the world he says, "Let all the angels of God worship him." 1.7. of the angels he says, "Who makes his angels winds, And his servants a flame of fire." 1.13. But of which of the angels has he said at any time, "Sit at my right hand, Until I make your enemies the footstool of your feet?" 1.14. Aren't they all ministering spirits, sent out to do service for the sake of those who will inherit salvation? 11.33. who, through faith subdued kingdoms, worked out righteousness, obtained promises, stopped the mouths of lions, 12.22. But you have come to Mount Zion, and to the city of the living God, the heavenly Jerusalem, and to innumerable hosts of angels,
47. New Testament, 1 Peter, 2.11, 4.15-4.16 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas, the •hermas, shepherd of Found in books: Dijkstra and Raschle (2020), Religious Violence in the Ancient World: From Classical Athens to Late Antiquity, 58; Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 179
2.11. Ἀγαπητοί, παρακαλῶ ὡςπαροίκους καὶ παρεπιδήμουςἀπέχεσθαι τῶν σαρκικῶν ἐπιθυμιῶν, αἵτινες στρατεύονται κατὰ τῆς ψυχῆς· 4.15. μὴ γάρ τις ὑμῶν πασχέτω ὡς φονεὺς ἢ κλέπτης ἢ κακοποιὸς ἢ ὡς ἀλλοτριεπίσκοπος· 4.16. εἰ δὲ ὡς Χριστιανός, μὴ αἰσχυνέσθω, δοξαζέτω δὲ τὸν θεὸν ἐν τῷ ὀνόματι τούτῳ. 2.11. Beloved, I beg you as sojourners and pilgrims, to abstain from fleshly lusts, which war against the soul; 4.15. For let none of you suffer as a murderer, or a thief, or an evil doer, or as a meddler in other men's matters. 4.16. But if one of you suffers for being a Christian, let him not be ashamed; but let him glorify God in this matter.
48. New Testament, Philippians, 2.7, 2.11, 3.20 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Moss (2010), The Other Christs: Imitating Jesus in Ancient Christian Ideologies of Martyrdom, 116; Nasrallah (2019), Archaeology and the Letters of Paul, 135; O'Daly (2020), Augustine's City of God: A Reader's Guide (2nd edn), 58
2.7. ἀλλὰ ἑαυτὸν ἐκένωσεν μορφὴν δούλου λαβών, ἐν ὁμοιώματι ἀνθρώπων γενόμενος· καὶ σχήματι εὑρεθεὶς ὡς ἄνθρωπος 2.11. καὶ πᾶσα γλῶσσα ἐξομολογήσηταιὅτι ΚΥΡΙΟΣ ΙΗΣΟΥΣ ΧΡΙΣΤΟΣ εἰς δόξανθεοῦπατρός. 3.20. ἡμῶν γὰρ τὸ πολίτευμα ἐν οὐρανοῖς ὑπάρχει, ἐξ οὗ καὶ σωτῆρα ἀπεκδεχόμεθα κύριον Ἰησοῦν Χριστόν, 2.7. but emptied himself, taking the form of a servant, being made in the likeness of men. 2.11. and that every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father. 3.20. For our citizenship is in heaven, from where we also wait for a Savior, the Lord Jesus Christ;
49. New Testament, Titus, 1.5-1.9, 1.5.0, 1.8.0, 1.11.0, 1.13.0, 2.1.0, 2.6.0, 2.7.0, 2.15.0, 3.1, 3.1.0, 3.8.0, 3.9-3.15 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 74, 410; Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 183
1.5. Τούτου χάριν ἀπέλειπόν σε ἐν Κρήτῃ ἵνα τὰ λείποντα ἐπιδιορθώσῃ, καὶ καταστήσῃς κατὰ πόλιν πρεσβυτέρους, ὡς ἐγώ σοι διεταξάμην, 1.6. εἴ τίς ἐστιν ἀνέγκλητος, μιᾶς γυναικὸς ἀνήρ, τέκνα ἔχων πιστά, μὴ ἐν κατηγορίᾳ ἀσωτίας ἢ ἀνυπότακτα. 1.7. δεῖ γὰρ τὸν ἐπίσκοπον ἀνέγκλητον εἶναι ὡς θεοῦ οἰκονόμον, μὴ αὐθάδη, μὴ ὀργίλον, μὴ πάροινον, μὴ πλήκτην, μὴ αἰσχροκερδῆ, 1.8. ἀλλὰ φιλόξενον, φιλάγαθον, σώφρονα, δίκαιον, ὅσιον, ἐγκρατῆ, ἀντεχόμενον τοῦ κατὰ τὴν διδαχὴν πιστοῦ λόγου, 1.9. ἵνα δυνατὸς ᾖ καὶ παρακαλεῖν ἐν τῇ διδασκαλίᾳ τῇ ὑγιαινούσῃ καὶ τοὺς ἀντιλέγοντας ἐλέγχειν. 3.1. Ὑπομίμνησκε αὐτοὺς ἀρχαῖς ἐξουσίαις ὑποτάσσεσθαι πειθαρχεῖν, πρὸς πᾶν ἔργον ἀγαθὸν ἑτοίμους εἶναι, 3.9. μωρὰς δὲ ζητήσεις καὶ γενεαλογίας καὶ ἔριν καὶ μάχας νομικὰς περιίστασο, εἰσὶν γὰρ ἀνωφελεῖς καὶ μάταιοι. 3.10. αἱρετικὸν ἄνθρω πον μετὰ μίαν καὶ δευτέραν νουθεσίαν παραιτοῦ, 3.11. εἰδὼς ὅτι ἐξέστραπται ὁ τοιοῦτος καὶ ἁμαρτάνει, ὢν αὐτοκατάκριτος. 3.12. Ὅταν πέμψω Ἀρτεμᾶν πρὸς σὲ ἢ Τύχικον, σπούδασον ἐλθεῖν πρός με εἰς Νικόπολιν, ἐκεῖ γὰρ κέκρικα παραχειμάσαι. 3.13. Ζηνᾶν τὸν νομικὸν καὶ Ἀπολλὼν σπουδαίως πρόπεμψον, ἵνα μηδὲν αὐτοῖς λείπῃ. 3.14. Μανθανέτωσαν δὲ καὶ οἱ ἡμέτεροι καλῶν ἔργων προΐστασθαι εἰς τὰς ἀναγκαίας χρείας, ἵνα μὴ ὦσιν ἄκαρποι. 3.15. Ἀσπάζονταί σε οἱ μετʼ ἐμοῦ πάντες. Ἄσπασαι τοὺς φιλοῦντας ἡμᾶς ἐν πίστει. Ἡ χάρις μετὰ πάντων ὑμῶν. 1.5. I left you in Crete for this reason, that you would set in order the things that were lacking, and appoint elders in every city, as I directed you; 1.6. if anyone is blameless, the husband of one wife, having children who believe, who are not accused of loose or unruly behavior. 1.7. For the overseer must be blameless, as God's steward; not self-pleasing, not easily angered, not given to wine, not violent, not greedy for dishonest gain; 1.8. but given to hospitality, as a lover of good, sober-minded, fair, holy, self-controlled; 1.9. holding to the faithful word which is according to the teaching, that he may be able to exhort in the sound doctrine, and to convict those who contradict him. 3.1. Remind them to be in subjection to rulers and to authorities, to be obedient, to be ready for every good work, 3.9. but shun foolish questionings, genealogies, strife, and disputes about the law; for they are unprofitable and vain. 3.10. Avoid a factious man after a first and second warning; 3.11. knowing that such a one is perverted, and sins, being self-condemned. 3.12. When I send Artemas to you, or Tychicus, be diligent to come to me to Nicopolis, for I have determined to winter there. 3.13. Send Zenas, the lawyer, and Apollos on their journey speedily, that nothing may be lacking for them. 3.14. Let our people also learn to maintain good works for necessary uses, that they may not be unfruitful. 3.15. All who are with me greet you. Greet those who love us in faith. Grace be with you all. Amen.
50. Polycarp of Smyrna, Letter To The Philippians, 10.2-10.6, 56.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas, inscription •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Nasrallah (2019), Archaeology and the Letters of Paul, 135, 137
10.2. ξυμ ποσσιτις βενεφαξερε, νολιτε διλφερρε, #3υια I Pet. 6, 6; Eph. 5, 21 ελεëμοσψνα δε μορτε λιβερατ. ομνες ϝολρις ινϝιξεμ συβιεξτι εστοτξ, ξονϝερσατιονεμ ϝεστραμ ιρρεπρενσιβιλεμ ηαβεντες ιν γεντιβυς, υτ εχ βονις οπεριβυς I Pet. 2, 12 ϝεστρις ετ ϝος λαυδεμ αξξιπιατις ετ δομινυς ιν ϝοβις Is. 52. νον βλασπηεμετυρ. 10.3. Ωαε αυτεμ, περ #3υεμ νομεν δομινι βλασπηεματυρ. σοβριξτατεμ εργο δοξετξ ομνες, ιν #3υα ετ ϝος ξονϝερσαμινι. 10.2. 10.3.
51. Plutarch, Moralia, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 183
52. New Testament, Romans, 1.11, 4.17, 11.2, 12.16, 16.14 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 538; Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 387; Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 206; Ward (2022), Clement and Scriptural Exegesis: The Making of a Commentarial Theologian, 73
1.11. ἐπιποθῶ γὰρ ἰδεῖν ὑμᾶς, ἵνα τι μεταδῶ χάρισμα ὑμῖν πνευματικὸν εἰς τὸ στηριχθῆναι ὑμᾶς, 4.17. καθὼς γέγραπται ὅτιΠατέρα πολλῶν ἐθνῶν τέθεικά σε,?̓ κατέναντι οὗ ἐπίστευσεν θεοῦ τοῦ ζωοποιοῦντος τοὺς νεκροὺς καὶ καλοῦντος τὰ μὴ ὄντα ὡς ὄντα· 11.2. οὐκ ἀπώσατο ὁ θεὸς τὸν λαὸν αὐτοῦὃν προέγνω. ἢ οὐκ οἴδατε ἐν Ἠλείᾳ τί λέγει ἡ γραφή, ὡς ἐντυγχάνει τῷ θεῷ κατὰ τοῦ Ἰσραήλ; 12.16. τὸ αὐτὸ εἰς ἀλλήλους φρονοῦντες, μὴ τὰ ὑψηλὰ φρονοῦντες ἀλλὰ τοῖς ταπεινοῖς συναπαγόμενοι.μὴ γίνεσθε φρόνιμοι παρʼ ἑαυτοῖς. 16.14. ἀσπάσασθε Ἀσύνκριτον, Φλέγοντα, Ἑρμῆν, Πατρόβαν, Ἑρμᾶν, καὶ τοὺς σὺν αὐτοῖς ἀδελφούς. 1.11. For I long to see you, that I may impart to you some spiritual gift, to the end that you may be established; 4.17. As it is written, "I have made you a father of many nations." This is in the presence of him whom he believed: God, who gives life to the dead, and calls the things that are not, as though they were. 11.2. God didn't reject his people, which he foreknew. Or don't you know what the Scripture says about Elijah? How he pleads with God against Israel: 12.16. Be of the same mind one toward another. Don't set your mind on high things, but associate with the humble. Don't be wise in your own conceits. 16.14. Greet Asyncritus, Phlegon, Hermes, Patrobas, Hermas, and the brothers who are with them.
53. Plutarch, Coriolanus, 7.1-7.3, 9.1.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Moss (2010), The Other Christs: Imitating Jesus in Ancient Christian Ideologies of Martyrdom, 116
7.1. ἐκ τούτου διηλλάγησαν, αἰτησάμενοι παρὰ τῆς βουλῆς καὶ τυχόντες ἄνδρας αἱρεῖσθαι πέντε προστάτας τῶν δεομένων βοηθείας, τοὺς νῦν δημάρχους καλουμένους, εἵλοντο δὲ πρώτους, οἷς ἐχρήσαντο καὶ τῆς ἀποστάσεως ἡγεμόσι, τοὺς περὶ Βροῦτον Ἰούνιον καὶ Σικίννιον Βέλλουτον. ἐπεὶ δʼ ἡ πόλις εἰς ἓν ἦλθεν, εὐθὺς ἐν τοῖς ὅπλοις ἦσαν οἱ πολλοὶ, καὶ παρεῖχον αὑτοὺς τοῖς ἄρχουσι χρῆσθαι προθύμως ἐπὶ τὸν πόλεμον. 7.2. ὁ δὲ Μάρκιος οὔτʼ αὐτὸς ἡδόμενος οἷς ὁ δῆμος ἴσχυεν ἐνδούσης τῆς ἀριστοκρατίας, καὶ τῶν ἄλλων πατρικίων πολλοὺς ὁρῶν τὸ αὐτὸ πεπονθότας, ὅμως παρεκάλει μὴ ἀπολείπεσθαι τῶν δημοτικῶν ἐν τοῖς περὶ τῆς πατρίδος ἀγῶσιν, ἀλλὰ τῇ ἀρετῇ μᾶλλον ἢ τῇ δυνάμει φαίνεσθαι διαφέροντας αὐτῶν. 7.1. When the city was thus united, the common people at once offered themselves as soldiers, and the consuls found them ready and eager for service in the war. 7.2.
54. Plutarch, On The Malice of Herodotus, 5.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Moss (2010), The Other Christs: Imitating Jesus in Ancient Christian Ideologies of Martyrdom, 116
55. Plutarch, On Being A Busybody, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Pevarello (2013), The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism. 151
519c. and a searching out and examination of matters which are closely guarded and escape general observation, while curiosity is an encroaching, a debauching and denuding of secret things. Since a natural consequence of much learning is to have much to say (and for this reason Pythagoras enjoined upon the young a five years' silence which he called a "Truce to Speech"), a necessary concomitant of inquisitiveness is to speak evil. For what the curious delight to hear they delight to tell, and what they zealously collect from others they joyously reveal to everyone else. Consequently, in addition to its other evils, their disease
56. Anon., The Shepherd, 2.2.6-2.2.7, 4.29 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Monnickendam (2020), Jewish Law and Early Christian Identity: Betrothal, Marriage, and Infidelity in the Writings of Ephrem the Syrian, 168; Pinheiro et al. (2012b), The Ancient Novel and Early Christian and Jewish Narrative: Fictional Intersections, 183
57. Clement of Rome, 1 Clement, 2.8, 3.4, 21.1, 46.5-46.6, 54.2, 54.4, 59.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas, the Found in books: Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 179, 206
2.8. τῇ παναρέτῳ καὶ σεβασμίῳ πολιτείᾳ κεκοσμημένοι πάντα ἐν τῷ φόβῳ αὐτοῦ ἐπετελεῖτε: τὰ προστάγματα καὶ τὰ δικαιώματα τοῦ κυρίου ἐπὶ τὰ Prov. 7, 8 πλάτη τῆς καρδίας ὑμῶν ἐγέγραπτο. 3.4. διὰ τοῦτο πόρρω ἄπεστιν ἡ δικαιοσύνη καὶ εἰρήνη, ἐν τῷ ἀπολιπεῖν ἕκαστον τὸν φόβον τοῦ θεοῦ καὶ ἐν τῇ πίστει αὐτοῦ ἀμβλυωπῆσαι, μηδὲ ἐν τοῖς νομίμοις τῶν προσταγμάτων αὐτοῦ πορεύεσθαι, μηδὲ πολιτεύεσθαι κατὰ τὸ καθῆκον τῷ Χριστῷ, ἀλλὰ ἕκαστον βαδίζειν κατὰ τὰς ἐπιθυμίας τῆς καρδίας αὐτοῦ τῆς πονηρᾶς, ζῆλον ἄδικον καὶ ἀσεβῆ ἀνειληφότας, Wisd. 7, 21 δἰ οὖ καὶ θάνατος εἰσῆλθεν εἰς τὸν κόσμον. 21.1. Ὁρᾶτε, ἀγαπητοί, μὴ αἱ εὐεργεσίαι αὐτοῦ αἱ πολλαὶ γένωνται εἰς κρίμα A(C) read kri/ma pa=sin h(mi=n. ἡμῖν, ἐὰν μὴ ἀξίως αὐτοῦ πολιτευόμενοι τὰ καλὰ καὶ εὐάρεστα ἐνώπιον αὐτοῦ ποιῶμεν μεθ̓ ὁμονοίας. 46.5. ἱνατί ἔρεις καὶ θυμοὶ καὶ διχοστασίαι καὶ σχίσματα πόλεμός τε Eph. 4, 4-6 ἐν ὑμῖν; 46.6. ἢ οὐχὶ ἕνα θεὸν ἔχομεν καὶ ἔνα Χριστὸν καὶ ἓν πνεῦμα τῆς χάριτος τὸ ἐκχυθὲν ἐφ̓ ἡμᾶς; καὶ μία κλῆσις ἐν Χριστῷ; 54.2. εἰπάτω: Εἰ δἰ ἐμὲ στάσις καὶ ἔρις καὶ σχίσματα, ἐκχωρῶ, ἄπειμι, οὗ ἐὰν βούλησθε, καὶ ποιῶ τὰ προστασσόμενα ὑπὸ τοῦ πλήθους: μόνον τὸ ποίμνιον τοῦ Χριστοῦ εἰρηνευέτω μετὰ τῶν καθεσταμένων πρεσβυτέρων. 54.4. ταῦτα οἱ πολιτευόμενοι τὴν ἀμεταμέλητον πολιτείαν τοῦ θεοῦ ἐποίησαν καὶ ποιήσουσιν. 59.4. ἀξιοῦμέν σε, δέσποτα, βοηθὸν γενέσθαι καὶ ἀντιλήπτορα ἡμῶν. τοὺς ἐν θλίψει ἡμῶν σῶσον, τοὺς ταπεινοὺς ἐλέησον, τοὺς πεπτωκότας ἔγειρον, τοῖς δεομένοις ἐπιφάνηθι, τοὺς ἀσθενεῖς ἴασαι, τοὺς πλανωμένους τοῦ λαοῦ σου ἐπίστρεψον: χόρτασον τοὺς πεινῶντας, λύτρωσαι τοὺς δεσμίους ἡμῶν, ἐξανάστησον τοὺς ἀσθενοῦντας, παρακάλεσον τοὺς ὀλιγοψυχοῦντας: I Kings 3, 60; II Kings 19, 19; Ezek. 86, 23 Ps. 78, 13; 94, 7; 99, 8 γνώτωσάν σε ἅπαντα τὰ ἔθνη. ὅτι σὺ εἶ ὁ θεὸς μόνος καὶ Ἰησοῦς Χριστὸς ὁ παῖς σου καὶ ἡμεῖς λαός σου καὶ πρόβατα τῆς νομῆς σου. 1. The church of God which sojourns at Rome, to the church of God sojourning at Corinth, to them that are called and sanctified by the will of God, through our Lord Jesus Christ: Grace unto you, and peace, from Almighty God through Jesus Christ, be multiplied. Owing, dear brethren, to the sudden and successive calamitous events which have happened to ourselves, we feel that we have been somewhat tardy in turning our attention to the points respecting which you consulted us; and especially to that shameful and detestable sedition, utterly abhorrent to the elect of God, which a few rash and self-confident persons have kindled to such a pitch of frenzy, that your venerable and illustrious name, worthy to be universally loved, has suffered grievous injury. For who ever dwelt even for a short time among you, and did not find your faith to be as fruitful of virtue as it was firmly established? Who did not admire the sobriety and moderation of your godliness in Christ? Who did not proclaim the magnificence of your habitual hospitality? And who did not rejoice over your perfect and well-grounded knowledge? For you did all things without respect of persons, and walked in the commandments of God, being obedient to those who had the rule over you, and giving all fitting honour to the presbyters among you. You enjoined young men to be of a sober and serious mind, you instructed your wives to do all things with a blameless, becoming, and pure conscience, loving their husbands as in duty bound; and you taught them that, living in the rule of obedience, they should manage their household affairs becomingly, and be in every respect marked by discretion.
58. New Testament, 1 John, 1.3, 1.7 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas, the •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 74; Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 183
1.3. ὃ ἑωράκαμεν καὶ ἀκηκόαμεν ἀπαγγέλλομεν καὶ ὑμῖν, ἵνα καὶ ὑμεῖς κοινωνίαν ἔχητε μεθʼ ἡμῶν· καὶ ἡ κοινωνία δὲ ἡ ἡμετέρα μετὰ τοῦ πατρὸς καὶ μετὰ τοῦ υἱοῦ αὐτοῦ Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ· 1.7. ἐὰν δὲ ἐν τῷ φωτὶ περιπατῶμεν ὡς αὐτὸς ἔστιν ἐν τῷ φωτί, κοινωνίαν ἔχομεν μετʼ ἀλλήλων καὶ τὸ αἷμα Ἰησοῦ τοῦ υἱοῦ αὐτοῦ καθαρίζει ἡμᾶς ἀπὸ πάσης ἁμαρτίας. 1.3. that which we have seen and heard we declare to you, that you also may have fellowship with us. Yes, and our fellowship is with the Father, and with his Son, Jesus Christ. 1.7. But if we walk in the light, as he is in the light, we have fellowship with one another, and the blood of Jesus Christ, his Son, cleanses us from all sin.
59. New Testament, Mark, 47 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 387
60. New Testament, Matthew, 6.7, 7.7 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Pevarello (2013), The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism. 151; Ward (2022), Clement and Scriptural Exegesis: The Making of a Commentarial Theologian, 74
6.7. Προσευχόμενοι δὲ μὴ βατταλογήσητε ὥσπερ οἱ ἐθνικοί, δοκοῦσιν γὰρ ὅτι ἐν τῇ πολυλογίᾳ αὐτῶν εἰσακουσθήσονται· 7.7. Αἰτεῖτε, καὶ δοθήσεται ὑμῖν· ζητεῖτε, καὶ εὑρήσετε· κρούετε, καὶ ἀνοιγήσεται ὑμῖν. 6.7. In praying, don't use vain repetitions, as the Gentiles do; for they think that they will be heard for their much speaking. 7.7. "Ask, and it will be given you. Seek, and you will find. Knock, and it will be opened for you.
61. Tertullian, Prescription Against Heretics, 3.7 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas / hermae pastor Found in books: Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 86
62. Justin, First Apology, 58.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas, the Found in books: Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 206
63. Justin, Second Apology, a b c d\n0 '8.1 '8.1 '8 1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 676
64. Justin, Dialogue With Trypho, 1.3-1.4, 5.6, 11.1-11.2, 56.4, 58.1, 110.4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Dijkstra and Raschle (2020), Religious Violence in the Ancient World: From Classical Athens to Late Antiquity, 58; Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 206
65. Anon., Sifra, None (2nd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Rosen-Zvi (2011), Demonic Desires: Yetzer Hara and the Problem of Evil in Late Antiquity. 56
66. Anon., Sifre Deuteronomy, 45 (2nd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Rosen-Zvi (2011), Demonic Desires: Yetzer Hara and the Problem of Evil in Late Antiquity. 121
67. Lucian, The Double Indictment, '28 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 410
68. Tertullian, On Monogamy, 9.5, 10.4, 11.14 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Monnickendam (2020), Jewish Law and Early Christian Identity: Betrothal, Marriage, and Infidelity in the Writings of Ephrem the Syrian, 168
69. Tertullian, On Idolatry, 4.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas / hermae pastor Found in books: Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 86
70. Tertullian, Exhortation To Chastity, 9 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Monnickendam (2020), Jewish Law and Early Christian Identity: Betrothal, Marriage, and Infidelity in the Writings of Ephrem the Syrian, 168
71. Tertullian, On The Apparel of Women, 1.1-1.3, 2.10.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas / hermae pastor Found in books: Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 86, 103
72. Tertullian, On The Crown, 13.1-13.4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: O'Daly (2020), Augustine's City of God: A Reader's Guide (2nd edn), 59
73. Tertullian, On Baptism, 17.5, 18.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas / hermae pastor •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 365; Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 86, 103
74. Tertullian, Against Praxeas, 1.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 37
75. Tertullian, Against Marcion, 4.16.1, 4.34 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas / hermae pastor •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Monnickendam (2020), Jewish Law and Early Christian Identity: Betrothal, Marriage, and Infidelity in the Writings of Ephrem the Syrian, 168; Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 86
4.34. But Christ prohibits divorce, saying, Whosoever puts away his wife, and marries another, commits adultery; and whosoever marries her that is put away from her husband, also commits adultery. Luke 16:18 In order to forbid divorce, He makes it unlawful to marry a woman that has been put away. Moses, however, permitted repudiation in Deuteronomy: When a man has taken a wife, and has lived with her, and it come to pass that she find no favour in his eyes, because he has found unchastity in her; then let him write her a bill of divorcement and give it in her hand, and send her away out of his house. Deuteronomy 24:1 You see, therefore, that there is a difference between the law and the gospel - between Moses and Christ? To be sure there is! But then you have rejected that other gospel which witnesses to the same verity and the same Christ. There, while prohibiting divorce, He has given us a solution of this special question respecting it: Moses, says He, because of the hardness of your hearts, suffered you to give a bill of divorcement; but from the beginning it was not so Matthew 19:8 - for this reason, indeed, because He who had made them male and female had likewise said, They two shall become one flesh; what therefore God has joined together, let not man put asunder. Matthew 19:4, 6 Now, by this answer of His (to the Pharisees), He both sanctioned the provision of Moses, who was His own (servant), and restored to its primitive purpose the institution of the Creator, whose Christ He was. Since, however, you are to be refuted out of the Scriptures which you have received, I will meet you on your own ground, as if your Christ were mine. When, therefore, He prohibited divorce, and yet at the same time represented the Father, even Him who united male and female, must He not have rather exculpated than abolished the enactment of Moses? But, observe, if this Christ be yours when he teaches contrary to Moses and the Creator, on the same principle must He be mine if I can show that His teaching is not contrary to them. I maintain, then, that there was a condition in the prohibition which He now made of divorce; the case supposed being, that a man put away his wife for the express purpose of marrying another. His words are: Whosoever puts away his wife, and marries another, commits adultery; and whosoever marries her that is put away from her husband, also commits adultery, Luke 16:18 - put away, that is, for the reason wherefore a woman ought not to be dismissed, that another wife may be obtained. For he who marries a woman who is unlawfully put away is as much of an adulterer as the man who marries one who is un-divorced. Permanent is the marriage which is not rightly dissolved; to marry, therefore, while matrimony is undissolved, is to commit adultery. Since, therefore, His prohibition of divorce was a conditional one, He did not prohibit absolutely; and what He did not absolutely forbid, that He permitted on some occasions, when there is an absence of the cause why He gave His prohibition. In very deed His teaching is not contrary to Moses, whose precept He partially defends, I will not say confirms. If, however, you deny that divorce is in any way permitted by Christ, how is it that you on your side destroy marriage, not uniting man and woman, nor admitting to the sacrament of baptism and of the eucharist those who have been united in marriage anywhere else, unless they should agree together to repudiate the fruit of their marriage, and so the very Creator Himself? Well, then, what is a husband to do in your sect, if his wife commit adultery? Shall he keep her? But your own apostle, you know, does not permit the members of Christ to be joined to a harlot. 1 Corinthians 6:15 Divorce, therefore, when justly deserved, has even in Christ a defender. So that Moses for the future must be considered as being confirmed by Him, since he prohibits divorce in the same sense as Christ does, if any unchastity should occur in the wife. For in the Gospel of Matthew he says, Whosoever shall put away his wife, saving for the cause of fornication, causes her to commit adultery. Matthew 5:32 He also is deemed equally guilty of adultery, who marries a woman put away by her husband. The Creator, however, except on account of adultery, does not put asunder what He Himself joined together, the same Moses in another passage enacting that he who had married after violence to a damsel, should thenceforth not have it in his power to put away his wife. Deuteronomy 22:28-29 Now, if a compulsory marriage contracted after violence shall be permanent, how much rather shall a voluntary one, the result of agreement! This has the sanction of the prophet: You shall not forsake the wife of your youth. Malachi 2:15 Thus you have Christ following spontaneously the tracks of the Creator everywhere, both in permitting divorce and in forbidding it. You find Him also protecting marriage, in whatever direction you try to escape. He prohibits divorce when He will have the marriage inviolable; He permits divorce when the marriage is spotted with unfaithfulness. You should blush when you refuse to unite those whom even your Christ has united; and repeat the blush when you disunite them without the good reason why your Christ would have them separated. I have now to show whence the Lord derived this decision of His, and to what end He directed it. It will thus become more fully evident that His object was not the abolition of the Mosaic ordice by any suddenly devised proposal of divorce; because it was not suddenly proposed, but had its root in the previously mentioned John. For John reproved Herod, because he had illegally married the wife of his deceased brother, who had a daughter by her (a union which the law permitted only on the one occasion of the brother dying childless, when it even prescribed such a marriage, in order that by his own brother, and from his own wife, seed might be reckoned to the deceased husband), Deuteronomy 25:5-6 and was in consequence cast into prison, and finally, by the same Herod, was even put to death. The Lord having therefore made mention of John, and of course of the occurrence of his death, hurled His censure against Herod in the form of unlawful marriages and of adultery, pronouncing as an adulterer even the man who married a woman that had been put away from her husband. This he said in order the more severely to load Herod with guilt, who had taken his brother's wife, after she had been loosed from her husband not less by death than by divorce; who had been impelled thereto by his lust, not by the prescription of the (Levirate) law - for, as his brother had left a daughter, the marriage with the widow could not be lawful on that very account; and who, when the prophet asserted against him the law, had therefore put him to death. The remarks I have advanced on this case will be also of use to me in illustrating the subsequent parable of the rich man tormented in hell, and the poor man resting in Abraham's bosom. Luke 16:19-31 For this passage, so far as its letter goes, comes before us abruptly; but if we regard its sense and purport, it naturally fits in with the mention of John wickedly slain, and of Herod, who had been condemned by him for his impious marriage. It sets forth in bold outline the end of both of them, the torments of Herod and the comfort of John, that even now Herod might hear that warning: They have there Moses and the prophets, let them hear them. Luke 16:29 Marcion, however, violently turns the passage to another end, and decides that both the torment and the comfort are retributions of the Creator reserved in the next life for those who have obeyed the law and the prophets; while he defines the heavenly bosom and harbour to belong to Christ and his own god. Our answer to this is, that the Scripture itself which dazzles his sight expressly distinguishes between Abraham's bosom, where the poor man dwells, and the infernal place of torment. Hell (I take it) means one thing, and Abraham's bosom another. A great gulf is said to separate those regions, and to hinder a passage from one to the other. Besides, the rich man could not have lifted up his eyes, Luke 16:23 and from a distance too, except to a superior height, and from the said distance all up through the vast immensity of height and depth. It must therefore be evident to every man of intelligence who has ever heard of the Elysian fields, that there is some determinate place called Abraham's bosom, and that it is designed for the reception of the souls of Abraham's children, even from among the Gentiles (since he is the father of many nations, which must be classed among his family), and of the same faith as that wherewithal he himself believed God, without the yoke of the law and the sign of circumcision. This region, therefore, I call Abraham's bosom. Although it is not in heaven, it is yet higher than hell, and is appointed to afford an interval of rest to the souls of the righteous, until the consummation of all things shall complete the resurrection of all men with the full recompense of their reward. This consummation will then be manifested in heavenly promises, which Marcion, however, claims for his own god, just as if the Creator had never announced them. Amos, however, tells us of those stories towards heaven which Christ builds- of course for His people. There also is that everlasting abode of which Isaiah asks, Who shall declare unto you the eternal place, but He (that is, of course, Christ) who walks in righteousness, speaks of the straight path, hates injustice and iniquity? Now, although this everlasting abode is promised, and the ascending stories (or steps) to heaven are built by the Creator, who further promises that the seed of Abraham shall be even as the stars of heaven, by virtue certainly of the heavenly promise, why may it not be possible, without any injury to that promise, that by Abraham's bosom is meant some temporary receptacle of faithful souls, wherein is even now delineated an image of the future, and where is given some foresight of the glory of both judgments? If so, you have here, O heretics, during your present lifetime, a warning that Moses and the prophets declare one only God, the Creator, and His only Christ, and how that both awards of everlasting punishment and eternal salvation rest with Him, the one only God, who kills and who makes alive. Well, but the admonition, says Marcion, of our God from heaven has commanded us not to hear Moses and the prophets, but Christ; Hear Him is the command. This is true enough. For the apostles had by that time sufficiently heard Moses and the prophets, for they had followed Christ, being persuaded by Moses and the prophets. For even Peter would not have been able to say, You are the Christ, Luke 9:20 unless he had beforehand heard and believed Moses and the prophets, by whom alone Christ had been hitherto announced. Their faith, indeed, had deserved this confirmation by such a voice from heaven as should bid them hear Him, whom they had recognized as preaching peace, announcing glad tidings, promising an everlasting abode, building for them steps upwards into heaven. Down in hell, however, it was said concerning them: They have Moses and the prophets; let them hear them!- even those who did not believe them or at least did not sincerely believe that after death there were punishments for the arrogance of wealth and the glory of luxury, announced indeed by Moses and the prophets, but decreed by that God, who deposes princes from their thrones, and raises up the poor from dunghills. Since, therefore, it is quite consistent in the Creator to pronounce different sentences in the two directions of reward and punishment, we shall have to conclude that there is here no diversity of gods, but only a difference in the actual matters before us.
76. Tertullian, On Prayer, 16.1 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas / hermae pastor Found in books: Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 86
77. Tertullian, On Repentance, 14.1 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas / hermae pastor Found in books: Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 86
78. Irenaeus, Refutation of All Heresies, 1.28, 4.33.9 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas •hermas, shepherd of Found in books: Dijkstra and Raschle (2020), Religious Violence in the Ancient World: From Classical Athens to Late Antiquity, 58; Pevarello (2013), The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism. 96
79. Tertullian, On Modesty, 10.12, 16.17, 20.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas / hermae pastor •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Monnickendam (2020), Jewish Law and Early Christian Identity: Betrothal, Marriage, and Infidelity in the Writings of Ephrem the Syrian, 168; Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 86, 103
80. Clement of Alexandria, Miscellanies, 2.13, 2.125.2, 3.96, 4.28.4-4.28.5, 4.78.1-4.78.2, 5.1.3, 5.2, 5.2.5, 5.6.2, 5.11.1, 5.21.4, 5.26.1, 5.61.1, 6.1.4, 6.14, 6.131.2-6.131.3, 6.167.4, 7.1.1 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 365
81. Clement of Alexandria, Christ The Educator, 2.73.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Dijkstra and Raschle (2020), Religious Violence in the Ancient World: From Classical Athens to Late Antiquity, 58; Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 676
82. Hermas, Mandates, a b c d\n0 '8.3 '8.3 '8 3 \n1 40.3 40.3 40 3 \n2 40.4 40.4 40 4 \n3 43.18 43.18 43 18\n4 8.9 8.9 8 9 \n5 1.1 1.1 1 1 \n6 12.1.1 12.1.1 12 1 \n7 12.1.2 12.1.2 12 1 \n8 12.2.4 12.2.4 12 2 \n9 12.2.5 12.2.5 12 2 \n10 11.12 11.12 11 12\n11 11.11 11.11 11 11\n12 6.2.4 6.2.4 6 2 \n13 6.2.5 6.2.5 6 2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 538
83. Hermas, Similitudes, a b c d\n0 9.22.2 9.22.2 9 22 \n1 '9.27.2 '9.27.2 '9 27 \n2 9.22.1 9.22.1 9 22 \n3 9.22.3 9.22.3 9 22 \n4 '8.9.1 '8.9.1 '8 9 \n5 9.28.3 9.28.3 9 28 \n6 9.28.4 9.28.4 9 28 \n7 9.18.4 9.18.4 9 18 \n8 9.18.3 9.18.3 9 18 \n9 9.13.7 9.13.7 9 13 \n10 9.13.5 9.13.5 9 13 \n11 9.17.4 9.17.4 9 17 \n12 9.17.5 9.17.5 9 17 \n13 9.31.4 9.31.4 9 31 \n14 1.5 1.5 1 5 \n15 1.4 1.4 1 4 \n16 1.3 1.3 1 3 \n17 1.2 1.2 1 2 \n18 1.1 1.1 1 1 \n19 1 1 1 None\n20 1.6 1.6 1 6 \n21 9.13.8 9.13.8 9 13 \n22 9.13.9 9.13.9 9 13 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 538
84. Anon., Genesis Rabba, 22.6 (2nd cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Rosen-Zvi (2011), Demonic Desires: Yetzer Hara and the Problem of Evil in Late Antiquity. 121
22.6. וַיִּשַׁע ה' אֶל הֶבֶל וְאֶל מִנְחָתוֹ (בראשית ד, ד), נִתְפַּיֵּס מִמֶּנּוּ. (בראשית ד, ה): וְאֶל קַיִן וְאֶל מִנְחָתוֹ לֹא שָׁעָה, לֹא נִתְפַּיֵּס מִמֶּנּוּ. (בראשית ד, ה): וַיִּחַר לְקַיִן מְאֹד וַיִּפְּלוּ פָנָיו, נַעֲשׂוּ כָּאוּר. (בראשית ד, ו): וַיֹּאמֶר ה' אֶל קָיִן לָמָּה חָרָה לָךְ וְלָמָּה נָפְלוּ פָנֶיךָ, (בראשית ד, ז): הֲלוֹא אִם תֵּיטִיב שְׂאֵת, בְּרָכָה, כְּמָה דְּאַתְּ אָמַר (ויקרא ט, כב): וַיִּשָֹּׂא אַהֲרֹן אֶת יָדָו אֶל הָעָם וַיְבָרְכֵם. וְאִם לֹא תֵיטִיב שְׂאֵת, קְלָלָה, דִּכְתִיב (ויקרא כב, טז): וְהִשִֹּׂיאוּ אוֹתָם עֲוֹן אַשְׁמָה. דָּבָר אַחֵר, אִם תֵּיטִיב אֲנִי מוֹחֵל לְךָ עַל עֲוֹנוֹתֶיךָ, וְאִם לָאו חֶטְאוֹ שֶׁל אוֹתוֹ הָאִישׁ גָּדוּשׁ וּמְגֻדָּשׁ, רַבִּי בֶּרֶכְיָה בְּשֵׁם רַבִּי שִׁמְעוֹן בַּר אַמֵּי אָמַר (תהלים לב, ט): לְדָוִד מַשְׂכִּיל אַשְׁרֵי נְשׂוּי פֶּשַׁע כְּסוּי חֲטָאָה, אַשְׁרָיו לְאָדָם שֶׁהוּא גָּבוֹהַּ מִפִּשְׁעוֹ וְלֹא פִּשְׁעוֹ גָּבוֹהַּ מִמֶּנּוּ, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (בראשית ד, ז): לַפֶּתַח חַטָּאת רֹבֵץ, חַטָּאת רוֹבֶצֶת אֵין כְּתִיב כָּאן, אֶלָּא חַטָּאת רֹבֵץ, בַּתְּחִלָּה הוּא תַּשׁ כִּנְקֵבָה, אַחַר כָּךְ הוּא מִתְגַּבֵּר כְּזָכָר. אָמַר רַבִּי עֲקִיבָא בַּתְּחִלָּה דּוֹמֶה לְחוּט שֶׁל עַכָּבִישׁ, וּלְבַסּוֹף נַעֲשָׂה כַּקֶּלַע הַזּוֹ שֶׁל סְפִינָה, הֲדָא הוּא דִכְתִיב (ישעיה ה, יח): הוֹי משְׁכֵי הֶעָוֹן בְּחַבְלֵי הַשָּׁוְא וְכַעֲבוֹת הָעֲגָלָה חַטָּאָה. אָמַר רַבִּי יִצְחָק בַּתְּחִלָּה הוּא נַעֲשָׂה אוֹרֵחַ, וְאַחַר כָּךְ הוּא נַעֲשָׂה בַּעַל הַבַּיִת, הֲדָא הוּא דִכְתִיב (שמואל ב יב, ד): וַיַּחְמֹל לָקַחַת מִצֹּאנוֹ וּמִבְּקָרוֹ לַעֲשׂוֹת לָאֹרֵחַ הַבָּא לוֹ, הֲרֵי אוֹרֵחַ, וַיִּקַּח אֶת כִּבְשַׂת הָאִישׁ הָרָאשׁ וַיַּעֲשֶׂהָ לָאִישׁ הַבָּא אֵלָיו, הֲרֵי בַּעַל הַבַּיִת. אָמַר רַבִּי תַּנְחוּם בַּר מֶרְיוֹן אִית כַּלְבִּין בְּרוֹמִי דְּיָדְעִין לְמִשְׁתַּדְּלָא, אָזֵיל וְיָתֵיב קַמֵּי פְּלָטֵירָא, וַעֲבֵיד גַּרְמֵיהּ מִתְנַמְנֵם וּמָרֵי פְּלָטֵירָא מִתְנַמְנֵם, וְהוּא שָׁמוּט עִגּוּלָא אַאַרְעָא עַד דְּהַוְיָא מְצַמֵּית לוֹן הוּא מִשְׂתַּכֵּר עִגּוּלָא וּמְהַלֵּךְ בֵּיהּ. אָמַר רַבִּי אַבָּא הַיֵּצֶר הַזֶּה דּוֹמֶה לְלִסְטִים שָׁפוּף שֶׁהָיָה יוֹשֵׁב בְּפָרָשַׁת דְּרָכִים, כָּל מַאן דְעָבַר הֲוָה אָמַר הַב מַה דְּעַלָּךְ, עָבַר פִּקֵּחַ אֶחָד וְרָאָה שֶׁאֵין בּוֹ תּוֹחֶלֶת לִגְזֹל לוֹ כְּלוּם, הִתְחִיל מְכַתְּתוֹ. כָּךְ כַּמָּה דּוֹרוֹת אִבֵּד יֵצֶר הָרָע, דּוֹר אֱנוֹשׁ, וְדוֹר הַפְלָגָה, וְדוֹר הַמַּבּוּל, כֵּיוָן שֶׁעָמַד אַבְרָהָם אָבִינוּ וְרָאָה שֶׁאֵין בּוֹ תּוֹחֶלֶת, הִתְחִיל מְכַתְּתוֹ, הֲדָא הוּא דִּכְתִיב (תהלים פט, כד): וְכַתּוֹתִי מִפָּנָיו צָרָיו וּמְשַׂנְאָיו אֶגּוֹף. אָמַר רַבִּי אָמֵי אֵין יֵצֶר הָרָע מְהַלֵּךְ לִצְדָדִים אֶלָּא בְּאֶמְצַע פְּלַטְיָא, וּבְשָׁעָה שֶׁהוּא רוֹאֶה אָדָם מְמַשְׁמֵשׁ בְּעֵינָיו, מְתַקֵּן בְּשַׂעֲרוֹ, מִתְלָא בַּעֲקֵבוֹ, הוּא אוֹמֵר הָדֵין דִּידִי, מַאי טַעְמֵיהּ (משלי כו, יב): רָאִיתָ אִישׁ חָכָם בְּעֵינָיו תִּקְוָה לַכְּסִיל מִמֶּנוּ. אָמַר רַבִּי אָבִין כָּל מִי שֶׁמְפַנֵּק אֶת יִצְרוֹ בְּנַעֲרוּתוֹ, סוֹפוֹ לִהְיוֹת מָנוֹן עָלָיו בְּזִקְנוּתוֹ, מַאי טַעְמָא (משלי כט, כא): מְפַנֵּק מִנֹעַר עַבְדּוֹ וְאַחֲרִיתוֹ יִהְיֶה מָנוֹן. רַבִּי חֲנִינָא בַּר פַּפָּא אָמַר אִם בָּא יִצְרְךָ לְהַשְׂחִיקְךָ, דָּחֵהוּ בְּדִבְרֵי תוֹרָה, אִם עָשִׂיתָ כֵּן מַעֲלֶה אֲנִי עָלֶיךָ כְּאִלּוּ בָּרָאתָ אֶת הַשָּׁלוֹם, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (ישעיה כו, ג): יֵצֶר סָמוּךְ תִּצֹּר שָׁלוֹם, וְאִם עָשִׂיתָ כֵּן מַעֲלֶה אֲנִי עָלֶיךָ כְּאִלּוּ בָּרָאתָ אֶת הַשָּׁלוֹם, שָׁלוֹם אֵין כְּתִיב כָּאן אֶלָּא שָׁלוֹם שָׁלוֹם. וְאִם תֹּאמַר שֶׁאֵינוֹ בִּרְשׁוּתְךָ, תַּלְמוּד לוֹמַר (ישעיה כו, ג): כִּי בְךָ בָּטוּחַ, וּכְבָר הִכְתַּבְתִּי לְךָ בַּתּוֹרָה (בראשית ד, ז): וְאֵלֶיךָ תְּשׁוּקָתוֹ וְאַתָּה תִּמְשָׁל בּוֹ. רַבִּי סִימוֹן אָמַר אִם בָּא יִצְרְךָ לְהַשְׂחִיקְךָ, שַׂמְּחֵהוּ בְּדִבְרֵי תוֹרָה, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (ישעיה כו, ג): יֵצֶר סָמוּךְ תִּצֹּר שָׁלוֹם, וְאִם עָשִׂיתָ כֵּן מַעֲלֶה אֲנִי עָלֶיךָ כְּאִלּוּ בָּרָאתָ אֶת שְׁנֵי הָעוֹלָמוֹת. תִּצֹּר שָׁלוֹם אֵין כְּתִיב כָּאן, אֶלָּא שָׁלוֹם שָׁלוֹם. וְאִם תֹּאמַר שֶׁאֵינוֹ בִּרְשׁוּתְךָ כְּבָר הִכְתַּבְתִּי בַּתּוֹרָה (בראשית ד, ז): וְאֵלֶיךָ תְּשׁוּקָתוֹ וגו'. 22.6. "'And Ad-nai paid heed to Hevel and his offering' (Gen. 4:4) - He was pacified because of him. 'And to Kayin and his offering He did not pay heed' - He was not pacified because of him. 'And Kayin was very angry, and his face fell' (Gen. 4:5) - his face became dark/repulsive/like fire. 'And Ad-nai said to Kayin: why are you so angry, and why is your face fallen? (Gen. 4:7) is it not that, when you do good, you rise up [se'et] ? [this is] blessing, just as you say 'and Aharon lift [vayisa'] up his hands to the people and blessed them' (Lev. 9:22). 'And if you don't do good, lift' [this is] curse, as it is written 'and cause them to carry [lift on shoulders] the iniquity of guilt' (Lev. 22:16). Another interpretation: if you do goof I forgive all your sins, and if not, the sin of that same man is heaped to excess. Rabbi Berachia in the name of Rabbi Shime'on the son of Ami said: of David, a maskil, happy is he whose transgression is forgiven, whose sin is pardoned.' (Ps. 22:1) - Happy is the person who is higher/greater from his sin, and whose sin is not higher/greater than him,as it says 'sin crouches at the door'. It is not written here 'she crouches' [chatat is feminine] but 'he crouches' - in the beginning the sin is weak like a lady, and after it strengthens as a male. Said rabbi Akiva: in the beginning it looks like a thread of a spider, and at the end it becomes like the rope of a boat, since it is written: 'Oy to those who draw iniquity with cords of vanity, and as the ropes of a cart, sin' (Isaiah 5:18). Said Rabbi Itzchak: at first it makes itself a guest, and later becomes the master of the house, since it is written: '[And there came a traveler to the rich man] and he spared to take of his own flock and of his own herd, to dress for the wayfaring man' - here is the guest - 'that had come to him, but took the poor man's lamb, and dressed it for the man that had come to him. '(II Sam. 12:4) - this is the master of the house. Rabbi Tanchum bar Merion said: there are dogs in Rome that know how to insinuate themselves, [the dog] goes and sits in front of a shop, and he pretends to take a nap, and the shopkeeper takes a nap, and the dog lets a bread roll fall near the ground, and and as onlookers are collecting [the scattered pile] the dog gets a bread roll for himself. Said Rabbi Aba: this impulse is similar to robbers, [such as] a person bent over, who was sitting at crossroads who would say to to everyone who passed 'give me what you have!' A smart one passed and saw that there was nothing he could do to rob him, and began to hit him. So too, the impulse for evil [yetzer hara] destroyed a few generations, the generation of Enosh, and the generation of the tower [dor haplagah] and the generation of the flood, when Avraham Avinu stood up and saw that [the yetzer hara] had nothing, began hitting him, since it is written 'And I will beat to pieces his adversaries before him, and smite them that hate him.' (Ps. 89:24). Said Rabbi Ami: The yetzer hara does not walk by the sides, rather, he walks by the middle of the square, and the moment he sees a man rolling his eyes, fixing his hair, and lifting his heel, he says: 'this one is mine!' What is the reason? 'Do you see a man wise in his own eyes? Sin has hope in him' (Prov. 26:12). Said Rabbi Avin: whoever indulges his yetzer [impulse to evil] in his youth, his end will be to be to managed by him. Rabbi Chanina bar Papa said: if your yetzer came to tempt you [lit. to make you desire] send him away with words of Torah, if you do so I rise you up as if you created peace itself, as it says: 'The yetzer near you, go out in battle of perfect peace [shalom shalom]' (Isaiah 26:3) if you do so I rise you up as if you created peace itself since not only peace is written here, but peace, peace. And if you say that it is not in your power to do so, the text says: 'because in you/You He/he trusts' (Isaiah 26:3). And I already told [lit. honored] you through Torah, 'Its urge is toward you, yet you can be its master.' (Gen. 4:7)",
85. Athenagoras, Apology Or Embassy For The Christians, 11.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Pevarello (2013), The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism. 22
86. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 10.96.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •hermas, shepherd of Found in books: Dijkstra and Raschle (2020), Religious Violence in the Ancient World: From Classical Athens to Late Antiquity, 58
87. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 10.96.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •hermas, shepherd of Found in books: Dijkstra and Raschle (2020), Religious Violence in the Ancient World: From Classical Athens to Late Antiquity, 58
88. Aelius Aristides, Sacred Tales, 1.26 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 37
89. Hermas, Visions, 2.1.3-2.1.4, 2.2.3, 3.2.1, 11.2, 20.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas •hermas, shepherd of Found in books: Dijkstra and Raschle (2020), Religious Violence in the Ancient World: From Classical Athens to Late Antiquity, 58; Iricinschi et al. (2013), Beyond the Gnostic Gospels: Studies Building on the Work of Elaine Pagels, 141; Pevarello (2013), The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism. 55, 96; Ward (2022), Clement and Scriptural Exegesis: The Making of a Commentarial Theologian, 73, 74
90. Theophilus, To Autolycus, 2.8.6, 2.38.7 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas, the Found in books: Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 206
91. Tertullian, On The Resurrection of The Flesh, 32.1 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas / hermae pastor Found in books: Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 86
92. Anon., Marytrdom of Polycarp, None (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 185
93. Origen, Homilies On Luke, a b c d\n0 29.7 29.7 29 7\n1 23206. 23206. 23206 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Ramelli (2013), The Christian Doctrine of Apokatastasis: A Critical Assessment from the New Testament to Eriugena, 207
94. Origen, Commentary On Romans, 10.31, 10.31.3-10.31.5 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Ramelli (2013), The Christian Doctrine of Apokatastasis: A Critical Assessment from the New Testament to Eriugena, 126, 207
95. Origen, Commentary On Romans, 10.31, 10.31.3-10.31.5 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Ramelli (2013), The Christian Doctrine of Apokatastasis: A Critical Assessment from the New Testament to Eriugena, 126, 207
96. Origen, Commentary On Romans, 10.31, 10.31.3-10.31.5 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Ramelli (2013), The Christian Doctrine of Apokatastasis: A Critical Assessment from the New Testament to Eriugena, 126, 207
97. Origen, Against Celsus, a b c d\n0 1.28 1.28 1 28\n1 '3.66 '3.66 '3 66 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Monnickendam (2020), Jewish Law and Early Christian Identity: Betrothal, Marriage, and Infidelity in the Writings of Ephrem the Syrian, 168
1.28. And since, in imitation of a rhetorician training a pupil, he introduces a Jew, who enters into a personal discussion with Jesus, and speaks in a very childish manner, altogether unworthy of the grey hairs of a philosopher, let me endeavour, to the best of my ability, to examine his statements, and show that he does not maintain, throughout the discussion, the consistency due to the character of a Jew. For he represents him disputing with Jesus, and confuting Him, as he thinks, on many points; and in the first place, he accuses Him of having invented his birth from a virgin, and upbraids Him with being born in a certain Jewish village, of a poor woman of the country, who gained her subsistence by spinning, and who was turned out of doors by her husband, a carpenter by trade, because she was convicted of adultery; that after being driven away by her husband, and wandering about for a time, she disgracefully gave birth to Jesus, an illegitimate child, who having hired himself out as a servant in Egypt on account of his poverty, and having there acquired some miraculous powers, on which the Egyptians greatly pride themselves, returned to his own country, highly elated on account of them, and by means of these proclaimed himself a God. Now, as I cannot allow anything said by unbelievers to remain unexamined, but must investigate everything from the beginning, I give it as my opinion that all these things worthily harmonize with the predictions that Jesus is the Son of God.
98. Pseudo-Justinus, Letters, 1.5 (3rd cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 37
99. Athanasius, Epistula Festalis Xxxix (Fragmentum In Collectione Canonum), 39 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas / hermae pastor Found in books: Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 26
100. Cyprian, Testimoniorum Libri Tres Adversus Judaeos (Ad Quirinum), 2.16 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas / hermae pastor Found in books: Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 152
101. Babylonian Talmud, Yevamot, None (3rd cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Rosen-Zvi (2011), Demonic Desires: Yetzer Hara and the Problem of Evil in Late Antiquity. 121
65b. הוא אמר אפלת בגו עשר והיא אמרה לא אפלית א"ר אמי אף בזו היא נאמנת דאם איתא דהפילה נפשה בעקרתה לא מחזקה,הפילה וחזרה והפילה וחזרה והפילה הוחזקה לנפלים הוא אמר אפילה תרי והיא אמרה תלת אמר רבי יצחק בן אלעזר עובדא הוה בי מדרשא ואמרו היא מהימנא דאם איתא דלא אפלה נפשה בניפלי לא מחזקה:, big strongמתני׳ /strong /big האיש מצווה על פריה ורביה אבל לא האשה רבי יוחנן בן ברוקה אומר על שניהם הוא אומר (בראשית א, כח) ויברך אותם אלהים ויאמר להם [אלהים] פרו ורבו:, big strongגמ׳ /strong /big מנא הני מילי אמר ר' אילעא משום ר' אלעזר בר' שמעון אמר קרא (בראשית א, כח) ומלאו את הארץ וכבשוה איש דרכו לכבש ואין אשה דרכה לכבש,אדרבה וכבשוה תרתי משמע אמר רב נחמן בר יצחק וכבשה כתיב רב יוסף אמר מהכא (בראשית לה, יא) אני אל שדי פרה ורבה ולא קאמר פרו ורבו,ואמר רבי אילעא משום ר' אלעזר בר' שמעון כשם שמצוה על אדם לומר דבר הנשמע כך מצוה על אדם שלא לומר דבר שאינו נשמע רבי אבא אומר חובה שנאמר (משלי ט, ח) אל תוכח לץ פן ישנאך הוכח לחכם ויאהבך,וא"ר אילעא משום רבי אלעזר בר' שמעון מותר לו לאדם לשנות בדבר השלום שנאמר (בראשית נ, טז) אביך צוה וגו כה תאמרו ליוסף אנא שא נא וגו',ר' נתן אומר מצוה שנאמר (שמואל א טז, ב) ויאמר שמואל איך אלך ושמע שאול והרגני וגו',דבי רבי ישמעאל תנא גדול השלום שאף הקדוש ברוך הוא שינה בו דמעיקרא כתיב (בראשית יח, יב) ואדוני זקן ולבסוף כתיב ואני זקנתי:,רבי יוחנן בן ברוקה אומר: אתמר רבי יוחנן ור' יהושע בן לוי חד אמר הלכה כרבי יוחנן בן ברוקה וחד אמר אין הלכה כרבי יוחנן בן ברוקה,תסתיים דרבי יוחנן הוא דאמר אין הלכה דיתיב ר' אבהו וקאמר משמיה דרבי יוחנן הלכה ואהדרינהו רבי אמי ורבי אסי לאפייהו,ואיכא דאמרי רבי חייא בר אבא אמר ואהדרינהו רבי אמי ורבי אסי לאפייהו אמר רב פפא בשלמא למאן דאמר רבי אבהו אמרה משום כבוד בי קיסר לא אמרו ליה ולא מידי אלא למאן דאמר רבי חייא בר אבא אמרה לימרו ליה לא אמר רבי יוחנן הכי,מאי הוה עלה ת"ש דאמר ר' אחא בר חנינא אמר ר' אבהו אמר ר' אסי עובדא הוה קמיה דרבי יוחנן בכנישתא דקיסרי ואמר יוציא ויתן כתובה ואי ס"ד לא מפקדה כתובה מאי עבידתה,דלמא בבאה מחמת טענה,כי ההיא דאתאי לקמיה דר' אמי אמרה ליה הב לי כתובה אמר לה זיל לא מיפקדת אמרה ליה מסיבו דילה מאי תיהוי עלה דהך אתתא אמר כי הא ודאי כפינן,ההיא דאתאי לקמיה דרב נחמן אמר לה לא מיפקדת אמרה ליה לא בעיא הך אתתא חוטרא לידה ומרה לקבורה אמר כי הא ודאי כפינן,יהודה וחזקיה תאומים היו אחד נגמרה צורתו לסוף תשעה ואחד נגמרה צורתו לתחלת שבעה יהודית דביתהו דר' חייא הוה לה צער לידה שנאי מנא ואתיא לקמיה דר' חייא ואמרה אתתא מפקדא אפריה ורביה אמר לה לא אזלא אשתיא סמא דעקרתא,לסוף איגלאי מילתא אמר לה איכו ילדת לי חדא כרסא אחריתא דאמר מר יהודה וחזקיה אחי פזי וטוי 65b. The Gemara addresses another case in which the court forces a man to divorce his wife who has not had children after ten years. If b he said: You miscarried within /b the b ten /b years of our marriage, and since less than ten years have elapsed since that time he should not have to divorce her, b and she said: I did not miscarry, Rabbi Ami said: Even in this /b case b she is believed, because if it is so that she miscarried she /b would b not establish herself as barren /b through denying his claim.,If b she miscarried, and /b then b miscarried again, and miscarried again, she has been established to /b be a woman who is prone to b miscarriages, /b and her husband must divorce her so that he can have children with another woman. If b he said she miscarried twice, and she said /b it occurred b three /b times, b Rabbi Yitzḥak ben Elazar said: There was an incident /b of this kind that was adjudicated in b the study hall and they said /b that b she is believed, because if it is so that /b she had b not miscarried /b a third time b she /b would b not establish herself /b as one who is prone to b miscarriages. /b , strong MISHNA: /strong b A man is commanded with regard to /b the mitzva to be b fruitful and multiply, but not a woman. Rabbi Yoḥa ben Beroka says /b that a woman is also commanded, as the verse b states with regard to both of them: “And God blessed them, and God said to them: Be fruitful and multiply” /b (Genesis 1:28)., strong GEMARA: /strong b From where are these matters /b derived, that a woman is not obligated in the mitzva to be fruitful and multiply? b Rabbi Ile’a said in the name of Rabbi Elazar, son of Rabbi Shimon: The verse states: /b “Be fruitful and multiply, b and fill the land and conquer it” /b (Genesis 1:28). b It is the manner of a man to conquer and it is not the manner of a woman to conquer. /b Consequently, it is evident that the entire command, including the mitzva to be fruitful and multiply, was given only to men and not to women.,The Gemara raises a difficulty. b On the contrary, /b the plural term: b “And conquer it [ i vekhivshuha /i ],” indicates /b that the b two /b of them are included. b Rav Naḥman bar Yitzḥak said: It is written /b in the Torah without the letter i vav /i , so that it can be read: b And conquer it [ i vekhivsha /i ], /b in the singular. b Rav Yosef said: /b The proof is b from here: /b “And God said to him: b I am God Almighty, be fruitful and multiply [ i perei urvei /i ]” /b (Genesis 35:11), which is in singular, b and it does not state: Be fruitful and multiply [ i peru urvu /i ] /b in the plural.,The Gemara cites other statements made by Rabbi Ile’a in the name of Rabbi Elazar, son of Rabbi Shimon. b And Rabbi Ile’a said in the name of Rabbi Elazar, son of Rabbi Shimon: Just as it is a mitzva for a person to say that which will be heeded, so is it a mitzva for a person not to say that which will not be heeded. /b One should not rebuke those who will be unreceptive to his message. b Rabbi Abba says: /b It is b obligatory /b for him to refrain from speaking, b as it is stated: “Do not reprove a scorner lest he hate you; reprove a wise man and he will love you” /b (Proverbs 9:8)., b And Rabbi Ile’a /b further b said in the name of Rabbi Elazar, son of Rabbi Shimon: It is permitted for a person to depart /b from the truth b in a matter /b that will bring b peace, as it is stated: “Your father commanded /b before he died, saying: b So you shall say to Joseph: Please pardon /b your brothers’ crime, etc.” (Genesis 50:16–17). Jacob never issued this command, but his sons falsely attributed this statement to him in order to preserve peace between them and Joseph., b Rabbi Natan says: /b It is b a mitzva /b to depart from the truth in order to preserve peace, b as it is stated: “And Samuel said: How can I go, and Saul will hear and kill me” /b (I Samuel 16:2). God responded in the next verse that Samuel should say he went to sacrifice an offering, indicating that God commands one to lie in order to preserve peace.,It was b taught /b in b the school of Rabbi Yishmael: Great is peace, as even the Holy One, Blessed be He, departed /b from the truth for b it. As, initially it is written /b that Sarah said of Abraham: b “And my lord is old” /b (Genesis 18:12), b and in the end it is written /b that God told Abraham that Sarah said: b “And I am old” /b (Genesis 18:13). God adjusted Sarah’s words in order to spare Abraham hurt feelings that might lead Abraham and Sarah to quarrel.,§ It is taught in the mishna that b Rabbi Yoḥa ben Beroka says /b that women are also included in the mitzva to be fruitful and multiply. b It was stated /b that two i amora’im /i , b Rabbi Yoḥa and Rabbi Yehoshua ben Levi, /b disagreed concerning this matter. b One said /b that the b i halakha /i is in accordance with /b the opinion of b Rabbi Yoḥa ben Beroka, and one said /b that the b i halakha /i is not in accordance with /b the opinion of b Rabbi Yoḥa ben Beroka. /b ,The Gemara comments: b Conclude that it was Rabbi Yoḥa who said /b that the b i halakha /i is not /b in accordance with the opinion of Rabbi Yoḥa ben Beroka, b as Rabbi Abbahu sat and said in the name of Rabbi Yoḥa /b that the b i halakha /i /b is in accordance with the opinion of Rabbi Yoḥa ben Beroka, b and Rabbi Ami and Rabbi Asi, /b who were sitting across from him, b turned their faces /b as an indication that they disagreed with this report of Rabbi Yoḥa’s opinion, but did not want to explicitly contradict Rabbi Abbahu’s statement out of respect for him., b And some say /b a different version of the incident, that it was b Rabbi Ḥiyya bar Abba /b who b said /b this statement, b and Rabbi Ami and Rabbi Asi turned their faces. Rav Pappa said: Granted, according to the one who said /b that b Rabbi Abbahu said it, /b it makes sense that b due to the honor of Caesar’s court, /b where Rabbi Abbahu maintained close ties, Rabbi Ami and Rabbi Asi b did not say anything to him /b and merely hinted at their disagreement. b However, according to the one who said /b that b Rabbi Ḥiyya bar Abba said it, let them say to him explicitly: Rabbi Yoḥa did not say this. /b In any event, it is clear that according to Rabbi Ami and Rabbi Asi, Rabbi Yoḥa disagreed with the opinion of Rabbi Yoḥa ben Beroka.,The Gemara asks: b What /b conclusion b was /b reached b about /b this issue? The Gemara suggests: b Come /b and b hear, as Rabbi Aḥa bar Ḥanina said /b that b Rabbi Abbahu said /b that b Rabbi Asi said: There was an incident /b that came b before Rabbi Yoḥa in the synagogue of Caesarea /b involving a woman who wanted a divorce from her husband after ten years of childless marriage, b and he said /b that the husband b must divorce /b her b and give /b her the payment for her b marriage contract. If it enters your mind /b to say b that she is not commanded /b to be fruitful and multiply, b what is /b payment for b a marriage contract doing /b here? Why does she have a right to demand to be divorced and to receive the payment for her marriage contract?,The Gemara responds: b Perhaps /b that was b in /b a case when b she came /b to demand a divorce b due to /b another b claim, /b i.e., she wanted children for a reason other than the fulfillment of the mitzva to be fruitful and multiply. Since this claim has merit, her husband must divorce her and pay her marriage contract.,This is b like /b the case of b a certain /b woman b who came before Rabbi Ami /b and requested a divorce due to her husband’s inability to father children. b She said to him /b : b Give me /b the payment for my b marriage contract. He said to her: Go /b away, as b you are not commanded /b to be fruitful and multiply and have no right to demand a divorce. b She said to him: In her old age, what will be with this woman, /b i.e., if I have no children, who will take care of me when I grow old? Rabbi Ami b said: /b In a situation b such as this, we certainly force /b the husband to divorce and her and pay her marriage contract.,The Gemara relates a similar incident: b A certain /b woman b came before Rav Naḥman /b and requested a divorce due to her husband’s inability to father children. b He said to her: You are not commanded /b to be fruitful and multiply. b She said to him: Does this woman not require a staff for her hand and a hoe for /b her b burial? /b In other words, the woman said that she wanted children so that they could care for her in her old age and bury her when she would die. Rav Naḥman b said: /b In a case b such as this, we certainly force /b the husband to divorce her.,The Gemara relates that Rabbi Ḥiyya’s sons, b Yehuda and Ḥizkiyya, were twins, /b but b one /b of them b was fully developed after nine /b months of pregcy b and one was fully developed at the beginning of the seventh /b month, and they were born two months apart. b Yehudit, the wife of Rabbi Ḥiyya, had /b acute b birthing pain /b from these unusual deliveries. She b changed her clothes /b to prevent Rabbi Ḥiyya from recognizing her b and came before Rabbi Ḥiyya /b to ask him a halakhic question. b She said: Is a woman commanded /b to be b fruitful and multiply? He said to her: No. She went and drank an infertility potion. /b , b Eventually the matter was revealed, /b and Rabbi Ḥiyya found out about what Yehudit had done. b He said to her: If only you had given birth to one more belly for me, /b i.e., another set of twins. b As the Master said: Yehuda and Ḥizkiyya /b were twin b brothers /b and became prominent Torah scholars, and b Pazi and Tavi, /b Rabbi Ḥiyya’s daughters,
102. Babylonian Talmud, Sukkah, None (3rd cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Rosen-Zvi (2011), Demonic Desires: Yetzer Hara and the Problem of Evil in Late Antiquity. 55
52a. (זכריה יב, יב) וספדה הארץ משפחות משפחות לבד משפחת בית דוד לבד ונשיהם לבד אמרו והלא דברים ק"ו ומה לעתיד לבא שעוסקין בהספד ואין יצר הרע שולט בהם אמרה תורה אנשים לבד ונשים לבד עכשיו שעסוקין בשמחה ויצה"ר שולט בהם על אחת כמה וכמה,הא הספידא מאי עבידתיה פליגי בה רבי דוסא ורבנן חד אמר על משיח בן יוסף שנהרג וחד אמר על יצה"ר שנהרג,בשלמא למאן דאמר על משיח בן יוסף שנהרג היינו דכתיב (זכריה יב, י) והביטו אלי את אשר דקרו וספדו עליו כמספד על היחיד אלא למאן דאמר על יצר הרע שנהרג האי הספידא בעי למעבד שמחה בעי למעבד אמאי בכו,כדדרש רבי יהודה לעתיד לבא מביאו הקב"ה ליצר הרע ושוחטו בפני הצדיקים ובפני הרשעים צדיקים נדמה להם כהר גבוה ורשעים נדמה להם כחוט השערה הללו בוכין והללו בוכין צדיקים בוכין ואומרים היאך יכולנו לכבוש הר גבוה כזה ורשעים בוכין ואומרים היאך לא יכולנו לכבוש את חוט השערה הזה ואף הקב"ה תמה עמהם שנאמר (זכריה ח, ו) כה אמר ה' צבאות כי יפלא בעיני שארית העם הזה בימים ההם גם בעיני יפלא,א"ר אסי יצה"ר בתחילה דומה לחוט של בוכיא ולבסוף דומה כעבותות העגלה שנאמר (ישעיהו ה, יח) הוי מושכי העון בחבלי השוא וכעבות העגלה חטאה,תנו רבנן משיח בן דוד שעתיד להגלות במהרה בימינו אומר לו הקב"ה שאל ממני דבר ואתן לך שנאמר (תהלים ב, ז) אספרה אל חוק וגו' אני היום ילדתיך (תהלים ב, ח) שאל ממני ואתנה גוים נחלתך וכיון שראה משיח בן יוסף שנהרג אומר לפניו רבש"ע איני מבקש ממך אלא חיים אומר לו חיים עד שלא אמרת כבר התנבא עליך דוד אביך שנאמר (תהלים כא, ה) חיים שאל ממך נתתה לו וגו',דרש ר' עוירא ואיתימא ר' יהושע בן לוי שבעה שמות יש לו ליצה"ר הקב"ה קראו רע שנאמר (בראשית ח, כא) כי יצר לב האדם רע מנעוריו משה קראו ערל שנאמר (דברים י, טז) ומלתם את ערלת לבבכם דוד קראו טמא שנאמר (תהלים נא, יב) לב טהור ברא לי אלהים מכלל דאיכא טמא,שלמה קראו שונא שנאמר (משלי כה, כא) אם רעב שנאך האכילהו לחם ואם צמא השקהו מים כי גחלים אתה חותה על ראשו וה' ישלם לך אל תקרי ישלם לך אלא ישלימנו לך,ישעיה קראו מכשול שנאמר (ישעיהו נז, יד) סולו סולו פנו דרך הרימו מכשול מדרך עמי יחזקאל קראו אבן שנאמר (יחזקאל לו, כו) והסרתי את לב האבן מבשרכם ונתתי לכם לב בשר יואל קראו צפוני שנאמר (יואל ב, כ) ואת הצפוני ארחיק מעליכם ת"ר ואת הצפוני ארחיק מעליכם זה יצה"ר שצפון ועומד בלבו של אדם,והדחתיו אל ארץ ציה ושממה למקום שאין בני אדם מצויין להתגרות בהן את פניו אל הים הקדמוני שנתן עיניו במקדש ראשון והחריבו והרג תלמידי חכמים שבו וסופו אל הים האחרון שנתן עיניו במקדש שני והחריבו והרג תלמידי חכמים שבו ועלה באשו ותעל צחנתו שמניח אומות העולם ומתגרה בשונאיהם של ישראל כי הגדיל לעשות אמר אביי ובתלמידי חכמים יותר מכולם,כי הא דאביי שמעיה לההוא גברא דקאמר לההיא אתתא נקדים וניזיל באורחא אמר איזיל אפרשינהו מאיסורא אזל בתרייהו תלתא פרסי באגמא כי הוו פרשי מהדדי שמעינהו דקא אמרי אורחין רחיקא וצוותין בסימא,אמר אביי אי מאן דסני לי הוה לא הוה מצי לאוקומיה נפשיה אזל תלא נפשיה בעיבורא דדשא ומצטער אתא ההוא סבא תנא ליה כל הגדול מחבירו יצרו גדול הימנו,אמר רבי יצחק יצרו של אדם מתגבר עליו בכל יום שנאמר (בראשית ו, ה) רק 52a. It is stated: b “The land will eulogize, each family separately; the family of the house of David separately, and their women separately, /b the family of the house of Nathan separately, and their women separately” (Zechariah 12:12). This indicates that at the end of days a great eulogy will be organized during which men and women will be separate. b They said: And are /b these b matters not /b inferred b i a fortiori /i ? If in the future, /b at the end of days referred to in this prophecy, b when /b people b are involved in /b a great b eulogy and /b consequently b the evil inclination does not dominate them, /b as typically during mourning inappropriate thoughts and conduct are less likely, and nevertheless b the Torah says: Men separately and women separately; /b then b now that they are involved in /b the b Celebration /b of the Drawing of the Water, b and /b as such b the evil inclination dominates them, /b since celebration lends itself to levity, b all the more so /b should men and women be separate.,Apropos the eulogy at the end of days, the Gemara asks: For b what is the nature of this eulogy? /b The Gemara answers: b Rabbi Dosa and the Rabbis disagree concerning this /b matter. b One said /b that this eulogy is b for Messiah ben Yosef who was killed /b in the war of Gog from the land of Magog prior to the ultimate redemption with the coming of Messiah ben David. b And one said /b that this eulogy is b for the evil inclination that was killed. /b ,The Gemara asks: b Granted, according to the one who said /b that the lament is for b Messiah ben Yosef who was killed, this /b would be the meaning of that b which is written /b in that context: b “And they shall look unto Me because they have thrust him through; and they shall mourn for him, as one mourns for his only son” /b (Zechariah 12:10). b However, according to the one who said /b that the eulogy is b for the evil inclination that was killed, /b does one b need to conduct a eulogy /b for b this? /b On the contrary, b one should conduct a celebration. Why, /b then, b did they cry? /b ,The Gemara answers: This can be understood b as Rabbi Yehuda taught: In the future, /b at the end of days, b God will bring the evil inclination and slaughter it in the presence of the righteous and in the presence of the wicked. /b For b the righteous /b the evil inclination b appears to them as a high mountain, and /b for b the wicked /b it b appears /b to b them as /b a mere b strand of hair. These weep and those weep. The righteous weep and say: How were we able to overcome so high a mountain? And the wicked weep and say: How were we unable to overcome this strand of hair? And even the Holy One, Blessed be He, will wonder with them, as it is stated /b with regard to the eulogy: b “So says the Lord of hosts: If it be wondrous in the eyes of the remt of this people in those days, it should also be wondrous in My eyes” /b (Zechariah 8:6).,Apropos the evil inclination and the battle against it, the Gemara cites that which b Rav Asi said: Initially, /b when it begins to entice someone, b the evil inclination is like a strand of a spider’s web [ i bukhya /i ]; and ultimately it is like /b the thick b ropes of a wagon, as it is stated: “Woe unto them that draw iniquity with cords of vanity, and sin as if it were with a wagon rope” /b (Isaiah 5:18). Initially, the enticement is almost imperceptible, like a thin strand; however, after one sins, it is like wagon ropes tied tightly around him., b The Sages taught: To Messiah ben David, who is destined to be revealed swiftly in our time, the Holy One, Blessed be He, says: Ask of Me anything and I will give you /b whatever you wish, b as it is stated: “I will tell of the decree; /b the Lord said unto me: You are My son, b this day have I begotten you, ask of Me, and I will give the nations for your inheritance, /b and the ends of the earth for your possession” (Psalms 2:7–8). b Once /b the Messiah ben David b saw Messiah ben Yosef, who was killed, he says /b to the Holy One, Blessed be He: b Master of the Universe, I ask of you only life; /b that I will not suffer the same fate. The Holy One, Blessed be He, b says to him: Life? /b Even b before you stated /b this request, b your father, David, already prophesied about you /b with regard to this matter precisely, b as it is stated: “He asked life of You, You gave it to him; /b even length of days for ever and ever” (Psalms 21:5).,§ b Rabbi Avira, and some say Rabbi Yehoshua ben Levi, taught: The evil inclination has seven names. The Holy One, Blessed be He, called it evil, as it is stated: “For the inclination of a man’s heart is evil from his youth” /b (Genesis 8:21). b Moses called it uncircumcised, as it is stated: “And circumcise the foreskin of your hearts” /b (Deuteronomy 10:16). b David called it impure, as it is stated: “Create for me a pure heart, O God” /b (Psalms 51:12); b by inference, there is an impure /b heart that is the evil inclination., b Solomon called it enemy, as it is stated: “If your enemy is hungry, give him bread to eat, and if he is thirsty, give him water to drink; for you will heap coals of fire upon his head, and the Lord will reward you” /b (Proverbs 25:21–22). b Do not read /b it as: b And the Lord will reward you [ i yeshalem lakh /i ]; rather /b read it as: And the Lord b will reconcile it to you [ i yashlimenu lakh /i ]. /b God will cause the evil inclination to love you and no longer seek to entice you to sin., b Isaiah called it a stumbling block, as it is stated: “And He will say: Cast you up, cast you up, clear the way, take up the stumbling block out of the way of My people” /b (Isaiah 57:14). b Ezekiel called it stone, as it is stated: “And I will take away the stony heart out of your flesh, and I will give you a heart of flesh” /b (Ezekiel 36:26). b Joel called it hidden one, as it says: “But I will remove the northern one [ i hatzefoni /i ] far off from you” /b (Joel 2:20). b The Sages taught /b concerning the verse: b “But I will remove the northern one [ i hatzefoni /i ] far off from you,” /b that b this is /b referring to b the evil inclination. /b And why is the evil inclination referred to as i tzefoni /i ? It is due to the fact b that it is always hidden [ i tzafun /i ] in the heart of man. /b ,The i baraita /i continues interpreting the verse in the book of Joel. b “And will drive it to a land barren and desolate” /b (Joel 2:20), b where there are no people for /b the evil inclination b to incite. /b And what damage does the evil inclination cause? b “With its face toward the eastern [ i hakadmoni /i ] sea” /b (Joel 2:20), b as it set its eyes on the First /b [ b i mukdam /i /b ] b Temple and destroyed it, and killed the Torah scholars that /b were b in it; “and its end toward the western [ i ha’aḥaron /i ] sea” /b (Joel 2:20), b as it set its eyes on the Second /b [ b i aḥaron /i /b ] b Temple and destroyed it, and killed the Torah scholars that /b were b in it; “its foulness may come up, and its ill odor may come up” /b (Joel 2:20), b as it forsakes the nations of the world and incites the enemies of /b the b Jewish people: /b In this context, the term the nations is a euphemism for the Jewish people. The evil inclination seeks to corrupt the Jews more than it does the members of any other nation. b “Because it has done greatly” /b (Joel 2:20): b Abaye said: And /b it provokes b Torah scholars more than /b it provokes b everyone /b else.,The Gemara illustrates that point. It is b like this /b incident, b as Abaye once heard a certain man say to a certain woman: Let us rise early and go on the road. /b Upon hearing this, Abaye b said /b to himself: b I will go /b and accompany them and b prevent them from /b violating b the prohibition /b that they certainly intend to violate. b He went after them /b for a distance of b three parasangs in a marsh /b among the reeds, while they walked on the road, and they did not engage in any wrongful activity. b When they were taking leave of each other, he heard that they were saying: /b We traveled b a long distance /b together, b and the company was pleasant company. /b , b Abaye said: /b In that situation, b if /b instead of that man b it had been one whom I hate, /b a euphemism for himself, b he would not have been able to restrain himself /b from sinning. After becoming aware of so great a shortcoming b he went and leaned against the doorpost, /b thinking b and feeling regret. A certain Elder came /b and b taught him: Anyone who is greater than another, his /b evil b inclination is greater than his. /b Therefore, Abaye should not feel regret, as his realization is a consequence of his greatness., b Rabbi Yitzḥak said: A person’s inclination overcomes him each day, as it is stated: “Only /b
103. Babylonian Talmud, Qiddushin, None (3rd cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Rosen-Zvi (2011), Demonic Desires: Yetzer Hara and the Problem of Evil in Late Antiquity. 121
30b. (משלי ז, ד) אמור לחכמה אחותי את וגו' ואומר (משלי ז, ג) קשרם על אצבעותיך כתבם על לוח לבך ואומר (תהלים קכז, ד) כחצים ביד גבור כן בני הנעורים ואומר (תהלים קכ, ד) חצי גבור שנונים ואומר (תהלים מה, ו) חציך שנונים עמים תחתיך יפלו ואומר (תהלים קכז, ה) אשרי הגבר אשר מלא את אשפתו מהם לא יבושו כי ידברו את אויבים בשער,מאי את אויבים בשער אמר רבי חייא בר אבא אפי' האב ובנו הרב ותלמידו שעוסקין בתורה בשער אחד נעשים אויבים זה את זה ואינם זזים משם עד שנעשים אוהבים זה את זה שנאמר (במדבר כא, יד) את והב בסופה אל תקרי בסופה אלא בסופה,ת"ר (דברים יא, יח) ושמתם סם תם נמשלה תורה כסם חיים משל לאדם שהכה את בנו מכה גדולה והניח לו רטיה על מכתו ואמר לו בני כל זמן שהרטיה זו על מכתך אכול מה שהנאתך ושתה מה שהנאתך ורחוץ בין בחמין בין בצונן ואין אתה מתיירא ואם אתה מעבירה הרי היא מעלה נומי,כך הקב"ה אמר להם לישראל בני בראתי יצר הרע ובראתי לו תורה תבלין ואם אתם עוסקים בתורה אין אתם נמסרים בידו שנאמר (בראשית ד, ז) הלא אם תטיב שאת,ואם אין אתם עוסקין בתורה אתם נמסרים בידו שנא' לפתח חטאת רובץ ולא עוד אלא שכל משאו ומתנו בך שנאמר ואליך תשוקתו ואם אתה רוצה אתה מושל בו שנאמר ואתה תמשל בו,ת"ר קשה יצר הרע שאפילו יוצרו קראו רע שנאמר (בראשית ח, כא) כי יצר לב האדם רע מנעוריו אמר רב יצחק יצרו של אדם מתחדש עליו בכל יום שנאמר (בראשית ו, ה) רק רע כל היום,ואמר ר"ש בן לוי יצרו של אדם מתגבר עליו בכל יום ומבקש המיתו שנאמר (תהלים לז, לב) צופה רשע לצדיק ומבקש להמיתו ואלמלא הקב"ה עוזרו אין יכול לו שנאמר אלהים לא יעזבנו בידו,תנא דבי ר' ישמעאל בני אם פגע בך מנוול זה משכהו לבית המדרש אם אבן הוא נימוח ואם ברזל הוא מתפוצץ שנאמר (ירמיהו כג, כט) הלא כה דברי כאש נאם ה' וכפטיש יפוצץ סלע אם אבן הוא נימוח שנאמר (ישעיהו נה, א) הוי כל צמא לכו למים ואומר (איוב יד, יט) אבנים שחקו מים,להשיאו אשה מנלן דכתיב (ירמיהו כט, ו) קחו נשים והולידו בנים ובנות וקחו לבניכם נשים ואת בנותיכם תנו לאנשים,בשלמא בנו בידו אלא בתו בידו היא הכי קאמר להו ניתן לה מידי ולבשייה ונכסייה כי היכי דקפצו עלה אינשי,ללמדו אומנות מנלן אמר חזקיה דאמר קרא (קהלת ט, ט) ראה חיים עם אשה אשר אהבת אם אשה ממש היא כשם שחייב להשיאו אשה כך חייב ללמדו אומנות אם תורה היא כשם שחייב ללמדו תורה כך חייב ללמדו אומנות,ויש אומרים אף להשיטו בנהר מאי טעמא חיותיה הוא,רבי יהודה אומר כל שאינו מלמדו אומנות מלמדו ליסטות ליסטות ס"ד אלא כאילו מלמדו ליסטות,מאי בינייהו איכא בינייהו דאגמריה עיסקא,כל מצות האב על הבן וכו' מאי כל מצות האב על הבן אילימא כל מצותא דמיחייב אבא למיעבד לבריה נשים חייבות והתניא האב חייב בבנו למולו ולפדותו אביו אין אמו לא,אמר רב יהודה הכי קאמר כל מצות האב המוטלת על הבן לעשות לאביו אחד אנשים ואחד נשים חייבין תנינא להא דת"ר איש אין לי אלא איש אשה מנין כשהוא אומר תיראו הרי כאן שנים,א"כ מה ת"ל איש איש סיפק בידו לעשות אשה אין סיפק בידה לעשות מפני שרשות אחרים עליה אמר רב אידי בר אבין אמר רב נתגרשה שניהם שוים,ת"ר נאמר (שמות כ, יב) כבד את אביך ואת אמך ונאמר (משלי ג, ט) כבד את ה' מהונך השוה הכתוב כבוד אב ואם לכבוד המקום,נאמר (ויקרא יט, ג) איש אמו ואביו תיראו ונאמר (דברים ו, יג) את ה' אלהיך תירא ואותו תעבוד השוה הכתוב מוראת אב ואם למוראת המקום,נאמר (שמות כא, יז) מקלל אביו ואמו מות יומת ונאמר (ויקרא כד, טו) איש איש כי יקלל אלהיו ונשא חטאו השוה הכתוב ברכת אב ואם לברכת המקום אבל בהכאה ודאי אי אפשר,וכן בדין ששלשתן שותפין בו ת"ר שלשה שותפין הן באדם הקב"ה ואביו ואמו בזמן שאדם מכבד את אביו ואת אמו אמר הקב"ה מעלה אני עליהם כאילו דרתי ביניהם וכבדוני,תניא רבי אומר גלוי וידוע לפני מי שאמר והיה העולם שבן מכבד את אמו יותר מאביו מפני 30b. b “Say to wisdom: You are my sister, /b and call understanding your kinswoman” (Proverbs 7:4), which indicates that one should be as knowledgeable in the Torah as in the identity of his sister. b And it states: “Bind them upon your fingers, you shall write them upon the tablet of your heart” /b (Proverbs 7:3). b And it states: “As arrows in the hand of a mighty man, so are the children of one’s youth” /b (Psalms 127:4). b And it states: “Sharp arrows of the mighty” /b (Psalms 120:4). b And it states: “Your arrows are sharp, the peoples fall under you” /b (Psalms 45:6). b And it states: “Happy is the man who has his quiver full of them; they shall not be put to shame when they speak with their enemies in the gate” /b (Psalms 127:5).,The Gemara asks: b What /b is the meaning of the phrase b “enemies in the gate” /b with regard to Torah study? b Rabbi Ḥiyya bar Abba says: Even a father and his son, /b or b a rabbi and his student, who are engaged in Torah /b together b in one gate become enemies with each other /b due to the intensity of their studies. b But they do not leave there until they love each other, as it is stated /b in the verse discussing the places the Jewish people engaged in battle in the wilderness: “Therefore it is said in the book of the wars of the Lord, b Vahev in Suphah [ i beSufa /i ], /b and the valleys of Arnon” (Numbers 21:14). The word “ i vahev /i ” is interpreted as related to the word for love, i ahava /i . Additionally, b do not read /b this as b “in Suphah [ i beSufa /i ]”; rather, /b read it as b “at its end [ i besofa /i ],” /b i.e., at the conclusion of their dispute they are beloved to each other., b The Sages taught: “And you shall place [ i vesamtem /i ] /b these words of Mine in your hearts” (Deuteronomy 11:18). Read this as though it stated b i sam tam /i , a perfect elixir. The Torah is compared to an elixir of life. /b There is b a parable that /b illustrates this: b A person hit his son with a strong blow and placed a bandage on his wound. And he said to him: My son, as long as this bandage is on your wound /b and is healing you, b eat what you enjoy and drink what you enjoy, and bathe in either hot water or cold water, and you do not need to be afraid, /b as it will heal your wound. b But if you take it off, /b the wound b will become gangrenous. /b , b So /b too b the Holy One, Blessed be He, said to Israel: My children, I created an evil inclination, /b which is the wound, b and I created Torah as its antidote. If you are engaged in Torah /b study b you will not be given over into the hand /b of the evil inclination, b as it is stated: “If you do well, shall it not be lifted up?” /b (Genesis 4:7). One who engages in Torah study lifts himself above the evil inclination., b And if you do not engage in Torah /b study, b you are given over to its power, as it is stated: “Sin crouches at the door” /b (Genesis 4:7). b Moreover, all /b of the evil inclination’s b deliberations /b will be b concerning you, as it is stated /b in the same verse: b “And to you is its desire.” And if you wish you shall rule over it, as it is stated /b in the conclusion of the verse: b “But you may rule over it” /b (Genesis 4:7)., b The Sages taught: /b So b difficult is the evil inclination that even its Creator calls it evil, as it is stated: “For the inclination of a man’s heart is evil from his youth” /b (Genesis 8:21). b Rav Yitzḥak says: A person’s /b evil b inclination renews itself to him every day, as it is stated: /b “And that every inclination of the thoughts in his heart was b only evil all day [ i kol hayyom /i ]” /b (Genesis 6:5). “ i Kol hayyom /i ” can also be understood as: Every day., b And Rabbi Shimon ben Levi says: A person’s inclination overpowers him every day, and seeks to kill him, as it is stated: “The wicked watches the righteous and seeks to slay him” /b (Psalms 37:32). b And if not /b for the fact that b the Holy One, Blessed be He, assists /b each person in battling his evil inclination, b he could not /b overcome b it, as it is stated: “The Lord will not leave him in his hand” /b (Psalms 37:33).,A Sage from b the school of Rabbi Yishmael taught: My son, if this wretched one, /b the evil inclination, b encounters you, pull it into the study hall, /b i.e., go and study Torah. b If it is a stone /b it will b melt, and if it is iron /b it will b break, as it is stated /b with regard to the Torah: b “Is not My word like fire, says the Lord, and like a hammer that breaks the rock in pieces?” /b (Jeremiah 23:29). Just as a stone shatters a hammer, so too one can overcome his evil inclination, which is as strong as iron, through Torah study. With regard to the second part of the statement: b If it is a stone /b it will b melt, /b this is b as it is stated /b with regard to the Torah: b “Ho, everyone who thirsts, come for water” /b (Isaiah 55:1), b and it states: “The water wears the stones” /b (Job 14:19), indicating that water is stronger than stone.,§ The i baraita /i (29a) teaches that a father is commanded b to marry /b his son to b a woman. /b The Gemara asks: b From where do we /b derive this matter? b As it is written: “Take wives and bear sons and daughters, and take wives for your sons and give your daughters to men” /b (Jeremiah 29:6).,The Gemara analyzes this verse: b Granted /b with regard to b his son, /b this is b in his power, /b i.e., he can instruct him to marry a woman, as a man is the active agent in a marriage. b But /b with regard to b his daughter, is /b this b in his power? /b She must wait for a man to marry her. The Gemara answers: b This is what /b Jeremiah was b saying to them /b in the aforementioned verse: Her father should b give her something /b for her dowry, b and he should dress and cover her /b with suitable clothing b so that men will leap to /b marry b her. /b ,§ The i baraita /i further states that a father is commanded b to teach /b his son b a trade. /b The Gemara asks: b From where do we /b derive this? b Ḥizkiyya said: As the verse states: “Enjoy life with the wife whom you love” /b (Ecclesiastes 9:9). b If /b this verse is interpreted literally, and b it /b is referring to b an actual woman, /b then one can derive as follows: b Just as /b a father b is obligated to marry /b his son b to a woman, so too, he is obligated to teach him a trade, /b as indicated by the term: Life. b And if /b the wife mentioned in this verse is allegorical, and b it is the Torah, /b then one should explain the verse in the following manner: b Just as he is obligated to teach him Torah, so too, he is obligated to teach him a trade. /b ,§ The i baraita /i adds: b And some say /b that a father is b also /b obligated b to teach /b his son b to swim in a river. /b The Gemara asks: b What is the reason /b for this? b It is /b necessary for b his life, /b i.e., this is potentially a lifesaving skill.,§ The i baraita /i further teaches that b Rabbi Yehuda says: Any /b father b who does not teach /b his son b a trade teaches him banditry. /b The Gemara asks: Can it b enter your mind /b that he actually teaches him b banditry? Rather, /b the i baraita /i means that it is b as though he taught him banditry. /b ,The Gemara asks: b What is /b the difference b between /b the opinion of the first i tanna /i and that of Rabbi Yehuda? Both state that a father must teach his son a trade. The Gemara answers: b There is /b a difference b between them /b in a case b where /b the father b teaches him /b to engage in b business. /b According to the first i tanna /i this is sufficient, whereas Rabbi Yehuda maintains that he must teach him an actual trade.,§ The mishna teaches: With regard to b all mitzvot of a father with regard to his son, /b both men and women are obligated to perform them. The Gemara inquires: b What /b is the meaning of the expression: b All mitzvot of a father with regard to his son? If we say /b that this is referring to b all of the mitzvot that a father is required to perform for his son, /b are b women obligated /b in these? b But isn’t it taught /b in a i baraita /i : b A father is obligated with regard to his son to circumcise him, and to redeem him? /b This indicates that b his father, yes, /b he is obligated to do these, but b his mother, no, /b she is not obligated to perform these mitzvot for her son., b Rav Yehuda said /b that b this is what /b the mishna b is saying: /b With regard to b each mitzva /b for b the father that is incumbent upon the son to perform for his father, both men and women are obligated /b in them. The Gemara comments: b We /b already b learned this, as the Sages taught /b in a i baraita /i , with regard to the verse: b “A man /b shall fear [ i tira’u /i ] his mother and his father” (Leviticus 19:3). b I have /b derived b only /b that b a man /b is obligated in this mitzva; b from where /b do I derive that b a woman /b is also obligated? b When it says /b in the same verse: b “A man shall fear [ i tira’u /i ] his mother and his father” /b (Leviticus 19:3), employing the plural form of the verb, this indicates that b there are two /b that are obligated b here, /b both a man and a woman., b If so, /b that both of them are obligated, b what /b is the meaning when b the verse states: “Man”? /b In the case of b a man, /b it is b in his power to perform /b this mitzva; whereas with regard to b a woman, /b it is b not /b always b in her power to perform /b this mitzva, b because she is under the authority of another /b person, i.e., her husband. As she is obligated to her husband to maintain her household, she is not always able to find time for her parents. b Rav Idi bar Avin says /b that b Rav says: /b Consequently, if a woman b is divorced, /b then b both of them, /b a daughter and a son, are b equal /b with regard to honoring and fearing their father and mother., b The Sages taught /b that b it is stated: “Honor your father and your mother” /b (Exodus 20:11), b and it is stated: “Honor the Lord with your wealth” /b (Proverbs 3:9). In this manner, b the verse equates the honor of one’s father and mother to the honor of the Omnipresent, /b as the term “honor” is used in both cases.,Similarly, b it is stated: “A man shall fear his mother and his father” /b (Leviticus 19:3), b and it is stated: “You shall fear the Lord your God and Him you shall serve” /b (Deuteronomy 6:13). b The verse equates the fear of one’s father and mother to the fear of the Omnipresent. /b ,Likewise, b it is stated: “He who curses his father or his mother shall be put to death” /b (Exodus 21:17), b and it is stated: “Whoever curses his God shall bear his sin” /b (Leviticus 24:15). b The verse equates the blessing, /b a euphemism for cursing, b of /b one’s b father and mother to the blessing of the Omnipresent. But with regard to striking, /b i.e., with regard to the i halakha /i that one who strikes his father or mother is liable to receive court-imposed capital punishment, b it is certainly not possible /b to say the same concerning the Holy One, Blessed be He., b And so /b too, the equating of one’s attitude toward his parents to his attitude toward God is b a logical derivation, as the three of them are partners in his /b creation. As b the Sages taught: There are three partners in /b the forming of b a person: The Holy One, Blessed be He, /b who provides the soul, b and his father and his mother. When a person honors his father and mother, the Holy One, Blessed be He, says: I ascribe /b credit b to them as if I dwelt between them and they honor Me /b as well., b It is taught /b in a i baraita /i that b Rabbi /b Yehuda HaNasi b says: It is revealed and known before the One Who spoke and the world came into being that a son honors his mother more than /b he honors b his father, because /b
104. Babylonian Talmud, Kiddushin, None (3rd cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Rosen-Zvi (2011), Demonic Desires: Yetzer Hara and the Problem of Evil in Late Antiquity. 121
30b. b “Say to wisdom: You are my sister, /b and call understanding your kinswoman” (Proverbs 7:4), which indicates that one should be as knowledgeable in the Torah as in the identity of his sister. b And it states: “Bind them upon your fingers, you shall write them upon the tablet of your heart” /b (Proverbs 7:3). b And it states: “As arrows in the hand of a mighty man, so are the children of one’s youth” /b (Psalms 127:4). b And it states: “Sharp arrows of the mighty” /b (Psalms 120:4). b And it states: “Your arrows are sharp, the peoples fall under you” /b (Psalms 45:6). b And it states: “Happy is the man who has his quiver full of them; they shall not be put to shame when they speak with their enemies in the gate” /b (Psalms 127:5).,The Gemara asks: b What /b is the meaning of the phrase b “enemies in the gate” /b with regard to Torah study? b Rabbi Ḥiyya bar Abba says: Even a father and his son, /b or b a rabbi and his student, who are engaged in Torah /b together b in one gate become enemies with each other /b due to the intensity of their studies. b But they do not leave there until they love each other, as it is stated /b in the verse discussing the places the Jewish people engaged in battle in the wilderness: “Therefore it is said in the book of the wars of the Lord, b Vahev in Suphah [ i beSufa /i ], /b and the valleys of Arnon” (Numbers 21:14). The word “ i vahev /i ” is interpreted as related to the word for love, i ahava /i . Additionally, b do not read /b this as b “in Suphah [ i beSufa /i ]”; rather, /b read it as b “at its end [ i besofa /i ],” /b i.e., at the conclusion of their dispute they are beloved to each other., b The Sages taught: “And you shall place [ i vesamtem /i ] /b these words of Mine in your hearts” (Deuteronomy 11:18). Read this as though it stated b i sam tam /i , a perfect elixir. The Torah is compared to an elixir of life. /b There is b a parable that /b illustrates this: b A person hit his son with a strong blow and placed a bandage on his wound. And he said to him: My son, as long as this bandage is on your wound /b and is healing you, b eat what you enjoy and drink what you enjoy, and bathe in either hot water or cold water, and you do not need to be afraid, /b as it will heal your wound. b But if you take it off, /b the wound b will become gangrenous. /b , b So /b too b the Holy One, Blessed be He, said to Israel: My children, I created an evil inclination, /b which is the wound, b and I created Torah as its antidote. If you are engaged in Torah /b study b you will not be given over into the hand /b of the evil inclination, b as it is stated: “If you do well, shall it not be lifted up?” /b (Genesis 4:7). One who engages in Torah study lifts himself above the evil inclination., b And if you do not engage in Torah /b study, b you are given over to its power, as it is stated: “Sin crouches at the door” /b (Genesis 4:7). b Moreover, all /b of the evil inclination’s b deliberations /b will be b concerning you, as it is stated /b in the same verse: b “And to you is its desire.” And if you wish you shall rule over it, as it is stated /b in the conclusion of the verse: b “But you may rule over it” /b (Genesis 4:7)., b The Sages taught: /b So b difficult is the evil inclination that even its Creator calls it evil, as it is stated: “For the inclination of a man’s heart is evil from his youth” /b (Genesis 8:21). b Rav Yitzḥak says: A person’s /b evil b inclination renews itself to him every day, as it is stated: /b “And that every inclination of the thoughts in his heart was b only evil all day [ i kol hayyom /i ]” /b (Genesis 6:5). “ i Kol hayyom /i ” can also be understood as: Every day., b And Rabbi Shimon ben Levi says: A person’s inclination overpowers him every day, and seeks to kill him, as it is stated: “The wicked watches the righteous and seeks to slay him” /b (Psalms 37:32). b And if not /b for the fact that b the Holy One, Blessed be He, assists /b each person in battling his evil inclination, b he could not /b overcome b it, as it is stated: “The Lord will not leave him in his hand” /b (Psalms 37:33).,A Sage from b the school of Rabbi Yishmael taught: My son, if this wretched one, /b the evil inclination, b encounters you, pull it into the study hall, /b i.e., go and study Torah. b If it is a stone /b it will b melt, and if it is iron /b it will b break, as it is stated /b with regard to the Torah: b “Is not My word like fire, says the Lord, and like a hammer that breaks the rock in pieces?” /b (Jeremiah 23:29). Just as a stone shatters a hammer, so too one can overcome his evil inclination, which is as strong as iron, through Torah study. With regard to the second part of the statement: b If it is a stone /b it will b melt, /b this is b as it is stated /b with regard to the Torah: b “Ho, everyone who thirsts, come for water” /b (Isaiah 55:1), b and it states: “The water wears the stones” /b (Job 14:19), indicating that water is stronger than stone.,§ The i baraita /i (29a) teaches that a father is commanded b to marry /b his son to b a woman. /b The Gemara asks: b From where do we /b derive this matter? b As it is written: “Take wives and bear sons and daughters, and take wives for your sons and give your daughters to men” /b (Jeremiah 29:6).,The Gemara analyzes this verse: b Granted /b with regard to b his son, /b this is b in his power, /b i.e., he can instruct him to marry a woman, as a man is the active agent in a marriage. b But /b with regard to b his daughter, is /b this b in his power? /b She must wait for a man to marry her. The Gemara answers: b This is what /b Jeremiah was b saying to them /b in the aforementioned verse: Her father should b give her something /b for her dowry, b and he should dress and cover her /b with suitable clothing b so that men will leap to /b marry b her. /b ,§ The i baraita /i further states that a father is commanded b to teach /b his son b a trade. /b The Gemara asks: b From where do we /b derive this? b Ḥizkiyya said: As the verse states: “Enjoy life with the wife whom you love” /b (Ecclesiastes 9:9). b If /b this verse is interpreted literally, and b it /b is referring to b an actual woman, /b then one can derive as follows: b Just as /b a father b is obligated to marry /b his son b to a woman, so too, he is obligated to teach him a trade, /b as indicated by the term: Life. b And if /b the wife mentioned in this verse is allegorical, and b it is the Torah, /b then one should explain the verse in the following manner: b Just as he is obligated to teach him Torah, so too, he is obligated to teach him a trade. /b ,§ The i baraita /i adds: b And some say /b that a father is b also /b obligated b to teach /b his son b to swim in a river. /b The Gemara asks: b What is the reason /b for this? b It is /b necessary for b his life, /b i.e., this is potentially a lifesaving skill.,§ The i baraita /i further teaches that b Rabbi Yehuda says: Any /b father b who does not teach /b his son b a trade teaches him banditry. /b The Gemara asks: Can it b enter your mind /b that he actually teaches him b banditry? Rather, /b the i baraita /i means that it is b as though he taught him banditry. /b ,The Gemara asks: b What is /b the difference b between /b the opinion of the first i tanna /i and that of Rabbi Yehuda? Both state that a father must teach his son a trade. The Gemara answers: b There is /b a difference b between them /b in a case b where /b the father b teaches him /b to engage in b business. /b According to the first i tanna /i this is sufficient, whereas Rabbi Yehuda maintains that he must teach him an actual trade.,§ The mishna teaches: With regard to b all mitzvot of a father with regard to his son, /b both men and women are obligated to perform them. The Gemara inquires: b What /b is the meaning of the expression: b All mitzvot of a father with regard to his son? If we say /b that this is referring to b all of the mitzvot that a father is required to perform for his son, /b are b women obligated /b in these? b But isn’t it taught /b in a i baraita /i : b A father is obligated with regard to his son to circumcise him, and to redeem him? /b This indicates that b his father, yes, /b he is obligated to do these, but b his mother, no, /b she is not obligated to perform these mitzvot for her son., b Rav Yehuda said /b that b this is what /b the mishna b is saying: /b With regard to b each mitzva /b for b the father that is incumbent upon the son to perform for his father, both men and women are obligated /b in them. The Gemara comments: b We /b already b learned this, as the Sages taught /b in a i baraita /i , with regard to the verse: b “A man /b shall fear [ i tira’u /i ] his mother and his father” (Leviticus 19:3). b I have /b derived b only /b that b a man /b is obligated in this mitzva; b from where /b do I derive that b a woman /b is also obligated? b When it says /b in the same verse: b “A man shall fear [ i tira’u /i ] his mother and his father” /b (Leviticus 19:3), employing the plural form of the verb, this indicates that b there are two /b that are obligated b here, /b both a man and a woman., b If so, /b that both of them are obligated, b what /b is the meaning when b the verse states: “Man”? /b In the case of b a man, /b it is b in his power to perform /b this mitzva; whereas with regard to b a woman, /b it is b not /b always b in her power to perform /b this mitzva, b because she is under the authority of another /b person, i.e., her husband. As she is obligated to her husband to maintain her household, she is not always able to find time for her parents. b Rav Idi bar Avin says /b that b Rav says: /b Consequently, if a woman b is divorced, /b then b both of them, /b a daughter and a son, are b equal /b with regard to honoring and fearing their father and mother., b The Sages taught /b that b it is stated: “Honor your father and your mother” /b (Exodus 20:11), b and it is stated: “Honor the Lord with your wealth” /b (Proverbs 3:9). In this manner, b the verse equates the honor of one’s father and mother to the honor of the Omnipresent, /b as the term “honor” is used in both cases.,Similarly, b it is stated: “A man shall fear his mother and his father” /b (Leviticus 19:3), b and it is stated: “You shall fear the Lord your God and Him you shall serve” /b (Deuteronomy 6:13). b The verse equates the fear of one’s father and mother to the fear of the Omnipresent. /b ,Likewise, b it is stated: “He who curses his father or his mother shall be put to death” /b (Exodus 21:17), b and it is stated: “Whoever curses his God shall bear his sin” /b (Leviticus 24:15). b The verse equates the blessing, /b a euphemism for cursing, b of /b one’s b father and mother to the blessing of the Omnipresent. But with regard to striking, /b i.e., with regard to the i halakha /i that one who strikes his father or mother is liable to receive court-imposed capital punishment, b it is certainly not possible /b to say the same concerning the Holy One, Blessed be He., b And so /b too, the equating of one’s attitude toward his parents to his attitude toward God is b a logical derivation, as the three of them are partners in his /b creation. As b the Sages taught: There are three partners in /b the forming of b a person: The Holy One, Blessed be He, /b who provides the soul, b and his father and his mother. When a person honors his father and mother, the Holy One, Blessed be He, says: I ascribe /b credit b to them as if I dwelt between them and they honor Me /b as well., b It is taught /b in a i baraita /i that b Rabbi /b Yehuda HaNasi b says: It is revealed and known before the One Who spoke and the world came into being that a son honors his mother more than /b he honors b his father, because /b
105. Babylonian Talmud, Avodah Zarah, None (3rd cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Rosen-Zvi (2011), Demonic Desires: Yetzer Hara and the Problem of Evil in Late Antiquity. 121
19a. אברהם אבינו שלא הלך בעצת אנשי דור הפלגה שרשעים היו שנאמר (בראשית יא, ד) הבה נבנה לנו עיר ובדרך חטאים לא עמד שלא עמד בעמידת סדום שחטאים היו שנאמר (בראשית יג, יג) ואנשי סדום רעים וחטאים לה' מאד,ובמושב לצים לא ישב שלא ישב במושב אנשי פלשתים מפני שלצנים היו שנאמר (שופטים טז, כה) ויהי כטוב לבם ויאמרו קראו לשמשון וישחק לנו,(תהלים קיב, א) אשרי איש ירא את ה' אשרי איש ולא אשרי אשה א"ר עמרם אמר רב אשרי מי שעושה תשובה כשהוא איש ר' יהושע בן לוי אמר אשרי מי שמתגבר על יצרו כאיש,במצותיו חפץ מאד אר"א במצותיו ולא בשכר מצותיו והיינו דתנן הוא היה אומר אל תהיו כעבדים המשמשין את הרב על מנת לקבל פרס אלא היו כעבדים המשמשין את הרב שלא על מנת לקבל פרס,כי אם בתורת ה' חפצו א"ר אין אדם לומד תורה אלא ממקום שלבו חפץ שנאמר (תהלים א, ב) כי אם בתורת ה' חפצו,לוי ור"ש ברבי יתבי קמיה דרבי וקא פסקי סידרא סליק ספרא לוי אמר לייתו [לן] משלי ר"ש ברבי אמר לייתו [לן] תילים כפייה ללוי ואייתו תילים כי מטו הכא כי אם בתורת ה' חפצו פריש רבי ואמר אין אדם לומד תורה אלא ממקום שלבו חפץ אמר לוי רבי נתת לנו רשות לעמוד,אמר ר' אבדימי בר חמא כל העוסק בתורה הקב"ה עושה לו חפציו שנאמר כי אם בתורת ה' חפצו אמר רבא לעולם ילמוד אדם תורה במקום שלבו חפץ שנאמר כי אם בתורת ה' חפצו,ואמר רבא בתחילה נקראת על שמו של הקב"ה ולבסוף נקראת על שמו שנאמר בתורת ה' חפצו ובתורתו יהגה יומם ולילה,ואמר רבא לעולם ילמד אדם תורה ואח"כ יהגה שנאמר בתורת ה' והדר ובתורתו יהגה,ואמר רבא לעולם ליגריס איניש ואע"ג דמשכח ואע"ג דלא ידע מאי קאמר שנאמר (תהלים קיט, כ) גרסה נפשי לתאבה גרסה כתיב ולא כתיב טחנה,רבא רמי כתיב (משלי ט, ג) על גפי וכתיב (משלי ט, יד) על כסא בתחלה על גפי ולבסוף על כסא,כתיב (משלי ח, ב) בראש מרומים וכתיב עלי דרך בתחלה בראש מרומים ולבסוף עלי דרך,עולא רמי כתיב (משלי ה, טו) שתה מים מבורך וכתיב ונוזלים מתוך בארך בתחלה שתה מבורך ולבסוף ונוזלים מתוך בארך,אמר רבא אמר רב סחורה אמר רב הונא מאי דכתיב (משלי יג, יא) הון מהבל ימעט וקובץ על יד ירבה אם עושה אדם תורתו חבילות חבילות מתמעט ואם קובץ על יד ירבה,אמר רבא ידעי רבנן להא מילתא ועברי עלה אמר רב נחמן בר יצחק אנא עבידתה וקיים בידי,אמר רב שיזבי משמיה דר"א בן עזריה מאי דכתיב (משלי יב, כז) לא יחרוך רמיה צידו לא יחיה ולא יאריך ימים צייד הרמאי,ורב ששת אמר צייד הרמאי יחרוך כי אתא רב דימי אמר משל לאדם שצד צפרין אם משבר כנפיה של ראשונה כולם מתקיימות בידו ואם לאו אין מתקיימות בידו,(תהלים א, ג) והיה כעץ שתול על פלגי מים אמרי דבי ר' ינאי כעץ שתול ולא כעץ נטוע כל הלומד תורה מרב אחד אינו רואה סימן ברכה לעולם, אמר להו רב חסדא לרבנן בעינא דאימא לכו מלתא ומסתפינא דשבקיתו לי ואזליתו כל הלומד תורה מרב אחד אינו רואה סימן ברכה לעולם שבקוהו ואזול קמיה דרבא אמר להו הני מילי סברא אבל גמרא מרב אחד עדיף כי היכי 19a. is referring to b our forefather Abraham, who did not walk in the counsel of the members of the generation of the dispersion, who were wicked, as it is stated /b that they said to each other: b “Come, let us build us a city, /b and a tower, with its top in heaven” (Genesis 11:4), a project with a wicked aim. b “Nor stood in the way of sinners” /b (Psalms 1:1); this too is referring to Abraham, b who did not join in the stand of /b the residents of b Sodom, who were sinners, as it is stated: “Now the men of Sodom were wicked and sinners against the Lord exceedingly” /b (Genesis 13:13)., b “Nor sat in the seat of the scornful” /b (Psalms 1:1); this means b that /b Abraham b did not sit in the seat of the Philistines, because they were scorners /b who engaged in jest and buffoonery. b As it is stated /b with regard to the Philistines in a later period: b “And it came to pass, when their hearts were merry, that they said: Call for Samson, that he may make us sport” /b (Judges 16:25).,The Gemara cites an interpretation of a similar verse: b “Happy is the man that fears the Lord, /b that delights greatly in His mitzvot” (Psalms 112:1). The Gemara asks: Is that to say b happy is the man, but not happy is the woman? /b Why is it necessary for the verse to emphasize that it is speaking of a man? b Rav Amram says /b that b Rav says: /b The verse applies to both men and women and is teaching: b Happy is one who repents when he is /b still b a man, /b i.e., before he becomes elderly and his strength dwindles. b Rabbi Yehoshua ben Levi says: Happy is one who triumphs over his /b evil b inclination like a man, /b i.e., with strength and vigor.,The verse continues: b “He delights greatly in His mitzvot.” Rabbi Elazar says: /b The person delights b in His mitzvot /b themselves b and not in the reward /b for performing b His mitzvot. And this is the same as we learned /b in a mishna ( i Avot /i 1:3): Antigonus of Sokho b would say: Do not be like /b the b servants who serve the master on the condition of receiving a reward; rather, be like /b the b servants who serve the master not on the condition that /b they b receive a reward. /b ,§ The Gemara returns to its interpretation of the verse that was discussed previously: b “But his delight is in the Torah of the Lord” /b (Psalms 1:2). b Rabbi /b Yehuda HaNasi b says: A person can learn Torah only from a place /b in the Torah b that his heart desires, as it is stated: But his delight is in the Torah of the Lord, /b i.e., his delight is in the part of the Torah that he wishes to study.,The Gemara relates: b Levi and Rabbi Shimon, son of Rabbi /b Yehuda HaNasi, b were sitting before Rabbi /b Yehuda HaNasi, b and /b they b were learning the Torah portion. /b When b they finished the book /b that they were learning and were ready to begin a new subject, b Levi said: Let them bring us /b the book of b Proverbs; /b and b Rabbi Shimon, son of Rabbi /b Yehuda HaNasi, b said: Let them bring us /b the book of b Psalms. /b He b compelled Levi /b to acquiesce, b and they brought /b a book of b Psalms. When they arrived here, /b at the verse: b “But his delight is in the Torah of the Lord,” Rabbi /b Yehuda HaNasi b explained /b the verse b and said: A person can learn Torah only from a place /b in the Torah b that his heart desires. Levi said: My teacher, you have given us, /b i.e., me, b permission to rise /b and leave, as I wish to study Proverbs, not Psalms.,The Gemara cites other interpretations of this verse. b Rabbi Avdimi bar Ḥama says: /b With regard to b anyone who engages in /b the study of b Torah, the Holy One, Blessed be He, fulfills his desires, as it is stated: “But in the Torah of the Lord is his delight,” /b i.e., if one engages in the study of the Torah of the Lord, he will have his desires met by the Lord. b Rava says, /b in accordance with the statement of Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi: b A person should always learn Torah from a place /b in the Torah b that his heart desires, as it is stated: “But his delight is in the Torah of the Lord.” /b , b And Rava /b also b says, /b with regard to this verse: b Initially /b the Torah b is called by the name of the Holy One, Blessed be He, but ultimately it is called by the name of /b the one who studies it. b As it is /b first b stated: “His delight is in the Torah of the Lord,” /b and in the continuation of the verse it states: b “And in his Torah he meditates day and night.” /b This teaches that through study one acquires ownership, as it were, of the Torah., b And Rava says /b in reference to this verse: b A person must always study Torah /b and gain a broad knowledge of it, b and /b only b then /b may he b analyze /b and delve into it. b As it is stated: /b “His delight is b in the Torah of the Lord,” /b meaning that he studies the Torah on a basic level, b and /b only b afterward /b does the verse state: b “And in his Torah he meditates,” /b i.e., he analyzes it., b And Rava says /b with regard to Torah study: b A person should always study [ i ligeris /i ] /b and review b even though /b he may afterward b forget, and even though he does not understand what it is saying. As it is stated /b with regard to the study of Torah: b “My soul breaks [ i garesa /i ] for the longing that it has /b for Your ordices at all times” (Psalms 119:20). b It is written: “Breaks,” and it is not written: Grinds, /b demonstrating that the soul is satisfied with breaking apart material, on a basic level, even if it does not have the opportunity to grind and analyze it in greater depth., b Rava raises a contradiction /b between two verses: b It is written /b that the Torah calls to people: b “Upon the highest places /b of the city” (Proverbs 9:3), b and it is written /b far more specifically: b “On a seat /b in the high places of the city” (Proverbs 9:14). He explains: b Initially, /b one who studies Torah does not have a secure place to sit, and therefore he is located merely b upon the highest places, but ultimately, /b as he advances in his learning, he is placed b on a seat /b of honor.,The Gemara mentions a similar contradiction. b It is written /b with regard to the Torah: b “In the top of high places” /b (Proverbs 8:2), b and it is written /b in the continuation of the verse that the Torah is b “by the path.” /b This contradiction is resolved as follows: b Initially, /b a person studies Torah in a private location, b in the top of high places, but ultimately /b he will spread his knowledge, b by the path, /b in the public realm., b Ulla raises a contradiction /b with regard to the following verse. b It is written: “Drink waters out of your own cistern” /b (Proverbs 5:15), b and it is written /b in the continuation of the verse: b “And running waters out of your own well.” /b He explains: b Initially /b one should b “drink waters out of your own cistern,” /b i.e., like the cistern that draws water into one location, learning all existing knowledge; b and ultimately /b one can produce b “running waters out of your own well,” /b i.e., original thought and innovative insights in Torah.,The Gemara cites other statements relating to Torah study. b Rava says /b that b Rav Seḥora says /b that b Rav Huna says: What /b is the meaning of that b which is written: “Wealth gotten through vanity [ i mehevel /i ] shall be diminished; but he that gathers little by little shall increase” /b (Proverbs 13:11)? b If a person turns his Torah into many bundles [ i ḥavilot /i ], /b by studying large amounts in a short period of time without reviewing, his Torah b will diminish. But if he gathers /b his knowledge b little by little, /b by studying slowly and reviewing, his knowledge b shall increase. /b , b Rava said: The Sages know this, but /b nevertheless b they transgress it, /b i.e., they fail to heed this advice. b Rav Naḥman bar Yitzḥak says: I did this, /b as I studied little by little and regularly reviewed what I had learned, b and /b my learning b has /b in fact b endured. /b , b Rav Sheizvi said in the name of Rabbi Elazar ben Azarya: What /b is the meaning of that b which is written: “The slothful man [ i remiyya /i ] will not roast [ i yaḥarokh /i ] his prey” /b (Proverbs 12:27)? b The deceitful [ i harammai /i ] hunter, /b i.e., one who tricks people into believing that he has acquired vast stores of knowledge by studying new material without reviewing that which he has already learned, b will not live [ i yiḥye /i ] a long [ i ya’arikh /i ] life. /b According to this interpretation, i yaḥarokh /i is a combination of the words i yiḥye /i and i ya’arikh /i ., b And Rav Sheshet says /b that the verse means the opposite: b The cunning [ i harammai /i ] hunter will roast /b his prey to prevent it from escaping, i.e., he reads the verse as a rhetorical question: Will not the hunter roast? b When Rav Dimi came /b from Eretz Yisrael to Babylonia, b he said: This is comparable to a person who is hunting birds; if he breaks the wings of the first /b bird so that it will be unable to fly off, and he proceeds in this manner, b all of /b his prey b will remain in his possession; but if not, /b they b will not remain in his possession, /b as each bird will fly off when the next is captured. In a similar fashion, a clever student reviews that which he learns, to ensure that he retains his knowledge.,§ The Gemara returns to its interpretation of the first verses of Psalms. b “And he shall be like a tree planted [ i shatul /i ] by streams of water” /b (Psalms 1:3). The students of b the school of Rabbi Yannai say: /b The verse states that a Torah scholar b is comparable to a tree /b that has been uprooted from its original location and b replanted [ i shatul /i ] /b somewhere else. It does b not /b say that he b is comparable to a tree that is planted [ i natu’a /i ] /b and remains in one place. This is teaching that b anyone who learns Torah from one teacher /b alone b never sees a sign of blessing, /b as it is necessary to acquire knowledge from many teachers., b Rav Ḥisda said to the Sages /b who were studying with him: b I wish to say something to you, but I am afraid that /b then b you will leave me and go. /b What did he wish to tell them? He wanted to say that b any-one who learns Torah from one teacher /b alone b never sees a sign of blessing. /b When the students heard this, they b did /b in fact b leave him and went /b to learn b from Rava. /b Rav Ḥisda b said to them: That matter /b applies only with regard to b reasoning, /b i.e., in order to come up with sophisticated reasoning it is necessary to hear many different opinions. b But /b with regard to the oral b tradition /b itself, b it is preferable /b to learn b from one teacher so that /b
106. Cyprian, On The Lord'S Prayer, 35 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas / hermae pastor Found in books: Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 152
107. Eusebius of Caesarea, Ecclesiastical History, 5.18.2, 5.18.4, 5.18.11, 6.14.1, 6.42.5 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Ramelli (2013), The Christian Doctrine of Apokatastasis: A Critical Assessment from the New Testament to Eriugena, 68; Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 103, 365
5.18.2. His actions and his teaching show who this new teacher is. This is he who taught the dissolution of marriage; who made laws for fasting; who named Pepuza and Tymion, small towns in Phrygia, Jerusalem, wishing to gather people to them from all directions; who appointed collectors of money; who contrived the receiving of gifts under the name of offerings; who provided salaries for those who preached his doctrine, that its teaching might prevail through gluttony. 5.18.4. Afterwards he says: Does not all Scripture seem to you to forbid a prophet to receive gifts and money? When therefore I see the prophetess receiving gold and silver and costly garments, how can I avoid reproving her? 5.18.11. Again, in another part of his work he speaks as follows of the prophets of whom they boast:If they deny that their prophets have received gifts, let them acknowledge this: that if they are convicted of receiving them, they are not prophets. And we will bring a multitude of proofs of this. But it is necessary that all the fruits of a prophet should be examined. Tell me, does a prophet dye his hair? Does a prophet stain his eyelids? Does a prophet delight in adornment? Does a prophet play with tables and dice? Does a prophet lend on usury? Let them confess whether these things are lawful or not; but I will show that they have been done by them. 6.14.1. To sum up briefly, he has given in the Hypotyposes abridged accounts of all canonical Scripture, not omitting the disputed books, — I refer to Jude and the other Catholic epistles, and Barnabas and the so-called Apocalypse of Peter. 6.42.5. A little further on he adds: These divine martyrs among us, who now are seated with Christ, and are sharers in his kingdom, partakers of his judgment and judges with him, received some of the brethren who had fallen away and become chargeable with the guilt of sacrificing. When they perceived that their conversion and repentance were sufficient to be acceptable with him who by no means desires the death of the sinner, but his repentance, having proved them they received them back and brought them together, and met with them and had fellowship with them in prayers and feasts.
108. Cyprian, Letters, 63.18.3 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas / hermae pastor Found in books: Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 152
109. Nag Hammadi, The Acts of Peter And The Twelve Apostles, 10.24 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Iricinschi et al. (2013), Beyond the Gnostic Gospels: Studies Building on the Work of Elaine Pagels, 141
110. Nag Hammadi, The Sentences of Sextus, None (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Pevarello (2013), The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism. 96
111. Nag Hammadi, The Apocryphon of James, 6-7 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Iricinschi et al. (2013), Beyond the Gnostic Gospels: Studies Building on the Work of Elaine Pagels, 141
112. Pseudo-Cyprian, Ad Vigilium De Iudaica Incredulitate, 1.3, 5.2, 7.4 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas / hermae pastor Found in books: Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 152
113. Epiphanius, Panarion, 59.1 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 365
114. Basil of Caesarea, Letters, 188.9, 199.21, 199.46 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Monnickendam (2020), Jewish Law and Early Christian Identity: Betrothal, Marriage, and Infidelity in the Writings of Ephrem the Syrian, 168
115. Basil of Caesarea, Letters, 188.9, 199.21, 199.46 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Monnickendam (2020), Jewish Law and Early Christian Identity: Betrothal, Marriage, and Infidelity in the Writings of Ephrem the Syrian, 168
116. Basil of Caesarea, De Spiritu Sancto, 40 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 365
117. Augustine, Confessions, 1.11 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 365
1.11. 17. Even as a boy I had heard of eternal life promised to us through the humility of the Lord our God condescending to our pride, and I was signed with the sign of the cross, and was seasoned with His salt even from the womb of my mother, who greatly trusted in You. You saw, O Lord, how at one time, while yet a boy, being suddenly seized with pains in the stomach, and being at the point of death - You saw, O my God, for even then You were my keeper, with what emotion of mind and with what faith I solicited from the piety of my mother, and of Your Church, the mother of us all, the baptism of Your Christ, my Lord and my God. On which, the mother of my flesh being much troubled - since she, with a heart pure in Your faith, travailed in birth Galatians 4:19 more lovingly for my eternal salvation - would, had I not quickly recovered, have without delay provided for my initiation and washing by Your life-giving sacraments, confessing You, O Lord Jesus, for the remission of sins. So my cleansing was deferred, as if I must needs, should I live, be further polluted; because, indeed, the guilt contracted by sin would, after baptism, be greater and more perilous. Thus I at that time believed with my mother and the whole house, except my father; yet he did not overcome the influence of my mother's piety in me so as to prevent my believing in Christ, as he had not yet believed in Him. For she was desirous that You, O my God, should be my Father rather than he; and in this You aided her to overcome her husband, to whom, though the better of the two, she yielded obedience, because in this she yielded obedience to You, who so commands. 18. I beseech You, my God, I would gladly know, if it be Your will, to what end my baptism was then deferred? Was it for my good that the reins were slackened, as it were, upon me for me to sin? Or were they not slackened? If not, whence comes it that it is still dinned into our ears on all sides, Let him alone, let him act as he likes, for he is not yet baptized? But as regards bodily health, no one exclaims, Let him be more seriously wounded, for he is not yet cured! How much better, then, had it been for me to have been cured at once; and then, by my own and my friends' diligence, my soul's restored health had been kept safe in Your keeping, who gave it! Better, in truth. But how numerous and great waves of temptation appeared to hang over me after my childhood! These were foreseen by my mother; and she preferred that the unformed clay should be exposed to them rather than the image itself.
118. Jerome, Letters, 41.3, 77.4, 133.3 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Pevarello (2013), The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism. 22; Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 365
119. Jerome, Letters, 41.3, 77.4 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 365
120. Jerome, Letters, 41.3, 77.4 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 365
121. Stobaeus, Anthology, a b c d\n0 4.23.40 4.23.40 4 23\n1 4.23.43 4.23.43 4 23\n2 4.23.34 4.23.34 4 23\n3 4.23.44 4.23.44 4 23\n4 4.23.35 4.23.35 4 23\n.. ... ... .. ..\n61 4.23.9 4.23.9 4 23\n62 4.23.48 4.23.48 4 23\n63 4.23.60 4.23.60 4 23\n64 4.23.25 4.23.25 4 23\n65 4.23.12 4.23.12 4 23\n\n[66 rows x 4 columns] (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Malherbe et al. (2014), Light from the Gentiles: Hellenistic Philosophy and Early Christianity: Collected Essays of Abraham J, 410
122. Anon., Miracula St. Demetrii, 9.13  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 365
123. Anon., Pachomius, Vita Graecae, 4.9, 4.13  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 365
124. Anon., Sententiae Pythagoreorum, 10  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Pevarello (2013), The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism. 151
125. Anon., Muratorian Fragment / Canon Muratori, 73-77, 79-80, 78  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Yates and Dupont (2023), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part II: Consolidation of the Canon to the Arab Conquest (ca. 393 to 650 CE).. 22
126. Cyril of Jerusalem, De Aleatoribus, "2"  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas / hermae pastor Found in books: Yates and Dupont (2023), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part II: Consolidation of the Canon to the Arab Conquest (ca. 393 to 650 CE).. 22
127. Athanasius of Alexandria, Epistulae Festalis, a b c d\n0 "39.2" "39.2" "39 2"  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas / hermae pastor Found in books: Yates and Dupont (2023), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part II: Consolidation of the Canon to the Arab Conquest (ca. 393 to 650 CE).. 22
128. Papyri, P.Beatty, 1  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Schliesser et al. (2021), Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World. 387
129. Council of Elvira, Can., 69  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Monnickendam (2020), Jewish Law and Early Christian Identity: Betrothal, Marriage, and Infidelity in the Writings of Ephrem the Syrian, 168
130. Anon., Martyrdom of Justin, 1  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas, the Found in books: Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 206
131. Bardaisan, De Legibus Libri Ex Regiones, 18  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Wilson (2018), Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to "Non-free Free Will": A Comprehensive Methodology, 62
132. Anon., Kerygma Petri Fragments, 77  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 107
133. Anon., Ascension of Isaiah, 10.17-10.31  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Moss (2010), The Other Christs: Imitating Jesus in Ancient Christian Ideologies of Martyrdom, 116
135. Florus Lucius Annaeus, Epitome Bellorum Omnium Annorum Dcc, 5  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 365
136. Origen, Homilies On Matthew, 14.24  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Monnickendam (2020), Jewish Law and Early Christian Identity: Betrothal, Marriage, and Infidelity in the Writings of Ephrem the Syrian, 168
138. Photius, Cod., 4.6  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Ramelli (2013), The Christian Doctrine of Apokatastasis: A Critical Assessment from the New Testament to Eriugena, 68
141. Ignatios of Antioch, Eph., 3.2, 13.1-14.2, 15.1  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 183
142. Gregory of Nazianzus, In Ps., 4.3.6, 11.12  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 103, 365
143. Ignatius, Polyc., None  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 206
144. Gregory of Elvira, Comm. In Cant., 10.41  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Ramelli (2013), The Christian Doctrine of Apokatastasis: A Critical Assessment from the New Testament to Eriugena, 42
145. Polycarp, Letter, 5.2  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas, the Found in books: Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 179
146. Justin, Fr., 2  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas, the Found in books: Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 206
147. Ps.-Justin, Mon., 2, 1  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 206
148. Athenagoras, Barnabas, 4.10  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas, the Found in books: Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 185
149. Cyprian, De Aleatoribus, 2  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas / hermae pastor Found in books: Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 26
150. Pseudo-Cyprian, De Aleatoribus, 2  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas / hermae pastor Found in books: Yates and Dupont (2020), The Bible in Christian North Africa: Part I: Commencement to the Confessiones of Augustine (ca. 180 to 400 CE), 152
151. Anon., Epistle To Diognetus, 3.2, 5.1-5.5, 5.9  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas, the Found in books: Stanton (2021), Unity and Disunity in Greek and Christian Thought under the Roman Peace, 179, 206
152. Rufinus, Sixti Sententiae (Praefatio), 10-11  Tagged with subjects: •nan Found in books: Pevarello (2013), The Sentences of Sextus and the Origins of Christian Ascetiscism. 22
153. Galen, Qam, 39.19  Tagged with subjects: •shepherd of hermas Found in books: Tabbernee (2007), Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism, 365